Jeff Morris Jr.

Jeff Morris Jr.

Investor & Founder @ChapterOne, Former VP Product, Revenue @Tinder.

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10+ Book Recommendations by Jeff Morris Jr.

  • @barkingd Great book. Need to read again.

  • Hatching Twitter

    Nick Bilton

    A behind-the-scenes portrait of the influential news and networking company traces its rise from a failed podcasting business to a multi-billion-dollar giant, recounting the high-stakes power struggles, betrayed friendships and global influences that shaped its evolution. 75,000 first printing.

    @Mossibat I read the book - great one.

  • VC

    Tom Nicholas

    From nineteenth-century whaling to a multitude of firms pursuing entrepreneurial finance today, venture finance reflects a deep-seated tradition in the deployment of risk capital in the United States. Tom Nicholas’s history of the venture capital industry offers a roller coaster ride through America’s ongoing pursuit of financial gain.

    @TurnerNovak @Keith_Wasserman I wish. Reading “VC: An American History” by Tom Nicholas right now.

  • Eboys

    Randall E. Stross

    Looking carefully at these "icons" of the 1990s, the author uses his unprecedented access to the venture capitalists behind Benchmark to reveal the surprising world behind the ultimate investment gamble.

    @maariabajwa @aplusk @arteeninLA @MichaelDTam @Austen Some light beach reading :) https://t.co/rVZhiGfcxk

  • Drawing on exclusive interviews with eBay's founder and employees, a journalist provides an inside look at Pierre Omidyar and his creation of the cyberspace giant and traces the company's history from first concept to a revolutionary Internet success. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

    @TieshunR @modestproposal1 The Perfect Store: Inside eBay https://t.co/Tp4HObqR8s

  • The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.

    @paulg @rivatez Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger. The best rebellion story.

  • VC

    Tom Nicholas

    From nineteenth-century whaling to a multitude of firms pursuing entrepreneurial finance today, venture finance reflects a deep-seated tradition in the deployment of risk capital in the United States. Tom Nicholas’s history of the venture capital industry offers a roller coaster ride through America’s ongoing pursuit of financial gain.

    @rabois Agreed. Highly recommend reading “VC: An American History” by Tom Nicholas which talked about this a bit. https://t.co/Biwlg9LdWC

  • Eboys

    Randall E. Stross

    Looking carefully at these "icons" of the 1990s, the author uses his unprecedented access to the venture capitalists behind Benchmark to reveal the surprising world behind the ultimate investment gamble.

    I finished reading eBoys yesterday. Best book ever on VC: * Benchmark allowed a journalist inside partner meetings & you see internal debates /eBay creation. * Firsthand account of @bgurley being recruited to Benchmark. * Wish more VC's gave this access. https://t.co/rVZhiGfcxk

  • The team behind How Google Works returns with management lessons from legendary coach and business executive, Bill Campbell, whose mentoring of some of our most successful modern entrepreneurs has helped create well over a trillion dollars in market value. Bill Campbell played an instrumental role in the growth of several prominent companies, such as Google, Apple, and Intuit, fostering deep relationships with Silicon Valley visionaries, including Steve Jobs, Larry Page, and Eric Schmidt. In addition, this business genius mentored dozens of other important leaders on both coasts, from entrepreneurs to venture capitalists to educators to football players, leaving behind a legacy of growing companies, successful people, respect, friendship, and love after his death in 2016. Leaders at Google for over a decade, Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, and Alan Eagle experienced firsthand how the man fondly known as Coach Bill built trusting relationships, fostered personal growth—even in those at the pinnacle of their careers—inspired courage, and identified and resolved simmering tensions that inevitably arise in fast-moving environments. To honor their mentor and inspire and teach future generations, they have codified his wisdom in this essential guide. Based on interviews with over eighty people who knew and loved Bill Campbell, Trillion Dollar Coach explains the Coach’s principles and illustrates them with stories from the many great people and companies with which he worked. The result is a blueprint for forward-thinking business leaders and managers that will help them create higher performing and faster moving cultures, teams, and companies.

    I finished Trillion Dollar Coach this week. I grew up knowing Bill Campbell as a family friend and my football coach & had no idea about his impact on the tech industry. He never mentioned any of that to us. Incredible human. Should be required reading at every company.

  • Eboys

    Randall E. Stross

    Looking carefully at these "icons" of the 1990s, the author uses his unprecedented access to the venture capitalists behind Benchmark to reveal the surprising world behind the ultimate investment gamble.

    "Failure Happens in Technology. Just ask Mark Twain." * Article I wrote about one of the worst angel investments of all time, which made made by Mark Twain. * Inspired by reading eBoys, a book about Benchmark & their incredible eBay investment. https://t.co/5JwKlM4iry

  • @sriramk @sippey @sarahcpr The entire book is magic. I’ve ordered 20+ copies for co-workers and friends: 100 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings: How to Get By Without Even Trying Coo... https://t.co/2eQrh484NK via @amazon

  • Bad Blood

    John Carreyrou

    The Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year A New York Times Notable Book A Washington Post Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, San Francisco Chronicle, Time, Esquire, Fortune, Marie Claire, GQ, Mental Floss, Science Friday, Bloomberg, Popular Mechanics, BookRiot, The Seattle Times, The Oregonian, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the next Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with its breakthrough device, which performed the whole range of laboratory tests from a single drop of blood. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.5 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. Erroneous results put patients in danger, leading to misdiagnoses and unnecessary treatments. All the while, Holmes and her partner, Sunny Balwani, worked to silence anyone who voiced misgivings--from journalists to their own employees. Rigorously reported and fearlessly written, Bad Blood is a gripping story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron--a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.

    I finished reading Bad Blood this weekend. The most stunning part of Theranos was the lack of technical diligence by investors & advisors who enabled this behavior. I often see the same lack of diligence with crypto investors and it’s a troubling sign. We need to do better.

  • Measure What Matters is a revolutionary approach to business that has been adopted by some of Silicon Valley's most successful startups. It is a movement that is behind the explosive growth of Intel, Google, Amazon and Uber and many more. Measure What Mattersis about using Objectives and Key Results (or OKRs) to make tough choices on business priorities. It's about communicating these objectives throughout the company from entry level to CEO and it's about collecting timely, relevant data to track progress - to measure what matters. When Google first started out, its founders had amazing technology, entrepreneurial energy and sky-high ambition but no business plan. John Doerr taught them a proven approach to operating excellence that has helped them achieve greatness. He has since shared OKRs with more than fifty companies with outstanding success. In this book, Larry Page, Bill Gates, Bono, Sheryl Sandberg and many more explain how OKRs have helped them exceed all expectations and run their organisations with focus and agility.

    I read "Measure What Matters" by @johndoerr today. My notes: 1. OKRs should be transparent. 92% of employees are more motivated to hit goals if teammates see their progress. 2. The most powerful OKRs stem from outside the C-suite. 3. Annual performance reviews are not enough.

  • Wild Ride

    Adam Lashinsky

    "Fortune writer and bestselling author of Inside Apple's expose of Uber, the multi-billion dollar Silicon Valley upstart that has disrupted the transportation industry around the world. Uber is one of the most fascinating and controversial businesses in the world, both beloved for its elegant ride-hailing concept and heady growth and condemned for CEO Travis Kalanick's ruthless pursuit of success at all cost. Despite the company's significance to the on-demand economy and the mobile revolution, and the battle for global dominance that Kalanick is waging against politicians and taxi companies all over the world, the full story behind Uber has never been told. It's a story that start-up founders, executives of traditional businesses, tech-savvy readers, and drivers and riders alike will find riveting. Adam Lashinsky, veteran Fortune writer and author of Inside Apple, traces the story of Uber's rapid growth from its murky origins to its plans for expansion into radically different industries. The company is fighting local competitors and lawmakers for markets around the world; it has already faced riots and protests in cities like Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and Mumbai. It fought, and lost, an expensive and grueling battle against rival Didi in China. Uber has also poached entire departments from top research universities in a push to build the first self-driving car and possibly replace the very drivers it's worked so hard to recruit. Uber is in the headlines every day, but so much about its past and its future plans are still unknown to the public. Lashinsky will offer a look inside Uber's vault in this informative, deeply researched book about the ur-disruptor and its visionary and fierce CEO"--

    I finished reading Wild Ride this weekend. Amazing to think the book finishes just before Travis resigns from Uber. https://t.co/aVEPSvUJAk