Balaji S. Srinivasan

Balaji S. Srinivasan

It may be possible to reverse aging. https://t.co/YESlCBNotL

20+ Book Recommendations by Balaji S. Srinivasan

  • The book he's reviewing is "Where is My Flying Car?". Don't judge this self-published book by its cover, just read it. It's only pi ($3.14) dollars on Amazon. https://t.co/ui4a5OQQtn

  • Working in Public

    Nadia Eghbal

    This is now out on Kindle for $10. Nadia is very smart and it’s worth reading anything she writes on open source. https://t.co/OyNlLHwRGh https://t.co/E6ZkKMoe0Z

  • UFO Hunters Book Two

    William J. Birnes

    The 2nd is the Tinley Park Lights. Crucially, this wasn't just a mass sighting. Different people actually caught a UFO on camera from multiple angles. With three video clips, these guys tried triangulating & doing image processing. The results were odd. https://t.co/xFJGWLSY3T https://t.co/wOpWYfNnnF

  • My Brother Ron

    Clayton E. Cramer

    @firasd https://t.co/sZXbB5mKQx https://t.co/TL8dzG9vLo

  • Merchants of Truth

    Jill Abramson

    The definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade. With the expert guidance of former Executive Editor of The New York Times Jill Abramson, we follow two legacy (The New York Times and The Washington Post) and two upstart (BuzzFeed and VICE) companies as they plow through a revolution in technology, economics, standards, commitment, and endurance that pits old vs. new media. Merchants of Truth is the groundbreaking and gripping story of the precarious state of the news business told by one of our most eminent journalists. Jill Abramson follows four companies: The New York Times, The Washington Post, BuzzFeed, and VICE Media over a decade of disruption and radical adjustment. The new digital reality nearly kills two venerable newspapers with an aging readership while creating two media behemoths with a ballooning and fickle audience of millennials. We get to know the defenders of the legacy presses as well as the outsized characters who are creating the new speed-driven media competitors. The players include Jeff Bezos and Marty Baron (The Washington Post), Arthur Sulzberger and Dean Baquet (The New York Times), Jonah Peretti (BuzzFeed), and Shane Smith (VICE) as well as their reporters and anxious readers. Merchants of Truth raises crucial questions that concern the well-being of our society. We are facing a crisis in trust that threatens the free press. Abramson’s book points us to the future.

    @matthewhughes Jill Abramson, former editor of the New York Times, on how business imperatives and pageviews drove the editorial process. From her book Merchants of Truth. https://t.co/9vq9lsqxWP

  • We’ve all read Grove. Only the paranoid survive. https://t.co/LhdyZXFpUf https://t.co/gHFbImsKRW

  • AI Superpowers

    Kai-Fu Lee

    Dr. Kai-Fu Lee - one of the world's most respected experts on AI and China - reveals that China has suddenly caught up to the US at an astonishingly rapid and unexpected pace. In AI SUPERPOWERS, Kai-fu Lee argues powerfully that because of these unprecedented developments in AI, dramatic changes will be happening much sooner than many of us expected. Indeed, as the US-Sino AI competition begins to heat up, Lee urges the US and China to both accept and to embrace the great responsibilities that come with significant technological power. Most experts already say that AI will have a devastating impact on blue-collar jobs. But Lee predicts that Chinese and American AI will have a strong impact on white-collar jobs as well. Is universal basic income the solution? In Lee's opinion, probably not. But he provides a clear description of which jobs will be affected and how soon, which jobs can be enhanced with AI, and most importantly, how we can provide solutions to some of the most profound changes in human history that are coming soon. AUTHOR: Dr. Kai-Fu Lee is the Chairman and CEO of Sinovation Ventures, which is a leading technology-savvy investment firm focusing on developing the next generation of Chinese high-tech companies. Prior to founding Sinovation in 2009, Dr. Lee was the President of Google China. Previously, he held executive positions at Microsoft, SGI, and Apple.

    Kai-Fu Lee's book AI Superpowers holds up very well today in key ways. I initially thought it'd be a pop overview of AI. But it's actually a history of the Chinese tech ecosystem. Many of his takes on speed of execution & innovation have now proven out. https://t.co/poFCoFUW3H

  • The Great Influenza

    John M. Barry

    Four books on the Spanish Flu. 1) The Great Influenza: https://t.co/Kg3brTYjsJ 2) Pale Rider: https://t.co/D8wXxEhSPr 3) Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918: https://t.co/gopi47nQMw 4) Pandemic 1918: https://t.co/fk5Y7IPB9J https://t.co/sGwbn3BktY

  • Pale Rider

    Laura Spinney

    Four books on the Spanish Flu. 1) The Great Influenza: https://t.co/Kg3brTYjsJ 2) Pale Rider: https://t.co/D8wXxEhSPr 3) Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918: https://t.co/gopi47nQMw 4) Pandemic 1918: https://t.co/fk5Y7IPB9J https://t.co/sGwbn3BktY

  • Flu

    Gina Kolata

    Four books on the Spanish Flu. 1) The Great Influenza: https://t.co/Kg3brTYjsJ 2) Pale Rider: https://t.co/D8wXxEhSPr 3) Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918: https://t.co/gopi47nQMw 4) Pandemic 1918: https://t.co/fk5Y7IPB9J https://t.co/sGwbn3BktY

  • Pandemic 1918

    Catharine Arnold

    Four books on the Spanish Flu. 1) The Great Influenza: https://t.co/Kg3brTYjsJ 2) Pale Rider: https://t.co/D8wXxEhSPr 3) Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918: https://t.co/gopi47nQMw 4) Pandemic 1918: https://t.co/fk5Y7IPB9J https://t.co/sGwbn3BktY

  • Few gave tiny Singapore much chance of survival when it was granted independence in 1965. How is it, then, that today the former British colonial trading post is a thriving Asian metropolis with not only the world's number one airline, best airport, and busiest port of trade, but also the world's fourth–highest per capita real income? The story of that transformation is told here by Singapore's charismatic, controversial founding father, Lee Kuan Yew. Rising from a legacy of divisive colonialism, the devastation of the Second World War, and general poverty and disorder following the withdrawal of foreign forces, Singapore now is hailed as a city of the future. This miraculous history is dramatically recounted by the man who not only lived through it all but who fearlessly forged ahead and brought about most of these changes. Delving deep into his own meticulous notes, as well as previously unpublished government papers and official records, Lee details the extraordinary efforts it took for an island city–state in Southeast Asia to survive at that time. Lee explains how he and his cabinet colleagues finished off the communist threat to the fledgling state's security and began the arduous process of nation building: forging basic infrastructural roads through a land that still consisted primarily of swamps, creating an army from a hitherto racially and ideologically divided population, stamping out the last vestiges of colonial–era corruption, providing mass public housing, and establishing a national airline and airport. In this illuminating account, Lee writes frankly about his trenchant approach to political opponents and his often unorthodox views on human rights, democracy, and inherited intelligence, aiming always "to be correct, not politically correct." Nothing in Singapore escaped his watchful eye: whether choosing shrubs for the greening of the country, restoring the romance of the historic Raffles Hotel, or openly, unabashedly persuading young men to marry women as well educated as themselves. Today's safe, tidy Singapore bears Lee's unmistakable stamp, for which he is unapologetic: "If this is a nanny state, I am proud to have fostered one." Though Lee's domestic canvas in Singapore was small, his vigor and talent assured him a larger place in world affairs. With inimitable style, he brings history to life with cogent analyses of some of the greatest strategic issues of recent times and reveals how, over the years, he navigated the shifting tides of relations among America, China, and Taiwan, acting as confidant, sounding board, and messenger for them. He also includes candid, sometimes acerbic pen portraits of his political peers, including the indomitable Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the poetry–spouting Jiang Zemin, and ideologues George Bush and Deng Xiaoping. Lee also lifts the veil on his family life and writes tenderly of his wife and stalwart partner, Kwa Geok Choo, and of their pride in their three children –– particularly the eldest son, Hsien Loong, who is now Singapore's deputy prime minister. For more than three decades, Lee Kuan Yew has been praised and vilified in equal measure, and he has established himself as a force impossible to ignore in Asian and international politics. From Third World to First offers readers a compelling glimpse into this visionary's heart, soul, and mind.

    @ErikVoorhees @matthewstoller 🙂 https://t.co/tqoe7ksKct

  • The Knowledge

    Lewis Dartnell

    First published by Penguin Press in hardcover as The knowledge: how to rebuild our world from scratch, 2014.

    @rajatsuri I agree with you generally. I do think however that autarky-as-backup-plan may come into vogue. Not the same standard of living as free trade, but not zero either in a supply chain disruption situation. It’s not easy but may be easier than people think. https://t.co/rAMKK8d9go

  • START-UP NATION addresses the trillion dollar question: How is it that Israel-- a country of 7.1 million, only 60 years old, surrounded by enemies, in a constant state of war since its founding, with no natural resources-- produces more start-up companies than large, peaceful, and stable nations like Japan, China, India, Korea, Canada and the UK? With the savvy of foreign policy insiders, Senor and Singer examine the lessons of the country's adversity-driven culture, which flattens hierarchy and elevates informality-- all backed up by government policies focused on innovation. In a world where economies as diverse as Ireland, Singapore and Dubai have tried to re-create the "Israel effect", there are entrepreneurial lessons well worth noting. As America reboots its own economy and can-do spirit, there's never been a better time to look at this remarkable and resilient nation for some impressive, surprising clues.

    @lorakolodny I love @dansenor's book! But I think we are going to see this trend accelerate. Just like there were Palm Pilots in 2000, but iPhones were bigger in 2010 and huge in 2020. https://t.co/kXsm0jLjEN

  • Netflixed

    Gina Keating

    Traces Netflix's rise throughout a decade-long war against Blockbuster, analyzing the polarizing characters attributed to its founders while evaluating how the company has become subject to competition and marketing tactics by cable companies and telecoms.

    What actually happened: Blockbuster tried to buy Hollywood Video, but the FTC called this off on antitrust (!) grounds. By 2010 Blockbuster was bankrupt and Netflix was soaring. In retrospect, state action was completely rearward looking and unnecessary. https://t.co/LndbQ2EIjd

  • Matt Mochary coaches the CEOs of many of the fastest-scaling technology companies in Silicon Valley. With The Great CEO Within, he shares his highly effective leadership and business-operating tools with any CEO or manager in the world. Learn how to efficiently scale your business from startup to corporation by implementing a system of accountability, effective problem-solving, and transparent feedback. Becoming a great CEO requires training. For a founding CEO, there is precious little time to complete that training, especially at the helm of a rapidly growing company. Now you have the guidance you need in one book.

    New book by Matt Mochary came out today. Preprint went viral on Hacker News a while back. @brian_armstrong and I used parts of this at Coinbase and @naval has used this at several of his companies. We found it helpful! https://t.co/nYtYzjweTc

  • Merchants of Truth

    Jill Abramson

    The definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade. With the expert guidance of former Executive Editor of The New York Times Jill Abramson, we follow two legacy (The New York Times and The Washington Post) and two upstart (BuzzFeed and VICE) companies as they plow through a revolution in technology, economics, standards, commitment, and endurance that pits old vs. new media. Merchants of Truth is the groundbreaking and gripping story of the precarious state of the news business told by one of our most eminent journalists. Jill Abramson follows four companies: The New York Times, The Washington Post, BuzzFeed, and VICE Media over a decade of disruption and radical adjustment. The new digital reality nearly kills two venerable newspapers with an aging readership while creating two media behemoths with a ballooning and fickle audience of millennials. We get to know the defenders of the legacy presses as well as the outsized characters who are creating the new speed-driven media competitors. The players include Jeff Bezos and Marty Baron (The Washington Post), Arthur Sulzberger and Dean Baquet (The New York Times), Jonah Peretti (BuzzFeed), and Shane Smith (VICE) as well as their reporters and anxious readers. Merchants of Truth raises crucial questions that concern the well-being of our society. We are facing a crisis in trust that threatens the free press. Abramson’s book points us to the future.

    @Henderburn @ani_pai @jeffjarvis > Do you know how to change a specific story to get more revenue from it? https://t.co/r8w3zBK6vW https://t.co/g7r6P7UuNX

  • Explores the relationship between journalists and their subjects, and the question of journalistic ethics, using the lawsuit of convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald against author Joe McGinniss, as a case study

    From the Journalist and the Murderer, by Janet Malcolm of the New Yorker. Rated one of the top 100 nonfiction books of the 20th century by the Modern Library. https://t.co/T5pJSuDFxK

  • You've probably heard about Bitcoin on the news or heard it being discussed by your friends or colleagues. How come the price keeps changing? Is Bitcoin a good investment? How does it even have value? Why do people keep talking about it like it's going to change the world?The Little Bitcoin Book tells the story of what's wrong with money today, and why Bitcoin was invented to provide an alternative to the current system. It describes in simple terms what Bitcoin is, how it works, why it's valuable, and how it affects individual freedom and opportunities of people everywhere - from Nigeria to the Philippines to Venezuela to the United States. This book also includes a Q & A section with some of the most frequently asked questions about Bitcoin.If you want to learn more about this new form of money which continues to gain interest and adoption around the world, then this book is for you.

    Hackathons are a good start. Maybe there’s more we can do in terms of harnessing all that brainpower in one place? As an example, the Little Bitcoin Book was written in a few days by N people, one chapter each, and then published on Amazon. @calilyliu @jimmysong What else?

  • The authors explain both the technical and business-relevant concepts that blockchain technology affords digital security.

    More and more frequently, I point people to @paulvigna and @mikejcasey’s book for an accessible explanation of how blockchains allow us to establish certain kinds of truths even in adversarial environments. https://t.co/8cxleO8ob9 https://t.co/a0zsXR0L6y

  • My Brother Ron

    Clayton E. Cramer

    America started a grand experiment in the 1960s: deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. The consequences were very destructive: homelessness; a degradation of urban life; increases in violent crime rates; increasing death rates for the mentally ill. My Brother Ron tells the story of deinstitutionalization from two points of view: what happened to the author's older brother, part of the first generation of those who became mentally ill after deinstitutionalization, and a detailed history of how and why America went down this path. My Brother Ron examines the multiple strands that came together to create the perfect storm that was deinstitutionalization: a well-meaning concern about the poor conditions of many state mental hospitals; a giddy optimism by the psychiatric profession in the ability of new drugs to cure the mentally ill; a rigid ideological approach to due process that ignored that the beneficiaries would end up starving to death or dying of exposure.

    @rezendi https://t.co/sZXbB5Emf7 https://t.co/tDr5Y6gK0Y

  • In 1957, Herbert L.Matthews of the New York Times, then considered one of the premiere foreign correspondents of his time, tracked down Fidel Castro in Cuba's Sierra Maestra mountains and returned with what was considered the scoop of the century. His heroic portrayal of Castro, who was then believed dead, had a powerful effect on American perceptions of Cuba, both in and out of the government, and profoundly influenced the fall of the Batista regime. When Castro emerged as a Soviet-backed dictator, Matthews became a scapegoat; his paper turned on him, his career foundered, and he was accused of betraying his country. In this fascinating book, New York Times reporter DePalma investigates the Matthews case to reveal how it contains the story not just of one newspaperman but of an age, not just how Castro came to power but how America determines who its enemies are. He re-creates the atmosphere of revolutionary Cuba and Cold War America, and clarifies the facts of Castro's ascension and political evolution from the many myths that have sprung up around them. Through a dramatic, ironic, in ways tragic story, The Man Who Invented Fidel offers provocative insights into Cuban politics, the Cuban-American relationship, and the many difficult balancing acts of responsible journalism.

    “[NYT reporter Herbert Matthews’] heroic portrayal of Castro, who was then believed dead, had a powerful effect on American perceptions of Cuba, both in and out of the government, and profoundly influenced the fall of the Batista regime.” https://t.co/0tE8pe8FWL

  • Ron Paul was to Bitcoin what Andrew Yang is to startup societies. Mainstreams ideas, prepares the ideological battlefield. https://t.co/W26YG3ghA1

  • If only Jack London’s Frisco was still au courant as a term for SF, this would be slightly more catchy Costco vs Frisco! https://t.co/nfHx5yBKuZ

  • Understanding modern physics doesn't have to be confusing and hard What if there was an intuitive way to understand how nature fundamentally works? What if there was a book that allowed you to see the whole picture and not just tiny parts of it? Thoughts like this are the reason that Physics from Finance now exists. What will you learn from this book? Get to know all fundamental interactions -Grasp how we can describe electromagnetic interactions, weak interactions, strong interactions and gravity using the same key ideas. Learn how to describe modern physics mathematically - Understand the meaning and origin of the Einstein equation, Maxwell's equations, and the Schrödinger equation. Develop an intuitive understanding of key concepts - Read how we can understand abstract ideas like Gauge Symmetry, Internal Spaces, Gauge Fields, Connections and Curvature using a simple toy model of the financial market. Get an understanding you can be proud of - Learn why fiber bundles and group theory provide a unified framework for all modern theories of physics. Physics from Finance is the most reader-friendly book on the geometry of modern physics ever written. Here's why. First of all, it's is nothing like a formal university lecture. Instead, it's like a casual conservation with a more experienced student. This also means that nothing is assumed to be "obvious" or "easy to see." Each chapter, each section, and each page focusses solely on the goal to help you understand. Nothing is introduced without a thorough motivation and it is always clear where each formula comes from. The book contains no fluff since unnecessary content quickly leads to confusion. Instead, it ruthlessly focusses on the fundamentals and makes sure you'll understand them in detail. The primary focus on the readers' needs is also visible in dozens of small features that you won't find in any other textbook In total, the book contains more than 100 illustrations that help you understand the most important concepts visually. Whenever a concept is used which was already introduced previously, there is a short sidenote that reminds you where it was first introduced and often recites the main points. In addition, helpful diagrams make sure you won't get lost.

    @js_horne This author’s work is a lot of fun. Not exactly art, but novel approach with a lot of visual inspiration. https://t.co/nbLagXvbmL

  • The Forgotten Man

    Amity Shlaes

    It's difficult today to imagine how America survived the Great Depression. Only through the stories of the common people who struggled during that era can we really understand how the nation endured. These are the people at the heart of Amity Shlaes's insightful and inspiring history of one of the most crucial events of the twentieth century. In The Forgotten Man, Amity Shlaes, one of the nation's most respected economic commentators, offers a striking reinterpretation of the Great Depression. Rejecting the old emphasis on the New Deal, she turns to the neglected and moving stories of individual Americans, and shows how through brave leadership they helped establish the steadfast character we developed as a nation. Some of those figures were well known, at least in their day—Andrew Mellon, the Greenspan of the era; Sam Insull of Chicago, hounded as a scapegoat. But there were also unknowns: the Schechters, a family of butchers in Brooklyn who dealt a stunning blow to the New Deal; Bill W., who founded Alcoholics Anonymous in the name of showing that small communities could help themselves; and Father Divine, a black charismatic who steered his thousands of followers through the Depression by preaching a Gospel of Plenty. Shlaes also traces the mounting agony of the New Dealers themselves as they discovered their errors. She shows how both Presidents Hoover and Roosevelt failed to understand the prosperity of the 1920s and heaped massive burdens on the country that more than offset the benefit of New Deal programs. The real question about the Depression, she argues, is not whether Roosevelt ended it with World War II. It is why the Depression lasted so long. From 1929 to 1940, federal intervention helped to make the Depression great—in part by forgetting the men and women who sought to help one another. Authoritative, original, and utterly engrossing, The Forgotten Man offers an entirely new look at one of the most important periods in our history. Only when we know this history can we understand the strength of American character today.

    @fmbutt I agree that those pressures were present. I find books like this useful as an alternate perspective on the era: https://t.co/6ZW8w2HHsI

  • In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. The “Asian Century” is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, Russia to Australia, Turkey to Indonesia—linking five billion people through trade, finance, infrastructure, and diplomatic networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. China has taken a lead in building the new Silk Roads across Asia, but it will not lead it alone. Rather, Asia is rapidly returning to the centuries-old patterns of commerce, conflict, and cultural exchange that thrived long before European colonialism and American dominance. Asians will determine their own future—and as they collectively assert their interests around the world, they will determine ours as well. There is no more important region of the world for us to better understand than Asia – and thus we cannot afford to keep getting Asia so wrong. Asia’s complexity has led to common misdiagnoses: Western thinking on Asia conflates the entire region with China, predicts imminent World War III around every corner, and regularly forecasts debt-driven collapse for the region’s major economies. But in reality, the region is experiencing a confident new wave of growth led by younger societies from India to the Philippines, nationalist leaders have put aside territorial disputes in favor of integration, and today’s infrastructure investments are the platform for the next generation of digital innovation. If the nineteenth century featured the Europeanization of the world, and the twentieth century its Americanization, then the twenty-first century is the time of Asianization. From investment portfolios and trade wars to Hollywood movies and university admissions, no aspect of life is immune from Asianization. With America’s tech sector dependent on Asian talent and politicians praising Asia’s glittering cities and efficient governments, Asia is permanently in our nation’s consciousness. We know this will be the Asian century. Now we finally have an accurate picture of what it will look like.

    The American century is ending. The Asian century is beginning. https://t.co/0waq25dx80

  • The Knowledge

    Lewis Dartnell

    First published by Penguin Press in hardcover as The knowledge: how to rebuild our world from scratch, 2014.

    You might productize this. The $100,000 containerized homestead. Like a meal kit++, except it’s a kit with which to make all your meals. The Knowledge by @lewis_dartnell is a great conceptual starting place if you’re interested in this kind of thing: https://t.co/rAMKK7VxRO