Annie Duke

Annie Duke

Speaker/writer/student of decision science. Author of #ThinkinginBets & #HowToDecide. I used to play poker. Navigating uncertainty.

30+ Book Recommendations by Annie Duke

  • Excited to get The Data Detective in the mail tomorrow (weathering willing)! @TimHarford wraps powerful wisdom on understanding data and statistics in compelling and fun story telling. Great read for navigating our overwhelming information environment. https://t.co/pdjM4uYtgr

  • How to Change

    Katy Milkman

    Award-winning Wharton Professor and Choiceology podcast host Katy Milkman has devoted her career to the study of behavior change. In this ground-breaking book, Milkman reveals a proven path that can take you from where you are to where you want to be, with a foreword from psychologist Angela Duckworth, the best-selling author of Grit. Set audacious goals. Foster good habits. Create social support. You've surely heard this advice before. If you've ever tried to change or encourage it -- to boost exercise or healthy eating, to prevent missed deadlines or kick-start savings -- then you know there are thousands of apps, books, and YouTube videos promising to help and offering sound guidance. And yet, you're still not where you want to be. This trailblazing book from award-winning behavioral scientist and Wharton Professor Katy Milkman explains why. In a career devoted to uncovering what helps people change, Milkman has discovered a crucial thing many of us get wrong: our strategy. Change, she's learned, comes most readily when you understand what's standing between you and success and tailor your solution to that roadblock. If you want to work out more but find exercise difficult and boring, downloading a goal-setting app probably won't help. But what if, instead, you transformed your workouts so they became a source of pleasure instead of a chore? Turning an uphill battle into a downhill one is the key to success. Drawing on Milkman's original research and the work of her dozens of world-renowned scientific collaborators, How to Change shares an innovative new approach that will help you change or encourage change in others. Through case studies, engaging stories, and examples from cutting-edge research, this book illustrates how to identify and overcome the barriers that regularly stand in the way of change. How to Change will teach you: * Why timing can be everything when it comes to making a change * How to turn temptation and inertia into assets that can help you conquer your goals * That giving advice, even if it's about something you're struggling with, can help you achieve more Whether you're a manager, coach, or teacher aiming to help others change for the better or are struggling to kick-start change yourself, How to Change offers an invaluable, science-based blueprint for achieving your goals, once and for all.

    .@Katy_Milkman wrote an amazing book. Everyone should preorder _How to Change_ now! Incredible book on habit change and attaining your goals. https://t.co/oWGh8ftzoE

  • Noise

    Daniel Kahneman

    From the bestselling author of Thinking, Fast and Slow and the co-author of Nudge, a groundbreaking exploration of why most people make bad judgments, and how to control for that noise.​ Imagine that two doctors in the same city give different diagnoses to identical patients -- or that two judges in the same courthouse give different sentences to people who have committed the same crime. Suppose that different food inspectors give different ratings to indistinguishable restaurants -- or that when a company is handling customer complaints, the resolution depends on who happens to be handling the particular complaint. Now imagine that the same doctor, the same judge, the same inspector, or the same company official makes different decisions, depending on whether it is morning or afternoon, or Monday rather than Wednesday. These are examples of noise: variability in judgments that should be identical. In Noise, Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein, and Olivier Sibony show how noise contributes significantly to errors in all fields, including medicine, law, economic forecasting, police behavior, food safety, bail, security checks at airports, strategy, and personnel selection. And although noise can be found wherever people make judgments and decisions, individuals and organizations alike are commonly oblivious to the role of chance in their judgments and in their actions. Drawing on the latest findings in psychology and behavioral economics, and the same kind of diligent, insightful research that made Thinking, Fast and Slow and Nudge groundbreaking New York Times bestsellers, Noise explains how and why humans are so susceptible to noise in judgment -- and what we can do about it.

    This book will have a deep and positive impact on your decision-making. Cognitive bias is all the rage. But noise may be the bigger flaw in human judgment. https://t.co/JyIPfPIwHv

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    @BestOfBecca @morganhousel Read Morgan’s book first. It is so good! 😊

  • Think Twice

    Michael J. Mauboussin

    .@MJMauboussin is the author of another fabulous book, Think Twice: Harnessing The Power of Counterintuition, which explores the common mental missteps we make in our decisions, like misunderstanding cause-and-effect, and how to address those errors. 8/14 https://t.co/F7LQjoG6Y7

  • The Success Equation

    Michael J. Mauboussin

    Examines the importance of skill and luck, describes how to develop analytical tools to understand them, and offers suggestions on putting these findings to work to achieve success.

    This book by @mjmauboussin is quite simply the best discussion out there of the influence of luck in our lives. 7/14 https://t.co/Suk3fsfED2

  • Range

    David Epstein

    Shares counterintuitive advice on the most effective path to success in any domain while revealing the essential contributions of generalist, not specialist, team members

    BTW, if exploring the advantages of being a generalist in a specialists’ world intrigues you, Range by @DavidEpstein is a must read addition to the topic. 14/16 https://t.co/ILmiaGPG42

  • Expert Political Judgment

    Philip E. Tetlock

    Since its original publication, Expert Political Judgment by New York Times bestselling author Philip Tetlock has established itself as a contemporary classic in the literature on evaluating expert opinion. Tetlock first discusses arguments about whether the world is too complex for people to find the tools to understand political phenomena, let alone predict the future. He evaluates predictions from experts in different fields, comparing them to predictions by well-informed laity or those based on simple extrapolation from current trends. He goes on to analyze which styles of thinking are more successful in forecasting. Classifying thinking styles using Isaiah Berlin's prototypes of the fox and the hedgehog, Tetlock contends that the fox--the thinker who knows many little things, draws from an eclectic array of traditions, and is better able to improvise in response to changing events--is more successful in predicting the future than the hedgehog, who knows one big thing, toils devotedly within one tradition, and imposes formulaic solutions on ill-defined problems. He notes a perversely inverse relationship between the best scientific indicators of good judgement and the qualities that the media most prizes in pundits--the single-minded determination required to prevail in ideological combat. Clearly written and impeccably researched, the book fills a huge void in the literature on evaluating expert opinion. It will appeal across many academic disciplines as well as to corporations seeking to develop standards for judging expert decision-making. Now with a new preface in which Tetlock discusses the latest research in the field, the book explores what constitutes good judgment in predicting future events and looks at why experts are often wrong in their forecasts.

    .@PTetlock also wrote the book, Expert Political Judgment: How Good Is It? How Can We Know? This is a must read exploration on the good and bad of deep subject matter expertise. 10/16 https://t.co/IMYffSjJGV

  • Superforecasting

    Philip E. Tetlock

    .@PTetlock is most famous for his work on Superforecasting with his wife and collaborator, Barb Mellers. That work resulted in the must read, Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction which he wrote with @DGardner. 2/16 https://t.co/MaezleZV1q

  • Deep Thinking

    Garry Kasparov

    Garry Kasparov's 1997 chess match against the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue was a watershed moment in the history of technology. It was the dawn of a new era in artificial intelligence: a machine capable of beating the reigning human champion at this most cerebral game. That moment was more than a century in the making, and in this breakthrough book, Kasparov reveals his astonishing side of the story for the first time. He describes how it felt to strategize against an implacable, untiring opponent with the whole world watching, and recounts the history of machine intelligence through the microcosm of chess, considered by generations of scientific pioneers to be a key to unlocking the secrets of human and machine cognition. Kasparov uses his unrivaled experience to look into the future of intelligent machines and sees it bright with possibility. As many critics decry artificial intelligence as a menace, particularly to human jobs, Kasparov shows how humanity can rise to new heights with the help of our most extraordinary creations, rather than fear them. Deep Thinking is a tightly argued case for technological progress, from the man who stood at its precipice with his own career at stake.

    Garry is also the author of Deep Thinking, a book that recounts the history of machine learning through the lens of chess. Of course, many will remember @kasparov63 battling deep blue. This book tells his side of the story. 6/8 https://t.co/hYgIKlX7uP

  • Winter Is Coming

    Garry Kasparov

    .@Kasparov63 is also a prolific author. He wrote Winter is Coming, a prescient book on the dangers of Vladimir Putin and the stunning story of Russia's slide back into a dictatorship-and how the West is now paying the price for allowing it to happen. 5/8 https://t.co/bqPWE5cbmt

  • New York Times Book Review 10 Best Books of 2018 A New York Times Notable Book The #1 New York Times bestseller. A brilliant and brave investigation into the medical and scientific revolution taking place around psychedelic drugs--and the spellbinding story of his own life-changing psychedelic experiences When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third. Thus began a singular adventure into various altered states of consciousness, along with a dive deep into both the latest brain science and the thriving underground community of psychedelic therapists. Pollan sifts the historical record to separate the truth about these mysterious drugs from the myths that have surrounded them since the 1960s, when a handful of psychedelic evangelists inadvertently catalyzed a powerful backlash against what was then a promising field of research. A unique and elegant blend of science, memoir, travel writing, history, and medicine, How to Change Your Mind is a triumph of participatory journalism. By turns dazzling and edifying, it is the gripping account of a journey to an exciting and unexpected new frontier in our understanding of the mind, the self, and our place in the world. The true subject of Pollan's "mental travelogue" is not just psychedelic drugs but also the eternal puzzle of human consciousness and how, in a world that offers us both suffering and joy, we can do our best to be fully present and find meaning in our lives.

    .@Katy_Milkman is also hard at work on a new book, How to Change, which will be coming out next year. I've had the chance to read an early draft and it's fabulous—a must read for anyone wanting to understand how to make better choices to achieve their long-term goals. 7/10

  • Think Again

    Adam Grant

    .@AdamMGrant's new book, Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know, comes out Feb 2021 and examines the art of critical rethinking, question your own opinion, and opening other people’s minds. I’ve already pre-ordered & so should you! 8/10 https://t.co/rWJU4to6SE

  • Leif and the Fall

    Allison Sweet Grant

    Persistence and creativity can lead to amazing things, as Leif the leaf discovers in this lovely storybook from Allison Sweet Grant and Adam Grant, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Originals. Leif is a leaf. A worried leaf. It is autumn, and Leif is afraid to fall. "All leaves fall in the fall," say the other leaves. But Leif is determined to find a different way down, and with his friend Laurel, he uses the resources around him to create a net, a kite, a parachute in hopes of softening his landing. The clock is ticking, the wind is blowing. What will happen when a gust of wind pulls Leif from his branch? In a culture that prizes achievement, kids are often afraid to fail--failing to realize that some of the very ideas that don't work are steps along the path to ones that will.

    Aside from what I’ve mentioned, @AdamMGrant has co-authored a lovely children’s book, The Lief and the Fall, with his wife, Allison Sweet Grant. 9/10 https://t.co/uCTOdrk8q0

  • Originals

    Adam Grant

    "Using surprising studies and stories spanning business, politics, sports, and entertainment, Grant explores how to recognize a good idea, speak up without getting silenced, build a coalition of allies, choose the right time to act, and manage fear and doubt; how parents and teachers can nurture originality in children; and how leaders can fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent"--

    .@AdamMGrant is also the author of Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, which made it to #1 on the NYT Bestseller list. Aside from all the usual luminaries heaping prase on this book, @JJAbrams and @RyanSeacrest joined in the praise! 6/10 https://t.co/U8yz7C2nNF

  • Give and Take

    Adam Grant

    Don’t take it from me, though. The list of fans of the book speaks for itself: @DanielPink @DanTGilbert @RobertCialdini @SusanCain @ThisIsSethsBlog and Tony Hsieh, to name just a few. 3/10 https://t.co/pS9MzjYWhU

  • How to Decide

    Annie Duke

    The Paradox of Experience Experience is necessary for learning, but individual experiences often interfere with learning, in part because of resulting and hindsight bias. Address the paradox to help you learn better lessons from your past. https://t.co/3wByNGgdzg

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    Release day for @MorganHousel book, The Psychology of Money, is out tomorrow. This is going to be a classic. One of the best books I’ve read, lifetime. The Psychology of Money: Timeless lessons on wealth, greed, and happiness. https://t.co/EAod6autLU

  • Nudge

    Richard H. Thaler

    Offering a groundbreaking study of the application of the science of choice, a guide that uses colorful examples from all aspects of life demonstrates how it is possible to design environments that make it more likely for us to act in our own interests. Reprint.

    .@CassSunstein coauthored Nudge with Nobel Laureate @R_Thaler. Nudge is one of the seminal books in the behavioral economics/policy space. 4/13 https://t.co/3PLxieu0l5

  • Edge

    Laura Huang

    Laura Huang, a preeminent Harvard Business School professor, shows that success is about gaining an edge: that elusive quality that gives you an upper hand and attracts attention and support. Some people seem to naturally have it. Now, Huang teaches the rest of us how to create our own from the challenges and biases we think hold us back, and turning them to work in our favor. How do you find a competitive edge when the obstacles feel insurmountable? How do you get people to take you seriously when they're predisposed not to, and perhaps have already written you off? Laura Huang has come up against that problem many times--and so has anyone who's ever felt out of place or underestimated. Many of us sit back quietly, hoping that our hard work and effort will speak for itself. Or we try to force ourselves into the mold of who we think is "successful," stifling the creativity and charm that makes us unique and memorable. In Edge, Huang offers a different approach. She argues that success is rarely just about the quality of our ideas, credentials, and skills, or our effort. Instead, achieving success hinges on how well we shape others' perceptions--of our strengths, certainly, but also our flaws. It's about creating our own edge by confronting the factors that seem like shortcomings and turning them into assets that make others take notice. Huang draws from her award-winning research on entrepreneurial intuition, persuasion, and implicit decision-making, to impart her profound findings and share stories of previously-overlooked Olympians, assistants-turned-executives, and flailing companies that made momentous turnarounds. Through her deeply-researched framework, Huang shows how we can turn weaknesses into strengths and create an edge in any situation. She explains how an entrepreneur scored a massive investment despite initially being disparaged for his foreign accent, and how a first-time political candidate overcame voters' doubts about his physical disabilities. Edge shows that success is about knowing who you are and using that knowledge unapologetically and strategically. This book will teach you how to find your unique edge and keep it sharp.

    Thank you, Laura!! And quick, everyone, go get Edge. It’s an amazing book! Edge: Turning Adversity into Advantage https://t.co/AMZyNlzNu5 https://t.co/w4x92JZebs

  • Mastermind

    Maria Konnikova

    Draws on neuroscience and psychology studies while analyzing the deductive strategies used by the character of Sherlock Holmes to suggest how to promote mental strength, clearer observation, and effective problem-solving.

    From the @NYTimes review, “An entertaining blend of Holmesiana and modern-day neuroscience.” 8/8 https://t.co/KyY47cNdPl

  • The Confidence Game

    Maria Konnikova

    A compelling investigation into the minds, motives, and methods of con artistsand the people who fall for their cons over and over again.

    As @SAPinker put it, “The story of the con artist may be unmatched for combining human interest with insight into human nature, and star psychology writer Maria Konnikova explains their wiles to us with her characteristic clarity, flair, and depth” 6/8 https://t.co/i3szm1Ybof

  • The Biggest Bluff

    Maria Konnikova

    How a New York Times bestselling author and New Yorker contributor parlayed a strong grasp of the science of human decision-making and a woeful ignorance of cards into a life-changing run as a professional poker player, under the wing of a legend of the game It's true that Maria Konnikova had never actually played poker before and didn't even know the rules when she approached Erik Seidel, Poker Hall of Fame inductee and winner of tens of millions of dollars in earnings, and convinced him to be her mentor. But she knew her man: a famously thoughtful and broad-minded player, he was intrigued by her pitch that she wasn't interested in making money so much as learning about life. She had faced a stretch of personal bad luck, and her reflections on the role of chance had led her to a giant of game theory, who pointed her to poker as the ultimate master class in learning to distinguish between what can be controlled and what can't. And she certainly brought something to the table, including a Ph.D. in psychology and an acclaimed and growing body of work on human behavior and how to hack it. So Seidel was in, and soon she was down the rabbit hole with him, into the wild, fiercely competitive, overwhelmingly masculine world of high-stakes Texas Hold'em, their initial end point the following year's World Series of Poker. But then something extraordinary happened. Under Seidel's guidance, Konnikova did have many epiphanies about life that derived from her new pursuit, including how to better read, not just her opponents but far more importantly herself; how to identify what tilted her into an emotional state that got in the way of good decisions; and how to get to a place where she could accept luck for what it was, and what it wasn't. But she also began to win. And win. In a little over a year, she began making earnest money from tournaments, ultimately totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars. She won a major title, got a sponsor, and got used to being on television, and to headlines like "How one writer's book deal turned her into a professional poker player." She even learned to like Las Vegas. But in the end, Maria Konnikova is a writer and student of human behavior, and ultimately the point was to render her incredible journey into a container for its invaluable lessons. The biggest bluff of all, she learned, is that skill is enough. Bad cards will come our way, but keeping our focus on how we play them and not on the outcome will keep us moving through many a dark patch, until the luck once again breaks our way.

    @MKonnikova is a beautiful writer and The Biggest Bluff is a beautiful book that is a must read. It is, deservedly so, a @nytimes Bestseller! 4/8 https://t.co/Yi4HYHYLna

  • How to Decide

    Annie Duke

    Through a blend of compelling exercises, illustrations, and stories, this workbook by the bestselling author of Thinking in Bets will train you to combat your own biases, address your weaknesses, and help you become a better and more confident decision-maker. What do you do when you're faced with a big decision? If you're like most people, you use a pro and con list, spend a lot of time second guessing or regretting decisions that don't work out, get caught in analysis paralysis, endlessly seeking other people's opinions and trying to find just that little bit more information that might make you sure, or you do the opposite and just go with your gut feeling. But this is exactly the wrong way to go about combating the biases working against you. What if there was a better way to make quality decisions so you can think clearly, feel more confident, second guess yourself less, and ultimately be more decisive and be more productive? The good news is that decision-making is not a matter of luck or smarts, but a teachable skill that anyone can get better at. And the great news is that even a small improvement in decision-making will make a huge impact on your life. In How to Decide, bestselling author and former professional poker player Annie Duke lays out a series of tools anyone can use to make better decisions. You'll learn how to identify and dismantle hidden biases and accept that you can rarely be certain of how things will turn out. Through practical exercises and engaging thought experiments, this book helps you analyze key decisions you've made in the past and troubleshoot those you're making in the future. Whether you're picking investments, evaluating a job offer, or trying to figure out your romantic life, this book is the key to happier outcomes and fewer regrets.

    .@tcscornavacchi and I talk about a bunch of material from my new book, How to Decide, coming out in September. - Why it’s good to be wrong - Why your gut isn’t a good decision tool - The power of negative thinking https://t.co/Gdu8QjbWJC

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    Oh, and go preorder Morgan’s upcoming book, The Psychology of Money. It’s a great bet. https://t.co/UizqOCnmZ5

  • The Biggest Bluff

    Maria Konnikova

    How a New York Times bestselling author and New Yorker contributor parlayed a strong grasp of the science of human decision-making and a woeful ignorance of cards into a life-changing run as a professional poker player, under the wing of a legend of the game It's true that Maria Konnikova had never actually played poker before and didn't even know the rules when she approached Erik Seidel, Poker Hall of Fame inductee and winner of tens of millions of dollars in earnings, and convinced him to be her mentor. But she knew her man: a famously thoughtful and broad-minded player, he was intrigued by her pitch that she wasn't interested in making money so much as learning about life. She had faced a stretch of personal bad luck, and her reflections on the role of chance had led her to a giant of game theory, who pointed her to poker as the ultimate master class in learning to distinguish between what can be controlled and what can't. And she certainly brought something to the table, including a Ph.D. in psychology and an acclaimed and growing body of work on human behavior and how to hack it. So Seidel was in, and soon she was down the rabbit hole with him, into the wild, fiercely competitive, overwhelmingly masculine world of high-stakes Texas Hold'em, their initial end point the following year's World Series of Poker. But then something extraordinary happened. Under Seidel's guidance, Konnikova did have many epiphanies about life that derived from her new pursuit, including how to better read, not just her opponents but far more importantly herself; how to identify what tilted her into an emotional state that got in the way of good decisions; and how to get to a place where she could accept luck for what it was, and what it wasn't. But she also began to win. And win. In a little over a year, she began making earnest money from tournaments, ultimately totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars. She won a major title, got a sponsor, and got used to being on television, and to headlines like "How one writer's book deal turned her into a professional poker player." She even learned to like Las Vegas. But in the end, Maria Konnikova is a writer and student of human behavior, and ultimately the point was to render her incredible journey into a container for its invaluable lessons. The biggest bluff of all, she learned, is that skill is enough. Bad cards will come our way, but keeping our focus on how we play them and not on the outcome will keep us moving through many a dark patch, until the luck once again breaks our way.

    Did a virtual book club today and was asked to make a recommendation for the next book they should read. Definitely @mkonnikova The Biggest Bluff. A blend of memoir and meditation on luck, uncertainty, and game theory + stunning prose. https://t.co/W8w1jyXKrE https://t.co/AcklsZjJq2

  • "Is confidence always a good thing? Don Moore, Professor of Management of Organizations at the Haas School of Business, argues that confidence is good, but overconfidence can hinder growth"--

    I was lucky enough to get to read an advance copy of Perfectly Confident by @donandrewmoore. It’s out today! Congrats, Don, and a spectacular book. Very confident it will be worth the purchase! https://t.co/IIiZDLtTkz

  • Excited that the kindle version of Thinking in Bets is a monthly deal on Amazon. Will be just $2.99 for the whole month. https://t.co/QhuMQDQwZk https://t.co/gkG1hDE6QL

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    I’ve had the privilege of getting to read an advance copy of The Psychology of Money from the fabulous @morganhousel. Go pre-order it right now! Morgan’s insights into the way we think about money are amazing and he sure can spin a compelling narrative. I have writer envy! https://t.co/AajypuGzjP

  • How to Decide

    Annie Duke

    Through a blend of compelling exercises, illustrations, and stories, this workbook by the bestselling author of Thinking in Bets will train you to combat your own biases, address your weaknesses, and help you become a better and more confident decision-maker. What do you do when you're faced with a big decision? If you're like most people, you use a pro and con list, spend a lot of time second guessing or regretting decisions that don't work out, get caught in analysis paralysis, endlessly seeking other people's opinions and trying to find just that little bit more information that might make you sure, or you do the opposite and just go with your gut feeling. But this is exactly the wrong way to go about combating the biases working against you. What if there was a better way to make quality decisions so you can think clearly, feel more confident, second guess yourself less, and ultimately be more decisive and be more productive? The good news is that decision-making is not a matter of luck or smarts, but a teachable skill that anyone can get better at. And the great news is that even a small improvement in decision-making will make a huge impact on your life. In How to Decide, bestselling author and former professional poker player Annie Duke lays out a series of tools anyone can use to make better decisions. You'll learn how to identify and dismantle hidden biases and accept that you can rarely be certain of how things will turn out. Through practical exercises and engaging thought experiments, this book helps you analyze key decisions you've made in the past and troubleshoot those you're making in the future. Whether you're picking investments, evaluating a job offer, or trying to figure out your romantic life, this book is the key to happier outcomes and fewer regrets.

    Oh, look what just came available for pre-order. Excited to see it in real life! https://t.co/37mgTvYjDI https://t.co/KY8v3pJbin

  • With groundbreaking research and exclusive interviews, Nir Eyal, author of the bestselling Hooked, lays bare the processes of distractions and how we can finally get them under control to give people the ultimate superpower of the 21st century: being indistractable.

    Indistractable by @nireyal is out today! My copy is already well worn. Awesome book for how to take back control of your attention. Grab yours → https://t.co/GQIpGlPUtf https://t.co/ScO3WspB3S

  • Poker champion turned business consultant Annie Duke teaches you how to get comfortable with uncertainty and make better decisions as a result. In Super Bowl XLIX, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll made one of the most controversial calls in football history: With 26 seconds remaining, and trailing by four at the Patriots' one-yard line, he called for a pass instead of a hand off to his star running back. The pass was intercepted and the Seahawks lost. Critics called it the dumbest play in history. But was the call really that bad? Or did Carroll actually make a great move that was ruined by bad luck? Even the best decision doesn't yield the best outcome every time. There's always an element of luck that you can't control, and there is always information that is hidden from view. So the key to long-term success (and avoiding worrying yourself to death) is to think in bets: How sure am I? What are the possible ways things could turn out? What decision has the highest odds of success? Did I land in the unlucky 10% on the strategy that works 90% of the time? Or is my success attributable to dumb luck rather than great decision making? Annie Duke, a former World Series of Poker champion turned business consultant, draws on examples from business, sports, politics, and (of course) poker to share tools anyone can use to embrace uncertainty and make better decisions. For most people, it's difficult to say "I'm not sure" in a world that values and, even, rewards the appearance of certainty. But professional poker players are comfortable with the fact that great decisions don't always lead to great outcomes and bad decisions don't always lead to bad outcomes. By shifting your thinking from a need for certainty to a goal of accurately assessing what you know and what you don't, you'll be less vulnerable to reactive emotions, knee-jerk biases, and destructive habits in your decision making. You'll become more confident, calm, compassionate and successful in the long run.

    Amazon’s pricing algorithm remains a mystery to me but that mystery means Thinking in Bets is just $8 today :) https://t.co/2cZYvQnZtY https://t.co/zowtOdeOpF