David Perell

David Perell

"The Writing Guy" | I tweet about writing, learning and business | My writing school: https://t.co/bzeQ7VVyS0 | My writing: https://t.co/SOE9HtxXdi

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80+ Book Recommendations by David Perell

  • FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE WAR OF ART ...There's a mantra that real writers know that wannabe writers don't. And the secret phrase is this: NOBODY WANTS TO READ YOUR SH*TRecognizing that painful truth is the first step in the writer's transformation from amateur to professional. "When you understand that nobody wants to read your shit, you develop empathy. You acquire the skill that is indispensable to all artists and entrepreneurs--the ability to switch back and forth in your imagination from your own point of view as writer/painter/seller to the point of view of your reader/gallery-goer/customer. You learn to ask yourself with every sentence and every phrase: Is this interesting? Is it fun or challenging or inventive? Am I giving the reader enough? Is she bored? Is she following where I want to lead her?"

    @nickhoward That's gotta be one of the best books ever written about the creative process. I also recommend "Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*T"

  • The War of Art

    Steven Pressfield

    "In this powerful, straight-from-the-hip examination of the internal obstacles to success, bestselling author Steven Pressfield shows readers how to identify, defeat, and unlock the inner barriers to creativity. The War of Art is an inspirational, funny, well-aimed kick in the pants guaranteed to galvanize every would-be artist, visionary, or entrepreneur." --from back cover.

    @nickhoward That's gotta be one of the best books ever written about the creative process. I also recommend "Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*T"

  • Fallen Leaves

    Will Durant

    You won’t find a book with a higher density of wisdom https://t.co/t6jKlLb9hC

  • Dominion

    Tom Holland

    A "marvelous" (Economist) account of how the Christian Revolution forged the Western imagination Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable, a punishment reserved for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion -- an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus -- was to be worshipped as a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history. Today, the West remains utterly saturated by Christian assumptions. As Tom Holland demonstrates, our morals and ethics are not universal but are instead the fruits of a very distinctive civilization. Concepts such as secularism, liberalism, science, and homosexuality are deeply rooted in a Christian seedbed. From Babylon to the Beatles, Saint Michael to #MeToo, Dominion tells the story of how Christianity transformed the modern world.

    @calzila1 Yes! That book was a big influence

  • Writers at Work Around the World

    Emily (preface) Nemens

    My favorite rabbit hole these days is books that are just a collection of interviews with really smart people. My recommendations: Paris Review and The Last Interview series https://t.co/F474Hs8oJD

  • Golf's Holy War

    Brett Cyrgalis

    Just as Michael Lewis’s Moneyball captured baseball at a technological turning point, Brett Cyrgalis’s Golf’s Holy War takes us inside golf’s clash between its beloved artistic tradition and its analytic future. The world of golf is at a crossroads. As tech­nological innovations displace traditional philosophies, the golfing community has splintered into two deeply combative factions: the old-school teachers and players who believe in feel, artistry, and imagination, and the technical minded who want to remake the game around data. In Golf’s Holy War, Brett Cyrgalis takes readers inside the heated battle playing out from weekend hackers to PGA Tour pros. At the Titleist Performance Institute in Oceanside, California, golfers clad in full-body sensors target weaknesses in their biomechanics, while others take part in mental exercises designed to test their brain’s psychological resilience. Meanwhile, coaches like Michael Hebron purge golfers of all technical infor­mation, tapping into the power of intuitive physical learning by playing rudimentary games. From historic St. Andrews to manicured Augusta, experimental com­munes in California to corporatized conferences in Orlando, William James to Ben Hogan to theoretical physics, the factions of the spiritual and technical push to redefine the boundaries of the game. And yet what does it say that Tiger Woods has orchestrated one of the greatest comebacks in sports history without the aid of a formal coach? But Golf’s Holy War is more than just a book about golf—it’s a story about modern life and how we are torn between resisting and embracing the changes brought about by the advancements of science and technology. It’s also an exploration of historical legacies, the enriching bonds of education, and the many interpretations of reality.

    @demccaffrey Incredible book if you love golf

  • Citing memory-related inconveniences suffered by average individuals, the author chronicles his own struggles with chronic forgetfulness and his year in memory training, as well as sharing historical lore and memory techniques.

    @LuEish Love that book! And I agree, there's some nuance here https://t.co/1tSCKpTF6u

  • The Road

    Cormac McCarthy

    Jack Kerouac's process for "On the Road" is one of my favorite FAST Writing examples. First, he spent seven years collecting experiences. Then, he turned all those experiences into a book in just 21 days — all on a 120-foot typewriter scroll. (h/t @BostonGlobe) https://t.co/6dJTrSakok

  • The Circle

    Dave Eggers

    NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE starring Tom Hanks, Emma Watson and John Boyega THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - a dark, thrilling and unputdownable novel about our obsession with the internet 'Prepare to be addicted' Daily Mail 'A gripping and highly unsettling read' Sunday Times 'The Circle is 'Brave New World' for our brave new world... Fast, witty and troubling' Washington Post When Mae is hired to work for the Circle, the world's most powerful internet company, she feels she's been given the opportunity of a lifetime. Run out of a sprawling California campus, the Circle links users' personal emails, social media, and finances with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of transparency. Mae can't believe her great fortune to work for them - even as life beyond the campus grows distant, even as a strange encounter with a colleague leaves her shaken, even as her role at the Circle becomes increasingly public ... 'An elegantly told, compulsively readable parable for the 21st Century' Vanity Fair 'Immensely readable and very timely' Metro 'Prescient, important and enjoyable . . . a deft modern synthesis of Swiftian wit with Orwellian prognostication' Guardian

    @p_millerd Have you read The Circle by Dave Eggers? This is straight out of that book

  • From the cofounder of Square, an inspiring and entertaining account of what it means to be a true entrepreneur and what it takes to build a resilient, world-changing company In 2009, a St. Louis glassblowing artist and recovering computer scientist named Jim McKelvey lost a sale because he couldn't accept American Express cards. Frustrated by the high costs and difficulty of accepting credit card payments, McKelvey joined his friend Jack Dorsey (the cofounder of Twitter) to launch Square, a startup that would enable small merchants to accept credit card payments on their mobile phones. With no expertise or experience in the world of payments, they approached the problem of credit cards with a new perspective, questioning the industry's assumptions, experimenting and innovating their way through early challenges, and achieving widespread adoption from merchants small and large. But just as Square was taking off, Amazon launched a similar product, marketed it aggressively, and undercut Square on price. For most ordinary startups, this would have spelled the end. Instead, less than a year later, Amazon was in retreat and soon discontinued its service. How did Square beat the most dangerous company on the planet? Was it just luck? These questions motivated McKelvey to study what Square had done differently from all the other companies Amazon had killed. He eventually found the key: a strategy he calls the Innovation Stack. McKelvey's fascinating and humorous stories of Square's early days are blended with historical examples of other world-changing companies built on the Innovation Stack to reveal a pattern of ground-breaking, competition-proof entrepreneurship that is rare but repeatable. The Innovation Stack is a thrilling business narrative that's much bigger than the story of Square. It is an irreverent first-person look inside the world of entrepreneurship, and a call to action for all of us to find the entrepreneur within ourselves and identify and fix unsolved problems--one crazy idea at a time.

    The source is a book called "The Innovation Stack," and if you want to read it, I found a free PDF for you https://t.co/CJnMVxwdax

  • Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.

    One of the best books of 2020 was @EricJorgenson’s compilation of @Naval’s worldview. I strongly suggest that you read it, and you can enjoy it for free too: https://t.co/04cG8KVw7V https://t.co/q2cCwJnYLZ

  • Man's Quest For God

    Abraham J. Heschel

    In this collection of powerful essays, Dr. Hartman looks with a clear, scholarly, yet passionate eye on the spiritual and theological questions that face all Jews and all religious persons in our day.

    @james_d_baird Heschel, who is a must read! (h/t @RabbiWolpe for the recommendation) https://t.co/Qmt4eq7qfv

  • Bowling Alone

    Robert D. Putnam

    Shows how changes in work, family structure, women's roles, and other factors have caused people to become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and democratic structures--and how they may reconnect.

    Robert Putnam's book Bowling Alone is one of the most influential pieces of American sociology. In it, he talks about the decline of social life in America, including the fall in church membership and attendance at public meetings. Here's a summary. https://t.co/HHRJoQ2rXa

  • I like books that were once popular, but now forgotten. One example is “Progress and Poverty,” which was the #2 best-seller in the 1890s but is nowhere to be found today. https://t.co/deFnW5kwkY

  • Understanding Media

    Marshall McLuhan

    McLuhan's view of a media-sculpted society of the future.

    This is my book Hall of Fame https://t.co/l0qtMU2U3W

  • Leisure

    Josef Pieper

    One of the most important philosophy titles published in the twentieth century, Joseph Pieper's Leisure, the Basis of Culture is more significant, even more crucial than it was when it first appeared fifty years ago. Pieper shows that Greeks understood and valued leisure, as did the medieval Europeans. He points out that religion can be born only in leisure. Leisure that allows time for the contemplation of the nature of God. Leisure has been, and always will be, the first foundation of any culture. He maintains that our bourgeois world of total labor has vanquished leisure, and issues a startling warning: Unless we regain the art of silence and insight, the ability for nonactivity, unless we substitute true leisure for our hectic amusements, we will destroy our cultureCand ourselves. These astonishing essays contradict all our pragmatic and puritanical conceptions about labor and leisure; Joseph Pieper demolishes the twentieth-century cult of Awork as he predicts its destructive consequences.

    This is my book Hall of Fame https://t.co/l0qtMU2U3W

  • Anam Cara

    John O'Donohue

    Discover the Celtic Circle of Belonging John O'Donohue, poet, philosopher, and scholar, guides you through the spiritual landscape of the Irish imagination. In Anam Cara, Gaelic for "soul friend," the ancient teachings, stories, and blessings of Celtic wisdom provide such profound insights on the universal themes of friendship, solitude, love, and death as: Light is generous The human heart is never completely born Love as ancient recognition The body is the angel of the soul Solitude is luminous Beauty likes neglected places The passionate heart never ages To benatural is to be holy Silence is the sister of the divine Death as an invitation to freedom

    This is my book Hall of Fame https://t.co/l0qtMU2U3W

  • This is my book Hall of Fame https://t.co/l0qtMU2U3W

  • This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

    One example is Oswald Spengler who wrote more than 100 years ago. He was an average teacher in an average school, but his book “Decline of the West” was a bestseller in Europe throughout the 1920s. He presents a theory of history unlike anything I’ve read. (h/t @jeremygiffon) https://t.co/5MWWm96s21

  • Leisure

    Josef Pieper

    One of the most important philosophy titles published in the twentieth century, Joseph Pieper's Leisure, the Basis of Culture is more significant, even more crucial than it was when it first appeared fifty years ago. Pieper shows that Greeks understood and valued leisure, as did the medieval Europeans. He points out that religion can be born only in leisure. Leisure that allows time for the contemplation of the nature of God. Leisure has been, and always will be, the first foundation of any culture. He maintains that our bourgeois world of total labor has vanquished leisure, and issues a startling warning: Unless we regain the art of silence and insight, the ability for nonactivity, unless we substitute true leisure for our hectic amusements, we will destroy our cultureCand ourselves. These astonishing essays contradict all our pragmatic and puritanical conceptions about labor and leisure; Joseph Pieper demolishes the twentieth-century cult of Awork as he predicts its destructive consequences.

    @JohnathanBi One of my favorite books of all time

  • Walter J. Ong's classic work provides a fascinating insight into the social effects of oral, written, printed and electronic technologies, and their impact on philosophical, theological, scientific and literary thought. This thirtieth anniversary edition – coinciding with Ong's centenary year – reproduces his best-known and most influential book in full and brings it up to date with two new exploratory essays by cultural writer and critic John Hartley. Hartley provides: A scene-setting chapter that situates Ong's work within the historical and disciplinary context of post-war Americanism and the rise of communication and media studies; A closing chapter that follows up Ong's work on orality and literacy in relation to evolving media forms, with a discussion of recent criticisms of Ong's approach, and an assessment of his concept of the 'evolution of consciousness'; Extensive references to recent scholarship on orality, literacy and the study of knowledge technologies, tracing changes in how we know what we know. These illuminating essays contextualize Ong within recent intellectual history, and display his work's continuing force in the ongoing study of the relationship between literature and the media, as well as that of psychology, education and sociological thought.

    @aaronzlewis Awesome book https://t.co/Ca649xZlhT

  • Media Control

    Noam Chomsky

    Examines American propaganda efforts and discusses how both major political parties use the falsification of history, suppression of information, and promotion of meaningless discourse to stifle questions about U.S. policy.

    @MatthewFox_ @JohnathanBi Chomsky‘s wrote and spoke well about the Overton Window https://t.co/5D4E71aE23

  • 1. Great ideas are buried in history Bryson's swing is inspired by a 1969 book called The Golfing Machine. It describes 144 ways you can swing a club and inspired Bryson to adopt a "single plane swing." It's one of the most controversial books ever written about golf. https://t.co/XO1NQeYQPK

  • Whether you've never picked up a knife or you're an accomplished chef, there are only four basic factors that determine how good your food will taste. Salt, Fat, Acid, and Heat are the four cardinal directions of cooking, and they will guide you as you choose which ingredients to use and how to cook them, and they will tell you why last minute adjustments will ensure that food tastes exactly as it should. This book will change the way you think about cooking and eating, and help you find your bearings in any kitchen, with any ingredients, while cooking any meal. --

    I just picked up a book called “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat” with beautiful illustrations that go beyond basic recipes https://t.co/2vQ5OlQ8lH

  • 2 distinguished historians express their evaluation of the nature of the human experience and what may be learned from it

    Will and Ariel Durant spent their lives studying civilization. To summarize what they learned, they wrote a 100–page book called “The Lessons of History.” This is my favorite paragraph. https://t.co/BLS7rKyFZ2

  • Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.

    Source: @MorganHousel’s excellent new book https://t.co/SdGz6q7xvU

  • Every Shot Counts

    Mark Broadie

    Applying cutting-edge science analyses to the game of golf, a Columbia Business School professor, using Golfmetric's amateur data, the PGA TOUR's ShotLink data, and newly developed golf analytics, shows golfers of all skill levels how to make better decisions on the course. 25,000 first printing.

    @CantHardyWait @TaylorPearsonMe Yep! In one sentence, putting is over-rated and more people should practice driving and mid-irons. Here's my interview with the author, @MarkBroadie: https://t.co/8IxXYmX5HF https://t.co/EMDQKvRsND LOVE this topic, could talk about it for hours.

  • Leisure

    Josef Pieper

    One of the most important philosophy titles published in the twentieth century, Joseph Pieper's Leisure, the Basis of Culture is more significant, even more crucial than it was when it first appeared fifty years ago. Pieper shows that Greeks understood and valued leisure, as did the medieval Europeans. He points out that religion can be born only in leisure. Leisure that allows time for the contemplation of the nature of God. Leisure has been, and always will be, the first foundation of any culture. He maintains that our bourgeois world of total labor has vanquished leisure, and issues a startling warning: Unless we regain the art of silence and insight, the ability for nonactivity, unless we substitute true leisure for our hectic amusements, we will destroy our cultureCand ourselves. These astonishing essays contradict all our pragmatic and puritanical conceptions about labor and leisure; Joseph Pieper demolishes the twentieth-century cult of Awork as he predicts its destructive consequences.

    @leonjcoe Yep, love that book

  • THE NEW YORK TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED FOR THE WELLCOME BOOK PRIZE 2017 'Finishing this book and then forgetting about it is simply not an option...Unmissable' New York Times At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, the next he was a patient struggling to live. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a medical student asking what makes a virtuous and meaningful life into a neurosurgeon working in the core of human identity – the brain – and finally into a patient and a new father. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when when life is catastrophically interrupted? What does it mean to have a child as your own life fades away? Paul Kalanithi died while working on this profoundly moving book, yet his words live on as a guide to us all. When Breath Becomes Air is a life-affirming reflection on facing our mortality and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a gifted writer who became both.

    @sidharthajha @taps Fantastic book, Lucy's afterword is equal parts heartwarming and soul-wrenching

  • ANAM CARA

    JOHN O`DONOHUE

    John O'Donohue nos recuerda en este maravilloso libro, convertido ya en un clasico, la sabiduria, la poesia y la informacion sagrada que casi cualquier lugar nos ofrece, si tan solo aprendemos a detenernos un momento y escuchar. Combinando el folclore irlandes, la espiritualidad celta y la sabiduria perenne, O'Donohue nos presenta un libro delicioso y un companero perfecto para quien se sienta inclinado hacia el camino espiritual, teniendo al mismo tiempo que convivir con la prisa, el ruido y el estres de la vida moderna. Un verdadero amigo que nos ayudara a volver a aquello que nunca debimos haber olvidado, aquello que desde siempre esta en nuestro interior. "Anam Cara" significa "alma amiga".

    @itsjonsantiago Anam Cara is his best book

  • @josephcwells @AlexAndBooks_ @dollarsanddata That’s pretty high up there! Also, this book https://t.co/zO6Fu2vnpJ

  • Shantaram

    Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.

    The book is called Shantaram. Thanks for the recommendation, @EricJorgenson. https://t.co/AXsvcUNpbD

  • Leon Krier is one of the best-known—and most provocative—architects and urban theoreticians in the world. Until now, however, his ideas have circulated mostly among a professional audience of architects, city planners, and academics. In The Architecture of Community, Krier has reconsidered and expanded writing from his 1998 book Architecture: Choice or Fate. Here he refines and updates his thinking on the making of sustainable, humane, and attractive villages, towns, and cities. The book includes drawings, diagrams, and photographs of his built works, which have not been widely seen until now. With three new chapters, The Architecture of Community provides a contemporary road map for designing or completing today’s fragmented communities. Illustrated throughout with Krier’s original drawings, The Architecture of Community explains his theories on classical and vernacular urbanism and architecture, while providing practical design guidelines for creating livable towns. The book contains descriptions and images of the author’s built and unbuilt projects, including the Krier House and Tower in Seaside, Florida, as well as the town of Poundbury in England. Commissioned by the Prince of Wales in 1988, Krier’s design for Poundbury in Dorset has become a reference model for ecological planning and building that can meet contemporary needs.

    Here's the source https://t.co/fzLDpcYj4z

  • The Sovereign Individual

    James Dale Davidson

    The authors identify both the likely disasters and the potential for prosperity inherent in the advent of the information age.

    If you're looking for new ideas about the future, I recommend The Sovereign Individual. I've never seen a book with so many correct predictions, and it's inspired a generation of builders, entrepreneurs, and technologists. Here's a free PDF. https://t.co/HhRRG36Wim

  • Rework

    Jason Fried

    This thread was inspired by @dhh and @JasonFried. I read this book in 24 hours, and it's going to be my go-to read as I build this business. Big thanks to @BrentBeshore, @Austin_Rief, @ForteLabs, and @AWilkinson who also inspired these thoughts. 🙏 https://t.co/clP5b3lk9B

  • @NicholasNikolov https://t.co/NtnZTAUF8a

  • Medical Nihilism

    Jacob Stegenga

    Medical nihilism is the view that we should have little confidence in the effectiveness of medical interventions. This book argues that medical nihilism is a compelling view of modern medicine. If we consider the frequency of failed medical interventions, the extent of misleading evidence inmedical research, the thin theoretical basis of many interventions, and the malleability of empirical methods in medicine, and if we employ our best inductive framework, then our confidence in the effectiveness of medical interventions ought to be low. Part I articulates theoretical and conceptual groundwork, in which Jacob Stegenga offers a defence of a hybrid theory of disease, which forms the basis of a novel account of effectiveness, and applies this to pharmacological science and to issues such as medicalization. Part II critically examinesdetails of medical research. Even the very best methods in medical research, such as randomized trials and meta-analyses, are malleable and suffer from various biases. Methods of measuring the effectiveness of medical interventions systematically overestimate benefits and underestimate harms. PartIII summarizes the arguments for medical nihilism and what this position entails for medical research and practice. To evaluate medical nihilism with care, Stegenga states the argument in formal terms. Medical nihilism suggests that medical research must be modified, that clinical practice should beless aggressive in its therapeutic approaches, and that regulatory standards should be enhanced.

    @danwwang @patrickc Have you seen this chart from Medical Nihilism? Suggests that Dan is on to something. https://t.co/KBnPuGhKV4 https://t.co/KoaYOk5JBM

  • Originally published separately, Weber's 'Science as a Vocation' and 'Politics as a Vocation' stand as the classic formulations of his positions on two related subjects that go to the heart of his thought: the nature and status of science and its claims to authority; and the nature and status of political claims and the ultimate justification for such claims. Together in this volume, these newly translated lectures offer an ideal point of entry into Weber's central project: understanding how, as Weber put it, "in the West alone there have appeared cultural manifestations [that seem to] go in the direction of universal significance and validity."

    Some context: I’ve spent the day reading and discussing an essay called “Science as a Vocation,” written by Max Weber in 1917. He believed intuition could not be forced and inspiration could not be created — it had to be accepted as a gift. https://t.co/aGYTQemCHJ

  • The Protestant ethic and "spirit" of capitalism -- "Churches" and "sects" in North America -- Critical remarks in response to the foregoing "critical contributions"--Remarks on the foregoing "reply"--Rebuttal of the critique of the "spirit" of capitalism -- A final rebuttal of Rachfahl's critique of the "spirit of capitalism."

    To add to the learning experiment, I’m going to drop into every class at a major New York university for an entire semester. The entire semester is focused on one book: “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.” Absolutely pumped.

  • Paramahansa Yogananda's remarkable life story takes you on an unforgettable exploration of the world of saints and yogis, science and miracles, death and resurrection.

    @oliveremberton Here's a fun twist on the idea. @ellenrhymes calls this Finding Your Bible — the one book that influences everything you do. Three examples: 1) Steve Jobs: Autobiography of a Yogi 2) Bob Dylan: On the Road 3) Shakespeare: Ovid's Metamorphoses https://t.co/RdHE0twII9

  • On the Road

    Jack Kerouac

    Follows the counterculture escapades of members of the Beat generation as they seek pleasure and meaning while traveling coast to coast

    @oliveremberton Here's a fun twist on the idea. @ellenrhymes calls this Finding Your Bible — the one book that influences everything you do. Three examples: 1) Steve Jobs: Autobiography of a Yogi 2) Bob Dylan: On the Road 3) Shakespeare: Ovid's Metamorphoses https://t.co/RdHE0twII9

  • The modern, unacademic idiom of A.D. Melville's translation opens the way to a fresh understanding of Ovid's unique and elusive vision of reality.

    @oliveremberton Here's a fun twist on the idea. @ellenrhymes calls this Finding Your Bible — the one book that influences everything you do. Three examples: 1) Steve Jobs: Autobiography of a Yogi 2) Bob Dylan: On the Road 3) Shakespeare: Ovid's Metamorphoses https://t.co/RdHE0twII9

  • This is the best resource I’ve found for Buffett’s letters. Compiled by @maxolson. https://t.co/bNkSpGfMgc

  • Insider Baseball

    Joan Didion

    Bingo! I just found a hidden genre of Kindle books. They're called "Vintage Shorts," and they're 50-70 page books on important subjects — the perfect length for a book. They're hard to find, but that's what makes them a secret. Here's an example. https://t.co/kwm2ns5wti

  • FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER THE ETYMOLOGICON. 'An informative but highly entertaining journey through the figures of rhetoric ... Mark Forsyth wears his considerable knowledge lightly. He also writes beautifully.' David Marsh, Guardian. Mark Forsyth presents the secret of writing unforgettable phrases, uncovering the techniques that have made immortal such lines as 'To be or not to be' and 'Bond. James Bond.' In his inimitably entertaining and witty style, he takes apart famous quotations and shows how you too can write like Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde or John Lennon. Crammed with tricks to make the most humdrum sentiments seem poetic or wise, The Elements of Eloquencereveals how writers through the ages have turned humble words into literary gold - and how you can do the same.

    @BatistLeman I recommend "Elements of Eloquence." But if you want to dramatically improve your writing, you should start by building a note-taking system and a repeatable process for creating and expressing interesting ideas. https://t.co/zX6fpiYGTc

  • Being the Third Edition of Systemantics, extensively revised and expanded by the addition of several new Chapters including new Axioms, Theorems, and Rules of Thumb, together with many new Case Histories and Horrible Examples.

    Here’s a similar observation from a book called “The Systems Bible.” h/t @DeeZeyDeeZe https://t.co/7vqbQIWAx6

  • Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.

    This is an outstanding paragraph. Written in the 1980s! Source: a book called “Amusing Ourselves to Death” https://t.co/jhaZsDZkGU

  • In this lively series of conversations with writer Michel Treguer, René Girard revisits the major concepts of mimetic theory and explores science, democracy, and the nature of God and freedom. Girard affirms that “our unprecedented present is incomprehensible without Christianity.” Globalization has unified the world, yet civil war and terrorism persist despite free trade and economic growth. Because of mimetic desire and the rivalry it generates, asserts Girard, “whether we’re talking about marriage, friendship, professional relationships, issues with neighbors or matters of national unity, human relations are always under threat.” Literary masters including Marivaux, Dostoevsky, and Joyce understood this, as did archaic religion, which warded off violence with blood sacrifice. Christianity brought a new understanding of sacrifice, giving rise not only to modern rationality and science but also to a fragile system that is, in Girard’s words, “always teetering between a new golden age and a destructive apocalypse.” Treguer, a skeptic of mimetic theory, wonders: “Is what he’s telling me true...or is it just a nice story, a way of looking at things?” In response, Girard makes a compelling case for his theory.

    @alanjosephwilli @visakanv this book. it's fantastic. https://t.co/L2JxtSUIAW

  • "With the New Economics Foundation"--Cover.

    Here’s the Monopoly story. From an excellent book called “Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing.” https://t.co/XMzBegJg0d

  • Get Together

    Bailey Richardson

    Although communities feel magical, they don't come together by magic. Get Together is a guide to cultivating a community-people who come together over what they care about. Whether starting a run crew, helping online streamers connect with fans, or sparking a movement of K-12 teachers, the secret to community-building is the same: don't fixate on what you can do for people (or what they can do for you). Instead, focus on what you can do with them. In Get Together, the People & Company team provides stories, prompts, and principles for each stage of cultivating a passionate group of people. Every organization holds the potential to build and sustain a thriving community. Get Together shows readers how companies and customers, artist and fans, or organizers and advocates, can join forces to accomplish more together than they could have alone.

    @packyM @JonHaidt @bhorowitz @baileyelaine @kevinhuynh @hi_kaielmer @lindakinstler @ethelsclub @kevin2kelly @southpkcommons @lunchclubai Loved Get Together. We’re gonna use it as a playbook to grow Write of Passage as well

  • Atomic Habits

    James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.

    Atomic Habits by @JamesClear is one of the best-selling books of the year. Three lessons: 1) He’s been interviewed on more than 100 podcasts. 2) His blog is a testing ground for ideas. Only the best ones made it into his book. 3) He has more than 500,000 email subscribers.

  • First commissioned by the CIA, this book offers a fascinating look at the never-ending quest for better intelligence analysis. At the fundamental core of this work are the cognitive challenges that any analyst faces, and how critical thinking can significantly improve our understanding and outcomes for complex issues. This book explains how the mind is poorly wired to deal with information that is vague, convoluted, or that has been deliberately distorted. Our mental processes can lead us to jump to conclusions or employ other simplifying strategies that create faulty judgments, known as cognitive biases. However, critical thinking can substantially improve analysis when dealing with these types of complex issues. Techniques for better understanding include structuring information, challenging assumptions and exploring different interpretations. The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis features articles consolidated by CIA veteran Richards J. Heuer. These timelessly relevant articles focus on how people process information and make judgments on incomplete and ambiguous material. Translating the technical reports into accessible language, Heuer equates the relevance of these findings to the problems all analysts must overcome.

    @RyanHoliday This book was written by the CIA. It's called "The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis." I recommend chapter 5. It's called "Do you really need more information?" https://t.co/UZ7QYceYw6

  • Atomic Habits

    James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.

    @JamesClear Does this count? https://t.co/1VPv3U8QTj

  • The Dream Machine

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    At a time when computers were a short step removed from mechanical data processors, Licklider was writing treatises on "human-computer symbiosis," "computers as communication devices," and a now not-so-unfamiliar "Intergalactic Network." His ideas became so influential, his passion so contagious, that Waldrop coined him "computing's Johnny Appleseed." In a simultaneously compelling personal narrative and comprehensive historical exposition, Waldrop tells the story of the man who not only instigated the work that led to the internet, but also shifted our understanding of what computers were and could be.

    @imohitbhatia The Dream Machine https://t.co/9c3NACBr55

  • This is the first-ever English-language edition of the book Leo Tolstoy considered to be his most important contribution to humanity, the work of his life's last years. Widely read in prerevolutionary Russia, banned and forgotten under Communism; and recently rediscovered to great excitement, A Calendar of Wisdom is a day-by-day guide that illuminates the path of a life worth living with a brightness undimmed by time. Unjustly censored for nearly a century, it deserves to be placed with the few books in our history that will never cease teaching us the essence of what is important in this world.

    ~ Hidden gem alert! ~ @RyanHoliday told me that Leo Tolstoy considered this his best book. It's a collection of quotes from places like the Bible, the Koran, and the Talmud. It's sweet, simple, and super fun to read. https://t.co/2ok8xmIKGs

  • New York Art Deco

    Anthony W. Robins

    The first guidebook devoted exclusively to New York City’s Art Deco treasures. Of all the world’s great cities, perhaps none is so defined by its Art Deco architecture as New York. Lively and informative, New York Art Deco leads readers step-by-step past the monuments of the 1920s and ’30s that recast New York as the world’s modern metropolis. Anthony W. Robins, New York’s best-known Art Deco guide, includes an introductory essay describing the Art Deco phenomenon, followed by eleven walking tour itineraries in Manhattan—each accompanied by a map designed by legendary New York cartographer John Tauranac—and a survey of Deco sites across the four other boroughs. Also included is a photo gallery of sixteen color plates by nationally acclaimed Art Deco photographer Randy Juster. In New York Art Deco, Robins has distilled thirty years’ worth of experience into a guidebook for all to enjoy at their own pace. “A wonderful, warmhearted, exceptionally knowledgeable and detailed guidebook that takes you firmly by the hand along fifteen thoughtfully planned itineraries through New York’s most exuberant and optimistic architectural heritage—those much-beloved Art Deco skyscrapers, apartment houses, shops, and theaters that stand out as the showy orchids and magnificent birds-of-paradise of the city’s building stock. Anthony W. Robins’s New York Art Deco is an essential introduction to hundreds of structures that are, as the book says, ‘waiting impatiently for you to visit.’” — Tony Hiss, author of In Motion: The Experience of Travel “Anthony W. Robins has produced what will surely stand as the definitive guide to New York City’s Art Deco architecture. The book is an authoritative as well as entertaining tour de force, drawn from the author’s encyclopedic knowledge of the subject.” — Jules Stewart, author of Gotham Rising: New York in the ’30s “Anthony Robins’s New York Art Deco fills a void in the design library of New York. Well organized by itineraries that begin at the very tip of Manhattan and work their way into the other four boroughs, it is filled with invaluable information on the monuments of Art Deco and French moderne structures whose design perfectly expresses the streamlined era when speed and movement were celebrated. This is a must-have book for every lover of Art Deco, whether you are a New Yorker or a visitor from New Zealand.” — David Garrard Lowe, author of Art Deco New York “The Art Deco style fits New York like a glove, from the skyscraping Chrysler Building to the little, eye-popping Lane Theater on Staten Island, and nobody knows it like Anthony Robins. If you thought you knew Art Deco—as I did, before I read his New York Art Deco—then buy this book and be surprised.” — Christopher Gray, author of the former New York Times Streetscapes column “Buy this book, take a few wonderful walks around the entire city (discovering some fine New York neighborhoods you probably have never been to), from the Grand Concourse and Washington Heights’ treasure trove of Deco to the Chrysler Building to Flatbush in Brooklyn, and ask yourself, do all those new glass towers in Manhattan leave you as delighted as Art Deco’s confections, whether seven stories or seventy? That generation knew how to make buildings that you really want to live in, work in, and walk by. Thank you, Anthony Robins, for giving us the keys to that kingdom.” — Barry Lewis, architectural historian “With the publication of New York Art Deco everyone, from the city explorer to the armchair reader, can now experience Anthony Robins’s dynamic Art Deco walking tours. Robins not only discusses the city’s famed Deco skyscrapers, but also identifies the spectacular but little-known Deco gems spread across the city. This book is a must for those who love New York and thrill to Art Deco architecture.” — Andrew Scott Dolkart, author of The Row House Reborn: Architecture and Neighborhoods in New York City, 1908–1929

    @devonzuegel Yessssss 🙏🏼 Next time you’re in New York, you should spend an afternoon reading this book and walking to the sites. I’ll go with you! https://t.co/29OE6xd1lQ

  • America's youth are in crisis. Raised by well-meaning but overprotective parents and coddled by well-meaning but misbegotten government programs, they are ill-equipped to survive in our highly-competitive global economy. Many of the coming-of-age rituals that have defined the American experience since the Founding: learning the value of working with your hands, leaving home to start a family, becoming economically self-reliant--are being delayed or skipped altogether. The statistics are daunting: 30% of college students drop out after the first year, and only 4 in 10 graduate. One in three 18-to-34 year-olds live with their parents. From these disparate phenomena: Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse who as president of a Midwestern college observed the trials of this generation up close, sees an existential threat to the American way of life. In The Vanishing American Adult, Sasse diagnoses the causes of a generation that can't grow up and offers a path for raising children to become active and engaged citizens. He identifies core formative experiences that all young people should pursue: hard work to appreciate the benefits of labor, travel to understand deprivation and want, the power of reading, the importance of nurturing your body--and explains how parents can encourage them. Our democracy depends on responsible, contributing adults to function properly--without them America falls prey to populist demagogues. A call to arms in the tradition of The Closing of the American Mind and a manifesto for parents in the traditions of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, The Vanishing American Adult will ignite a much-needed debate about the link between the way we're raising our children and the future of our country.

    @amchenault Depends on what I’m writing about. When I wrote my most recent essay about Peter Thiel, I read multiple books of Rene Girard interviews. Now, I’m writing about adulthood and reading “The Vanishing American Adult.” https://t.co/HklaWOyeZq

  • "This book exposes our unconscious selfish motives, those we're reluctant to discuss or even think about. These motives drive our body language, laughter, and conversation, as well as venerated institutions like art, school, charity, medicine, politics, and religion"--

    Inspired by this phenomenal book. Written by @KevinSimler and @robinhanson https://t.co/jX2V6EbBZu

  • Source https://t.co/QQgfRZeK6u

  • The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken man's awareness of himself as an heroic being.

    @iAmLikelyWrong Fountainhead or Atlas Shrugged? Enjoy our conversation about her a couple weeks ago. Definitely on my reading list. Wish you could join me and @BMBernstein for philosophy discussions in NYC

  • Conspiracy

    Ryan Holiday

    An NPR Book Concierge Best Book of 2018! A Sunday Times of London Pick of the Paperbacks A stunning story about how power works in the modern age--the book the New York Times called "one helluva page-turner" and The Sunday Times of London celebrated as "riveting...an astonishing modern media conspiracy that is a fantastic read." Pick up the book everyone is talking about. In 2007, a short blogpost on Valleywag, the Silicon Valley-vertical of Gawker Media, outed PayPal founder and billionaire investor Peter Thiel as gay. Thiel's sexuality had been known to close friends and family, but he didn't consider himself a public figure, and believed the information was private. This post would be the casus belli for a meticulously plotted conspiracy that would end nearly a decade later with a $140 million dollar judgment against Gawker, its bankruptcy and with Nick Denton, Gawker's CEO and founder, out of a job. Only later would the world learn that Gawker's demise was not incidental--it had been masterminded by Thiel. For years, Thiel had searched endlessly for a solution to what he'd come to call the "Gawker Problem." When an unmarked envelope delivered an illegally recorded sex tape of Hogan with his best friend's wife, Gawker had seen the chance for millions of pageviews and to say the things that others were afraid to say. Thiel saw their publication of the tape as the opportunity he was looking for. He would come to pit Hogan against Gawker in a multi-year proxy war through the Florida legal system, while Gawker remained confidently convinced they would prevail as they had over so many other lawsuit--until it was too late. The verdict would stun the world and so would Peter's ultimate unmasking as the man who had set it all in motion. Why had he done this? How had no one discovered it? What would this mean--for the First Amendment? For privacy? For culture? In Holiday's masterful telling of this nearly unbelievable conspiracy, informed by interviews with all the key players, this case transcends the narrative of how one billionaire took down a media empire or the current state of the free press. It's a study in power, strategy, and one of the most wildly ambitious--and successful--secret plots in recent memory. Some will cheer Gawker's destruction and others will lament it, but after reading these pages--and seeing the access the author was given--no one will deny that there is something ruthless and brilliant about Peter Thiel's shocking attempt to shake up the world.

    @jon_choi_ https://t.co/Yp4nFLUnsY

  • The Timeless Way of Building

    Christopher Alexander

    This introductory volume to Alexander's other works, A Pattern of Language and The Oregon Experiment, explains concepts fundamental to his original approaches to the theory and application of architecture

    @khemaridh @Clayton_Dorge The Timeless Way of Building

  • Hard Landing

    Thomas Petzinger

    @gabebassin deep into the airline rabbit hole https://t.co/5zMQhuy7wX

  • Average is Over

    Tyler Cowen

    A renowned economist describes the post-recession job market that is erasing the middle range, leaving only high-earning jobs that utilize machine intelligence and data analysis and low-earning jobs for those who aren't learning and adopting the new technologies.

    @PHLemos @tylercowen https://t.co/uMhyqRoHYl

  • The Timeless Way of Building

    Christopher Alexander

    This introductory volume to Alexander's other works, A Pattern of Language and The Oregon Experiment, explains concepts fundamental to his original approaches to the theory and application of architecture

    All this inspired by this excellent book https://t.co/w4zwt0vY2E

  • The Timeless Way of Building

    Christopher Alexander

    This introductory volume to Alexander's other works, A Pattern of Language and The Oregon Experiment, explains concepts fundamental to his original approaches to the theory and application of architecture

    100% committed to this strategy right now. Reading multiple books: - The Timeless Way of Building - Wisdom of Crowds - The Brothers Karamazov - The Reason for God Group reading. Much more fun.

  • Looks at the theory that large groups have more collective intelligence than a smaller number of experts, drawing on a wide range of disciplines to offer insight into such topics as politics, business, and the environment.

    100% committed to this strategy right now. Reading multiple books: - The Timeless Way of Building - Wisdom of Crowds - The Brothers Karamazov - The Reason for God Group reading. Much more fun.

  • The Brothers Karamazov

    Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.

    100% committed to this strategy right now. Reading multiple books: - The Timeless Way of Building - Wisdom of Crowds - The Brothers Karamazov - The Reason for God Group reading. Much more fun.

  • The Reason for God

    Timothy Keller

    Arguing that most Americans are members of the Christian faith, a response to promoters of science and secularism addresses key questions about suffering, exclusivity, and the belief that Christianity is the only true religion. Reprint.

    100% committed to this strategy right now. Reading multiple books: - The Timeless Way of Building - Wisdom of Crowds - The Brothers Karamazov - The Reason for God Group reading. Much more fun.

  • The Sovereign Individual

    James Dale Davidson

    The authors identify both the likely disasters and the potential for prosperity inherent in the advent of the information age.

    From a book called The Sovereign Individual: "The greatest source of wealth will be the ideas you have in your head." In the Information Age, if you can communicate and share your ideas, you'll be unstoppable. Simple as that. https://t.co/hXRRbZLeO2

  • Big Business

    Tyler Cowen

    An against-the-grain polemic on American capitalism from New York Times bestselling author Tyler Cowen. We love to hate the 800-pound gorilla. Walmart and Amazon destroy communities and small businesses. Facebook turns us into addicts while putting our personal data at risk. From skeptical politicians like Bernie Sanders who, at a 2016 presidential campaign rally said, “If a bank is too big to fail, it is too big to exist,” to millennials, only 42 percent of whom support capitalism, belief in big business is at an all-time low. But are big companies inherently evil? If business is so bad, why does it remain so integral to the basic functioning of America? Economist and bestselling author Tyler Cowen says our biggest problem is that we don’t love business enough. In Big Business, Cowen puts forth an impassioned defense of corporations and their essential role in a balanced, productive, and progressive society. He dismantles common misconceptions and untangles conflicting intuitions. According to a 2016 Gallup survey, only 12 percent of Americans trust big business “quite a lot,” and only 6 percent trust it “a great deal.” Yet Americans as a group are remarkably willing to trust businesses, whether in the form of buying a new phone on the day of its release or simply showing up to work in the expectation they will be paid. Cowen illuminates the crucial role businesses play in spurring innovation, rewarding talent and hard work, and creating the bounty on which we’ve all come to depend.

    Congrats to @tylercowen on his new book. Tyler is a human encyclopedia. As I once said to a friend, he speaks intelligently — and has a unique perspective — on just about every topic under the sun. Congrats Tyler! https://t.co/4VIRpcYUGQ

  • The Boron Letters

    Gary Halbert

    A series of letters by history's greatest copywriter Gary C. Halbert, explaining insider tactics and sage wisdom to his youngest son Bond.Once only available as part of a paid monthly premium, The Boron Letters are unique in the marketing universe and now they are a bona fide cult classic among direct response marketers and copywriters around the world.The letters inside are written from a father to a son, in a loving way that goes far beyond a mere sales book or fancy "boardroom" advertising advice...It's more than a Master's Degree in selling & persuasion...it's hands-down the best SPECIFIC and ACTIONABLE training on how to convince people to buy your products or services than I have ever read. The Boron Letters contain knowledge well beyond selling. The letters also explain how to navigate life's hurdles.This marketing classic is personal and easily digestible. Plus... immediately after reading the first chapters, you can go out and make money and a real, noticeable difference in your marketplace. There are very few successful direct response marketers (online or off) who don't owe something to Gary Halbert...and for many of them, The Boron Letters is the crown jewel in their collection.Copywriters and marketers read and re-read The Boron Letters over and over again for a reason.These strategies, secrets and tips are going to be relevant 5, 10, even 100 years from now because they deal honestly with the part of human psychology which never changes, how to convince and convert folks into buyers.Bottom line? Read the first chapter. Get into the flow of Gary's mind. Then read the second. I dare you to NOT finish the entire darn thing. After you put a few of the lessons into practice, you too will find yourself reading The Boron Letters again and again like so many of today's top marketers.If you don't already have your copy get it now. I promise you won't regret it. My best,Lawton Chiles

    @FriscoSmoove The Boron Letters. I suggest the old stuff. Also check out @TheCharlieton’s latest thread. https://t.co/mOoL0zQBCl

  • The Boron Letters

    Gary Halbert

    A series of letters by history's greatest copywriter Gary C. Halbert, explaining insider tactics and sage wisdom to his youngest son Bond.Once only available as part of a paid monthly premium, The Boron Letters are unique in the marketing universe and now they are a bona fide cult classic among direct response marketers and copywriters around the world.The letters inside are written from a father to a son, in a loving way that goes far beyond a mere sales book or fancy "boardroom" advertising advice...It's more than a Master's Degree in selling & persuasion...it's hands-down the best SPECIFIC and ACTIONABLE training on how to convince people to buy your products or services than I have ever read. The Boron Letters contain knowledge well beyond selling. The letters also explain how to navigate life's hurdles.This marketing classic is personal and easily digestible. Plus... immediately after reading the first chapters, you can go out and make money and a real, noticeable difference in your marketplace. There are very few successful direct response marketers (online or off) who don't owe something to Gary Halbert...and for many of them, The Boron Letters is the crown jewel in their collection.Copywriters and marketers read and re-read The Boron Letters over and over again for a reason.These strategies, secrets and tips are going to be relevant 5, 10, even 100 years from now because they deal honestly with the part of human psychology which never changes, how to convince and convert folks into buyers.Bottom line? Read the first chapter. Get into the flow of Gary's mind. Then read the second. I dare you to NOT finish the entire darn thing. After you put a few of the lessons into practice, you too will find yourself reading The Boron Letters again and again like so many of today's top marketers.If you don't already have your copy get it now. I promise you won't regret it. My best,Lawton Chiles

    @FourFourths The Boron Letters are excellent. Read the old stuff. https://t.co/mOoL0zQBCl

  • The Evolution of Cooperation provides valuable insights into the age-old question of whether unforced cooperation is ever possible. Widely praised and much-discussed, this classic book explores how cooperation can emerge in a world of self-seeking egoists-whether superpowers, businesses, or individuals-when there is no central authority to police their actions. The problem of cooperation is central to many different fields. Robert Axelrod recounts the famous computer tournaments in which the "cooperative" program Tit for Tat recorded its stunning victories, explains its application to a broad spectrum of subjects, and suggests how readers can both apply cooperative principles to their own lives and teach cooperative principles to others.

    New Post: Why People Cooperate. It's about a book called "The Evolution of Cooperation." This post is different. It's an example of the kind of blog post new writers should start with. It's short, sweet and to-the-point, so I'd appreciate your feedback. https://t.co/qOnOi4AUDV

  • Creation

    Steve Grand

    The producer of the "Creatures" computer game that allows players to create artificial life explores the philosophical, ethical, and scientific issues surrounding this controversial topic.

    @jposhaughnessy @RyanHoliday Nothing better than a book where you can feel your mind expanding as you turn the pages. Last such book for me was creation, recommended by @patrick_oshag https://t.co/WIds2B3aaD

  • @mikedariano @ryandawidjan I recommend Mike’s book on @rorysutherland It’s short, sweet, and to the point. dot: Rory Sutherland: Thinking like a marketing genius https://t.co/f0uNRUTMxp

  • The Bitcoin Standard

    Saifedean Ammous

    When a pseudonymous programmer introduced “a new electronic cash system that’s fully peer-to-peer, with no trusted third party” to a small online mailing list in 2008, very few paid attention. Ten years later, and against all odds, this upstart autonomous decentralized software offers an unstoppable and globally-accessible hard money alternative to modern central banks. The Bitcoin Standard analyzes the historical context to the rise of Bitcoin, the economic properties that have allowed it to grow quickly, and its likely economic, political, and social implications. While Bitcoin is a new invention of the digital age, the problem it purports to solve is as old as human society itself: transferring value across time and space. Ammous takes the reader on an engaging journey through the history of technologies performing the functions of money, from primitive systems of trading limestones and seashells, to metals, coins, the gold standard, and modern government debt. Exploring what gave these technologies their monetary role, and how most lost it, provides the reader with a good idea of what makes for sound money, and sets the stage for an economic discussion of its consequences for individual and societal future-orientation, capital accumulation, trade, peace, culture, and art. Compellingly, Ammous shows that it is no coincidence that the loftiest achievements of humanity have come in societies enjoying the benefits of sound monetary regimes, nor is it coincidental that monetary collapse has usually accompanied civilizational collapse. With this background in place, the book moves on to explain the operation of Bitcoin in a functional and intuitive way. Bitcoin is a decentralized, distributed piece of software that converts electricity and processing power into indisputably accurate records, thus allowing its users to utilize the Internet to perform the traditional functions of money without having to rely on, or trust, any authorities or infrastructure in the physical world. Bitcoin is thus best understood as the first successfully implemented form of digital cash and digital hard money. With an automated and perfectly predictable monetary policy, and the ability to perform final settlement of large sums across the world in a matter of minutes, Bitcoin’s real competitive edge might just be as a store of value and network for final settlement of large payments—a digital form of gold with a built-in settlement infrastructure. Ammous’ firm grasp of the technological possibilities as well as the historical realities of monetary evolution provides for a fascinating exploration of the ramifications of voluntary free market money. As it challenges the most sacred of government monopolies, Bitcoin shifts the pendulum of sovereignty away from governments in favor of individuals, offering us the tantalizing possibility of a world where money is fully extricated from politics and unrestrained by borders. The final chapter of the book explores some of the most common questions surrounding Bitcoin: Is Bitcoin mining a waste of energy? Is Bitcoin for criminals? Who controls Bitcoin, and can they change it if they please? How can Bitcoin be killed? And what to make of all the thousands of Bitcoin knock-offs, and the many supposed applications of Bitcoin’s ‘blockchain technology’? The Bitcoin Standard is the essential resource for a clear understanding of the rise of the Internet’s decentralized, apolitical, free-market alternative to national central banks.

    @maxua https://t.co/8XjrvGDaF9

  • Zero to One

    Peter Thiel

    WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin wonâe(tm)t make a search engine. If you are copying these guys, you arenâe(tm)t learning from them. Itâe(tm)s easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. Every new creation goes from 0 to 1. This book is about how to get there. âe~Peter Thiel has built multiple breakthrough companies, and Zero to One shows how.âe(tm) ELON MUSK, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla âe~This book delivers completely new and refreshing ideas on how to create value in the world.âe(tm) MARK ZUCKERBERG, CEO of Facebook âe~When a risk taker writes a book, read it. In the case of Peter Thiel, read it twice. Or, to be safe, three times. This is a classic.âe(tm) NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB, author of The Black Swan

    5. Something Keith learned from Peter Thiel: To scale a startup, you’ll need two things: 1. Become a magnet for talented people 2. Be able to asymmetrically assess other people. Otherwise, you’ll never be able to compete with the incumbents.

  • Titan

    Ron Chernow

    The author draws on Rockefeller's own papers to provide a biography of the legendary oilman, capitalist, and philanthropist

    @faizaaaaan @arjunblj https://t.co/CHAOxLtAnx

  • Source: “Human As Media” It’s an obscure, but incredible eBook. A true hidden gem. https://t.co/ljc3vtb5R4

  • Ecce Homo

    Friedrich Nietzsche

    Ecce Homo is an autobiography like no other. Nietzsche passes under review all his previous books and reaches a final reckoning with his many enemies. Ecce Homo is the summation of an extraordinary philosophical career.

    @VillabencH @michael_nielsen @voeliz @BMBernstein @iAmLikelyWrong Found it. https://t.co/MFUbos0W3k

  • Venture Deals

    Brad Feld

    Help take your startup to the next step with the new and revised edition of the popular book on the VC deal process—from the co-founders of the Foundry Group How do venture capital deals come together? This is one of the most frequent questions asked by each generation of new entrepreneurs. Surprisingly, there is little reliable information on the subject. No one understands this better than Brad Feld and Jason Mendelson. The founders and driving force behind the Foundry Group—a venture capital firm focused on investing in early-stage information technology companies—Brad and Jason have been involved in hundreds of venture capital financings. Their investments range from small startups to large Series A venture financing rounds. The new edition of Venture Deals continues to show fledgling entrepreneurs the inner-workings of the VC process, from the venture capital term sheet and effective negotiating strategies to the initial seed and the later stages of development. Fully updated to reflect the intricacies of startups and entrepreneurship in today's dynamic economic environment, this new edition includes revisions and updates to coverage on negotiating, gender issues, ICO’s, and economic terms. New chapters examine legal and procedural considerations relevant to fundraising, bank debt, equity and convertible debt, how to hire an investment banker to sell a company, and more. Provides valuable, real-world insights into venture capital structure and strategy Explains and clarifies the VC term sheet and other misunderstood aspects of capital funding Helps to build collaborative and supportive relationships between entrepreneurs and investors Draws from the author’s years of practical experience in the VC arena Includes extensively revised and updated content throughout to increase readability and currency Venture Deals: Be Smarter Than Your Lawyer and Venture Capitalist is a must-have resource for Any aspiring entrepreneur, venture capitalist, or lawyer involved in VC deals as well as students and instructors in related areas of study.

    @CathyReisenwitz Best option. Hands down. https://t.co/JBJKT4zXET