Ben Carlson

Ben Carlson

Trying to bring some common sense to the world of finance. Book: https://t.co/c53AckMaZF Podcast: https://t.co/GrhZZzIjLv

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80+ Book Recommendations by Ben Carlson

  • A Shot to Save the World

    Gregory Zuckerman

    Longlisted for the FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award The authoritative account of the race to produce the vaccines that are saving us all, from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Man Who Solved the Market Few were ready when a mysterious respiratory illness emerged in Wuhan, China in January 2020. Politicians, government officials, business leaders, and public-health professionals were unprepared for the most devastating pandemic in a century. Many of the world's biggest drug and vaccine makers were slow to react or couldn't muster an effective response. It was up to a small group of unlikely and untested scientists and executives to save civilization. A French businessman dismissed by many as a fabulist. A Turkish immigrant with little virus experience. A quirky Midwesterner obsessed with insect cells. A Boston scientist employing questionable techniques. A British scientist despised by his peers. Far from the limelight, each had spent years developing innovative vaccine approaches. Their work was met with skepticism and scorn. By 2020, these individuals had little proof of progress. Yet they and their colleagues wanted to be the ones to stop the virus holding the world hostage. They scrambled to turn their life's work into life-saving vaccines in a matter of months, each gunning to make the big breakthrough--and to beat each other for the glory that a vaccine guaranteed. A #1 New York Times bestselling author and award-winning Wall Street Journal investigative journalist lauded for his "bravura storytelling" (Gary Shteyngart) and "first-rate" reporting (The New York Times), Zuckerman takes us inside the top-secret laboratories, corporate clashes, and high-stakes government negotiations that led to effective shots. Deeply reported and endlessly gripping, this is a dazzling, blow-by-blow chronicle of the most consequential scientific breakthrough of our time. It's a story of courage, genius, and heroism. It's also a tale of heated rivalries, unbridled ambitions, crippling insecurities, and unexpected drama. A Shot to Save the World is the story of how science saved the world.

    @tola2252 https://t.co/eHLUJpfFHU

  • @slimVic89 This is excellent as well https://t.co/zxdz9nfiGU

  • The Great Crash 1929

    John Kenneth Galbraith

    Presents a study of the stock market crash of 1929 that reveals the influential role of Wall Street on the economic growth of America.

    @slimVic89 This is a good one https://t.co/jmudNzploo

  • Fortune's Children

    Arthur T. Vanderbilt

    @frazerrice this was a good read: https://t.co/i5lTrgXDY2

  • Jim Paul's meteoric rise took him from a small town in Northern Kentucky to governor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, yet he lost it all--his fortune, his reputation, and his job--in one fatal attack of excessive economic hubris. In this honest, frank analysis, Paul and Brendan Moynihan revisit the events that led to Paul's disastrous decision and examine the psychological factors behind bad financial practices in several economic sectors. This book--winner of a 2014 Axiom Business Book award gold medal--begins with the unbroken string of successes that helped Paul achieve a jet-setting lifestyle and land a key spot with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. It then describes the circumstances leading up to Paul's $1.6 million loss and the essential lessons he learned from it--primarily that, although there are as many ways to make money in the markets as there are people participating in them, all losses come from the same few sources. Investors lose money in the markets either because of errors in their analysis or because of psychological barriers preventing the application of analysis. While all analytical methods have some validity and make allowances for instances in which they do not work, psychological factors can keep an investor in a losing position, causing him to abandon one method for another in order to rationalize the decisions already made. Paul and Moynihan's cautionary tale includes strategies for avoiding loss tied to a simple framework for understanding, accepting, and dodging the dangers of investing, trading, and speculating.

    @danielcrosby What I Learned Losing a Million Dollars https://t.co/GSGbtHJL9o

  • I've been on a sci-fi reading kick lately. 3 good ones I've read this summer: Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir https://t.co/6gjEheTT0H Recursion by Blake Crouch https://t.co/6QglmuLCGh Dark Matter also by Crouch https://t.co/TYXA3N2W3K

  • Recursion

    Blake Crouch

    I've been on a sci-fi reading kick lately. 3 good ones I've read this summer: Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir https://t.co/6gjEheTT0H Recursion by Blake Crouch https://t.co/6QglmuLCGh Dark Matter also by Crouch https://t.co/TYXA3N2W3K

  • Dark Matter

    Blake Crouch

    I've been on a sci-fi reading kick lately. 3 good ones I've read this summer: Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir https://t.co/6gjEheTT0H Recursion by Blake Crouch https://t.co/6QglmuLCGh Dark Matter also by Crouch https://t.co/TYXA3N2W3K

  • The manager of a top investment fund discusses how individuals can make a killing in the market through research and investment techniques that confound conventional market wisdom.

    Most cited investment books by decade: 1990s: One Up on Wall Street (stock pickers) 2000s: The Intelligent Investor (value investors) 2010s: Thinking Fast & Slow (behavioral/index investing) 2020s: Sapiens (crypto)

  • A psychologist draws on years of research to introduce his "machinery of the mind" model on human decision making to reveal the faults and capabilities of intuitive versus logical thinking.

    Most cited investment books by decade: 1990s: One Up on Wall Street (stock pickers) 2000s: The Intelligent Investor (value investors) 2010s: Thinking Fast & Slow (behavioral/index investing) 2020s: Sapiens (crypto)

  • Sapiens

    Yuval Noah Harari

    **THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLER** 'Interesting and provocative... It gives you a sense of how briefly we've been on this Earth' Barack Obama What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? Yuval Noah Harari challenges everything we know about being human in the perfect read for these unprecedented times. Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it: us. In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. 'I would recommend Sapiens to anyone who's interested in the history and future of our species' Bill Gates **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**

    Most cited investment books by decade: 1990s: One Up on Wall Street (stock pickers) 2000s: The Intelligent Investor (value investors) 2010s: Thinking Fast & Slow (behavioral/index investing) 2020s: Sapiens (crypto)

  • Analyzes the principles of stock selection and various approaches to investing, and compares the patterns and behavior of specific securities under diverse economic conditions

    Most cited investment books by decade: 1990s: One Up on Wall Street (stock pickers) 2000s: The Intelligent Investor (value investors) 2010s: Thinking Fast & Slow (behavioral/index investing) 2020s: Sapiens (crypto)

  • Everybody Lies

    Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

    Foreword by Steven Pinker Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our world—provided we ask the right questions. By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information—unprecedented in history—can tell us a great deal about who we are—the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable. Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didn’t vote for Barack Obama because he’s black? Does where you go to school effect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives and who’s more self-conscious about sex, men or women? Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potential—revealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions we’re afraid to ask that might be essential to our health—both emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data everyday, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world.

    @MebFaber from the book Everybody Lies: https://t.co/HCHiApJVQW

  • An indispensable roadmap for creating a successful investment program from Yale’s chief investment officer, David F. Swensen. In the years since the now-classic Pioneering Portfolio Management was first published, the global investment landscape has changed dramatically -- but the results of David Swensen's investment strategy for the Yale University endowment have remained as impressive as ever. Year after year, Yale's portfolio has trumped the marketplace by a wide margin, and, with over $20 billion added to the endowment under his twenty-three-year tenure, Swensen has contributed more to Yale's finances than anyone ever has to any university in the country. What may have seemed like one among many success stories in the era before the Internet bubble burst emerges now as a completely unprecedented institutional investment achievement. In this fully revised and updated edition, Swensen, author of the bestselling personal finance guide Unconventional Success, describes the investment process that underpins Yale's endowment. He provides lucid and penetrating insight into the world of institutional funds management, illuminating topics ranging from asset-allocation structures to active fund management. Swensen employs an array of vivid real-world examples, many drawn from his own formidable experience, to address critical concepts such as handling risk, selecting advisors, and weathering market pitfalls. Swensen offers clear and incisive advice, especially when describing a counterintuitive path. Conventional investing too often leads to buying high and selling low. Trust is more important than flash-in-the-pan success. Expertise, fortitude, and the long view produce positive results where gimmicks and trend following do not. The original Pioneering Portfolio Management outlined a commonsense template for structuring a well-diversified equity-oriented portfolio. This new edition provides fund managers and students of the market an up-to-date guide for actively managed investment portfolios.

    RIP David Swensen Pioneering Portfolio Management had a huge impact on my career when I was just starting out Charley Ellis wrote a forward for the updated version of the book laying out 6 reasons for Swensen's success at Yale: https://t.co/b57IEu3AY0

  • Zac Bissonnette explores what happened when a stuffed animal took over America and turned a college dropout into a billionaire. Beanie Babies drove millions of people into a greed-fuelled frenzy as they chased the rarest Beanie Babies, whose values escalated weekly in the late 1990s. The Great Beanie Baby Bubble tells the inspiring yet tragic story of Ty Warner, creator of Beanie Babies and one of America's most enigmatic self-made tycoons. Sometimes called the 'Steve Jobs of plush' by his employees, he obsessed over every detail of every animal.

    At the height of the mania Beanie Babies made up as much as 10% of eBay's revenue This book by Zac Bissonnette is excellent on crowd psychology, persuasion and sales tactics https://t.co/oPTzIJYjGd

  • Devil Take the Hindmost

    Edward Chancellor

    Examines stock market speculation since the seventeenth century, discussing the range of motivations of investors and the effects on economies throughout history.

    @balajide I have yet to find one. But Devil Takes the Hindmost has a good chapter on it

  • How not to gamble your life away and other hard-learned life lessons from Cousin Sal. Over the last forty years, Cousin Sal has made bets with doctors, lawyers, teachers, agents, bookies, writers, comedians, radio DJs, tv producers, baseball players, front office executives, bandleaders, movie stars, publicists, weed lab owners, hedge fund operators, and even professional wrestlers. From his early days growing up in Brooklyn and Long Island flipping baseball cards to now hosting podcasts and TV shows and managing several offshore accounts we don't talk about, Cousin Sal has truly become the average American sports fan's go to source for gambling tips. So here's how not to do it... With hilarious tales of love and loss, winning and (a lot) of losing, crazy family and fatherhood, and a life saga that inspired the Phil Collins' song, "Against All Odds," Cousin Sal has now written THE Vegas super-system, MIT-algorithmic, sharp-approved book for how to gamble like a pro -- or at least not how not to go broke and lose your kids to Child Protective Services.

    @BluewaterFp @michaelbatnick I'm reading this one right now. Very funny gambling stories https://t.co/tQMuC7W0XG

  • You can now buy the Kindle version of my book for just $2.99 Or you could buy that latte and never be able to retire The choice is yours https://t.co/5WrDlMZA7R

  • Travel writer Frank Bures investigates the strange phenomenon of 'culture-bound' syndromes across the world: illnesses with a combination of psychiatric and somatic symptoms that are only considered to be a disease within a specific society or culture. They are found across the world within cultures and viewed from outside can seem both mysterious and odd. Bures has travelled worldwide and recounts strange cases such as voodoo death and penis theft. He investigates epidemics that seem like madness to outsiders but all-too-real to those experiencing them.

    @BullandBaird this is one of the most interesting books I've read in a long time (so of course I had to tie it into the stock mkt): https://t.co/N0XNcxTXXP

  • Can I Retire Yet?

    Darrow Kirkpatrick

    You've worked hard, lived carefully, and saved diligently. You've reached major milestones and accumulated more assets than you dreamed possible, and yet you hesitate. ""Can I retire?"" This book will help answer that question by showing you.... The tools you need to live a secure and independent retirement, without worrying about money What you must know before leaving a career behind How much it will cost you to live in retirement, and how to manage your cash flow The current choices for retirement health care, including lesser-known but effective options The threat from inflation: two secrets that politicians and bankers will never admit A realistic assessment of the impact that income taxes will have on your retirement Social Security's role in your retirement: when you should claim and how much it's worth to you How to construct and manage an investment portfolio for income and growth in retirement About immediate annuities and why you need multiple sources of retirement income The key variables and unknowns in your retirement withdrawal equation Reviews of the best retirement calculators, and tips for how to use them accurately Beyond the simplistic 4% Rule to the latest research on safe withdrawal rates Realistic bracketing of your retirement savings needs, without over caution or overconfidence The history of economic cycles and the related asset classes for optimal retirement security A survey of strategies plus original research for how to orchestrate your retirement distributions A practical "retirement fuel gauge" alerting you to problems while you still have time to act Backup plans: the "lifeboat strategies" for ensuring you'll never be without essential income The 6 crucial questions to answer before you can retire The one, simple, powerful, non-financial reason that you can and should retire earlier than later

    @NickL4STL @michaelbatnick This one was good too https://t.co/veicwjonnN

  • The definitive oral history of the cult classic Dazed and Confused, featuring behind-the-scenes stories from the cast and crew and written with the cooperation of Oscar-nominated director Richard Linklater. Dazed and Confused not only heralded the arrival of filmmaker Richard Linklater, it introduced a cast of unknowns who would become the next generation of movie stars. Embraced as a cultural touchstone, the 1993 film would also make Matthew McConaughey's famous phrase--alright, alright, alright--ubiquitous. But it started with a simple idea: Linklater thought people might like to watch a movie about high school kids just hanging out and listening to music on the last day of school in 1976. To some, that might not even sound like a movie. But to a few studio executives, it sounded enough like the next American Graffiti to justify the risk. Dazed and Confused made almost no money at the box office and seemed destined to disappear. Then something weird happened: Linklater turned out to be right. This wasn't the kind of movie everybody liked, but it was the kind of movie certain people loved, with an intensity that felt personal. No matter what their high school experience was like, they thought Dazed and Confused was about them. Alright, Alright, Alright is the story of how this iconic film came together and why it worked. Combining behind-the-scenes photos and insights from nearly the entire cast, including Matthew McConaughey, Parker Posey, Ben Affleck, Joey Lauren Adams, and many others, and with the full cooperation of Linklater himself, it offers an inside look at how a budding filmmaker and a cast of newcomers made a period piece that would feel timeless for decades to come.

    If you're a fan of Dazed & Confused or just the movie business in general I can't recommend this book highly enough Such a fun read https://t.co/Tz1Qssm2Ze

  • Greenlights

    Matthew McConaughey

    From the Academy Award®-winning actor, an unconventional memoir filled with raucous stories, outlaw wisdom, and lessons learned the hard way about living with greater satisfaction "Unflinchingly honest and remarkably candid, Matthew McConaughey's book invites us to grapple with the lessons of his life as he did--and to see that the point was never to win, but to understand."--Mark Manson, author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck I've been in this life for fifty years, been trying to work out its riddle for forty-two, and been keeping diaries of clues to that riddle for the last thirty-five. Notes about successes and failures, joys and sorrows, things that made me marvel, and things that made me laugh out loud. How to be fair. How to have less stress. How to have fun. How to hurt people less. How to get hurt less. How to be a good man. How to have meaning in life. How to be more me. Recently, I worked up the courage to sit down with those diaries. I found stories I experienced, lessons I learned and forgot, poems, prayers, prescriptions, beliefs about what matters, some great photographs, and a whole bunch of bumper stickers. I found a reliable theme, an approach to living that gave me more satisfaction, at the time, and still: If you know how, and when, to deal with life's challenges--how to get relative with the inevitable--you can enjoy a state of success I call "catching greenlights." So I took a one-way ticket to the desert and wrote this book: an album, a record, a story of my life so far. This is fifty years of my sights and seens, felts and figured-outs, cools and shamefuls. Graces, truths, and beauties of brutality. Getting away withs, getting caughts, and getting wets while trying to dance between the raindrops. Hopefully, it's medicine that tastes good, a couple of aspirin instead of the infirmary, a spaceship to Mars without needing your pilot's license, going to church without having to be born again, and laughing through the tears. It's a love letter. To life. It's also a guide to catching more greenlights--and to realizing that the yellows and reds eventually turn green too. Good luck.

    Biggest upset of the year is my low expectations vs the new Matthew McConaughey memoir Might be my favorite book of the year I can't believe how much I liked it Some awesome stories & lessons in here https://t.co/7G0DXJLB4h

  • The stunning metamorphosis of twenty-first-century Hollywood and what lies ahead for the art and commerce of film

    @justinisreal @lhamtil Good book about how the business side of the movie industry has changed

  • @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Sound, sensible advice from a hero to frustrated investors everywhere William Bernstein's The Four Pillars of Investing gives investors the tools they need to construct top-returning portfolios­­--without the help of a financial adviser. In a relaxed, nonthreatening style, Dr. Bernstein provides a distinctive blend of market history, investing theory, and behavioral finance, one designed to help every investor become more self-sufficient and make better-informed investment decisions. The 4 Pillars of Investing explains how any investor can build a solid foundation for investing by focusing on four essential lessons, each building upon the other. Containing all of the tools needed to achieve investing success, without the help of a financial advisor, it presents: Practical investing advice based on fascinating history lessons from the market Exercises to determine risk tolerance as an investor An easy-to-understand explanation of risk and reward in the capital markets

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment strategy for building wealth over the long term: buy and hold, at very low cost, a mutual fund that tracks a broad stock market Index such as the S&P 500. While the stock market has tumbled and then soared since the first edition of Little Book of Common Sense was published in April 2007, Bogle’s investment principles have endured and served investors well. This tenth anniversary edition includes updated data and new information but maintains the same long-term perspective as in its predecessor. Bogle has also added two new chapters designed to provide further guidance to investors: one on asset allocation, the other on retirement investing. A portfolio focused on index funds is the only investment that effectively guarantees your fair share of stock market returns. This strategy is favored by Warren Buffett, who said this about Bogle: “If a statue is ever erected to honor the person who has done the most for American investors, the hands-down choice should be Jack Bogle. For decades, Jack has urged investors to invest in ultra-low-cost index funds. . . . Today, however, he has the satisfaction of knowing that he helped millions of investors realize far better returns on their savings than they otherwise would have earned. He is a hero to them and to me.” Bogle shows you how to make index investing work for you and help you achieve your financial goals, and finds support from some of the world's best financial minds: not only Warren Buffett, but Benjamin Graham, Paul Samuelson, Burton Malkiel, Yale’s David Swensen, Cliff Asness of AQR, and many others. This new edition of The Little Book of Common Sense Investing offers you the same solid strategy as its predecessor for building your financial future. Build a broadly diversified, low-cost portfolio without the risks of individual stocks, manager selection, or sector rotation. Forget the fads and marketing hype, and focus on what works in the real world. Understand that stock returns are generated by three sources (dividend yield, earnings growth, and change in market valuation) in order to establish rational expectations for stock returns over the coming decade. Recognize that in the long run, business reality trumps market expectations. Learn how to harness the magic of compounding returns while avoiding the tyranny of compounding costs. While index investing allows you to sit back and let the market do the work for you, too many investors trade frantically, turning a winner’s game into a loser’s game. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is a solid guidebook to your financial future.

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • A detailed guide to overcoming the most frequently encountered psychological pitfalls of investing Bias, emotion, and overconfidence are just three of the many behavioral traits that can lead investors to lose money or achieve lower returns. Behavioral finance, which recognizes that there is a psychological element to all investor decision-making, can help you overcome this obstacle. In The Little Book of Behavioral Investing, expert James Montier takes you through some of the most important behavioral challenges faced by investors. Montier reveals the most common psychological barriers, clearly showing how emotion, overconfidence, and a multitude of other behavioral traits, can affect investment decision-making. Offers time-tested ways to identify and avoid the pitfalls of investor bias Author James Montier is one of the world's foremost behavioral analysts Discusses how to learn from our investment mistakes instead of repeating them Explores the behavioral principles that will allow you to maintain a successful investment portfolio Written in a straightforward and accessible style, The Little Book of Behavioral Investing will enable you to identify and eliminate behavioral traits that can hinder your investment endeavors and show you how to go about achieving superior returns in the process. Praise for The Little Book Of Behavioral Investing "The Little Book of Behavioral Investing is an important book for anyone who is interested in understanding the ways that human nature and financial markets interact." —Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics, Duke University, and author of Predictably Irrational "In investing, success means¿being on the right side of most trades. No book provides a better starting point toward that goal than this one." —Bruce Greenwald, Robert Heilbrunn Professor of Finance and Asset Management, Columbia Business School "'Know thyself.' Overcoming human instinct is key to becoming a better investor.¿ You would be irrational if you did not read this book." —Edward Bonham-Carter, Chief Executive and Chief Investment Officer, Jupiter Asset Management "There is not an investor anywhere who wouldn't profit from reading this book." —Jeff Hochman, Director of Technical Strategy, Fidelity Investment Services Limited "James Montier gives us a very accessible version of why we as investors are so predictably irrational, and a guide to help us channel our 'Inner Spock' to make better investment decisions. Bravo!" —John Mauldin, President, Millennium Wave Investments

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Praise for Damn Right! From the author of the bestselling WARREN BUFFETT SPEAKS. . . "Charlie Munger, whose reputation is deep and wide, based on an extraordinary record of brilliantly successful business strategies, sees things that others don't. There is a method to his mastery and, through this book, we get a chance to learn about this rare individual." -MICHAEL EISNER, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company "Janet Lowe uncovers the iconoclastic genius and subtle charm behind Charlie Munger's curmudgeonly facade in this richly woven portrait of our era's heir to Ben Franklin. With a biographer's detachment, an historian's thoroughness, and a financial writer's common sense, Lowe produces a riveting account of the family, personal, and business life of the idiosyncratically complex and endlessly fascinating figure." -LAWRENCE CUNNINGHAM, Cardozo Law School, Author of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America "For years, Berkshire Hathaway shareholders and investors worldwide (me included) have struggled to learn more about Warren Buffett's cerebral sidekick. Now we can rest and enjoy reading Janet Lowe's book about this rare intellectual jewel called Charlie Munger." -ROBERT G. HAGSTROM, Author of The Warren Buffett Way "Charlie has lived by the creed that one should live a life that doesn't need explaining. But his life should be explained. In a city where heroism is too often confused with celebrity, Charlie is a true hero and mentor. He lives the life lessons that he has studiously extracted from other true heroes and mentors, from Ben Franklin to Ben Graham. This book illuminates those life lessons." -RONALD L. OLSON, Munger, Tolles & Olson llp "Janet Lowe's unprecedented access to Charlie Munger and Warren Buffett has resulted in a first-class book that investors, academics, and CEOs will find entertaining and highly useful."-TIMOTHY P. VICK, Money Manager and Author of How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Investing

    Robert Hagstrom

    In this updated second edition, well-known investment author Hagstrom explores basic and fundamental investing concepts in a range of fields outside of economics, including physics, biology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and literature.

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Devil Take the Hindmost

    Edward Chancellor

    Examines stock market speculation since the seventeenth century, discussing the range of motivations of investors and the effects on economies throughout history.

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • This book explains the keys to successful investment and the pitfalls that can destroy capital or ruin a career. Utilizing passages from his memos to illustrate his ideas, Marks teaches by example, detailing the development of an investment philosophy that fully acknowledges the complexities of investing and the perils of the financial world. Brilliantly applying insight to today's volatile markets, Marks offers a volume that is part memoir, part creed, with a number of broad takeaways.

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Winning the Loser's Game

    Charles D. Ellis

    The Classic Guide to Winning on Wall Street—Completely Updated and Expanded! “The best book about investing? The answer is simple: Winning the Loser’s Game. Using compelling data and pithy stories, Charley Ellis has captured beautifully in this new and expanded edition of his classic work the most important lessons regarding investing. In today's unforgiving environment, it's a must-read!” F. William McNabb III, Chief Executive Officer and President, Vanguard “Charley Ellis has been one of the most influential investment writers for decades. This classic should be required reading for both individual and institutional investors.” Burton Malkiel, author, A Random Walk Down Wall Street “No one understands what it takes to be a successful investor better than Charley Ellis and no one explains it more clearly or eloquently. This updated investment classic belongs on every investor’s bookshelf.” Consuelo Mack, Anchor and Managing Editor, Consuelo Mack WealthTrack “A must-reread classic, refreshed and updated with the latest ‘lessons to be learned’ from the 2008-2009 market events.” Martin Leibowitz, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Research “Winning the Loser’s Game has long been required reading for professional investors. . . . This elegant volume explores approaches for individuals such as relying on intellect rather than emotion, and building a personal portfolio by taking advantage of what other investors already know.” Abby Joseph Cohen, Goldman Sachs & Co “This is less a book about competition than about sound money management. Sounder than Charley Ellis they do not come.” Andrew Tobias, author, The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need About the Book: Peter Drucker referred to Winning the Loser's Game as “by far the best book on investment policy and management.” Now, in it's fifth edition, the investing classic has been updated and improved. With refreshing candor, straight talk, and good humor, Winning the Loser’s Game helps individual investors succeed with their investments and control their financial futures. Ellis, dubbed “Wall Street’s Wisest Man” by Money magazine, has been showing investors for three decades how stock markets really work and what individuals can do to be sure they are long-term winners. Applying wisdom gained from half a century of working with the leading investment managers and securities firms around the world, Ellis explains how to avoid common traps and get on the road to investment success. Winning the Loser’s Game helps you set realistic objectives and develop a sensible strategy. You will learn how to: Create an investment program based on the realities of markets Use the “unfair” index fund to succeed, even in tumultuous markets Institute an annual review process to steer your investments well into the future Maximize investing success through five stages, from earning and saving through investing, estate planning, and giving The need for a trustworthy investing guide has never been greater. Sixty million individuals with 401(k)s are now responsible for making important investment decisions. They know they’re not experts but don’t know whom to trust. Winning the Loser’s Game explains why conventional investing is a loser’s game, and how you can easily make it a winner’s game!

    @KShannon14 For me it was mostly just the process of becoming a regular reader but here are some books I listed in my first book that had an impact on my thinking as an investor https://t.co/AA2ldfQawI

  • Devil Take the Hindmost

    Edward Chancellor

    Examines stock market speculation since the seventeenth century, discussing the range of motivations of investors and the effects on economies throughout history.

    @BoozeBreath Not an entire book but this one has an excellent chapter on it https://t.co/oHOtPjorGQ

  • I Must Say

    Martin Short

    @oscarazocar50 Loved this book

  • The Big Change

    Frederick Lewis Allen

    @DaveTarantini not specifically on the topic of debt but these two books cover this period from a number of angles: https://t.co/4sSDnBMGMm https://t.co/JBsepcJGs9

  • The Fifties

    David Halberstam

    @DaveTarantini not specifically on the topic of debt but these two books cover this period from a number of angles: https://t.co/4sSDnBMGMm https://t.co/JBsepcJGs9

  • The groundbreaking NEW YORK TIMES and WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER that taught a generation how to earn more, save more, and live a rich life—now in a revised 2nd edition. Buy as many lattes as you want. Choose the right accounts and investments so your money grows for you—automatically. Best of all, spend guilt-free on the things you love. Personal finance expert Ramit Sethi has been called a “wealth wizard” by Forbes and the “new guru on the block” by Fortune. Now he’s updated and expanded his modern money classic for a new age, delivering a simple, powerful, no-BS 6-week program that just works. I Will Teach You to Be Rich will show you: • How to crush your debt and student loans faster than you thought possible • How to set up no-fee, high-interest bank accounts that won’t gouge you for every penny • How Ramit automates his finances so his money goes exactly where he wants it to—and how you can do it too • How to talk your way out of late fees (with word-for-word scripts) • How to save hundreds or even thousands per month (and still buy what you love) • A set-it-and-forget-it investment strategy that’s dead simple and beats financial advisors at their own game • How to handle buying a car or a house, paying for a wedding, having kids, and other big expenses—stress free • The exact words to use to negotiate a big raise at work Plus, this 10th anniversary edition features over 80 new pages, including: • New tools • New insights on money and psychology • Amazing stories of how previous readers used the book to create their rich lives Master your money—and then get on with your life.

    @IrishDemocracy @michaelbatnick Try this book https://t.co/VoN8UIxoyS

  • How We Got to Now

    Steven Johnson

    @BullandBaird @morganhousel You ever read How We Got to Now? Awesome book on this https://t.co/CxeEVEWcWq

  • One of the Best Books of the Year The San Francisco Chronicle * The Philadelphia Inquirer * Vox * The Globe and Mail (Toronto) From Tim Wu, author of the award-winning The Master Switch ( a New Yorker and Fortune Book of the Year) and who coined the term "net neutrality"--a revelatory, ambitious and urgent account of how the capture and re-sale of human attention became the defining industry of our time. Ours is often called an information economy, but at a moment when access to information is virtually unlimited, our attention has become the ultimate commodity. In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of efforts to harvest our attention. This condition is not simply the byproduct of recent technological innovations but the result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. Wu's narrative begins in the nineteenth century, when Benjamin Day discovered he could get rich selling newspapers for a penny. Since then, every new medium--from radio to television to Internet companies such as Google and Facebook--has attained commercial viability and immense riches by turning itself into an advertising platform. Since the early days, the basic business model of "attention merchants" has never changed: free diversion in exchange for a moment of your time, sold in turn to the highest-bidding advertiser. Full of lively, unexpected storytelling and piercing insight, The Attention Merchants lays bare the true nature of a ubiquitous reality we can no longer afford to accept at face value.

    @franklucano5 Agreed. The Attention Merchants is a good book on that

  • Some of my favorite books on this history: The Rise & Fall of American Growth by Robert Gordon https://t.co/Q8ThqbSnOQ The Fifties by David Halberstam https://t.co/JBsepcJGs9 The Big Change by Frederick Lewis Allen https://t.co/4sSDnBMGMm

  • The Fifties

    David Halberstam

    Some of my favorite books on this history: The Rise & Fall of American Growth by Robert Gordon https://t.co/Q8ThqbSnOQ The Fifties by David Halberstam https://t.co/JBsepcJGs9 The Big Change by Frederick Lewis Allen https://t.co/4sSDnBMGMm

  • The Big Change

    Frederick Lewis Allen

    Some of my favorite books on this history: The Rise & Fall of American Growth by Robert Gordon https://t.co/Q8ThqbSnOQ The Fifties by David Halberstam https://t.co/JBsepcJGs9 The Big Change by Frederick Lewis Allen https://t.co/4sSDnBMGMm

  • The Deficit Myth

    Stephanie Kelton

    Seems like a combination of right place, right time but The Deficit Myth could end of being one of the more important economics books in a long time (and I still can't tell if that importance is going to be good or bad) Definitely worth a read https://t.co/7Mj3sIXgsI

  • My book rec this week: A Piece of the Action by Joe Nocera on how the middle class turned into the consumer class https://t.co/v17RPwKGbQ Michael's rec: The Great Inflation by Robert Samuelson on why the 1970s was such a difficult economic environment https://t.co/fgaqc4WXHp

  • It’s a giant gap in our history. The Great Inflation, argues award-winning columnist Robert J. Samuelson in this provocative book, was the worst domestic policy blunder of the postwar era and played a crucial role in transforming American politics, economy, and everyday life–and yet its story is hardly remembered or appreciated. In these uncertain economic times, it is more imperative than ever that we understand what happened in the 1960s and 1970s, lest we be doomed to repeat our mistakes. From 1960 to 1979, inflation rose from barely more than 1 percent to nearly 14 percent. It was the greatest peacetime inflationary spike in this nation’s history, and it had massive repercussions in every area of our lives. The direct consequences included Ronald Reagan’s election to the presidency in 1980, stagnation in living standards, and a growing belief–both in America and abroad–that the great-power status of the United States was ending. The Great Inflation and Its Aftermath traces the origins and rise of double-digit inflation and its fall in the brutal 1981-82 recession, engineered by the Federal Reserve under then-chairman Paul Volcker and with the staunch backing of Reagan. But that is only half the story. The end of high inflation triggered economic and social changes that are still with us. The stock market and housing booms were both direct outcomes; American business became more productive–and also much less protective of workers; and globalization was encouraged. We cannot understand today’s world, Samuelson contends, without understanding the Great Inflation and its aftermath. Nor can we prepare for the future unless we heed its lessons. This incisive and enlightening book will stand as the authoritative account of a watershed event of our times. Praise for The Great Inflation and Its Aftermath "Newsweek and Washington Post columnist Samuelson is one of the rare journalists who debates politics and economics with a healthy skepticism toward conventional wisdom. Politicians would do well to study [the errors] the past that teach that choosing quick fixes only delays and worsens the inevitable.”– Booklist "If you want to understand the economic events of the last half century, you should read. . . Robert Samuelson's The Great Inflation and Its Aftermath: --U.S News & World Report. From the Hardcover edition.

    My book rec this week: A Piece of the Action by Joe Nocera on how the middle class turned into the consumer class https://t.co/v17RPwKGbQ Michael's rec: The Great Inflation by Robert Samuelson on why the 1970s was such a difficult economic environment https://t.co/fgaqc4WXHp

  • Bubble in the Sun

    Christopher Knowlton

    Christopher Knowlton, author of Cattle Kingdom and former Fortune writer, takes an in-depth look at the spectacular Florida land boom of the 1920s and shows how it led directly to the Great Depression. The 1920s in Florida was a time of incredible excess, immense wealth, and precipitous collapse. The decade there produced the largest human migration in American history, far exceeding the settlement of the West, as millions flocked to the grand hotels and the new cities that rose rapidly from the teeming wetlands. The boom spawned a new subdivision civilization—and the most egregious large-scale assault on the environment in the name of “progress.” Nowhere was the glitz and froth of the Roaring Twenties more excessive than in Florida. Here was Vegas before there was a Vegas: gambling was condoned and so was drinking, since prohibition was not enforced. Tycoons, crooks, and celebrities arrived en masse to promote or exploit this new and dazzling American frontier in the sunshine. Yet, the import and deep impact of these historical events have never been explored thoroughly until now. In Bubble in the Sun Christopher Knowlton examines the grand artistic and entrepreneurial visions behind Coral Gables, Boca Raton, Miami Beach, and other storied sites, as well as the darker side of the frenzy. For while giant fortunes were being made and lost and the nightlife raged more raucously than anywhere else, the pure beauty of the Everglades suffered wanton ruination and the workers, mostly black, who built and maintained the boom, endured grievous abuses. Knowlton breathes dynamic life into the forces that made and wrecked Florida during the decade: the real estate moguls Carl Fisher, George Merrick, and Addison Mizner, and the once-in-a-century hurricane whose aftermath triggered the stock market crash. This essential account is a revelatory—and riveting—history of an era that still affects our country today.

    I had only read about the Florida real estate bubble in passing (it gets overshadowed by the Great Depression) but this thing was nuts I highly recommend reading Bubble in the Sun for any financial history buffs https://t.co/KonmXK68uZ https://t.co/jqPTIb4O6D

  • Deep Risk

    William J. Bernstein

    This booklet takes portfolio design beyond the familiar "black box" mean-variance framework. Most importantly, the short-term volatility of financial assets, commonly measured as standard deviation, is a highly imperfect measure of the actual long-horizon perils faced by real-world investors subject to the vagaries of financial and military history. These risks have names--inflation, deflation, confiscation, and devastation--and any useful discussion of portfolio design of necessity incorporates their probabilities, consequences, and costs of mitigation ... This booklet contains ... with luck, a framework within income and all-equity portfolios. This booklet contains ... with luck, a framework within which to think more clearly about risk. Note: the entire Investing for Adults series is not for beginners.

    Here's the interview: https://t.co/gjE3wcyt8i and if you haven't read Bernstein's book Deep Risk, it's especially relevant during a bear market https://t.co/iZgxP5KmbG

  • Devil Take the Hindmost

    Edward Chancellor

    Examines stock market speculation since the seventeenth century, discussing the range of motivations of investors and the effects on economies throughout history.

    On today's show we gave some of our favorite books on historical market panics: Devil Take the Hindmost by Edward Chancellor https://t.co/EKHdmWfXZL Once in Golconda by John Brooks https://t.co/fy3nE6beXk The Great Crash 1929 by John Kenneth Galbraith https://t.co/dGTh9tWCev

  • Once in Golconda

    John Brooks

    Once in Golconda "In this book, John Brooks-who was one of the most elegant of all business writers-perfectly catches the flavor of one of history's best-known financial dramas: the 1929 crash and its aftershocks. It's packed with parallels and parables for the modern reader." -From the Foreword by Richard Lambert Editor-in-Chief, The Financial Times Once in Golconda is a dramatic chronicle of the breathtaking rise, devastating fall, and painstaking rebirth of Wall Street in the years between the wars. Focusing on the lives and fortunes of some of the era's most memorable traders, bankers, boosters, and frauds, John Brooks brings to vivid life all the ruthlessness, greed, and reckless euphoria of the '20s bull market, the desperation of the days leading up to the crash of '29, and the bitterness of the years that followed. Praise for Once in Golconda "A fast-moving, sophisticated account.embracing the stock-market boom of the twenties, the crash of 1929, the Depression, and the coming of the New Deal. Its leitmotif is the truly tragic personal history of Richard Whitney, the aristocrat Morgan broker and head of the Stock Exchange, who ended up in Sing Sing." -Edmund Wilson, writing in the New Yorker "As Mr. Brooks tells this tale of dishonor, desperation, and the fall of the mighty, it takes on overtones of Greek tragedy, a king brought down by pride. Whitney's sordid history has been told before..But in Mr. Brooks's hands, the drama becomes freshly shocking." -Wall Street Journal "It's all there in Once in Golconda-the avarice of an era that favored the rich; and the later anguish of myriads of speculators doomed by a bloated market, easy credit, and their own cupidity and stupidity." -Saturday Review

    On today's show we gave some of our favorite books on historical market panics: Devil Take the Hindmost by Edward Chancellor https://t.co/EKHdmWfXZL Once in Golconda by John Brooks https://t.co/fy3nE6beXk The Great Crash 1929 by John Kenneth Galbraith https://t.co/dGTh9tWCev

  • The Great Crash 1929

    John Kenneth Galbraith

    Presents a study of the stock market crash of 1929 that reveals the influential role of Wall Street on the economic growth of America.

    On today's show we gave some of our favorite books on historical market panics: Devil Take the Hindmost by Edward Chancellor https://t.co/EKHdmWfXZL Once in Golconda by John Brooks https://t.co/fy3nE6beXk The Great Crash 1929 by John Kenneth Galbraith https://t.co/dGTh9tWCev

  • William Bernstein is one of the smartest investing minds I know If you want to understand today's market through the lens of history first read The Four Pillars of Investing https://t.co/LL2Rxvdj5h then read The Investor's Manifesto https://t.co/X1GWSQdnXK

  • The Investor's Manifesto

    William J. Bernstein

    William Bernstein is one of the smartest investing minds I know If you want to understand today's market through the lens of history first read The Four Pillars of Investing https://t.co/LL2Rxvdj5h then read The Investor's Manifesto https://t.co/X1GWSQdnXK

  • Bull

    Maggie Mahar

    In 1982, the Dow hovered below 1000. Then, the market rose and rapidly gained speed until it peaked above 11,000. Noted journalist and financial reporter Maggie Mahar has written the first book on the remarkable bull market that began in 1982 and ended just in the early 2000s. For almost two decades, a colorful cast of characters such as Abby Joseph Cohen, Mary Meeker, Henry Blodget, and Alan Greenspan came to dominate the market news. This inside look at that 17-year cycle of growth, built upon interviews and unparalleled access to the most important analysts, market observers, and fund managers who eagerly tell the tales of excesses, presents the period with a historical perspective and explains what really happened and why.

    @PermanentBear The book Bull by Maggie Mahar is good on this

  • book recs from this week's show: A Piece of the Action by Joe Nocera https://t.co/sBg3uCHJvq and one of my all-time favorite wise-guy private eye book series: Spenser by Robert Parker (Mark Wahlberg didn't do it justice on Netflix)

  • An up close and personal portrait of a legendary filmmaker, theater director, and comedian, drawing on candid conversations with his closest friends in show business and the arts—from Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep to Natalie Portman and Lorne Michaels. The work of Mike Nichols pervades American cultural consciousness—from The Graduate and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? to Angels in America, The Birdcage, Working Girl, and Primary Colors, not to mention his string of hit plays, including Barefoot in the Park and The Odd Couple. If that weren’t enough, he was also one half of the timelessly funny duo Nichols & May, as well as a founding member of the original improv troupe. Over a career that spanned half a century, Mike Nichols changed Hollywood, Broadway, and comedy forever. Most fans, however, know very little of the person behind it all. Since he never wrote his memoirs, and seldom appeared on television, they have very little sense of his searching intellect or his devastating wit. They don't know that Nichols, the great American director, was born Mikail Igor Peschkowsky, in Berlin, and came to this country, speaking no English, to escape the Nazis. They don't know that Nichols was at one time a solitary psychology student, or that a childhood illness caused permanent, life-altering side effects. They don't know that he withdrew into a debilitating depression before he "finally got it right," in his words, by marrying Diane Sawyer. Here, for the first time, Ash Carter and Sam Kashner offer an intimate look behind the scenes of Nichols' life, as told by the stars, moguls, playwrights, producers, comics and crewmembers who stayed loyal to Nichols for years. Life Isn't Everything is a mosaic portrait of a brilliant and original director known for his uncommon charm, wit, vitality, and genius for friendship, this volume is also a snapshot of what it meant to be living, loving, and making art in the 20th century.

    Book recs from this week: Life Isn't Everything https://t.co/29YzVjyuHz The Devil's Chessboard https://t.co/6x1Uu7kdrX The MVP Machine https://t.co/8x1L2I7fva The Great Influenza https://t.co/34LC897cfb

  • Book recs from this week: Life Isn't Everything https://t.co/29YzVjyuHz The Devil's Chessboard https://t.co/6x1Uu7kdrX The MVP Machine https://t.co/8x1L2I7fva The Great Influenza https://t.co/34LC897cfb

  • The MVP Machine

    Ben Lindbergh

    Two New York Times-bestselling authors chronicle the next revolution in baseball: the data-driven quest to build better players Fifteen years after Michael Lewis brought the Oakland A's' groundbreaking team-building strategies to light in Moneyball, every team takes a data-driven approach to evaluating players, and the league's smarter front offices no longer have an edge. As Ben Lindbergh and Travis Sawchik reveal in The MVP Machine, instead of out-drafting, out-signing, and out-trading rivals, baseball's best minds have turned to out-developing opponents, eking extra runs out of athletes who were seen as finished products. Lindbergh and Sawchik take us inside the transformation of former role players into home-run kings, and show how washed-up pitchers have emerged as aces. The MVP Machine charts the future of a sport and offers a lesson for any business: success comes from developing the people already working for you, rather than from bringing in star performers from elsewhere.

    Book recs from this week: Life Isn't Everything https://t.co/29YzVjyuHz The Devil's Chessboard https://t.co/6x1Uu7kdrX The MVP Machine https://t.co/8x1L2I7fva The Great Influenza https://t.co/34LC897cfb

  • The Great Influenza

    John M. Barry

    An account of the deadly influenza epidemic of 1918, which took the lives of millions of people around the world, examines its causes, its impact on early twentieth-century society, and the lasting implications of the crisis.

    Book recs from this week: Life Isn't Everything https://t.co/29YzVjyuHz The Devil's Chessboard https://t.co/6x1Uu7kdrX The MVP Machine https://t.co/8x1L2I7fva The Great Influenza https://t.co/34LC897cfb

  • The Great Influenza

    John M. Barry

    An account of the deadly influenza epidemic of 1918, which took the lives of millions of people around the world, examines its causes, its impact on early twentieth-century society, and the lasting implications of the crisis.

    The Great Influenza by John Barry is equal parts terrifying (influenza is a bad MFer) and inspiring (the doctors who were fighting it) Read this to better understand the flu Or don't read this if you panic easily What a sad/scary/unbelievable story https://t.co/34LC897cfb https://t.co/eEPanijB71

  • Dark Towers

    David Enrich

    A searing expose by the author of The Spider Network of the most scandalous bank in the world, including its shadowy ties to Donald Trump's business empire. In January 2017, Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. As he delivered his fiery Inaugural address, a grey-haired woman named Rosemary Vrablic sat in the VIP section of the audience. Vrablic was an executive at Deutsche Bank, and without her, Donald Trump probably wouldn’t have been moving into the White House. This is the never-before-told story of how a 150-year-old German bank became the global face of financial recklessness and criminality, a history that traces back to its role helping the Nazis build Auschwitz. In the 1990s, a succession of hard-charging executives made the fateful decision to chase Wall Street riches—and set Deutsche Bank on an epic path of devastation. Its sins included manipulating markets, violating international sanctions, and laundering money for Russian oligarchs. Desperate for an American foothold, Deutsche started doing business with a self-promoting real estate magnate who most banks deemed too dangerous to touch: Donald Trump. Over the next 20 years, Deutsche executives—including a man with a damaged brain, the son of a Supreme Court justice, and Rosemary Vrablic—loaned billions to Trump and the Kushner family. Why? To unravel this mystery, the book traces the rise and fall of Bill Broeksmit, an American executive who was regarded as the conscience of Deutsche Bank. In 2014, he was found hanging in his London apartment. His son gets access to Broeksmit’s computer files and embarks on a wild quest to understand why his father killed himself. The answers he finds will help explain how Deutsche Bank became the financial equivalent of a weapon of mass destruction.

    Book recs from this week's show: Dark Towers by @davidenrich https://t.co/lY5jA9fkIS The Great Influenza by John Barry https://t.co/34LC897cfb Home Game by Michael Lewis https://t.co/zTEVTnOshq

  • The Great Influenza

    John M. Barry

    An account of the deadly influenza epidemic of 1918, which took the lives of millions of people around the world, examines its causes, its impact on early twentieth-century society, and the lasting implications of the crisis.

    Book recs from this week's show: Dark Towers by @davidenrich https://t.co/lY5jA9fkIS The Great Influenza by John Barry https://t.co/34LC897cfb Home Game by Michael Lewis https://t.co/zTEVTnOshq

  • Home Game

    Michael Lewis

    An unsparing observation about the disparity between social expectation and the actual experiences of new fathers shares stories from the author's life after the births of his three children.

    Book recs from this week's show: Dark Towers by @davidenrich https://t.co/lY5jA9fkIS The Great Influenza by John Barry https://t.co/34LC897cfb Home Game by Michael Lewis https://t.co/zTEVTnOshq

  • Fewer, Richer, Greener

    Laurence B. Siegel

    How the world has become much better and why optimism is abundantly justified Why do so many people fear the future? Is their concern justified, or can we look forward to greater wealth and continued improvement in the way we live? Our world seems to be experiencing stagnant economic growth, climatic deterioration, dwindling natural resources, and an unsustainable level of population growth. The world is doomed, they argue, and there are just too many problems to overcome. But is this really the case? In Fewer, Richer, Greener, author Laurence B. Siegel reveals that the world has improved—and will continue to improve—in almost every dimension imaginable. This practical yet lighthearted book makes a convincing case for having gratitude for today’s world and optimism about the bountiful world of tomorrow. Life has actually improved tremendously. We live in the safest, most prosperous time in all human history. Whatever the metric—food, health, longevity, education, conflict—it is demonstrably true that right now is the best time to be alive. The recent, dramatic slowing in global population growth continues to spread prosperity from the developed to the developing world. Technology is helping billions of people rise above levels of mere subsistence. This technology of prosperity is cumulative and rapidly improving: we use it to solve problems in ways that would have be unimaginable only a few decades ago. An optimistic antidote for pessimism and fear, this book: Helps to restore and reinforce our faith in the future Documents and explains how global changes impact our present and influence our future Discusses the costs and unforeseen consequences of some of the changes occurring in the modern world Offers engaging narrative, accurate data and research, and an in-depth look at the best books on the topic by leading thinkers Traces the history of economic progress and explores its consequences for human life around the world Fewer, Richer, Greener: Prospects for Humanity in an Age of Abundance is a must-read for anyone who wishes to regain hope for the present and wants to build a better future.

    found all of this in Fewer, Richer, Greener by Laurence Siegel https://t.co/DgCWQMifQN

  • Bull

    Maggie Mahar

    In 1982, the Dow hovered below 1000. Then, the market rose and rapidly gained speed until it peaked above 11,000. Noted journalist and financial reporter Maggie Mahar has written the first book on the remarkable bull market that began in 1982 and ended just in the early 2000s. For almost two decades, a colorful cast of characters such as Abby Joseph Cohen, Mary Meeker, Henry Blodget, and Alan Greenspan came to dominate the market news. This inside look at that 17-year cycle of growth, built upon interviews and unparalleled access to the most important analysts, market observers, and fund managers who eagerly tell the tales of excesses, presents the period with a historical perspective and explains what really happened and why.

    The rise of the financial media during the dot-com bubble was wild 22 new business publications came out in 1996 alone In 1997, almost one-third of all national newspaper ad revenues were coming from the financial services industry. per Maggie Mahar https://t.co/9xgyJjuWnW

  • "The financial market is a complex system, but that doesn't mean it requires a complex strategy; in fact, this false premise is the driving force behind many investors' market 'mistakes.' Information is important, but understanding and perspective are the keys to better decision-making. This book describes [a] way to view the markets and your portfolio, and [outlines] strategies that [may] make investing more profitable, less confusing, and less time-consuming"--Amazon.com.

    @PerfinBusiness Check out my first book. I try to lay it all out for ppl of any finance knowledge https://t.co/c8F2f0O44d

  • An account of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 relates the stories of two men who shaped the history of the event--architect Daniel H. Burnham, who coordinated its construction, and serial killer Herman Mudgett.

    @77cyko Did you read Devil in the White City? Very good on this

  • The Godfather

    Mario Puzo

    An inside fictional portrait journeys inside the world of the Cosa Nostra and its operations to chronicle the lives and fortunes of Mafia leader Vito Corleone, his family, and his underworld domain. Reissue.

    I know I'm about 50 years late on this one but The Godfather is easily one of the best books I've ever read Reading it even made the movies more enjoyable (which I am currently re-watching) https://t.co/dDP1JcHGoj

  • The CEO of Disney, one of TIME's most influential people of 2019, shares the ideas and values he embraced to reinvent one of the most beloved companies in the world and inspire the people who bring the magic to life.

    Shoe Dog by Phil Knight is the best book I've ever read by a CEO The Ride of a Lifetime by Bob Iger is just as good This might be the best book about leadership I've ever read It was fantastic and far more honest than I would've expected https://t.co/qL9tnhGkMt

  • Just got the first batch of hardcovers for my new book Never written something like this before so I’m very excited about it Hardcover comes out Jan 9 Available for pre-order now (and the best part is it’s only 170 pages) https://t.co/qFibaSpS0Z https://t.co/QifXO1y9Wx

  • Holiday, author of The Obstacle Is the Way and Ego Is the Enemy draws on timeless Stoic and Buddhist philosophy to show why slowing down is the secret weapon for those charging ahead.

    Mr. Rogers tried to keep his weight at 143 lbs every single day Guessing he followed a strict keto diet via Ryan Holiday in Stillness is the Key https://t.co/0odYuv55jh https://t.co/ZrF5RgD0nh

  • @MilesAbound read this book at the time. it made sense https://t.co/N7DG9FWkPw

  • Bestselling author and veteran Wall Street Journal reporter Zuckerman answers the question investors have been asking for decades: How did Jim Simons do it? Simons is the greatest money maker in modern financial history. His track record bests those of legendary investors including Warren Buffett, Peter Lynch, Ray Dalio, and George Soros..

    I finished the Jim Simons/Renaissance Technologies book this past weekend One of the first truly new investment stories I've read in years If you think you know everything about the markets this book will change your mind https://t.co/A7OyZTyhHx

  • "This trade book takes on the widely-shared belief that learning the history of something always contributes to understanding it, is often the best way to do so, and sometimes is the only way. The aim is to explain away these three beliefs, to show why historical narrative is always, always wrong, not just incomplete or inaccurate or unfounded, but mistaken the way Ptolemaic astronomy or Phlogiston chemistry is wrong. The resources employed to do this are those of evolutionary anthropology, cognitive science, and most of all neuroscience. Much of the book reports Nobel Prize winning advances in neuroscience in ways that are accessible to the non-specialist and reveals their relevance for our fatal attraction to stories. Although framed as a searching critique of historical narrative as path to understanding and knowledge, the book also provides a report of the current state of play of research in cognitive social psychology, evolutionary anthropology, and the study of the brain at the level of neural detail"--

    @morganhousel You ever read this book? It claims there have been 40k books written about Lincoln https://t.co/87nFe2Ambs

  • Alchemy

    Rory Sutherland

    The legendary advertising guru—Ogilvy UK’s vice chairman—and star of three massively popular TED Talks, blends the science of human behavior with his vast experience in the art of persuasion in this incomparable book that decodes successful branding and marketing in the vein of Freakonomics, Thinking Fast and Slow, and The Power of Habit. When Rory Sutherland was a trainee working on a direct mail campaign at the famed advertising firm OgilvyOne, he noticed that very small changes in design often had immense effects on the number of consumer responses. Yet no one he worked with knew why. Sutherland began taking stock of each effective yet nebulous trick—”the thing which has no name”—he discovered. As he rose in the advertising industry, he began to understand why these things had no name: no one was interested in quantifying them, cataloguing them, or really investigating them. So, he did it himself. Like classic behavioral economists Daniel Kahneman and Richard Thaler, Sutherland peels away hidden, often irrational human behaviors that explain how the world around us functions. In How to Be an Alchemist he examines why certain ads work and the broader truths they tell us about who we are. Why do people prefer stripy toothpaste, and how might that help us design retirement plans that young people would actually buy? Why do we think orange juice is healthy, and how does the same principle guide our feelings about nuclear reactors? Why do budget airlines advertise services they don’t offer—and what might insurance companies learn from them about keeping healthcare costs low? Filled with startling and profound conclusions, Sutherland’s journey through the world of advertising and its surprising lessons for human behavior is insightful, brilliant, eye-opening, and irresistibly fun.

    I loved the backstory on Red Bull's success despite less than stellar early reviews Alchemy is full of good stories & anecdotes like this https://t.co/f6E9OrYKoR https://t.co/Vc3PYcLfC4

  • The Big Change

    Frederick Lewis Allen

    Looks at the changes in American society during the first half of the twentieth century.

    The Big Change: American Transforms Itself 1900-1950 by Frederick Lewis Allen was excellent One of the best history books I've read in a long time https://t.co/jutaBLaC5M

  • Talking to Strangers

    Malcolm Gladwell

    THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 'Compelling, haunting, tragic stories . . . resonate long after you put the book down' James McConnachie, Sunday Times Book of the Year The routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy. The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon. The false conviction of Amanda Knox. Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie, read a face or judge a stranger's motives? Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature, where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous consequences.

    TL;DR Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell Don't judge a book by its cover (or like the first 4 chapters) https://t.co/4pPx0ixieO

  • Super Pumped

    Mike Isaac

    Isaac delivers a gripping account of Uber's rapid rise, its pitched battles with taxi unions and drivers, the company's toxic internal culture, and the bare-knuckle tactics it devised to overcome obstacles in its quest for dominance.

    I was lukewarm about an Uber book but Super Pumped by Mike Isaac was excellent Couldn't put it down Finished entirely on my flight(s) to @wealthstackconf this morning Not only about Uber/Kalanick but also a history of Unicorns, apps & tech bro culture https://t.co/tE9VVJXjZP

  • Home Game

    Michael Lewis

    An unsparing observation about the disparity between social expectation and the actual experiences of new fathers shares stories from the author's life after the births of his three children.

    @trevorpage1287 Home Game by Michael Lewis was great

  • Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.

    “What the advertiser needs to know is not what is right about the product but what is wrong about the buyer.” -Neil Postman from Amusing Ourselves to Death this is our next book for the Re-Kindled podcast & it's scary good https://t.co/ZIAOfLMgUl