Hunter Walk

Hunter Walk

You'll find me @homebrew, Seed Stage Venture Fund w @satyap. Previously made products at YouTube, Google & SecondLife. Married to @cbarlerin.

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30+ Book Recommendations by Hunter Walk

  • Amazon Unbound

    Brad Stone

    From the bestselling author of The Everything Store, an unvarnished picture of Amazon’s unprecedented growth and its billionaire founder, Jeff Bezos, revealing the most important business story of our time. Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon, an internet pioneer quietly changing the way we shop online, in his bestseller The Everything Store. But ever since, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once housed in a garage, now spans the globe. Between services like Whole Foods, Prime Video, and Amazon’s cloud computing unit, AWS, plus Bezos’s ownership of The Washington Post, it’s impossible to go a day without encountering its impact. We live in a world run, supplied, and controlled by Amazon and its iconoclast founder. In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone presents a deeply reported, vividly drawn portrait of how a retail upstart became one of the most powerful and feared entities in the global economy. With unprecedented access to current and former executives, employees, regulators, and critics, Stone shows how seismic changes inside the company over the past decade led to dramatic innovations, as well as to missteps that turned public sentiment against its sharp-elbowed business practices and gameshow treatment of its search for a second headquarters. Stone also probes the evolution of Bezos himself—who started as a geeky technologist totally devoted to building Amazon, but who transformed to become a fit, disciplined billionaire with global ambitions; who ruled Amazon with an iron fist, even as he found his personal life splashed over the tabloids. As his empire expands, the book investigates how Bezos gradually pulled away from day-to-day activities at Amazon to focus on his many interests outside of it, announcing his momentous transition from CEO to executive chairman. Definitive, timely, and revelatory, Stone has provided an unvarnished portrait of a man and company that we couldn’t imagine modern life without.

    @BradStone Ready! https://t.co/vlyMrS9UD9

  • Super Founders

    Ali Tamaseb

    "Every VC is chasing a unicorn-those billion dollar companies that fundamentally change their industries, and every entrepreneur certainly wants to become one. For Super Founders, author Ali Tamaseb gathered and analyzed 40,000 data points about the 200+ unicorns founded since 2005 and found out what these billion dollar companies and their founders actually looked like. And you'll be surprised by what he discovered. Half of unicorn founders are over 35. Most founders don't have any directly relevant work experience in the industry they're disrupting. There's no disadvantage to being a solo founder. Sixty percent of billion dollar companies are started by repeat entrepreneurs, many of whom already have at least one $50M+ exit under their belt. And over half of unicorns were competing with multiple incumbents at the time of their founding. What we thought we knew about these companies doesn't turn out to be true, which has serious implications for both the kinds of startups that get funding and the for the kinds of people who decide to start companies in the first place. Super Founders gives readers an unprecedented look not just at what the data tells us about the world's most successful startups and the people who create them, but also at those companies and founders themselves, many of which are not well-known among the general public. A blend of data, analysis, stories and exclusive interviews, the book is a paradigm-shifting guide for entrepreneurs and the investment community. You may look more like a Super Founder than you think!"--

    @alitamaseb 🥳📖 https://t.co/FSzzI5o7Hl

  • The Box

    Marc Levinson

    In April 1956, a refitted oil tanker carried fifty-eight shipping containers from Newark to Houston. From that modest beginning, container shipping developed into a huge industry that made the boom in global trade possible. The Box tells the dramatic story of the container's creation, the decade of struggle before it was widely adopted, and the sweeping economic consequences of the sharp fall in transportation costs that containerization brought about. But the container didn't just happen. Its adoption required huge sums of money, both from private investors and from ports that aspired to be on the leading edge of a new technology. It required years of high-stakes bargaining with two of the titans of organized labor, Harry Bridges and Teddy Gleason, as well as delicate negotiations on standards that made it possible for almost any container to travel on any truck or train or ship. Ultimately, it took McLean's success in supplying U.S. forces in Vietnam to persuade the world of the container's potential. Drawing on previously neglected sources, economist Marc Levinson shows how the container transformed economic geography, devastating traditional ports such as New York and London and fueling the growth of previously obscure ones, such as Oakland. By making shipping so cheap that industry could locate factories far from its customers, the container paved the way for Asia to become the world's workshop and brought consumers a previously unimaginable variety of low-cost products from around the globe. Published in hardcover on the fiftieth anniversary of the first container voyage, this is the first comprehensive history of the shipping container. Now with a new chapter, The Box tells the dramatic story of how the drive and imagination of an iconoclastic entrepreneur turned containerization from an impractical idea into a phenomenon that transformed economic geography, slashed transportation costs, and made the boom in global trade possible.

    @ShiraOvide there was this wonderful set of expository books in that era - "The Box" "Cod" "Salt" etc Some were great (Box as one). Many felt like they could have just been NYer articles.

  • Salt

    Mark Kurlansky

    @ShiraOvide there was this wonderful set of expository books in that era - "The Box" "Cod" "Salt" etc Some were great (Box as one). Many felt like they could have just been NYer articles.

  • Soon to be a New HBO® Series from J.J. Abrams (Executive Producer of Westworld), Misha Green (Creator of Underground) and Jordan Peele (Director of Get Out) The critically acclaimed cult novelist makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in this brilliant and wondrous work of the imagination that melds historical fiction, pulp noir, and Lovecraftian horror and fantasy. Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, 22-year-old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George—publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide—and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite—heir to the estate that owned one of Atticus’s ancestors—they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours. At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn—led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb—which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his—and the whole Turner clan’s—destruction. A chimerical blend of magic, power, hope, and freedom that stretches across time, touching diverse members of two black families, Lovecraft Country is a devastating kaleidoscopic portrait of racism—the terrifying specter that continues to haunt us today.

    @bendhalpern what types of stuff do you like? here's are my three fav fiction books of past years Lovecraft Country https://t.co/qjM6bLuPXO Exhalation https://t.co/xPnGwkYogU Friday Black https://t.co/T5wjqynhTY

  • Exhalation

    Ted Chiang

    From an award-winning science fiction writer (whose short story "The Story of Your Life" was the basis for the Academy Award-nominated movie Arrival), the long-awaited new collection of stunningly original, humane, and already celebrated short stories This much-anticipated second collection of stories is signature Ted Chiang, full of revelatory ideas and deeply sympathetic characters. In "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate," a portal through time forces a fabric seller in ancient Baghdad to grapple with past mistakes and the temptation of second chances. In the epistolary "Exhalation," an alien scientist makes a shocking discovery with ramifications not just for his own people, but for all of reality. And in "The Lifecycle of Software Objects," a woman cares for an artificial intelligence over twenty years, elevating a faddish digital pet into what might be a true living being. Also included are two brand-new stories: "Omphalos" and "Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom." In this fantastical and elegant collection, Ted Chiang wrestles with the oldest questions on earth--What is the nature of the universe? What does it mean to be human?--and ones that no one else has even imagined. And, each in its own way, the stories prove that complex and thoughtful science fiction can rise to new heights of beauty, meaning, and compassion.

    @bendhalpern what types of stuff do you like? here's are my three fav fiction books of past years Lovecraft Country https://t.co/qjM6bLuPXO Exhalation https://t.co/xPnGwkYogU Friday Black https://t.co/T5wjqynhTY

  • Friday Black

    Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

    A piercingly raw debut story collection from a young writer with an explosive voice; a treacherously surreal, and, at times, heartbreakingly satirical look at what it's like to be young and black in America.

    @bendhalpern what types of stuff do you like? here's are my three fav fiction books of past years Lovecraft Country https://t.co/qjM6bLuPXO Exhalation https://t.co/xPnGwkYogU Friday Black https://t.co/T5wjqynhTY

  • Think Again

    Adam Grant

    @AdamMGrant new book alert ✌️✌️ https://t.co/OVvl3NdGED

  • Against the Grain

    James C. Scott

    @jasoncrawford unrelated to the watch discussion, but another thing you might find interesting was a book i read a few years ago about why we ended up with wheat/grain crops so dominant https://t.co/q9bKiWsbsh https://t.co/Iw60TwslqN

  • Offers a handbook for understanding the key issues in the 2004 election and beyond, discussing how progressives need to look at issues to counter conservative arguments.

    @JasonHirschhorn best book on this https://t.co/jsxlC2iayU

  • Jeff Lawson, software developer turned CEO of Twilio, shares a new approach for winning in the digital era: unleash the creativity and productivity of the 25 million most important workers in the digital economy, software developers. From banking and retail to insurance and finance, every industry is turning digital, and every company needs the best software to win the hearts and minds of customers. The landscape has shifted from the classic build vs. buy question, to one of build vs. die. Companies have to get this right to survive. But how do they make this transition? Software developers are sought after, highly paid, and desperately needed to compete in the modern, digital economy. Yet most companies treat them like digital factory workers without really understanding what software developers are able to contribute. Lawson argues that developers are the creative workforce who can solve major business problems and create hit products for customers--not just grind through rote tasks. Lawson talks to executives, developers at startups, and founders who code to learn how forward-thinking companies embrace this approach. From Google and Amazon, to one-person online software companies--companies that bring software developers in as partners are winning. Adopting the Ask Your Developer mindset enables companies to take advantage of an underutilized asset, unleash tremendous untapped creativity and brainpower inside their software teams, recruit and retain the best talent, and integrate developers into everyday decisions. For developers, this mindset can help you show up and be viewed as a full, talented, creative professional - not a code monkey. How to compete in the digital economy? In short: Ask Your Developer.

    Thanks @twilio CEO @jeffiel for the 💬 about Ask Your Developer Order now https://t.co/NYG0Ydeoc6 https://t.co/u6aFyj9E2e

  • Jeff Lawson, software developer turned CEO of Twilio, shares a new approach for winning in the digital era: unleash the creativity and productivity of the 25 million most important workers in the digital economy, software developers. From banking and retail to insurance and finance, every industry is turning digital, and every company needs the best software to win the hearts and minds of customers. The landscape has shifted from the classic build vs. buy question, to one of build vs. die. Companies have to get this right to survive. But how do they make this transition? Software developers are sought after, highly paid, and desperately needed to compete in the modern, digital economy. Yet most companies treat them like digital factory workers without really understanding what software developers are able to contribute. Lawson argues that developers are the creative workforce who can solve major business problems and create hit products for customers--not just grind through rote tasks. Lawson talks to executives, developers at startups, and founders who code to learn how forward-thinking companies embrace this approach. From Google and Amazon, to one-person online software companies--companies that bring software developers in as partners are winning. Adopting the Ask Your Developer mindset enables companies to take advantage of an underutilized asset, unleash tremendous untapped creativity and brainpower inside their software teams, recruit and retain the best talent, and integrate developers into everyday decisions. For developers, this mindset can help you show up and be viewed as a full, talented, creative professional - not a code monkey. How to compete in the digital economy? In short: Ask Your Developer.

    📚 NEW BOOK ALERT @twilio CEO @jeffiel is super smart and his book on the Developer Economy is available NOW https://t.co/RXNqSYXUwu

  • Soon to be a New HBO® Series from J.J. Abrams (Executive Producer of Westworld), Misha Green (Creator of Underground) and Jordan Peele (Director of Get Out) The critically acclaimed cult novelist makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in this brilliant and wondrous work of the imagination that melds historical fiction, pulp noir, and Lovecraftian horror and fantasy. Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, 22-year-old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George—publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide—and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite—heir to the estate that owned one of Atticus’s ancestors—they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours. At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn—led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb—which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his—and the whole Turner clan’s—destruction. A chimerical blend of magic, power, hope, and freedom that stretches across time, touching diverse members of two black families, Lovecraft Country is a devastating kaleidoscopic portrait of racism—the terrifying specter that continues to haunt us today.

    @bharat Read the book (lovecraft) which was amazing. Maybe one of my fav fiction in past 10 years.

  • @manuelhe fantastic book

  • Flow

    Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

    @karanortman @jsngr Yes! great book on finding flow https://t.co/A62qXd23DE

  • How to create a thriving startup ecosystem in a location near you—a practical guide We are in the midst of a global startup revolution. The proliferation of digital technologies, a rising middle-class, and the quest for sustained economic growth have put entrepreneurship on the map for talent, governments, universities, and corporations everywhere. Along with the widely-recognized opportunity presented by entrepreneurship has come a realization that the success of today’s startups is determined to a large degree by the complex global and uniquely local environments in which they operate. It is the nature of these external factors—and more importantly, the quality of their linkages with each other—that explains why some places are consistently able to produce high-impact entrepreneurship while many other places are not. No one tells this story better than acclaimed author and investor Brad Feld and Ian Hathaway, an entrepreneurship expert and startup advisor. The Startup Community Way: Evolving an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem—the much-anticipated sequel to Feld’s bestselling book Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City—explores what makes startup communities thrive and how to improve collaboration in rapidly-changing environments. The Startup Community Way is a governing philosophy for startup communities, rooted in the theory of complex systems and the practice of community-building in many contexts. This book establishes a robust framework and shares lessons from around the globe that illustrate how to create a flourishing startup ecosystem anywhere. Each of the crucial aspects of community-building, such as the organizing principles of community, the attributes of leadership, the goals and values of a startup community, the application of systems thinking, and methods for changing behavior and mindset are discussed in detail. Advancing the practice of building startup communities, this book: Offers practical, real-world advice for entrepreneurs, community builders, and other stakeholders who want to harness the power of startups in their city Advances a new framework for effective startup community building grounded in complex adaptive systems and systems thinking Discusses the role of key institutions—such as governments, corporations, and universities—in supporting startup communities Explores the value of key stakeholders and why leaders are crucial for bringing communities together Includes contributions from leading entrepreneurial voices in the field The Startup Community Way is a must-have resource for entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, C-suite executives, business and community leaders, and anyone wishing to understand how startup communities work anywhere in the world.

    he's someone who always picks up the phone when you need him, and excited to read @bfeld's The Startup Community Way: Evolving an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem https://t.co/aemL0arqpK

  • @jasoncwarner I'm sure there are some articles online which summarize their theories but for Haidt "the righteous mind" is the book and for Lakoff "don't think of an elephant"

  • The Righteous Mind

    Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.

    @jasoncwarner I'm sure there are some articles online which summarize their theories but for Haidt "the righteous mind" is the book and for Lakoff "don't think of an elephant"

  • Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers

    Robert M. Sapolsky

    Renowned primatologist Robert Sapolsky offers a completely revised and updated edition of his most popular work, with nearly 90,000 copies in print Now in a third edition, Robert M. Sapolsky's acclaimed and successful Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers features new chapters on how stress affects sleep and addiction, as well as new insights into anxiety and personality disorder and the impact of spirituality on managing stress. As Sapolsky explains, most of us do not lie awake at night worrying about whether we have leprosy or malaria. Instead, the diseases we fear-and the ones that plague us now-are illnesses brought on by the slow accumulation of damage, such as heart disease and cancer. When we worry or experience stress, our body turns on the same physiological responses that an animal's does, but we do not resolve conflict in the same way-through fighting or fleeing. Over time, this activation of a stress response makes us literally sick. Combining cutting-edge research with a healthy dose of good humor and practical advice, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers explains how prolonged stress causes or intensifies a range of physical and mental afflictions, including depression, ulcers, colitis, heart disease, and more. It also provides essential guidance to controlling our stress responses. This new edition promises to be the most comprehensive and engaging one yet.

    @NaithanJones i always found this one interesting in terms of how we're still basically "fight or flight" animals https://t.co/nmRGQGdDlJ

  • @susanthesquark Season of the Witch

  • Founders at Work

    Jessica Livingston

    Now available in paperback—with a new preface and interview with Jessica Livingston about Y Combinator! Founders at Work: Stories of Startups’ Early Days is a collection of interviews with founders of famous technology companies about what happened in the very earliest days. These people are celebrities now. What was it like when they were just a couple friends with an idea? Founders like Steve Wozniak (Apple), Caterina Fake (Flickr), Mitch Kapor (Lotus), Max Levchin (PayPal), and Sabeer Bhatia (Hotmail) tell you in their own words about their surprising and often very funny discoveries as they learned how to build a company. Where did they get the ideas that made them rich? How did they convince investors to back them? What went wrong, and how did they recover? Nearly all technical people have thought of one day starting or working for a startup. For them, this book is the closest you can come to being a fly on the wall at a successful startup, to learn how it's done. But ultimately these interviews are required reading for anyone who wants to understand business, because startups are business reduced to its essence. The reason their founders become rich is that startups do what businesses do—create value—more intensively than almost any other part of the economy. How? What are the secrets that make successful startups so insanely productive? Read this book, and let the founders themselves tell you.

    @kfury Founders At Work was the closest i've seen

  • One of our keenest social observers examines the deep historical roots--and untapped possibilities--of our newfound, all-consuming drive to reduce. Everywhere we hear the mantra: Less is more. Marie Kondo and other decluttering gurus promise that shedding our stuff will solve our problems, while tech-industry lifehackers preach a ruthless time-management gospel. We commit to cleanse diets and strive for inbox zero. Amid the frantic pace and distraction of everyday life, we covet silence--and airy, Instagrammable spaces in which to enjoy it. All the while, the enduring values of minimalism become harder to discern through its branding as yet another luxury commodity. After years covering these trends for leading publications, cultural critic Kyle Chayka delves beneath the minimalist lifestyle's glossy surface, seeking ways to better claim the time and space we crave, on our own terms. He finds that the origins of our current love affair with austerity go back further than we realize, as his search leads him to the stories of the singular innovators whose creativity laid the foundation for minimalism as we know it today: artists such as Donald Judd and Agnes Martin; composers such as John Cage and Julius Eastman; architects and ascetics; philosophers and poets. As Chayka looks anew at their extraordinary lives and explores the places where they worked, he gleans fresh insights into our longing for less. And finally, tracing the footsteps of two Japanese literary masters, he arrives at an elegant new synthesis of our minimalist desires and our profound emotional needs.

    @chaykak 🔜📚 https://t.co/cfrhZt4EA7

  • SprawlBall

    Kirk Goldsberry

    "Beautifully illustrated and sharply written, SprawlBall is both a celebration and a critique of the 3-point shot. If you want to understand how the modern NBA came to be, you'll need to read this book." --Nate Silver, editor of fivethirtyeight.com From the leading expert in the exploding field of basketball analytics, a stunning infographic decoding of the modern NBA: who shoots where, and how. The field of basketball analytics has leaped to overdrive thanks to Kirk Goldsberry, whose visual maps of players, teams, and positions have helped teams understand who really is the most valuable player at any position. SprawlBall combines stunning visuals, in-depth analysis, fun, behind-the-scenes stories and gee-whiz facts to chart a modern revolution. From the introduction of the 3-point line to today, the game has changed drastically . . . Now, players like Steph Curry and Draymond Green are leading the charge. In chapters like "The Geography of the NBA," "The Interior Minister (Lebron James)," "The Evolution of Steph Curry," and "The Investor (James Harden)," Goldsberry explains why today's on-court product--with its emphasis on shooting, passing, and spacing--has never been prettier or more democratic. And it's never been more popular. For fans of Bill Simmons and FreeDarko, SprawlBall is a bold new vision of the game, presenting an innovative, cutting-edge look at the sport based on the latest research, as well as a visual and infographic feast for fans.

    @tobyns technically from @kirkgoldsberry https://t.co/YxuWPSpROf just shared by me

  • The End of Loyalty

    Rick Wartzman

    @beLaurie https://t.co/M7prFCVBcw

  • Friday Black

    Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

    A piercingly raw debut story collection from a young writer with an explosive voice; a treacherously surreal, and, at times, heartbreakingly satirical look at what it's like to be young and black in America.

    @tconrad right? so goooood. Friday Black is the other amazing short story collection i read this year - https://t.co/K7LollCiiw

  • @semil @km big part of this @tylercowen book - Complacent Class https://t.co/23AfET3yln

  • Facebook

    Steven Levy

    "In his sophomore year of college, Mark Zuckerberg created a simple website to serve as a campus social network. The site caught on like wildfire, and soon students nationwide were on Facebook. Today, Facebook is nearly unrecognizable from Zuckerberg's first, modest iteration. It has grown into a tech giant, the largest social media platform and one of the most gargantuan companies in the world, with a valuation of more than $576 billion and almost 3 billion users. There is no denying the power and omnipresence of Facebook in American daily life. And in light of recent controversies surrounding election-influencing 'fake news' accounts, the handling of its users' personal data, and growing discontent with the actions of its founder and CEO, never has the company been more central to the national conversation. Based on years of exclusive reporting and interviews with Facebook's key executives and employees, including Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, Steven Levy's sweeping narrative digs deep into the whole story of the company that has changed the world and reaped the consequences"--

    wow, what a cover. @StevenLevy's @facebook book is available for pre-order. Ships 2/20 https://t.co/Xvnv8Yqd8O https://t.co/MtWH9Mxleb

  • Know My Name

    Chanel Miller

    "Looking back, all the ones who doubted or hurt or nearly conquered me faded away, and I am the only one standing. So now, the time has come. I dust myself off, and go on." power, grace & vulnerability from Chanel Miller https://t.co/zm78n2nNsJ https://t.co/A6kureYNF2

  • Ben Horowitz, a leading venture capitalist, modern management expert, and New York Times bestselling author, combines lessons both from history and from modern organizational practice with practical and often surprising advice to help executives build cultures that can weather both good and bad times. Ben Horowitz has long been fascinated by history, and particularly by how people behave differently than you’d expect. The time and circumstances in which they were raised often shapes them—yet a few leaders have managed to shape their times. In What You Do Is Who You Are, he turns his attention to a question crucial to every organization: how do you create and sustain the culture you want? To Horowitz, culture is how a company makes decisions. It is the set of assumptions employees use to resolve everyday problems: should I stay at the Red Roof Inn, or the Four Seasons? Should we discuss the color of this product for five minutes or thirty hours? If culture is not purposeful, it will be an accident or a mistake. What You Do Is Who You Are explains how to make your culture purposeful by spotlighting four models of leadership and culture-building—the leader of the only successful slave revolt, Haiti’s Toussaint Louverture; the Samurai, who ruled Japan for seven hundred years and shaped modern Japanese culture; Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire; and Shaka Senghor, an American ex-con who created the most formidable prison gang in the yard and ultimately transformed prison culture. Horowitz connects these leadership examples to modern case-studies, including how Louverture’s cultural techniques were applied (or should have been) by Reed Hastings at Netflix, Travis Kalanick at Uber, and Hillary Clinton, and how Genghis Khan’s vision of cultural inclusiveness has parallels in the work of Don Thompson, the first African-American CEO of McDonalds, and of Maggie Wilderotter, the CEO who led Frontier Communications. Horowitz then offers guidance to help any company understand its own strategy and build a successful culture. What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted? Who you are is not the values you list on the wall. It’s not what you say in company-wide meeting. It’s not your marketing campaign. It’s not even what you believe. Who you are is what you do. This book aims to help you do the things you need to become the kind of leader you want to be—and others want to follow.

    @bhorowitz is giving 100% of proceeds from his new book to anti-recidivism & Haitian charities. Which is just another great reason to purchase it.... ty Ben! https://t.co/atLx1Y8OG1

  • The former Google executive, editorial director of Twitter and self-described introvert offers networking advice for anyone who has ever cancelled a coffee date due to social anxiety—about how to nurture a vibrant circle of reliable contacts without leaving your comfort zone. Networking has garnered a reputation as a sort of necessary evil in the modern business world. Some do relish the opportunity to boldly work the room, introduce themselves to strangers, and find common career ground—but for many others, the experience is often awkward, or even terrifying. The common networking advice for introverts are variations on the theme of overcoming or “fixing” their quiet tendencies. But Karen Wickre is a self-described introvert who has worked in Silicon Valley for 30 years. She shows you to embrace your true nature to create sustainable connections that can be called upon for you to get—and give—career assistance, advice, introductions, and lasting connections. Karen’s “embrace your quiet side” approach is for anyone who finds themselves shying away from traditional networking activities, or for those who would rather be curled up with a good book on a Friday night than out at a party. For example, if you’re anxious about that big professional mixer full of people you don’t know, she advises you to consider skipping it (many of these are not productive), and instead set up an intimate, one-on-one coffee date. She shows how to truly make the most out of social media to sustain what she calls “the loose touch habit” to build your own brain trust to last a lifetime. With compelling arguments and creative strategies, this new way to network is perfect not only for introverts, but for anyone who wants for a less conventional approach to get ahead in today’s job market.

    @kvox ty for the 📚 !!!! Introverts unite! https://t.co/KZA7Fquef5

  • Super Pumped

    Mike Isaac

    Isaac delivers a gripping account of Uber's rapid rise, its pitched battles with taxi unions and drivers, the company's toxic internal culture, and the bare-knuckle tactics it devised to overcome obstacles in its quest for dominance.

    @Propllrhead @MikeIsaac 😂🥰🤗 https://t.co/U1knm8EjEd

  • The Color of Law

    Richard Rothstein

    Lauded by Ta-Nehisi Coates for his "brilliant" and "fine understanding of the machinery of government policy" (The Atlantic), Richard Rothstein has painstakingly documented how American cities, from San Francisco to Boston, became so racially divided. Rothstein describes how federal, state, and local governments systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning, public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities, subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs, tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation, and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. He demonstrates that such policies still influence tragedies in places like Ferguson and Baltimore. Scholars have separately described many of these policies, but until now, no author has brought them together to explode the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces. Like The New Jim Crow, Rothstein's groundbreaking history forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

    @Mr_Keels @MehrsaBaradaran Color of Law explains the role of segregated housing policies causing wealth inequality

  • Share this timeless classic with a new generation of readers! The handsome retro look and the focus on the power of imagination resonate with today's parents and children, making Harold and the Purple Crayon a joy to share. One evening, after thinking it over for some time, Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. Armed only with an oversize purple crayon, young Harold draws himself a landscape full of wonder and excitement. Harold and his crayon travel through woods and across seas and past dragons before returning to bed, safe and sound. Full of funny twists and surprises, this joyful story shows just how far your imagination can take you. Harold and the Purple Crayon has delighted readers of all ages for decades and has lost none of its imagination-sparking wonder.

    @andrewparker @webdevMason Harold and the Purple Crayon

  • One of the start-up world’s most in-demand executive coaches—hailed as the “CEO Whisperer” (Gimlet Media)—reveals why radical self-inquiry is critical to professional success and healthy relationships in all realms of life. Jerry Colonna helps start-up CEOs make peace with their demons, the psychological habits and behavioral patterns that have helped them to succeed—molding them into highly accomplished individuals—yet have been detrimental to their relationships and ultimate well-being. Now, this venture capitalist turned executive coach shares his unusual yet highly effective blend of Buddhism, Jungian therapy, and entrepreneurial straight talk to help leaders overcome their own psychological traumas. Reboot is a journey of radical self-inquiry, helping you to reset your life by sorting through the emotional baggage that is holding you back professionally, and even more important, in your relationships. Jerry has taught CEOs and their top teams to realize their potential by using the raw material of their lives to find meaning, to build healthy interpersonal bonds, and to become more compassionate and bold leaders. In Reboot, he inspires everyone to hold themselves responsible for their choices and for the possibility of truly achieving their dreams. Work does not have to destroy us. Work can be the way in which we achieve our fullest self, Jerry firmly believes. What we need, sometimes, is a chance to reset our goals and to reconnect with our deepest selves and with each other. Reboot moves and empowers us to begin this journey.

    Should you buy @jerrycolonna book? Yes, if you are any one of the following: 1️⃣ a CEO 2️⃣ a leader 3️⃣ a human https://t.co/AP3gkUr443 https://t.co/GaU9BS73FM