Anna Gat

Anna Gat

Founder and CEO of @interintellect_ · immigrant, explorer, general enthusiast · she/her · https://t.co/XaZMpPbBOU · I am a part of all that I have met

90+ Book Recommendations by Anna Gat

  • Chronicles the Nazi's rise to power, conquest of Europe, and dramatic defeat at the hands of the Allies.

    @ericbahn Fantastic book!

  • Lenin

    Victor Sebestyen

    Victor Sebestyen's riveting biography of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin--the first major biography in English in nearly two decades--is not only a political examination of one of the most important historical figures of the twentieth century but also a fascinating portrait of Lenin the man. Brought up in comfort and with a passion for hunting and fishing, chess, and the English classics, Lenin was radicalized after the execution of his brother in 1887. Sebestyen traces the story from Lenin's early years to his long exile in Europe and return to Petrograd in 1917 to lead the first Communist revolution in history. Uniquely, Sebestyen has discovered that throughout Lenin's life his closest relationships were with his mother, his sisters, his wife, and his mistress. The long-suppressed story told here of the love triangle that Lenin had with his wife, Nadezhda Krupskaya, and his beautiful, married mistress and comrade, Inessa Armand, reveals a more complicated character than that of the coldly one-dimensional leader of the Bolshevik Revolution. With Lenin's personal papers and those of other leading political figures now available, Sebestyen gives is new details that bring to life the dramatic and gripping story of how Lenin seized power in a coup and ran his revolutionary state. The product of a violent, tyrannical, and corrupt Russia, he chillingly authorized the deaths of thousands of people and created a system based on the idea that political terror against opponents was justified for a greater ideal. An old comrade what had once admired him said that Lenin "desired the good . . . but created evil." This included his invention of Stalin, who would take Lenin's system of the gulag and the secret police to horrifying new heights. In Lenin, Victor Sebestyen has written a brilliant portrait of this dictator as a complex and ruthless figure, and he also brings to light important new revelations about the Russian Revolution, a pivotal point in modern history. (With 16 pages of black-and-white photographs)

    @KevinBCook Read Sebestyen's book Lenin. The Russian Revolution was a giant mess -- the only reason it succeeded is because the other side was even more unimaginably incompetent!

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

    Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    @Apps_RG When I was young and a fatalist my favourite book was One Hundred Years of Solitude which I read 9 times, dropped into a pool, washed into the sea, and spilled multiple dinners and litres of coffee on it — it was an object of use, a tool

  • Ideas

    Peter Watson

    Peter Watson's hugely ambitious and stimulating history of ideas from deep antiquity to the present day—from the invention of writing, mathematics, science, and philosophy to the rise of such concepts as the law, sacrifice, democracy, and the soul—offers an illuminated path to a greater understanding of our world and ourselves.

    From the book - the history of ideas coming from other ideas: https://t.co/VzqtdZS3mH

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

    Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    @ranadesiddhesh Oh that was my favourite book growing up!!! Read it some 8 times 💗

  • Purge

    Sofi Oksanen

    Aliide Truu, an older woman guilty of crimes during the Soviet occupation of Estonia, takes in a young woman, Zara, who is trying to escape a sex-trafficking ring, and as they work through their suspicion, the two rediscover a tragic family history from the past.

    With all this talk of purges I just wish Sofi Oksanen’s excellent novel ‘Purge’ was trending! https://t.co/7peR9cu5Zg

  • The Double Flame

    Octavio Paz

    A collection of essays examines the themes of love and sex in literature, from Plato to modern fiction

    @PHurducas @UberEats And I'm reading this now for my History of Love series https://t.co/fqXw5W2ZUk

  • A special anniversary edition featuring the complete English and German texts, this collection of poetry, based on the Book of Hours--psalms and prayers for various times throughout the day--used by monks, offers prayers and songs that address such concerns as spirituality in the modern age and the sufferings of war, poverty, and disease. Reprint.

    @katrinadlc The Book of Hours is very special to me ---

  • These Truths

    Jill Lepore

    The challenge of retelling five hundred years of American history in a single volume has been so daunting that hardly any historian has attempted it in decades. When Jill Lepore's New York Times best-selling These Truths appeared in 2018, critics quickly hailed it as a classic--appealing not only to academics, but to thousands of astonished general readers. Picking up the book out of a feeling of civic duty, they opened its pages to discover a different kind of writing, and what the Washington Post called "an honest reckoning with America's past"--a story filled with women and men and people of every color and religion, one that wrestles with the state of American politics, the legacy of slavery, the persistence of inequality, and the nature of technological change. With These Truths, Harvard historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore has produced a book that will shape our view of American history for decades to come.

    @hrabk @seanphughes99 @WoodardColin Reading These Truths on and off! Actually a very underrated US history book - astonishingly written - is Hugh Brogan's, in case you're looking for something unobvious

  • American Nations

    Colin Woodard

    This book is GREAT; thanks @seanphughes99 for the recommendation (and @WoodardColin for writing it) 👏🏼 https://t.co/Vrzw3J84WE

  • The fawn

    MAGDA SZABO

    @nixseah Though her most astonishing book are: Abigail (by far - a masterpiece!) https://t.co/ww20tW75OQ And The Fawn https://t.co/pCG2TNfDXM

  • Fourteen-year-old Gina, the spoiled daughter of a Hungarian general, rails against being sent to boarding school far from Budapest when war breaks out, but finds help in a statue of Abigail and her new "sisters."

    @nixseah Though her most astonishing book are: Abigail (by far - a masterpiece!) https://t.co/ww20tW75OQ And The Fawn https://t.co/pCG2TNfDXM

  • These Truths

    Jill Lepore

    New York Times Bestseller In the most ambitious one-volume American history in decades, award-winning historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history. Written in elegiac prose, Lepore’s groundbreaking investigation places truth itself—a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence—at the center of the nation’s history. The American experiment rests on three ideas—"these truths," Jefferson called them—political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise? These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation’s truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News. Along the way, Lepore’s sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues’ gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism. Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can’t be shirked. There’s nothing for it but to get to know it."

    "To write something down is to make a fossil record of a mind." - Love Jill Lepore's These Truths so much. What a book. How rare to find a book like this.

  • The Goal

    Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    "Includes case study interviews"--Cover.

    @nickducoff @rlj_law @m2jr @ShaneAParrish That's a great book!!

  • Reclaiming Control

    Amy McMillen

    Beautiful Interintellect fireside chat last night 📚✨ Fellow Interintellects @TheAlexYao and @scottjdavies01 discussing her debut book with the great @amymcmai 💗 You can buy 'Reclaiming Control: Looking Inward to Recalibrate Your Life' here: https://t.co/ZVL6ihCAwI https://t.co/gkpXawT0ah

  • Moira Kelly has come to Africa to start her life over. Still reeling from her divorce, she is grateful when a handsome stranger invites her on an expedition to visit gorillas in Uganda's wild Impenetrable Forest. But the trip goes desperately wrong when the group of tourists are captured by brutal gunmen, marched into the lawless Congo, and held for ransom. Then one tourist is executed. Their abduction is only the first move in a deadly strategic game that may consume entire nations. Twisting and turning, this brilliant new novel by the rising star of thriller writing will take your breath away.

    Watch out @rezendi you have a new reader https://t.co/HJZcGoQdww

  • Arts and Minds

    Anton Howes

    "For almost 300 years, an organisation has quietly tried to change almost every aspect of life in Britain. That organisation is the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, often known simply as the Royal Society of Arts. It has acted as Britain's private national improvement agency, in every way imaginable - essentially, a society for the improvement of everything and anything. This book is its history. From its beginnings in a coffee house in the mid-eighteenth century, the Society has tried to change Britain's art, industry, laws, music, environment, education, and even culture. It has sometimes even succeeded. It has been a prize-fund for innovations, a platform for Victorian utilitarian reformers, a convenor of disparate interest groups, and the focal point for social movements. There has never been an organisation quite like it, constantly having to reinvent itself to find something new to improve. The book rewrites many of the old official histories of the Society and updates them to the present day, incorporating over half a century of further research into the periods they covered, along with new insights into the organisation's evolution. The book reveals the hidden and often surprising history of how a few public-spirited people tried to make their country better, offering lessons from their triumphs and their failures for all would-be reformers today"--

    This book is FANTASTIC 🚀🚀🚀 https://t.co/Cd4lX3oxt2

  • Working in Public

    Nadia Eghbal

    And if you haven't seen our Interintellect Talks series -- not as conversational as Salons but fascinating deep dives for our community and beyond -- Check out the one with @nayafia about her book Working in Public, a new Bible for all things Open Source: https://t.co/htqRPQcnos

  • In this remarkable oral history, Slava Gerovitch presents interviews with the men and women who witnessed Soviet space efforts firsthand. Rather than comprising a "master narrative," these fascinating and varied accounts bring to light the often divergent perspectives, experiences, and institutional cultures that defined the Soviet space program.

    @nickarner @_ArnaudS_ @GeffenAvraham This book https://t.co/a940FKW36L

  • @visakanv @Neats29 Love that book!

  • High class Moscow hooker A. Huli is foxy in more ways than one . . . And when a client goes inexplicably and fatally berserk at the sight of her in his luxury suite she has to employ all of her cunning to escape. But it's not until she places an ad on the internet that trouble really begins to kick off, as the journey she takes catapults her into a world of perverts, former KGB agents, oil tycoons and amorous werewolves.

    OK I tried and you can't actually do this game with The Scared Book of the Werewolf. However you twist it it's interesting! https://t.co/6oxOEfIkFD

  • “There are at least two kinds of games,” states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. “One could be called finite; the other infinite.” Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change—as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end. What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we play—finitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives? Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely. He surveys our world—from the finite games of the playing field and playing board to the infinite games found in culture and religion—leaving all we think we know illuminated and transformed. Along the way, Carse finds new ways of understanding everything, from how an actress portrays a role to how we engage in sex, from the nature of evil to the nature of science. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander. Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. Reading it is the first step in learning to play the infinite game.

    Last week I told a friend about Finite and Infinite Games, and I realised what a privilege it is to introduce somebody to a potentially life-changing book. So much responsibility in book recommendations - and boy is it rewarding!

  • Working in Public

    Nadia Eghbal

    OH MY GOD @nayafia's book is out!!!!!!! One of the most shining minds of our generation, I have been waiting for this moment for years ✨ Congratulations, my friend! Here's to your first book of many to come! 🍾 https://t.co/LDeUif6MOa

  • Leonardo da Vinci

    Walter Isaacson

    The #1 New York Times bestseller from Walter Isaacson brings Leonardo da Vinci to life in this exciting new biography that is “a study in creativity: how to define it, how to achieve it…Most important, it is a powerful story of an exhilarating mind and life” (The New Yorker). Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo da Vinci’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson “deftly reveals an intimate Leonardo” (San Francisco Chronicle) in a narrative that connects his art to his science. He shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and an imagination so playful that it flirted with fantasy. He produced the two most famous paintings in history, The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. His ability to stand at the crossroads of the humanities and the sciences, made iconic by his drawing of Vitruvian Man, made him history’s most creative genius. In the “luminous” (Daily Beast) Leonardo da Vinci, Isaacson describes how Leonardo’s delight at combining diverse passions remains the ultimate recipe for creativity. So, too, does his ease at being a bit of a misfit: illegitimate, gay, vegetarian, left-handed, easily distracted, and at times heretical. His life should remind us of the importance to be imaginative and, like talented rebels in any era, to think different. Here, da Vinci “comes to life in all his remarkable brilliance and oddity in Walter Isaacson’s ambitious new biography…a vigorous, insightful portrait” (The Washington Post).

    Helplessly into this book 😍 https://t.co/n2BRdZ2GWb

  • Meredith

    David Oliver Doswell

    I am ridiculously excited about @david_doswell's first book coming out! https://t.co/1i29yyWf18 "Competent computer hacker, Meredith Sandoval, lives in the conservative Hayes Valley, San Francisco, California section, in the year 2139...

  • Sex at Dawn

    Cacilda Jetha Christopher Ryan

    @ssica3003 @LukeRobertMason Very good book 👇👇👇👇👇 https://t.co/vQwvxgnbZU

  • Personal History

    Katharine Graham

    The longtime owner of the Washington Post recounts her experiences, including how she rebounded from her husband's suicide to command the Post during Vietnam and Watergate

    @Apps_RG OMG I love love love love love that book

  • One of the world’s most respected voices on erotic intelligence, Esther Perel offers a bold, provocative new take on intimacy and sex. Mating in Captivity invites us to explore the paradoxical union of domesticity and sexual desire, and explains what it takes to bring lust home. Drawing on more than twenty years of experience as a couples therapist, Perel examines the complexities of sustaining desire. Through case studies and lively discussion, Perel demonstrates how more exciting, playful, and even poetic sex is possible in long-term relationships. Wise, witty, and as revelatory as it is straightforward, Mating in Captivity is a sensational book that will transform the way you live and love.

    This book has changed my mind about like 15 things already and it is so beautiful I also cry around 15 times a day because of it. Definitely a contact sport... Please read it, good people of Twitter. https://t.co/qJ4qIxqtM0

  • Paradoxe. https://t.co/jPKWES7r7l

  • Reading the Perel book I keep thinking about the last key sentence in a foundational text in my culture: Madách's The Tragedy of Man. In this mid-19th c. play Lucifer takes Adam and Eve on a vision trip through history to show them what's coming: Ancient Rome, Kepler's workshop,

  • Thomas Sowell's many writings on the history of economic thought have appeared in a number of scholarly journals and books, and these writings have been praised, reprinted, and translated in various countries around the world. The classical era in the history of economics is an important part of the history of ideas in general, and its implications reach beyond the bounds of the economics profession. On Classical Economics is a book from which students can learn both history and economics. It is not simply a Cook's tour of colorful personalities of the past but a study of how certain economic concepts and tools of analysis arose, and how their implications were revealed during the controversies that followed. In addition to a general understanding of classical macroeconomics and microeconomics, this book offers special insight into the neglected pioneering work of Sismondi--and why it was neglected--and a detailed look at John Stuart Mill's enigmatic role in the development of economics and the mysteries of Marxian economics. Clear, engaging, and very readable, without being either cute or condescending, On Classical Economics can enable a course on the history of economic thought to make a contribution to students’ understanding of economics in general--whether in price theory, monetary theory, or international trade. In short, it is a book about analysis as well as history.

    @rivatez Bedside... https://t.co/BYggNtQOCj

  • Deaf Republic

    Ilya Kaminsky

    Finalist for the National Book Award for Poetry Ilya Kaminsky’s astonishing parable in poems asks us, What is silence? Deaf Republic opens in an occupied country in a time of political unrest. When soldiers breaking up a protest kill a deaf boy, Petya, the gunshot becomes the last thing the citizens hear—they all have gone deaf, and their dissent becomes coordinated by sign language. The story follows the private lives of townspeople encircled by public violence: a newly married couple, Alfonso and Sonya, expecting a child; the brash Momma Galya, instigating the insurgency from her puppet theater; and Galya’s girls, heroically teaching signing by day and by night luring soldiers one by one to their deaths behind the curtain. At once a love story, an elegy, and an urgent plea, Ilya Kaminsky’s long-awaited Deaf Republic confronts our time’s vicious atrocities and our collective silence in the face of them.

    This book - a book of poetry - exquisite - everybody read this book: https://t.co/Vsvrpy8lnw

  • Five Little Pigs

    Agatha Christie

    Beautiful Caroline Crale was convicted of poisoning her husband, but just like the nursery rhyme, there were five other “little pigs” who could have done it: Philip Blake (the stockbroker), who went to market; Meredith Blake (the amateur herbalist), who stayed at home; Elsa Greer (the three-time divorcÉe), who had her roast beef; Cecilia Williams (the devoted governess), who had none; and Angela Warren (the disfigured sister), who cried all the way home. Sixteen years later, Caroline’s daughter is determined to prove her mother’s innocence, and Poirot just can’t get that nursery rhyme out of his mind.

    @five_books @agathachristie Five Little Pigs is a masterpiece!!!

  • I read this book 8 times when I was a teenager, my old Hungarian copy has swimming pool stains, sand, chocolate, and other remnants of staying and traveling smeared into it - it was perhaps the most essential reading of my life. A tableau of Life. https://t.co/nNx2keBIaA

  • Explores the phenomenon through which people become resourceful and altruistic after a disaster and communities reflect a shared sense of purpose, analyzing events ranging from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to Hurricane Katrina.

    This has just come up at the @whatstheii Salon - I can't wait to read it! https://t.co/zmR65bFq4U

  • Name of the Rose

    Umberto Eco

    In 1327, Brother William of Baskerville is sent to investigate charges of heresy against Franciscan monks at a wealthy Italian abbey but finds his mission overshadowed by seven bizarre murders.

    @fuehrerking @tylercowen Oh la la I couldn't sleep for a month that book is so scary!! And YES please @SethMacFarlane <> @tylercowen 💙

  • Far From the Tree

    Andrew Solomon

    The National Book Award-winning author of The Noonday Demon explores the consequences of extreme personal differences between parents and children, describing his own experiences as a gay child of straight parents while evaluating the circumstances of people affected by physical, developmental or cultural factors that divide families. 150,000 first printing.

    It was a total highlight for me that on my first ever day in San Francisco I got to meet Sam IRL and give him the book 'Far from the Tree' by Andrew Solomon as a way to thank him 💕💕💕 (Thank you, Sam!)

  • The Savage Detectives

    Roberto Bolano

    OMG this book is incredible why haven't I read this before???? https://t.co/9FqUTdlTBi

  • The Dao of Capital

    Mark Spitznagel

    Combing ancient Daoist philosophy with old school Austrian economics, this timely resource presents a singular approach to investing that illuminates the market's natural homeostatic processes.

    I just buy the books @rivatez tells me to https://t.co/2qzRsSHzVM

  • In this foundational book, Robert Trivers seeks to answer one of the most provocative and consequential questions to face humanity: why do we lie to ourselves? Deception is everywhere in nature. And nowhere more so than in our own species. We humans are especially good at telling others less - or more - than the truth. Why, however, would organisms both seek out information and then act to destroy it? In short, why practice self-deception? To biologists this has long been a mystery. Our sense organs have evolved to give us a marvellously detailed and accurate view of the outside world. So why should natural selection then lead us to systematically distort what we know? After decades of research, Robert Trivers has at last provided the missing theory to answer these questions. What emerges is a picture of deceit and self-deception as, at root, different sides of the same coin. We deceive ourselves the better to deceive others, and thereby reap the advantages. From space and aviation disasters to warfare, politics and religion, and the anxieties of our everyday social lives, Deceit and Self-Deception explains what really underlies a whole host of human problems. But can we correct our own biases? Are we doomed to indulge in fantasies, inflate our egos, and show off? Is it even a good idea to battle self-deception? With his characteristically wry and self-effacing wit, Trivers reveals how he finds self-deception everywhere in his own life, and shows us that while we may not always avoid it, we can now at least hope to understand it.

    @jasoncrawford @TriversRobert @Gena_I_Gorlin We must do a debate (within ourselves)! https://t.co/1ZLrskxe0m

  • The Dream Machine

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    At a time when computers were a short step removed from mechanical data processors, Licklider was writing treatises on "human-computer symbiosis," "computers as communication devices," and a now not-so-unfamiliar "Intergalactic Network." His ideas became so influential, his passion so contagious, that Waldrop coined him "computing's Johnny Appleseed." In a simultaneously compelling personal narrative and comprehensive historical exposition, Waldrop tells the story of the man who not only instigated the work that led to the internet, but also shifted our understanding of what computers were and could be.

    @BrianTHeligman https://t.co/aL2LHxOcRe

  • Personal History

    Katharine Graham

    The longtime owner of the Washington Post recounts her experiences, including how she rebounded from her husband's suicide to command the Post during Vietnam and Watergate

    @zck I've finally got myself to forgive its popularity and read Wolf Hall. Much enjoying it! The best nonfiction I read recently was Kay Graham's Personal History, but I think we've discussed that :)

  • A Primate's Memoir

    Robert M. Sapolsky

    In the tradition of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Robert Sapolsky, a foremost science writer and recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant, tells the mesmerizing story of his twenty-one years in remote Kenya with a troop of Savannah baboons. “I had never planned to become a savanna baboon when I grew up; instead, I had always assumed I would become a mountain gorilla,” writes Robert Sapolsky in this witty and riveting chronicle of a scientist’s coming-of-age in remote Africa. An exhilarating account of Sapolsky’s twenty-one-year study of a troop of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate’s Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti—for man and beast alike. Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa. As he conducts unprecedented physiological research on wild primates, he becomes evermore enamored of his subjects—unique and compelling characters in their own right—and he returns to them summer after summer, until tragedy finally prevents him. By turns hilarious and poignant, A Primate’s Memoir is a magnum opus from one of our foremost science writers.

    @visakanv Hahahah man you HAVE to read and live tweet A Primate's Memoir. We'll be dying of laughter!!! It's BRILLIANT.

  • Kingdom

    EMMANUEL CARRÈRE

    This guy's book The Kingdom completely messed me up. To everyone who has ever had a crisis of faith of one kind or another - he is a must-read. cc @matthewclifford https://t.co/EvF9dGhlPS

  • Letters to a Young Contrarian

    Christopher Hitchens

    Please everyone read Christopher Hitchens' Letters to a Young Contrarian if you haven't yet. https://t.co/NHsvtRuzFQ

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

    Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    My most-read books to date: One Hundred Years of Solitude, read it 8x (1998-2003) Arcadia, read it 7x (2014-2018) The Tragedy of the Moon, read it 5x (2011-2019) https://t.co/140tg7LFMA

  • All essays in this volume are reprinted from the Magazine of fantasy and science fiction.

    My most-read books to date: One Hundred Years of Solitude, read it 8x (1998-2003) Arcadia, read it 7x (2014-2018) The Tragedy of the Moon, read it 5x (2011-2019) https://t.co/140tg7LFMA

  • Arcadia is a brilliantly inventive play that moves back and forth between centuries, populated by a varied and vastly entertaining cast of characters who discuss such topics as the nature of truth and time, the difference between the classical and the romantic temperament, and the disruptive influence of sex on our orbits in life-according to the author, "the attraction which Newton left out.

    My most-read books to date: One Hundred Years of Solitude, read it 8x (1998-2003) Arcadia, read it 7x (2014-2018) The Tragedy of the Moon, read it 5x (2011-2019) https://t.co/140tg7LFMA

  • The Tin Drum

    Günter Grass

    To mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of this classic, a new translation of the Nobel Prize winner's story is offered, which includes a huge cast of intriguing characters, including Oskar Matzerath, the indomitable drummer; his family; Oskar's midget friends Bebra and Roswitha Raguna; and more. Reprint.

    @drnelk The Tin Drum.

  • Traces the development of thought through historical movements and periods from 1500 to 1830.

    @carolynz Oh I see! Best "holistic" intro-type books may be Koestler's Sleepwalkers, Bronowski's The Western Intellectual Tradition, Bryson's Home, Ferguson's The Ascent of Money? (The latter two are light - but smart - )

  • The Ascent of Money

    Niall Ferguson

    Chronicles the evolution of finance from its origins in Mesopotamia to the modern world's most recent upheavals, covering such topics as the stock market bubble that prompted the French Revolution and the theories behind common investment vehicles.

    @carolynz Oh I see! Best "holistic" intro-type books may be Koestler's Sleepwalkers, Bronowski's The Western Intellectual Tradition, Bryson's Home, Ferguson's The Ascent of Money? (The latter two are light - but smart - )

  • The Sleepwalkers

    Arthur Koestler

    A thought-provoking account of the scientific achievements and lives of cosmologists from Babylonians to Newton.

    @carolynz Oh I see! Best "holistic" intro-type books may be Koestler's Sleepwalkers, Bronowski's The Western Intellectual Tradition, Bryson's Home, Ferguson's The Ascent of Money? (The latter two are light - but smart - )

  • At Home

    Bill Bryson

    Explores the ways in which homes reflect history, from a bathroom's revelations about medicine and hygiene to a kitchen's exposure of the stories of trade and nutrition.

    @carolynz Oh I see! Best "holistic" intro-type books may be Koestler's Sleepwalkers, Bronowski's The Western Intellectual Tradition, Bryson's Home, Ferguson's The Ascent of Money? (The latter two are light - but smart - )

  • Journal - volume 1

    Sándor Márai

    Inédit en France, le Journal du grand écrivain hongrois Sándor Márai éclaire l'homme et l'oeuvre d'une lumière nouvelle. Romancier, chroniqueur, Sándor Márai fut également le témoin et l'acteur d'une époque dont il a consigné les événements dès 1943 dans un Journal qui l'a accompagné jusqu'à la fin de ses jours, devenant un de ses chefs-d'oeuvre. Ce premier volume couvre la période historique la plus riche - la guerre, l'arrivée des Soviétiques, le départ en exil - et dévoile des passages plus personnels de l'oeuvre où se déploient la causticité et la clairvoyance de l'homme de lettres. Sous la direction de la traductrice Catherine Fay, avec la collaboration d'András Kányádi, maître de conférences à l'INALCO, cette édition du Journal apparaît comme la pièce maîtresse de l'oeuvre de Márai : au fil de pages superbes, où le moindre détail prend une ampleur romanesque, on assiste à la pensée en mouvement d'un homme conscient que sa seule façon d'être au monde est l'écriture.

    ♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️ https://t.co/xGMnZa6IPK

  • "In his book of literary commentary, The Hatred of Poetry, [Ben] Lerner posits a very different role for art in modernity, one that turns not on the willing suspension of disbelief, but on our “embarrassment” that poems and novels exist at all."

  • A third selection of Sontag's most important critical writings comment on the relation between moral and aesthetic ideas, discussing the works of Antonin Artaud, Leni Riefenstahl, Elias Canetti, Walter Benjamin, and others. Reprint.

    Sontag's essay On Paul Goodman - my favourite by her - completely shook me when I first read it in her collection Under the Sign of Saturn as a teen. As if I'd known how relevant it would become for me... Rereading it now had the same deep effect. Last night in Oxford we used it

  • The Birth of Tragedy

    Friedrich Nietzsche

    Presents an argument for the necessity for art in life. This book is based on the author's enthusiasms for Greek tragedy, for the philosophy of Schopenhauer and for the music of Wagner. It outlines a distinction between two central forces: the Apolline, representing beauty and order, and the Dionysiac, a primal or ecstatic reaction to the sublime.

    I must admit I'd forgotten The Birth of Tragedy is mostly an enquiry into *pessimism* -- as a cultural constant, underneath all the throbbing beauty, the pomp. Brings me back to my intuitions at @britishmuseum recently https://t.co/GUiR6Pc8CB You never open a book by accident! https://t.co/kFPNMUfqdF

  • "In her introduction, Borradori contends that philosophy has an invaluable contribution to make to the understanding of terrorism. Just as the traumas produced by colonialism, totalitarianism, and the Holocaust wrote the history of the twentieth century, the history of the twenty-first century is already signed by global terrorism. Each dialogue here, accompanied by a critical essay, recognizes the magnitude of this upcoming challenge. Characteristically, Habermas's dialogue is dense, compact, and elegantly traditional. Derrida's, on the other hand, takes the reader on a long, winding, and unpredictable road. Yet unexpected agreements emerge between them: both have a deep suspicion of the concept of "terrorism" and both see the need for a transition from classical international law, premised on the model of nation-states, to a new cosmopolitan order based on continental alliances.".

    This, ultimately. https://t.co/yGl1gf1esb

  • At Home

    Bill Bryson

    Explores the ways in which homes reflect history, from a bathroom's revelations about medicine and hygiene to a kitchen's exposure of the stories of trade and nutrition.

    @sarthakgh Weirdly, a very enjoyable book about how good work with data, and a scientist approach, changes everyday life for every person and home was Bill Bryson's At Home. It's his underrated masterpiece.

  • "A wide-ranging anthology of ethnopoetry including origin texts, visionary texts, texts about death, texts about events--collected from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Ancient Near East, and Oceania."--Provided by publiher.

    @schnozking1 I love this part... Miss my 'Technicians of the Sacred' book so much....

  • The Goal

    Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    "Includes case study interviews"--Cover.

    @starsandrobots @david_perell I loved the book The Goal with all its absurdities.... How is the audio version?

  • On Tyranny

    Timothy Snyder

    In previous books, Holocaust historian Timothy Snyder dissected the events and values that enabled the rise of Hitler and Stalin and the execution of their catastrophic policies. With Twenty Lessons, Snyder draws from the darkest hours of the twentieth century to provide hope for the twenty-first. As he writes, "Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism and communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience."

    Recommended readings: https://t.co/dyoTCjCdSO https://t.co/YwJDT125UJ https://t.co/0MKNOyX1U9 (And I cannot wait for https://t.co/ybD0ldpnMO) https://t.co/0Zl3IoUZcp

  • Twilight of Democracy

    Anne Applebaum

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning author, professor, and historian offers an expert guide to understanding the appeal of the strongman as a leader and an explanation for why authoritarianism is back with a menacing twenty-first century twist. Across the world today, from the Americas to Europe and beyond, liberal democracy is under siege while populism and nationalism are on the rise. In Twilight of Democracy, prize-winning historian Anne Applebaum offers an unexpected explanation: that there is a deep and inherent appeal to authoritarianism, strongmen, and, especially, to one-party rule--that is, to political systems that benefit true believers, or loyal soldiers, or simply the friends and distant cousins of the Leader, to the exclusion of everyone else. People, she argues, are not just ideological, they are also practical, pragmatic, opportunist. They worry about their families, their houses, their careers. Some political systems offer them possibilities and others don't. In particular, the modern authoritarian parties that have arisen within democracies today offer the possibility of success to people who do not thrive in the meritocratic, democratic, or free-market competition that determines access to wealth and power. Drawing on reporting in Spain, Switzerland, Poland, Hungary, and Brazil; using historical examples including Stalinist central Europe and Nazi Germany; and investigating related phenomena: the modern conspiracy theory, nostalgia for a golden past, political polarization, and meritocracy and its discontents, Anne Applebaum brilliantly illuminates the seduction of totalitarian thinking and the eternal appeal of the one-party state.

    Recommended readings: https://t.co/dyoTCjCdSO https://t.co/YwJDT125UJ https://t.co/0MKNOyX1U9 (And I cannot wait for https://t.co/ybD0ldpnMO) https://t.co/0Zl3IoUZcp

  • @venite I much recommend Simonyi Sr's incredible, Whole Earth Catalog style, talmudically intertextual A Cultural History of Physics. Here Freeman Dyson talks about it (with son George commenting) https://t.co/rfF3HOfF5M And here is an EXCERPT (we're so lucky) https://t.co/S6nVvk3jxf

  • While the physical sciences are a continuously evolving source of technology and of understanding about our world, they have become so specialized and rely on so much prerequisite knowledge that for many people today the divide between the sciences and the humanities seems even greater than it was when C. P. Snow delivered his famous 1959 lecture, "The Two Cultures." In A Cultural History of Physics, Hungarian scientist and educator Károly Simonyi succeeds in bridging this chasm by describing the experimental methods and theoretical interpretations that created scientific knowledge, from ancient times to the present day, within the cultural environment in which it was formed. Unlike any other work of its kind, Simonyi’s seminal opus explores the interplay of science and the humanities to convey the wonder and excitement of scientific development throughout the ages. These pages contain an abundance of excerpts from original resources, a wide array of clear and straightforward explanations, and an astonishing wealth of insight, revealing the historical progress of science and inviting readers into a dialogue with the great scientific minds that shaped our current understanding of physics. Beautifully illustrated, accurate in its scientific content and broad in its historical and cultural perspective, this book will be a valuable reference for scholars and an inspiration to aspiring scientists and humanists who believe that science is an integral part of our culture.

    @venite I much recommend Simonyi Sr's incredible, Whole Earth Catalog style, talmudically intertextual A Cultural History of Physics. Here Freeman Dyson talks about it (with son George commenting) https://t.co/rfF3HOfF5M And here is an EXCERPT (we're so lucky) https://t.co/S6nVvk3jxf

  • Talking Stone

    Paul Goldsmith

    "This book acts as a visual vehicle to see the rock art of the Coso Range. The Coso Range sits on the edge of the Mojave Desert, just east of the Sierra Nevada. It is located within the 1.2 million acres Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake and contains distinctive and spectacular displays of rock art. This rock art fills the lava gorges of Renegade Canyon, Big Petroglyph Canyon, and Sheep Canyon with images of bighorn sheep, anthropomorphs, abstract geometric figures and shield-like figures. These are pecked into the dark basalt and most appear to be between 1000 to 3000 years old, although some may be older and date to the earliest occupation of the region roughly 13,000 years ago. Both the text and photography are by Paul Goldsmith, an acclaimed cinematographer. This project is highly visual in nature and provides a photographic tour of the canyons and rock art for those that will never have a chance to visit them"--Provided by publisher.

    @BrianTHeligman @davidsuculum Ah!! Yes...! But have you read The Talking Stone? Such an underrated short story; it is so beautiful. I also tweeted a bunch about The Tragedy of the Moon! My favourite essay collection by Isaac. (Btw I will name all my children Isaac.)

  • All essays in this volume are reprinted from the Magazine of fantasy and science fiction.

    @BrianTHeligman @davidsuculum Ah!! Yes...! But have you read The Talking Stone? Such an underrated short story; it is so beautiful. I also tweeted a bunch about The Tragedy of the Moon! My favourite essay collection by Isaac. (Btw I will name all my children Isaac.)

  • Si Jed Martin, le personnage principal de ce roman, devait vous en raconter l'histoire, il commencerait par vous parler d'une panne de chauffe-eau. Ou de son père, architecte connu et engagé, avec qui il passa seul de nombreux réveillons de Noël. Il évoquerait Olga, une très jolie Russe rencontrée lors d'une première exposition de son travail photographique à partir de cartes routières Michelin "la carte est plus intéressante que le territoire". C'était avant que le succès mondial n'arrive avec la série des "métiers", portraits de personnalités de tous milieux, dont l'écrivain Michel Houellebecq. Il dirait aussi comment il aida le commissaire Jasselin à élucider une atroce affaire criminelle. L'art, l'argent, l'amour, le rapport au père, la mort, le travail, la France devenue un paradis touristique sont quelques-uns des thèmes de ce roman, résolument classique et ouvertement moderne.

    @shadihamid Ooooh. I haven't dared read anything by him since La Carte et le Territoire because it was too perfect! Might give this one a try....

  • Captivity

    György Spiró

    “Captivity is a complex and fast-paced tale of Jewish life in the early first century, a sort of sword-and-sandals saga as reimagined by Henry Roth. The narrative follows Uri from Rome to Jerusalem and back, from prospectless dreamer to political operative to pogrom survivor—who along the way also happens to dine with Herod Antipas and Pontius Pilate and get thrown into a cell with a certain Galilean rabble-rouser. Hungarian György Spiró’s deft combination of philosophical inquiry and page-turning brio should overcome that oft-mentioned American timidity toward books in translation.” —The Wall Street Journal, Best Books of 2015 A literary sensation, György Spiró’s Captivity is both a highly sophisticated historical novel and a gripping page-turner. Set in the tumultuous first century A.D., between the year of Christ’s death and the outbreak of the Jewish War, Captivity recounts the adventures of the feeble-bodied, bookish Uri, a young Roman Jew. Frustrated with his hapless son, Uri’s father sends the young man to the Holy Land to regain the family’s prestige. In Jerusalem, Uri is imprisoned by Herod and meets two thieves and (perhaps) Jesus before their crucifixion. Later, in cosmopolitan Alexandria, he undergoes a scholarly and sexual awakening—but must also escape a pogrom. Returning to Rome at last, he finds an entirely unexpected inheritance. Equal parts Homeric epic, brilliantly researched Jewish history, and picaresque adventure, Captivity is a dramatic tale of family, fate, and fortitude. In its weak-yet-valiant hero, fans will be reminded of Robert Graves’ classics of Ancient Rome, I, Claudius and Claudius the God.

    @_TamaraWinter @qwertyplication Yes. Christianity is incredibly memetic and resilient and Lindy and all that. When you stop to think about it, it's crazy -- how it was built out, how it spread, how it survives... Btw do you follow @C_Harwick @catholickungfu Also recommending Spiro's book Captivity!

  • I keep saying that the fact that tech people don't read Jauss - he happens to be more wellknown in Central European aesthetics / social sciences - makes no sense. He said a lot of things we're trying to *invent*, and in a concise and practical way, too. https://t.co/ujaoeiPqyp https://t.co/1T40GIcBxu

  • In a future North America, where the rulers of Panem maintain control through an annual televised survival competition pitting young people from each of the twelve districts against one another, sixteen-year-old Katniss's skills are put to the test when she voluntarily takes her younger sister's place.

    @avyfain @vgr I mean this is pretty shite, guys. 50 Shades of Grey ffs. (I applaud both the first The Hunger Games and Larsson books though. Within their genre they're both excellent works.) https://t.co/SN16RM7p6Z

  • Two prize-winning economists show how economics, when done right, can help us solve the thorniest social and political problems of our day The experience of the last decade has not been kind to the image of economists: asleep at the wheel (perhaps with the foot on the gas pedal) in the run-up to the great recession, squabbling about how to get out of it, tone-deaf in discussions of the plight of Greece or the Euro area; they seem to have lost the ability to provide reliable guidance on the great problems of the day. In this ambitious, provocative book Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo show how traditional western-centric thinking has failed to explain what is happening to people in a newly globalized world: in short Good Economics has been done badly. This precise but accessible book covers many of the most essential issues of our day--including migration, unemployment, growth, free trade, political polarization, and welfare. Banerjee and Duflo will confound and clarify the presumptions of our times, such as: Why migration doesn't follow the law of supply and demand Why trade liberalization can drive unemployment up and wages down Why macroeconomists like to bend the data to fit the model Why nobody can really explain why and when growth happens Why economists' assumption that people don't change their minds has made has made polarization worse Why quite often it doesn't take a village, especially if the villagers aren't that nice In doing so, they seek to reclaim this essential terrain, and to offer readers an economist's view of the great issues of the day--one that is candid about the complexities, the zones of ignorance, and the areas of genuine disagreement.

    Reading 'Good Economics for Hard Times', and it's all the way as witty as you would think - https://t.co/PV6IiEikCf

  • The Secret Place

    Tana French

    @regancodes I have nothing against light fiction when written by genre masters. After JG try Tana French's The Secret Place, which we recently discussed here.

  • The Firm

    John Grisham

    A Harvard law graduate finds that the tax firm he's employed by is not what it seems when the FBI approaches him to become an informant.

    @regancodes Classic Grisham is generally amazing. I don't know his new stuff but when I was a teen I read all of the famous ones - The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client... I mean it's a specific genre but within that amazing works!

  • The Pelican Brief

    John Grisham

    When the Supreme Court's most liberal and most conservative justices are gunned down, law student Darby Shaw builds a case against a powerful suspect, whose threats send her underground. By the author of The Firm. 250,000 first printing. $500,000 ad/promo. Tour.

    @regancodes Classic Grisham is generally amazing. I don't know his new stuff but when I was a teen I read all of the famous ones - The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client... I mean it's a specific genre but within that amazing works!

  • The Client

    John Grisham

    @regancodes Classic Grisham is generally amazing. I don't know his new stuff but when I was a teen I read all of the famous ones - The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client... I mean it's a specific genre but within that amazing works!

  • An extraordinary and beautifully illustrated exploration of the medieval world through twelve manuscripts, from one of the world's leading experts. Winner of The Wolfson History Prize and The Duff Cooper Prize. A San Francisco Chronicle Holiday Book Gift Guide Pick! Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts is a captivating examination of twelve illuminated manuscripts from the medieval period. Noted authority Christopher de Hamel invites the reader into intimate conversations with these texts to explore what they tell us about nearly a thousand years of medieval history - and about the modern world, too. In so doing, de Hamel introduces us to kings, queens, saints, scribes, artists, librarians, thieves, dealers, and collectors. He traces the elaborate journeys that these exceptionally precious artifacts have made through time and shows us how they have been copied, how they have been embroiled in politics, how they have been regarded as objects of supreme beauty and as symbols of national identity, and who has owned them or lusted after them (and how we can tell). From the earliest book in medieval England to the incomparable Book of Kells to the oldest manuscript of the Canterbury Tales, these encounters tell a narrative of intellectual culture and art over the course of a millennium. Two of the manuscripts visited are now in libraries of North America, the Morgan Library in New York and the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Part travel book, part detective story, part conversation with the reader, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts allows us to experience some of the greatest works of art in our culture to give us a different perspective on history and on how we come by knowledge.

    Spent last night in major book crush. I was reminded of all the cool accidental orthography revolutions caused by monks like the French -x plural, which happened because they were tired copying in the dark and overcrossed the -s at the bottom 🤗💛✨ Santa rocks! https://t.co/xlsAtwvgBS

  • "Published in conjunction with the exhibition 'Yona Friedman -- Genesis of a Vision,' which was presented in 2012 at Archizoom, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. ... The first part brings together a large number of projects and proposals by Yona Friedman into a classified anthology, which includes unpublished works. The second part presents an essay by Manuel Orazi that reconstructs the many facets of Freidman's work since his formative years and places it within the political and geographical context of its time"--Last page.

    Please read this: https://t.co/M1uvy18Ihj I don't think this is "Avantgarde urbanism" -- but it is disruptive, in a good way. Yona Friedman is amazing. And when you go to his exhibitions, you need to climb a lot. Which can only be a good sign.

  • Thomas Sowell's many writings on the history of economic thought have appeared in a number of scholarly journals and books, and these writings have been praised, reprinted, and translated in various countries around the world. The classical era in the history of economics is an important part of the history of ideas in general, and its implications reach beyond the bounds of the economics profession. On Classical Economics is a book from which students can learn both history and economics. It is not simply a Cook's tour of colorful personalities of the past but a study of how certain economic concepts and tools of analysis arose, and how their implications were revealed during the controversies that followed. In addition to a general understanding of classical macroeconomics and microeconomics, this book offers special insight into the neglected pioneering work of Sismondi--and why it was neglected--and a detailed look at John Stuart Mill's enigmatic role in the development of economics and the mysteries of Marxian economics. Clear, engaging, and very readable, without being either cute or condescending, On Classical Economics can enable a course on the history of economic thought to make a contribution to students’ understanding of economics in general--whether in price theory, monetary theory, or international trade. In short, it is a book about analysis as well as history.

    @tomscrace @ThomasSowell @Andrew_Solomon Hmhm maaaybe https://t.co/rHCljkA6nT

  • A complete and up-to-date guide to the music industry covers such topics as record industry trends, copyright law, sources of publishing income, buying and selling of catalogues, agents and managers, and music videos.

    In the US, music (copyright) has always been for sale in a v different way than in Europe. Private equity may scale the customs, but doesn't fundamentally change them. Read Shemel, Krasilovsky, Gross "This Business of Music"; very edifying in the matter: https://t.co/mg0hY3avUc https://t.co/hH4RrEiJNt

  • While the physical sciences are a continuously evolving source of technology and of understanding about our world, they have become so specialized and rely on so much prerequisite knowledge that for many people today the divide between the sciences and the humanities seems even greater than it was when C. P. Snow delivered his famous 1959 lecture, "The Two Cultures." In A Cultural History of Physics, Hungarian scientist and educator Károly Simonyi succeeds in bridging this chasm by describing the experimental methods and theoretical interpretations that created scientific knowledge, from ancient times to the present day, within the cultural environment in which it was formed. Unlike any other work of its kind, Simonyi’s seminal opus explores the interplay of science and the humanities to convey the wonder and excitement of scientific development throughout the ages. These pages contain an abundance of excerpts from original resources, a wide array of clear and straightforward explanations, and an astonishing wealth of insight, revealing the historical progress of science and inviting readers into a dialogue with the great scientific minds that shaped our current understanding of physics. Beautifully illustrated, accurate in its scientific content and broad in its historical and cultural perspective, this book will be a valuable reference for scholars and an inspiration to aspiring scientists and humanists who believe that science is an integral part of our culture.

    Or the regal A Cultural History of Physics, also tamudically hypertextual, a pre-internet internet in its vast maps -- its entire topography of knowledge unique, brilliant, infinite...! MUST be reprinted. By Simony Sr. Read Freeman Dyson's introduction: https://t.co/rfF3HOfF5M https://t.co/o3yEF0zaWU

  • The Ascent of Money

    Niall Ferguson

    Chronicles the evolution of finance from its origins in Mesopotamia to the modern world's most recent upheavals, covering such topics as the stock market bubble that prompted the French Revolution and the theories behind common investment vehicles.

    @jasoncrawford @kevin2kelly The second one of from The Pattern on the Stone. The third from The Ascent of Money.

  • The Pattern On The Stone

    W. Daniel Hillis

    @jasoncrawford @kevin2kelly The second one of from The Pattern on the Stone. The third from The Ascent of Money.

  • Collection of poems revealing the spirit of North American Indian attitudes on life, love, and other experiences.

    @BrianTHeligman His poetry book The Summer of Black Widows is incredible.

  • The well-known astronomer and astrobiologist surveys current knowledge of the development of intelligence on Earth in various forms of life and explains his persuasion that intelligence must have developed along similar lines throughout the universe

    @made_in_cosmos Sagan: The Dragons of Eden.

  • The author offers a feminine perspective on writing in a collection of essays that examines her development as a poet and bestselling novelist, and includes references to the works of Virgil, Isak Dinesen, and Robertson Davies.

    This reminds me both of Sandor Weores's essay on how writers are and Margaret Atwood's Negotiating with the Dead where she tries to figure out what is one way in which all writers are the same and concludes: lonely childhood, time spent alone, thinking, books (cf world building) https://t.co/Wp2xvNsaf6

  • At Home

    Bill Bryson

    Explores the ways in which homes reflect history, from a bathroom's revelations about medicine and hygiene to a kitchen's exposure of the stories of trade and nutrition.

    @jnymnz Also, much recommending Bryson's At Home which imo is even better!! (If that's possible)

  • @JimmyRis I think most people should read this book ASAP - though, personally, I feel I read both this and The Righteous Mind "too late" (not that this makes them any less great).

  • The Righteous Mind

    Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.

    @JimmyRis I think most people should read this book ASAP - though, personally, I feel I read both this and The Righteous Mind "too late" (not that this makes them any less great).

  • Nobel Prize winner Heinrich Böll's powerful novel about a woman terrorized by the media In an era in which journalists will stop at nothing to break a story, Henrich Böll's The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum has taken on heightened relevance. A young woman's association with a hunted man makes her the target of a journalist determined to grab headlines by portraying her as an evil woman. As the attacks on her escalate and she becomes the victim of anonymous threats, Katharina sees only one way out of her nightmare. Turning the mystery genre on its head, the novel begins with the confession of a crime, drawing the reader into a web of sensationalism, character assassination, and the unavoidable eruption of violence.

    People of Twitter, you should read this book 👇 https://t.co/ojngVvsBnr