Chetan Puttagunta

Chetan Puttagunta

@benchmark investing in software

5 Book Recommendations by Chetan Puttagunta

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    "The Psychology of Money" by @morganhousel is such a clear and concise book that covers so many complex concepts around money and investing. Congratulations Morgan!

  • TAPE SUCKS

    Frank Slootman

    Silicon Valley has been birthing renegade technology companies for the better part of a century, a storied lineage that traces from Stanford's Fred Terman to the Varian brothers' Klystron amplifier, from the hallowed garage of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard to the bold "traitorous eight" who fled Shockley Labs to form Fairchild Semiconductor. These companies, to be sure, broke new science and engineering ground-yet their most lasting legacy may well be their pioneering approach to business itself. They blazed a path that led to Intel, Apple, Oracle, Genentech, Gilead, Sun, Adobe, Cisco, Yahoo, eBay, Google, Salesforce, Facebook, Twitter, and many, many others.What causes a fledgling company to break through and prosper? At the highest level, the blueprint is always the same: An upstart team with outsized ambition somehow possesses an uncanny ability to surpass customer expectations, upend whole industries, and topple incumbents. But how do they do it? If only we could observe the behaviors of such a company from the inside. If only we were granted a first-person perspective at a present-day Silicon Valley startup-cum-blockbuster. What might we learn? This document-the story of Data Domain's rise from zero to one billion dollars in revenue-is your invitation to find out. For anyone curious about the process of new business formation, Tape Sucks offers a provocative, ripped-from-the-headlines case study. How does a new company bootstrap itself? What role does venture capital play? Why do customers and new recruits take a chance on a risky new player? Frank Slootman, who lived and breathed the Data Domain story for six years, offers up his clear-eyed, "first-person shooter" version of events. You're with him on the inside as he and his team navigate the tricky waters of launching a high-technology business. You'll feel-deep in your gut-the looming threat of outside combatants and the array of challenges that make mere survival an accomplishment. You'll catch a glimpse of an adrenalin-fueled place where victories are visceral, communication wide open, and esprit de corps palpable. The upshot is that the principles of the early entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley are alive and well. Their straightforward ideas include employee-ownership, tolerance for failure, unfettered meritocracy, faith in the power of technology breakthroughs, a preference for handshakes and trust over contracts and lawsuits, pragmatism, egalitarianism, and a belief in the primacy of growth and reinvestment over dividends and outbound profits. Tape Sucks is an honest, informed perspective on technology wave riding. It allows you to observe a high-growth business at close range and get an unvarnished picture of how things really work.

    @bentossell There haven't been a lot of books written on enterprise sales/ enterprise software (yet). As you know, I've mentioned "Tape Sucks" previously. Porter's "Competitive Strategy" and Moore's "Crossing the Chasm" are very relevant.

  • Competitive Strategy

    Michael E. Porter

    Now nearing its sixtieth printing in English and translated into nineteen languages, Michael E. Porter's Competitive Strategy has transformed the theory, practice, and teaching of business strategy throughout the world. Electrifying in its simplicity—like all great breakthroughs—Porter’s analysis of industries captures the complexity of industry competition in five underlying forces. Porter introduces one of the most powerful competitive tools yet developed: his three generic strategies—lowest cost, differentiation, and focus—which bring structure to the task of strategic positioning. He shows how competitive advantage can be defined in terms of relative cost and relative prices, thus linking it directly to profitability, and presents a whole new perspective on how profit is created and divided. In the almost two decades since publication, Porter's framework for predicting competitor behavior has transformed the way in which companies look at their rivals and has given rise to the new discipline of competitor assessment. More than a million managers in both large and small companies, investment analysts, consultants, students, and scholars throughout the world have internalized Porter's ideas and applied them to assess industries, understand competitors, and choose competitive positions. The ideas in the book address the underlying fundamentals of competition in a way that is independent of the specifics of the ways companies go about competing. Competitive Strategy has filled a void in management thinking. It provides an enduring foundation and grounding point on which all subsequent work can be built. By bringing a disciplined structure to the question of how firms achieve superior profitability, Porter’s rich frameworks and deep insights comprise a sophisticated view of competition unsurpassed in the last quarter-century.

    @bentossell There haven't been a lot of books written on enterprise sales/ enterprise software (yet). As you know, I've mentioned "Tape Sucks" previously. Porter's "Competitive Strategy" and Moore's "Crossing the Chasm" are very relevant.

  • The bible for bringing cutting-edge products to larger markets—now revised and updated with new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing In Crossing the Chasm, Geoffrey A. Moore shows that in the Technology Adoption Life Cycle—which begins with innovators and moves to early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards—there is a vast chasm between the early adopters and the early majority. While early adopters are willing to sacrifice for the advantage of being first, the early majority waits until they know that the technology actually offers improvements in productivity. The challenge for innovators and marketers is to narrow this chasm and ultimately accelerate adoption across every segment. This third edition brings Moore's classic work up to date with dozens of new examples of successes and failures, new strategies for marketing in the digital world, and Moore's most current insights and findings. He also includes two new appendices, the first connecting the ideas in Crossing the Chasm to work subsequently published in his Inside the Tornado, and the second presenting his recent groundbreaking work for technology adoption models for high-tech consumer markets.

    @bentossell There haven't been a lot of books written on enterprise sales/ enterprise software (yet). As you know, I've mentioned "Tape Sucks" previously. Porter's "Competitive Strategy" and Moore's "Crossing the Chasm" are very relevant.

  • TAPE SUCKS

    Frank Slootman

    @manavdas It is a great read. It’s available on Amazon here: https://t.co/oW9hWFV5uY