54 Best Books on UI UX Design

  • Mapping Experiences

    James Kalbach

    If you want to create products and services that provide real value, you should first identify touchpoints—areas where business and customer needs intersect. This practical book shows you how. Using various mapping techniques from UX design, you’ll learn how to turn customer observations into actionable insight for product design. Author Jim Kalbach, Principal UX Designer with Citrix, introduces you to the principles behind alignment diagrams—a class of deliverable also known as experience mapping—using several examples. You’ll learn how to visually map your existing customer experience, based on user research, and demonstrate how and where customer perspectives intersect with business goals. Using alignment diagrams, you’ll not only be able to orchestrate business-customer touchpoints, but also gain stakeholder support for a product or service that provides value to both your business and your customers. This book is ideal for product managers, marketers, customer experience professionals, and designers.

    @CharlesGedeon I’m a big fan of @JimKalbach’s Mapping Experiences as a must-read resource. https://t.co/mpILYNrs7t

  • Cognetics and the locus of attention - Meanings, modes, monotony, and myths - Quantification - Unification - Navigation and other aspects of humane interfaces - Interface issues outside the user interface.

    @davidhoang the book that inspired my interest in operating systems!

  • Mapping Experiences

    James Kalbach

    If you want to create products and services that provide real value, you should first identify touchpoints—areas where business and customer needs intersect. This practical book shows you how. Using various mapping techniques from UX design, you’ll learn how to turn customer observations into actionable insight for product design. Author Jim Kalbach, Principal UX Designer with Citrix, introduces you to the principles behind alignment diagrams—a class of deliverable also known as experience mapping—using several examples. You’ll learn how to visually map your existing customer experience, based on user research, and demonstrate how and where customer perspectives intersect with business goals. Using alignment diagrams, you’ll not only be able to orchestrate business-customer touchpoints, but also gain stakeholder support for a product or service that provides value to both your business and your customers. This book is ideal for product managers, marketers, customer experience professionals, and designers.

    @ianjmacintosh I highly recommend @JimKalbach’s Mapping Experiences book. https://t.co/mpILYNrs7t

  • The User Experience Team of One prescribes a range of approaches that have big impact and take less time and fewer resources than the standard lineup of UX deliverables. Whether you want to cross over into user experience or you're a seasoned practitioner trying to drag your organization forward, this book gives you tools and insight for doing more with less.

    @RosenfeldMedia @leahbuley this book was instrumental for me when I started out. Thank you for writing it

  • Cognetics and the locus of attention - Meanings, modes, monotony, and myths - Quantification - Unification - Navigation and other aspects of humane interfaces - Interface issues outside the user interface.

    @lkanies I can't recall if Tesler is. It's author, Jef Raskin, is zealous about modeless interfaces. He goes to great lengths to explain how a truly modeless interface could be designed. The book proved formative in my thinking about UI.

  • Early user interface (UI) practitioners were trained in cognitive psychology, from which UI design rules were based. But as the field evolves, designers enter the field from many disciplines. Practitioners today have enough experience in UI design that they have been exposed to design rules, but it is essential that they understand the psychology behind the rules in order to effectively apply them. In Designing with the Mind in Mind, Jeff Johnson, author of the best selling GUI Bloopers, provides designers with just enough background in perceptual and cognitive psychology that UI design guidelines make intuitive sense rather than being just a list of rules to follow. * The first practical, all-in-one source for practitioners on user interface design rules and why, when and how to apply them. * Provides just enough background into the reasoning behind interface design rules that practitioners can make informed decisions in every project. * Gives practitioners the insight they need to make educated design decisions when confronted with tradeoffs, including competing design rules, time constrictions, or limited resources.

    New work books https://t.co/sXMKAGveCp

  • Paper Prototyping

    Carolyn Snyder

    The practical guide on using paper prototyping when designing user interfaces.

    @vino15 Well, Carolyn Snyder’s Paper Prototyping book was a direct outcome of this work: https://t.co/H1dWeOpMuv I don’t think we’ve ever written a case study or reflection on the design exercise. It’s a great idea.

  • Provides information on user interface design of small details that exist inside applications, covering such topics as triggers, rules, feedback, and loops and modes.

    It's clearly time to bring this back. For the rest of 2020 I'll be donating all my royalties from Microinteractions to #BlackLivesMatter organizations. If you haven't bought it, now's a good time! Please RT! https://t.co/Yhu7Y2tnnt https://t.co/2gUIqAr4eY

  • Annotation Every designer has had to justify designs to non-designers, yet most lack the ability to explain themselves in a way that is compelling and fosters agreement. The ability to effectively articulate design decisions is critical to the success of a project, because the most articulate person often wins. This practical book provides principles, tactics and actionable methods for talking about designs with executives, managers, developers, marketers and other stakeholders who have influence over the project with the goal of winning them over and creating the best user experience.

    You should also check out books like Articulating Design Decisions by @tomgreever https://t.co/Zvvj06DQ7z

  • @NewRetirement @GustoHQ @PayPal @patrick_oshag Examples are more offline than online, but have you read The Design of Everyday Things? https://t.co/l5rVyO79a4

  • @bigbrutha_ @tidyzilla Allow me to help. ;) https://t.co/TrnCV9Awg6

  • Whether you’re designing consumer electronics, medical devices, enterprise Web apps, or new ways to check out at the supermarket, today’s digitally-enabled products and services provide both great opportunities to deliver compelling user experiences and great risks of driving your customers crazy with complicated, confusing technology. Designing successful products and services in the digital age requires a multi-disciplinary team with expertise in interaction design, visual design, industrial design, and other disciplines. It also takes the ability to come up with the big ideas that make a desirable product or service, as well as the skill and perseverance to execute on the thousand small ideas that get your design into the hands of users. It requires expertise in project management, user research, and consensus-building. This comprehensive, full-color volume addresses all of these and more with detailed how-to information, real-life examples, and exercises. Topics include assembling a design team, planning and conducting user research, analyzing your data and turning it into personas, using scenarios to drive requirements definition and design, collaborating in design meetings, evaluating and iterating your design, and documenting finished design in a way that works for engineers and stakeholders alike.

    @erinlynnyoung @halvorson I mean, @kimgoodwin's "Designing for the Digital Age" is THE essential text. @ellenLupton "Design is Storytelling" is fantastic and economical.

  • The User Experience Team of One prescribes a range of approaches that have big impact and take less time and fewer resources than the standard lineup of UX deliverables. Whether you want to cross over into user experience or you're a seasoned practitioner trying to drag your organization forward, this book gives you tools and insight for doing more with less.

    @ppedrazzi My off-the-cuff recommendations: • @leahbuley’s UX Team of One • @odannyboy’s Microinteractions • @MrAlanCooper About face • @danachis Handbook of Usability Testing • @amyjokim Game Design Thinking That’s today’s recommendations. Ask me tomorrow and I’d give others.

  • Provides information on user interface design of small details that exist inside applications, covering such topics as triggers, rules, feedback, and loops and modes.

    @ppedrazzi My off-the-cuff recommendations: • @leahbuley’s UX Team of One • @odannyboy’s Microinteractions • @MrAlanCooper About face • @danachis Handbook of Usability Testing • @amyjokim Game Design Thinking That’s today’s recommendations. Ask me tomorrow and I’d give others.

  • About Face

    Alan Cooper

    The essential interaction design guide, fully revised and updated for the mobile age About Face: The Essentials of Interaction Design, Fourth Edition is the latest update to the book that shaped and evolved the landscape of interaction design. This comprehensive guide takes the worldwide shift to smartphones and tablets into account. New information includes discussions on mobile apps, touch interfaces, screen size considerations, and more. The new full-color interior and unique layout better illustrate modern design concepts. The interaction design profession is blooming with the success of design-intensive companies, priming customers to expect "design" as a critical ingredient of marketplace success. Consumers have little tolerance for websites, apps, and devices that don't live up to their expectations, and the responding shift in business philosophy has become widespread. About Face is the book that brought interaction design out of the research labs and into the everyday lexicon, and the updated Fourth Edition continues to lead the way with ideas and methods relevant to today's design practitioners and developers. Updated information includes: Contemporary interface, interaction, and product design methods Design for mobile platforms and consumer electronics State-of-the-art interface recommendations and up-to-date examples Updated Goal-Directed Design methodology Designers and developers looking to remain relevant through the current shift in consumer technology habits will find About Face to be a comprehensive, essential resource.

    @ppedrazzi My off-the-cuff recommendations: • @leahbuley’s UX Team of One • @odannyboy’s Microinteractions • @MrAlanCooper About face • @danachis Handbook of Usability Testing • @amyjokim Game Design Thinking That’s today’s recommendations. Ask me tomorrow and I’d give others.

  • Whether it?s software, a cell phone, or a refrigerator, your customer wants?no, expects?your product to be easy to use. This fully revised handbook provides clear, step-by-step guidelines to help you test your product for usability. Completely updated with current industry best practices, it can give you that all-important marketplace advantage: products that perform the way users expect. You?ll learn to recognize factors that limit usability, decide where testing should occur, set up a test plan to assess goals for your product?s usability, and more.

    @ppedrazzi My off-the-cuff recommendations: • @leahbuley’s UX Team of One • @odannyboy’s Microinteractions • @MrAlanCooper About face • @danachis Handbook of Usability Testing • @amyjokim Game Design Thinking That’s today’s recommendations. Ask me tomorrow and I’d give others.

  • Game Thinking

    Amy Jo Kim

    During her time working on genre-defining games like The Sims, Rock Band, and Ultima Online, Amy Jo learned that customers stick with products that help them get better at something they care about, like playing an instrument or leading a team. Amy Jo has used her insights from gaming to help hundreds of companies like Netflix, Disney, The New York Times, Ubisoft and Happify innovate faster and smarter, and drive long-term engagement.

    @ppedrazzi My off-the-cuff recommendations: • @leahbuley’s UX Team of One • @odannyboy’s Microinteractions • @MrAlanCooper About face • @danachis Handbook of Usability Testing • @amyjokim Game Design Thinking That’s today’s recommendations. Ask me tomorrow and I’d give others.

  • @brownorama wrote a whole book on this: https://t.co/RhxDwAVyER https://t.co/hFXbtUDRzk

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    .@monteiro is running an online book club tomorrow at 12pm PT on his book “Ruined by Design.” What a great way to spend your lunch hour 📚 https://t.co/viRwz9ZSD7

  • Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious—even liberating—book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization. The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time. In this entertaining and insightful analysis, cognitive scientist Don Norman hails excellence of design as the most important key to regaining the competitive edge in influencing consumer behavior. Now fully expanded and updated, with a new introduction by the author, The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how—and why—some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.

    One thing I like to do to make the time I spend reading more valuable is to write up “book reports” distilling insights that might be valuable for the rest of my team. Here are my takeaways from “The Design of Everyday Things” by Don Norman: https://t.co/h3PrbapzeE

  • UX Design for Growth

    Molly Norris Walker

    Q: What books do you recommend for learning about growth design? A: As far as I know, there's only one book on growth design: “UX Design for Growth” by @ixdmolly https://t.co/kEDtbJK0xg I'd also recommend “Hacking Growth”, “Running Lean” and “UX Strategy”.

  • Hacking Growth

    Sean Ellis

    That methodology is called Growth Hacking, and it'spractitioners include not just today's hottest start-ups, but also companies like IBM, Walmart, and Microsoft as well as the millions of entrepreneurs, marketers, managers and executives who make up the community of GrowthHackers.com, Think of the Growth Hacking methodology as doing for market-share growth what Lean Start-Up did for product development, and Scrum did for productivity. It involves cross-functional teams and rapid-tempo testing and iteration that focuses customers: attaining them, retaining them, engaging them, and motivating them to come back and buy more. An accessible and practical toolkit that teams and companies in all industries can use to increase their customer base and market share, this book walks readers through the process of creating and executing their own custom-made growth hacking strategy. .

    Q: What books do you recommend for learning about growth design? A: As far as I know, there's only one book on growth design: “UX Design for Growth” by @ixdmolly https://t.co/kEDtbJK0xg I'd also recommend “Hacking Growth”, “Running Lean” and “UX Strategy”.

  • UX Strategy

    Jaime Levy

    User experience (UX) strategy requires a careful blend of business strategy and UX design, but until now, there hasn't been an easy-to-apply framework for executing it. This hands-on guide introduces lightweight strategy tools and techniques to help you and your team craft innovative multi-device products that people want to use. Whether you're an entrepreneur, UX/UI designer, product manager, or part of an intrapreneurial team, this book teaches simple-to-advanced strategies that you can use in your work right away. Along with business cases, historical context, and real-world examples throughout, you'll also gain different perspectives on the subject through interviews with top strategists. Define and validate your target users through provisional personas and customer discovery techniques Conduct competitive research and analysis to explore a crowded marketplace or an opportunity to create unique value Focus your team on the primary utility and business model of your product by running structured experiments using prototypes Devise UX funnels that increase customer engagement by mapping desired user actions to meaningful metrics

    Q: What books do you recommend for learning about growth design? A: As far as I know, there's only one book on growth design: “UX Design for Growth” by @ixdmolly https://t.co/kEDtbJK0xg I'd also recommend “Hacking Growth”, “Running Lean” and “UX Strategy”.

  • Web Form Design

    Luke Wroblewski

    @NegatedVoid Luke Wroblewski’s Web Form Design is a good place for some basics https://t.co/pbk1NxnkU8

  • Speaking to the HCI community and other design professionals, this work is grounded in both practice and scientific research. It encourages designers to try new methods, test themselves with the exercises and projects, and see an improvement in innovative interaction design that works.

    @MSGuzy @wasbuxton’s Sketching User Experiences is the go to resource on this topic. https://t.co/Yt8tqNLRmO

  • On the one hand I wish I'd rediscovered cybernetics while I was working on my book Conversational Design, and on the other—well, these are meant to be very short, practical books and my editors already had their work trimming my tangents cut out for them.

  • In today’s digital world, any product, app, or website requires a professional User Experience (UX) designer to ensure success. With this book, new UX designers will learn the practical skills they need to get started in the field, skills that can be immediately applied to real-world UX projects. UX for Beginners is broken into one hundred short, illustrated lessons, a user-friendly approach that makes learning fun and gives you the foundation you need to succeed as a UX designer. This book is based on the popular UX Crash Course blog at The Hipper Element, which has more than 400,000 readers.

    Harvard’s Book of the Week: UX for Beginners. Cc: @OReillyMedia @MaryTreseler @ANGELARUFINO1 @JessHaberman https://t.co/5pYi02M4gT

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    Hey, @StarFire2258. Just so you know, @monteiro’s book, Ruined By Design, is excellent. I think it’s mandatory reading for everyone who works in tech.

  • In today’s digital world, any product, app, or website requires a professional User Experience (UX) designer to ensure success. With this book, new UX designers will learn the practical skills they need to get started in the field, skills that can be immediately applied to real-world UX projects. UX for Beginners is broken into one hundred short, illustrated lessons, a user-friendly approach that makes learning fun and gives you the foundation you need to succeed as a UX designer. This book is based on the popular UX Crash Course blog at The Hipper Element, which has more than 400,000 readers.

    The great @kiki_muriuki created a conference talk about user psychology based on content from my book, UX For Beginners. So obviously it was excellent. Then he turned that talk into an easy, funny blog post! Boom. Read it here! https://t.co/IIqA4ehLdy

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    Speaking of books, check out this awesome new cover for Ruined by Design (which probably Amazon will pull at some point). When you order the book, at least one employee will see the message: https://t.co/eNASj11I1l

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    And, uh, the Kindle version is currently $2.99, which is a 10th of what I paid for the printed version: https://t.co/vHTYPxxkPn

  • Design Systems

    Alla Kholmatova

    This book presents a perspective on design systems based on the authors experience as an interaction and visual designer. It is about how to approach your design process in a more systematic way, and ensure your design system helps to achieve the purpose of your product and fits with the culture of your team

    Doing a little light reading this morning as I’m headed to the airport to speak at @ReactBoston about... DESIGN SYSTEMS ❤️☺️ And did I mention the @smashingmag books are beautiful?! Amazing work @craftui 😌 https://t.co/TkqqCYsmIk

  • Game Thinking

    Amy Jo Kim

    During her time working on genre-defining games like The Sims, Rock Band, and Ultima Online, Amy Jo learned that customers stick with products that help them get better at something they care about, like playing an instrument or leading a team. Amy Jo has used her insights from gaming to help hundreds of companies like Netflix, Disney, The New York Times, Ubisoft and Happify innovate faster and smarter, and drive long-term engagement.

    I think @amyjokim’s Game Thinking framework is a perfect way to design for the user’s duration with the product or service. https://t.co/v8saJuyfx6 https://t.co/h1ee3s2cRF

  • @austingovella @jessicaivins @CenterCentre Yes, we have two courses in the @CenterCentre curriculum that are relevant: Communicating Design, based on @brownorama’s book of the same title. Information Design, which covers data visualization and gets into many Tuftian concepts.

  • Whether you’re designing consumer electronics, medical devices, enterprise Web apps, or new ways to check out at the supermarket, today’s digitally-enabled products and services provide both great opportunities to deliver compelling user experiences and great risks of driving your customers crazy with complicated, confusing technology. Designing successful products and services in the digital age requires a multi-disciplinary team with expertise in interaction design, visual design, industrial design, and other disciplines. It also takes the ability to come up with the big ideas that make a desirable product or service, as well as the skill and perseverance to execute on the thousand small ideas that get your design into the hands of users. It requires expertise in project management, user research, and consensus-building. This comprehensive, full-color volume addresses all of these and more with detailed how-to information, real-life examples, and exercises. Topics include assembling a design team, planning and conducting user research, analyzing your data and turning it into personas, using scenarios to drive requirements definition and design, collaborating in design meetings, evaluating and iterating your design, and documenting finished design in a way that works for engineers and stakeholders alike.

    @sovsetog I recommend looking at Goal-Directed Design in Kim Goodwin’s book and Indy Young’s Mental Models as great starting points. Both use a much richer research process to ensure that outcomes are chosen effectively.

  • @berkun @alicerawsthorn @ABRAMSbooks @wwnorton And because they under printed it, you can’t find paper copies for less than $80??? https://t.co/XnOU05m7Al

  • A resource for navigating your one-on-one user research sessions. Inside, find guidance for nearly 100 diverse situations (ranging from business-as-usual to tricky and sticky) that might occur during usability studies, contextual inquiries, or user interviews.

    @YaelBenDavid @EuroUXWriters @Microcopy_UX @elainetall For instance, if I'm teaching people how to do usability testing, I always point them toward The Moderator's Survival Guide by Donna Tedesco and Fiona Tranquada. Great book.

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    Every design decision makes a difference. Design affects world peace. Yes, even what you work on every day. If you care about design, if you care about world peace, read @monteiro’s book. Get his newsletter. https://t.co/kWtUw0Oj0q https://t.co/xoxIXWQIlS

  • Ruined by Design

    Mike Monteiro

    The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet's atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they're designed to work. And every time we "improve" their design, they get better at killing. Facebook's privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their "real names" initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter's toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it's designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it's not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network's interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that's on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we've excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we've made as a society.If you're a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you're working on. You'll learn how to present your concerns. You'll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You'll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You'll learn to say NO in a way that'll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities.

    Reading Ruined By Design by @monteiro and it pulls no punches in the intro chapter. Can't say I disagree with its advice to Twitter or Uber employees either. https://t.co/kcppPy1ttD

  • Game Thinking

    Amy Jo Kim

    During her time working on genre-defining games like The Sims, Rock Band, and Ultima Online, Amy Jo learned that customers stick with products that help them get better at something they care about, like playing an instrument or leading a team. Amy Jo has used her insights from gaming to help hundreds of companies like Netflix, Disney, The New York Times, Ubisoft and Happify innovate faster and smarter, and drive long-term engagement.

    It’s true! This book is worth 20 articles and 5 books on game design. Worth it to learn how to drive engagement. https://t.co/UkiADAbe9c

  • Forms that Work

    Caroline Jarrett

    Forms that Work: Designing Web Forms for Usability clearly explains exactly how to design great forms for the web. The book provides proven and practical advice that will help you avoid pitfalls, and produce forms that are aesthetically pleasing, efficient and cost-effective. It features invaluable design methods, tips, and tricks to help ensure accurate data and satisfied customers. It includes dozens of examples - from nitty-gritty details (label alignment, mandatory fields) to visual designs (creating good grids, use of color). This book isn’t just about colons and choosing the right widgets. It’s about the whole process of making good forms, which has a lot more to do with making sure you’re asking the right questions in a way that your users can answer than it does with whether you use a drop-down list or radio buttons. In an easy-to-read format with lots of examples, the authors present their three-layer model - relationship, conversation, appearance. You need all three for a successful form - a form that looks good, flows well, asks the right questions in the right way, and, most important of all, gets people to fill it out. Liberally illustrated with full-color examples, this book guides readers on how to define requirements, how to write questions that users will understand and want to answer, and how to deal with instructions, progress indicators and errors. This book is essential reading for HCI professionals, web designers, software developers, user interface designers, HCI academics and students, market research professionals, and financial professionals. *Provides proven and practical advice that will help you avoid pitfalls, and produce forms that are aesthetically pleasing, efficient and cost-effective. *Features invaluable design methods, tips, and tricks to help ensure accurate data and satisfied customers. *Includes dozens of examples -- from nitty-gritty details (label alignment, mandatory fields) to visual designs (creating good grids, use of color). *Foreword by Steve Krug, author of the best selling Don't Make Me Think!

    @davidhoos "Buy one of the two great books that are out there: Forms That Work by Caroline Jarrett and Gerry Gaffney, or Designing UX: Forms by Jessica Enders. And if you've waited too long to do that, try what I call cubicle testing." 2/3

  • Designing UX: Forms

    Jessica Enders

    A recent study found that on average, designing a form to have a great user experience almost doubled the rate of successful first-time completions. For example, Ebay made an additional $USD 500 million annually from redesigning just the button on one of their mobile form screens. More conversions, fewer dissatisfied users, better return on investment. Can you afford not to improve your forms' user experiences? This book will walk you through every part of designing a great forms user experience. From the words, to how the form looks, and on to interactivity, you'll learn how to design a web form that works beautifully on mobiles, laptops and desktops. Filled with practical and engaging insights, and plenty of real-world examples, both good and bad. You'll learn answers to common queries like: Where should field labels go? What makes a question easy to understand? How do you design forms to work on small screens? How does touch impact on form design? How long can a form be? What look and feel should the form have: skeumorphic, flat, or something else? What's best practice for error messaging?

    @davidhoos "Buy one of the two great books that are out there: Forms That Work by Caroline Jarrett and Gerry Gaffney, or Designing UX: Forms by Jessica Enders. And if you've waited too long to do that, try what I call cubicle testing." 2/3

  • In Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, you will learn, through step-by-step instructions and exercises, various sketching methods that will let you express your design ideas about user experiences across time. Collectively, these methods will be your sketching repertoire: a toolkit where you can choose the method most appropriate for developing your ideas, which will help you cultivate a culture of experience-based design and critique in your workplace. Features standalone modules detailing methods and exercises for practitioners who want to learn and develop their sketching skills Extremely practical, with illustrated examples detailing all steps on how to do a method Excellent for individual learning, for classrooms, and for a team that wants to develop a culture of design practice Perfect complement to Buxton's Sketching User Experience or any UX text

    @MarkSkinner_ Mark, you may already know this, but related, the workbook has a lot more practical hands-on material https://t.co/Xvs38zUE9O

  • Provides an overview of the complexities of interactive Web design for non-designers, explaining the processes, methods, and vocabulary of user experience design.

    If there is ONE book I refer CEOs to so they can learn about UX it's @jjg's book "The Elements of User Experience" https://t.co/I87DoL2b2J

  • Smashing UX Design

    Jesmond Allen

    @Tundey1 Sure, for example "Smashing UX Design: Foundations for Designing Online User Experiences" is a comprehensive book on UX

  • Apps! Websites! Rubber Ducks! Naked Ninjas! This book has everything. If you want to get started in user experience design (UX), you've come to the right place: 100 self-contained lessons that cover the whole spectrum of fundamentals. Forget dry, technical material. This book—based on the wildly popular UX Crash Course from Joel Marsh’s blog The Hipper Element—is laced with the author's snarky brand of humor, and teaches UX in a simple, practical way. Becoming a professional doesn’t have to be boring. Follow the real-life UX process from start-to-finish and apply the skills as you learn, or refresh your memory before the next meeting. UX for Beginners is perfect for non-designers who want to become designers, managers who teach UX, and programmers, salespeople, or marketers who want to learn more. Start from scratch: the fundamentals of UX Research the weird and wonderful things users do The process and science of making anything user-friendly Use size, color, and layout to help and influence users Plan and create wireframes Make your designs feel engaging and persuasive Measure how your design works in the real world Find out what a UX designer does all day

    @99yardTD @YasmineEvjen p.s. — These lessons (plus 50 more) will be a book called "UX for Beginners" from O’Reilly, coming out this month!

  • From the moment it was published almost ten years ago, Elements of User Experience became a vital reference for web and interaction designers the world over, and has come to define the core principles of the practice. Now, in this updated, expanded, and full-color new edition, Jesse James Garrett has refined his thinking about the Web, going beyond the desktop to include information that also applies to the sudden proliferation of mobile devices and applications. Successful interaction design requires more than just creating clean code and sharp graphics. You must also fulfill your strategic objectives while meeting the needs of your users. Even the best content and the most sophisticated technology won't help you balance those goals without a cohesive, consistent user experience to support it. With so many issues involved—usability, brand identity, information architecture, interaction design— creating the user experience can be overwhelmingly complex. This new edition of The Elements of User Experience cuts through that complexity with clear explanations and vivid illustrations that focus on ideas rather than tools or techniques. Garrett gives readers the big picture of user experience development, from strategy and requirements to information architecture and visual design.

    @Abgr26 @PlugandPlayTC @bidgely @vkhosla The first book I'd recommend is "The Elements of User Experience" by @jjg. A must read!!!

  • @katecaldwell If interested in icon use in interaction, the bible is Dreyfuss (1972), a must have for UX designers: http://t.co/Ic6lWmq69S

  • A Web for Everyone

    Sarah Horton

    If you are in charge of the user experience, development, or strategy for a web site, A Web for Everyone will help you make your site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. Rooted in universal design principles, this book provides solutions: practical advice and examples of how to create sites that everyone can use.

    Just shipped: A Web for Everyone, one of the 8 books I recommend in DMMT Revisited http://t.co/dE1XRTh9Ri http://t.co/lDGuT4C9nr

  • Eye tracking is a widely used research method, but there are many questions and misconceptions about how to effectively apply it. Eye Tracking the User Experience—the first how-to book about eye tracking for UX practitioners—offers step-by-step advice on how to plan, prepare, and conduct eye tracking studies; how to analyze and interpret eye movement data; and how to successfully communicate eye tracking findings.

    Read the foreword I wrote for @agabojko's new book Eye Tracking the User Experience http://t.co/pHaLCTa6Vs then maybe buy a copy

  • See what I Mean

    Kevin Cheng

    Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports.

    @BrianSJ3 Tom & Kevin have done a great job of showing the power of comics to capture concepts. I love Kevin's book: http://t.co/EKk2mISmPv

  • See what I Mean

    Kevin Cheng

    Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports.

    Kevin Chen's new book on using comics in UX design just arrived. Highly recommended! Great read as well as tutorial. http://t.co/nAzONZEM

  • In Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, you will learn, through step-by-step instructions and exercises, various sketching methods that will let you express your design ideas about user experiences across time. Collectively, these methods will be your sketching repertoire: a toolkit where you can choose the method most appropriate for developing your ideas, which will help you cultivate a culture of experience-based design and critique in your workplace. Features standalone modules detailing methods and exercises for practitioners who want to learn and develop their sketching skills Extremely practical, with illustrated examples detailing all steps on how to do a method Excellent for individual learning, for classrooms, and for a team that wants to develop a culture of design practice Perfect complement to Buxton's Sketching User Experience or any UX text

    Good. The Sketching Workbook is finally shipping from Amazon! http://t.co/xPfR1QLu

  • In Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, you will learn, through step-by-step instructions and exercises, various sketching methods that will let you express your design ideas about user experiences across time. Collectively, these methods will be your sketching repertoire: a toolkit where you can choose the method most appropriate for developing your ideas, which will help you cultivate a culture of experience-based design and critique in your workplace. Features standalone modules detailing methods and exercises for practitioners who want to learn and develop their sketching skills Extremely practical, with illustrated examples detailing all steps on how to do a method Excellent for individual learning, for classrooms, and for a team that wants to develop a culture of design practice Perfect complement to Buxton's Sketching User Experience or any UX text

    It's real! Came home and found copy of the workbook companion to my sketching book waiting for me: http://t.co/zfvPDGUB Really happy!