Patrick OShaughnessy

Patrick OShaughnessy

Mapping the world’s business & investing knowledge: @OSAMResearch 🧬 / @psumvc 🟣 / @capitalcamp ⛺️ / @joincolossus 🔎

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60+ Book Recommendations by Patrick OShaughnessy

  • Wanting

    Luke Burgis

    Interesting idea from @lukeburgis, from his book “Wanting:” Act as if your behavior influences what those around you want or desire, because it does. https://t.co/AUm6jVq55C

  • After his father's death, Jasper reflects on Martin Dean, the man who had raised him in intellectual captivity and spent his entire life analyzing absolutely everything, and describes his unusual boyhood, colorful family members, father's failed battle to make a lasting impression on the world, and their many adventures together. A first novel. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

    A friend asked me today for a fiction book suggestion. This was the first that came to mind. https://t.co/XjTScf1MfY

  • Piranesi

    Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.

    A uniquely strange book. I couldn’t put it down. Good fast read if you want a novel. https://t.co/bEu2Nvk5jF

  • Breath

    James Nestor

    AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER No matter what you eat, how much you exercise, how skinny or young or wise you are, none of it matters if you're not breathing properly. There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing: take air in, let it out, repeat 25,000 times a day. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences. Journalist James Nestor travels the world to figure out what went wrong and how to fix it. The answers aren't found in pulmonology labs, as we might expect, but in the muddy digs of ancient burial sites, secret Soviet facilities, New Jersey choir schools, and the smoggy streets of São Paulo. Nestor tracks down men and women exploring the hidden science behind ancient breathing practices like Pranayama, Sudarshan Kriya, and Tummo and teams up with pulmonary tinkerers to scientifically test long-held beliefs about how we breathe. Modern research is showing us that making even slight adjustments to the way we inhale and exhale can jump-start athletic performance; rejuvenate internal organs; halt snoring, asthma, and autoimmune disease; and even straighten scoliotic spines. None of this should be possible, and yet it is. Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, Breath turns the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function on its head. You will never breathe the same again.

    This was one of the books that may permanently change my behavior. Don’t find those often. Reminded me of Born to Run. After reading Born to Run, I never ran the same again. After Breath, I’ll breath less and mostly though my nose https://t.co/nb2nCObXmD

  • The sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission to save both humanity and the earth, Ryland Grace is hurtled into the depths of space when he must conquer an extinction-level threat to our species.

    For two years now, I’ve struggled to read books. For non-fiction topics, I find conversation and other media so much better than books and it’s hard to imagine that ever changing back. But I miss just reading a book. Project Hail Mary just gave me a great taste. I recommend it!

  • Priceless

    William Poundstone

    Prada stores carry a few obscenely expensive items in order to boost sales for everything else (which look like bargains in comparison). People used to download music for free, then Steve Jobs convinced them to pay. How? By charging 99 cents. That price has a hypnotic effect: the profit margin of the 99 Cents Only store is twice that of Wal-Mart. Why do text messages cost money, while e-mails are free? Why do jars of peanut butter keep getting smaller in order to keep the price the "same"? The answer is simple: prices are a collective hallucination. In Priceless, the bestselling author William Poundstone reveals the hidden psychology of value. In psychological experiments, people are unable to estimate "fair" prices accurately and are strongly influenced by the unconscious, irrational, and politically incorrect. It hasn't taken long for marketers to apply these findings. "Price consultants" advise retailers on how to convince consumers to pay more for less, and negotiation coaches offer similar advice for businesspeople cutting deals. The new psychology of price dictates the design of price tags, menus, rebates, "sale" ads, cell phone plans, supermarket aisles, real estate offers, wage packages, tort demands, and corporate buyouts. Prices are the most pervasive hidden persuaders of all. Rooted in the emerging field of behavioral decision theory, Priceless should prove indispensable to anyone who negotiates.

    Every year, I respect marketing, messaging, sales, and communications more Best books: - Pitch Anything (Klaff) - Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t (Pressfield) - Positioning (Ries, Trout) - Influence (Cialdini) - Scientific Advertising (Hopkins) - Priceless (Poundstone)

  • Pitch Anything

    Oren Klaff

    Every year, I respect marketing, messaging, sales, and communications more Best books: - Pitch Anything (Klaff) - Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t (Pressfield) - Positioning (Ries, Trout) - Influence (Cialdini) - Scientific Advertising (Hopkins) - Priceless (Poundstone)

  • FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE WAR OF ART ...There's a mantra that real writers know that wannabe writers don't. And the secret phrase is this: NOBODY WANTS TO READ YOUR SH*TRecognizing that painful truth is the first step in the writer's transformation from amateur to professional. "When you understand that nobody wants to read your shit, you develop empathy. You acquire the skill that is indispensable to all artists and entrepreneurs--the ability to switch back and forth in your imagination from your own point of view as writer/painter/seller to the point of view of your reader/gallery-goer/customer. You learn to ask yourself with every sentence and every phrase: Is this interesting? Is it fun or challenging or inventive? Am I giving the reader enough? Is she bored? Is she following where I want to lead her?"

    Every year, I respect marketing, messaging, sales, and communications more Best books: - Pitch Anything (Klaff) - Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t (Pressfield) - Positioning (Ries, Trout) - Influence (Cialdini) - Scientific Advertising (Hopkins) - Priceless (Poundstone)

  • This Edition Includes: How Advertising Laws Are Established - Just Salesmanship - Offer Service - Mail Order Advertising - What It Teaches - Headlines - Psychology - Being Specific - Tell Your Full Story - Art in Advertising - Things Too Costly - Information - Strategy - Use of Samples - Getting Distribution - Test Campaigns - Leaning On Dealers - Individuality - Negative Advertising - Letter Writing - A Name That Helps - Good Business

    Every year, I respect marketing, messaging, sales, and communications more Best books: - Pitch Anything (Klaff) - Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t (Pressfield) - Positioning (Ries, Trout) - Influence (Cialdini) - Scientific Advertising (Hopkins) - Priceless (Poundstone)

  • The first book to deal with the problems of communicating to a skeptical, media-blitzed public, Positioning describes a revolutionary approach to creating a "position" in a prospective customer's mind-one that reflects a company's own strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Writing in their trademark witty, fast-paced style, advertising gurus Ries and Trout explain how to: Make and position an industry leader so that its name and message wheedles its way into the collective subconscious of your market-and stays there Position a follower so that it can occupy a niche not claimed by the leader Avoid letting a second product ride on the coattails of an established one. Positioning also shows you how to: Use leading ad agency techniques to capture the biggest market share and become a household name Build your strategy around your competition's weaknesses Reposition a strong competitor and create a weak spot Use your present position to its best advantage Choose the best name for your product Determine when-and why-less is more Analyze recent trends that affect your positioning. Ries and Trout provide many valuable case histories and penetrating analyses of some of the most phenomenal successes and failures in advertising history. Revised to reflect significant developments in the five years since its original publication, Positioning is required reading for anyone in business today.

    “Positioning” is one of the most important books I’ve read. “The basic idea is not to create something new and different, but to manipulate what’s already in the mind, to retie the connections that already exist.” E.g. this is how we came up with the term “Custom Indexing” https://t.co/vJpIZoep1Z

  • The Company

    Stephen Bown

    NATIONAL BESTSELLER A thrilling new telling of the story of modern Canada's origins. The story of the Hudson's Bay Company, dramatic and adventurous and complex, is the story of modern Canada's creation. And yet it hasn't been told in a book for over thirty years, and never in such depth and vivid detail as in Stephen R. Bown's exciting new telling. The Company started out small in 1670, trading practical manufactured goods for furs with the Indigenous inhabitants of inland subarctic Canada. Controlled by a handful of English aristocrats, it expanded into a powerful political force that ruled the lives of many thousands of people--from the lowlands south and west of Hudson Bay, to the tundra, the great plains, the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific northwest. It transformed the culture and economy of many Indigenous groups and ended up as the most important political and economic force in northern and western North America. When the Company was faced with competition from French traders in the 1780s, the result was a bloody corporate battle, the coming of Governor George Simpson--one of the greatest villains in Canadian history--and the Company assuming political control and ruthless dominance. By the time its monopoly was rescinded after two hundred years, the Hudson's Bay Company had reworked the entire northern North American world. Stephen R. Bown has a scholar's profound knowledge and understanding of the Company's history, but wears his learning lightly in a narrative as compelling, and rich in well-drawn characters, as a page-turning novel.

    Here are the blocks for today's episode with @cdixon The original Bitcoin white paper is a fascinating read, as is the book "The Company" https://t.co/tJnLuaAEK5 https://t.co/4O9kOp3lPy

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Praised for enjoyable writing, practical suggestions, and scientifically documented material, previous editions of this title have been widely read by business professionals, fundraisers, and those interested in psychology. This new edition includes morefirsthand accounts of how principles presented in the book apply to personal lives; updated coverage of popular culture and new technology; and more on how compliance principles work in other cultures.--From publisher description.

    @ykovzel @peteweishaupt You can do in school. Make it a series of projects with guidance and sharing in between. The best book on sales is Influence by Cialdini. But even after reading that you have to go out it into practice.

  • Profiles technology as an evolving international system with predictable trends, counseling readers on how to prepare themselves and future generations by anticipating and steering their choices toward developing needs.

    Reading "What Technology Wants" by @kevin2kelly (its great) makes me realize how long its been since I read a good non-fiction book. Books have lost the non-ficiton crown forever, IMO. Great books will persist. But something other than a book is almost always better now.

  • Social Chemistry

    Marissa King

    Next Big Idea Club Nominee Fall 2020 Social Chemistry will utterly transform the way you think about "networking." Understanding the contours of your social network can dramatically enhance personal relationships, work life, and even your global impact. Are you an Expansionist, a Broker, or a Convener? The answer matters more than you think. . . . Yale professor Marissa King shows how anyone can build more meaningful and productive relationships based on insights from neuroscience, psychology, and network analytics. Conventional wisdom says it's the size of your network that matters, but social science research has proven there is more to it. King explains that the quality and structure of our relationships has the greatest impact on our personal and professional lives. As she shows, there are three basic types of networks, so readers can see the role they are already playing: Expansionist, Broker, or Convener. This network decoder enables readers to own their network style and modify it for better alignment with their life plans and values. High-quality connections in your social network strongly predict cognitive functioning, emotional resilience, and satisfaction at work. A well-structured network is likely to boost the quality of your ideas, as well as your pay. Beyond the office, social connections are the lifeblood of our health and happiness. The compiled results from dozens of previous studies found that our social relationships have an effect on our likelihood of dying prematurely--equivalent to obesity or smoking. Rich stories of Expansionists like Vernon Jordan, Brokers like Yo-Yo Ma, and Conveners like Anna Wintour, as well as personal experiences from King's own world of connections, inform this warm, engaging, revelatory investigation into some of the most consequential decisions we can make about the trajectory of our lives.

    Had a fairly mind blowing conversation with @marissadking. Highly suggest you check out her book "Social Chemistry," which will leave your brain buzzing.

  • Working Backwards is an insider's breakdown of Amazon's approach to culture, leadership, and best practices from Colin Bryar and Bill Carr, two long-time, top-level Amazon executives...

    @tech_month Working Backwards the book

  • The Prize

    Daniel Yergin

    Deemed "the best history of oil ever written" by Business Week and with more than 300,000 copies in print, Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power has been extensively updated to address the current energy crisis.

    Thanks everyone. Starting Yergins new book because of this thread, which I didn’t know existed before. “The Prize” remains my favorite history book.

  • Among the oldest of India’s spiritual texts, the Upanishads are records of intensive question-and-answer sessions given by illumined sages to their students. Widely featured in philosophy courses, the Upanishads have puzzled and inspired wisdom seekers from Yeats to Schopenhauer. Eknath Easwaran makes this challenging text more accessible by selecting the passages most relevant to readers seeking timeless truths today. His accessible, highly readable translation and lively foreword place the teachings in a contemporary context for students and general readers alike.

    @MikeSimanovsky https://t.co/Hs9HMCxnM9

  • One Up

    Joost van Dreunen

    What explains the massive worldwide success of video games such as Fortnite, Minecraft, and Pokémon Go? Game companies look unconventional--and are often ignored--from the standpoint of traditional business strategy. Yet they have thrived in the face of digitalization, generating billions in revenue through business models such as offering content for free in order to build market share and draw in customers. One Up offers a pioneering empirical analysis of innovation and strategy in the video games industry to explain how it has gone from the fringe to the mainstream. Drawing on almost twenty years of practical and academic experience in the interactive entertainment field, Joost van Dreunen analyzes how business model innovation has made the video game industry what it is today. Covering more than three decades of industry data, he demonstrates that video game companies flourish when they bring the same level of creativity to business strategy as they do to game design. Filled with case studies of companies such as Activision Blizzard, Apple, Electronic Arts, Epic Games, Microsoft, Nexon, Sony, Take-Two Interactive, Tencent, and Valve, this book reveals how the emergence of digital and mobile gaming can make us rethink traditional product-based strategies. One Up is required reading for investors, strategic decision makers, creatives, and anyone looking to learn about the major drivers of change and growth in contemporary entertainment.

    3/ As I learned in @joosterizer book One Up, their early physical retail edge rested on counterpositioning: doing things Walmart and others couldn't: 1. Accessibility 2. Deeply trained expert staff 3. Tailored loyalty program 4. Custom inventory management for used game sales

  • Dune

    Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.

    @edwardczech Favorite sci fi? That’s tough. Dune is probably the most memorable book. Asimov probably the author I’ve read most. Ursula Guin probably the most interesting variety.

  • TAPE SUCKS

    Frank Slootman

    Silicon Valley has been birthing renegade technology companies for the better part of a century, a storied lineage that traces from Stanford's Fred Terman to the Varian brothers' Klystron amplifier, from the hallowed garage of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard to the bold "traitorous eight" who fled Shockley Labs to form Fairchild Semiconductor. These companies, to be sure, broke new science and engineering ground-yet their most lasting legacy may well be their pioneering approach to business itself. They blazed a path that led to Intel, Apple, Oracle, Genentech, Gilead, Sun, Adobe, Cisco, Yahoo, eBay, Google, Salesforce, Facebook, Twitter, and many, many others.What causes a fledgling company to break through and prosper? At the highest level, the blueprint is always the same: An upstart team with outsized ambition somehow possesses an uncanny ability to surpass customer expectations, upend whole industries, and topple incumbents. But how do they do it? If only we could observe the behaviors of such a company from the inside. If only we were granted a first-person perspective at a present-day Silicon Valley startup-cum-blockbuster. What might we learn? This document-the story of Data Domain's rise from zero to one billion dollars in revenue-is your invitation to find out. For anyone curious about the process of new business formation, Tape Sucks offers a provocative, ripped-from-the-headlines case study. How does a new company bootstrap itself? What role does venture capital play? Why do customers and new recruits take a chance on a risky new player? Frank Slootman, who lived and breathed the Data Domain story for six years, offers up his clear-eyed, "first-person shooter" version of events. You're with him on the inside as he and his team navigate the tricky waters of launching a high-technology business. You'll feel-deep in your gut-the looming threat of outside combatants and the array of challenges that make mere survival an accomplishment. You'll catch a glimpse of an adrenalin-fueled place where victories are visceral, communication wide open, and esprit de corps palpable. The upshot is that the principles of the early entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley are alive and well. Their straightforward ideas include employee-ownership, tolerance for failure, unfettered meritocracy, faith in the power of technology breakthroughs, a preference for handshakes and trust over contracts and lawsuits, pragmatism, egalitarianism, and a belief in the primacy of growth and reinvestment over dividends and outbound profits. Tape Sucks is an honest, informed perspective on technology wave riding. It allows you to observe a high-growth business at close range and get an unvarnished picture of how things really work.

    @jrichlive @thogge @jimcramer Great book

  • THE NEW YORK TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED FOR THE WELLCOME BOOK PRIZE 2017 'Finishing this book and then forgetting about it is simply not an option...Unmissable' New York Times At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, the next he was a patient struggling to live. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a medical student asking what makes a virtuous and meaningful life into a neurosurgeon working in the core of human identity – the brain – and finally into a patient and a new father. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when when life is catastrophically interrupted? What does it mean to have a child as your own life fades away? Paul Kalanithi died while working on this profoundly moving book, yet his words live on as a guide to us all. When Breath Becomes Air is a life-affirming reflection on facing our mortality and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a gifted writer who became both.

    @dopamine_uptake That book opened my soul up

  • A landmark, bestselling business book and a fascinating behind-the-scenes history of the creation of Danny's most famous eating establishments, Setting the Table is a treasure trove of valuable, innovative insights applicable to any business or organization.

    @schlaf @dhmeyer Danny’s book is one of my all time favorites. Great pick.

  • Draws on the lives of some of the world's forefront writers and activists to evaluate the intimate nature of human relationships with their significant others, their work, and their inner selves, explaining the importance of balancing one's commitments to each.

    The @SamHarrisOrg podcast with David Whyte is worth the price of his podcast subscription. Best I’ve heard this year. I also loved his book “The Three Marriages” He reads this poem early in the conversation: https://t.co/j0z6F7GCM5

  • Spillover

    David Quammen

    A masterpiece of science reporting that tracks the animal origins of emerginghuman diseases.

    Interesting 📖 : 1) human activity causing disintegration of natural ecosystems 2) ecosystems have millions of unknown creatures, many parasitic 3) disruption of ecosystems causing more spillover into humans Ecological contact & breakdown + interconnected 🌎 = more diseases https://t.co/yvttvuxPZe

  • The unforgettable true story of Christopher Knight, who found refuge from the pressures of modern society by living alone in the Maine woods for twenty-seven years.

    @EconomPic Walking had most impact. Stranger in woods was riveting. Walking is sort of a philosophy book though.

  • Walking

    Henry David Thoreau

    @EconomPic Walking had most impact. Stranger in woods was riveting. Walking is sort of a philosophy book though.

  • Excellence Wins

    Horst Schulze

    In Excellence Wins, Every Time, co-founder of The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company Horst Schulze shares the visionary and disruptive principles that have produced immense global successes over the course of his still prolific fifty-year career.

    A good “reminder” book that can be read very quickly. I like these books that serve as a reminder that it’s not about you. It is about who you are serving, how you do it, and why. Customers want: - no defects - timeliness - kindness - individualization + personalization https://t.co/mLqwqnyTEQ

  • Drawing on wisdom from Ecclesiastes, David Gibson persuades us that only with a proper perspective on death can we find satisfaction in life--and see just how great God is.

    I’m not religious, and there was a time I’d have scoffed at reading this book, but it is thought provoking. Good reminder for me that you earn a high return on an open mind. “Our excesses are the best clues to our own poverty, and our best way of concealing it from ourselves” https://t.co/eOXExdJJ2n

  • Pitch Anything

    Oren Klaff

    Two books for me are way above the rest: 1) Pitch Anything by Klaff 2) Influence by Cialdini https://t.co/mSE9qJGUsk

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Dr Robert Cialdini explains the six psychological principles that drive the human impulse to comply to the pressures of others and reveals how to defend oneself against manipulation.

    Two books for me are way above the rest: 1) Pitch Anything by Klaff 2) Influence by Cialdini https://t.co/mSE9qJGUsk

  • Shantaram

    Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.

    Outstanding book. Talk about immersive. Few other epic fiction books that left me wowed: -thousand autumn’s of Jacob de Zoet by Mitchell -cloud atlas by Mitchell -a fraction of the whole by Toltz https://t.co/JuAZOvVYgr

  • Dispatched to the influential Japanese port of Dejima in 1799, ambitious clerk Jacob de Zoet resolves to earn enough money to deserve his wealthy fiancâee, an effort that is challenged by his relationship with the midwife daughter of a samurai.

    Outstanding book. Talk about immersive. Few other epic fiction books that left me wowed: -thousand autumn’s of Jacob de Zoet by Mitchell -cloud atlas by Mitchell -a fraction of the whole by Toltz https://t.co/JuAZOvVYgr

  • Cloud Atlas

    David Stephen Mitchell

    Outstanding book. Talk about immersive. Few other epic fiction books that left me wowed: -thousand autumn’s of Jacob de Zoet by Mitchell -cloud atlas by Mitchell -a fraction of the whole by Toltz https://t.co/JuAZOvVYgr

  • After his father's death, Jasper reflects on Martin Dean, the man who had raised him in intellectual captivity and spent his entire life analyzing absolutely everything, and describes his unusual boyhood, colorful family members, father's failed battle to make a lasting impression on the world, and their many adventures together. A first novel. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

    Outstanding book. Talk about immersive. Few other epic fiction books that left me wowed: -thousand autumn’s of Jacob de Zoet by Mitchell -cloud atlas by Mitchell -a fraction of the whole by Toltz https://t.co/JuAZOvVYgr

  • How do you price your software? Is it art, science or magic? How much attention should you pay to your competitors? This short handbook will provide you with the theory, practical advice and case studies you need to stop yourself from reaching for the dice. Table of Contents Chapter 01: Some - but not too much - Economics Chapter 02: Pricing Psychology: What is your product worth? Chapter 03: Pricing Pitfalls Chapter 04: Advanced Pricing Chapter 05: What your price says about you (and how to change it) Why read this book? "At Business of Software 2007 Michael Pryor held an impromptu session on how to price your software. So many people turned up, and so many people kept on arriving, that by the time they d introduced themselves there was no time left to talk about software pricing. I ve had similar experiences; in fact, How do I price my software? is probably the most common question I m asked by software entrepreneurs and product managers. This handbook is an attempt to answer that question." Neil Davidson, Author. About the Author Neil Davidson is co-founder and joint CEO of Red Gate Software. Red Gate was founded in 1999 and now employs some 150 people. It was Cambridge News business of the year in 2006 and has been in the Sunday Times top 100 companies to work for three years running. It was founded with no VC money and little debt. Neil is also founder of the annual Business of Software conference and runs the Business of Software social network.

    Most non fiction should be about this long. 56 page mini book on how to price a product. Fairly introductory but lots of great reminders. https://t.co/LLmcm4PX89 https://t.co/xIylWO5vcm

  • THE NEW YORK TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED FOR THE WELLCOME BOOK PRIZE 2017 'Finishing this book and then forgetting about it is simply not an option...Unmissable' New York Times At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, the next he was a patient struggling to live. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a medical student asking what makes a virtuous and meaningful life into a neurosurgeon working in the core of human identity – the brain – and finally into a patient and a new father. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when when life is catastrophically interrupted? What does it mean to have a child as your own life fades away? Paul Kalanithi died while working on this profoundly moving book, yet his words live on as a guide to us all. When Breath Becomes Air is a life-affirming reflection on facing our mortality and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a gifted writer who became both.

    @LarissaBundziak Yea. Definitely not your average book. Speaking of one sitting books, ever read when breathe becomes air?

  • Winner of the 2015 FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award ANew York Times Bestseller Top Business Book of 2015 at Forbes One of NBCNews.com 12 Notable Science and Technology Books of 2015 What are the jobs of the future? How many will there be? And who will have them? As technology continues to accelerate and machines begin taking care of themselves, fewer people will be necessary. Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making "good jobs” obsolete: many paralegals, journalists, office workers, and even computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots and smart software. As progress continues, blue and white collar jobs alike will evaporate, squeezing working- and middle-class families ever further. At the same time, households are under assault from exploding costs, especially from the two major industries--education and health care--that, so far, have not been transformed by information technology. The result could well be massive unemployment and inequality as well as the implosion of the consumer economy itself. The past solutions to technological disruption, especially more training and education, aren’t going to work. We must decide, now, whether the future will see broad-based prosperity or catastrophic levels of inequality and economic insecurity.Rise of the Robots is essential reading to understand what accelerating technology means for our economic prospects--not to mention those of our children--as well as for society as a whole.

    What is the best nonfiction book or long post you’ve read which discusses the present and potential future of some field of interest? A good example of what I mean would be the rise of the robots by @MFordFuture https://t.co/oJzTSD6y99

  • Dignity

    Chris Arnade

    Once or twice a generation, an author reveals what life is like for the truly needy and disenfranchised. Like Jacob Riis in the 1890s, Walker Evans in the 1930s, or Michael Harrington in the 1960s, Chris Arnade cuts through the jargon and abstractions to expose the reality of our current class divide in stark pictures and unforgettable true stories. After abandoning his Wall Street career, Arnade decided to document poverty and addiction in the Bronx, spending years interviewing, photographing, and becoming close friends with homeless addicts, hanging out in drug dens and McDonald's in the South Bronx. Then he started driving across America to see how the rest of the country compared. He found the same types of stories everywhere, across lines of race, ethnicity, religion, and geography. The people he got to know, from Alabama to California and Maine to Nevada, gave Arnade a new respect for the dignity and resilience of what he calls America's Back Row-those who lack the credentials and advantages of the Front Row. The strivers in the Front Row, with their advanced degrees and upward mobility, see the Back Row's forms of meaningas worthless, and then tell them they are wasting their time staying in dying towns or cities. Why not move for better jobs? The responses from the Back Row-about the comforts of faith, community, family, and tradition-are seen as backward. But the Back Row finds love, companionship, and dignity in surprising places-in drug dens, community colleges, churches, and even in McDonald's. In Arnade's pictures and writings, the suffering and flawed are also seen searching for dignity in the midst of loss and humiliation. As Takeesha, a woman in Hunts Point, told Arnade, she wants the secular elites to see her as she sees herself- "a prostitute, a mother of six, and a child of God." This book is his attempt to help the rest of us truly see, hear, and respect millions of people who've been left behind.

    I can’t put this book down https://t.co/iQkd8lo6dk

  • Disunited Nations

    Peter Zeihan

    A forward-thinking geopolitical guru explains who will win and who will lose in the coming global disorder. The world is entering a period of dangerous instability and conflict not seen since before World War I, Peter Zeihan asserts. America's allies depend on our commitments for their economic and physical security, and they hope the Trump administration's hostility is an aberration. This hope is misplaced, Zeihan contends. The problem goes deeper than America. A growing number of countries are stepping back from the international system, and nationalism is on the rise worldwide, from Brazil to Great Britain to Italy to Hungary. We are at the dawn of a new age--that of the isolationist populist politician. People worldwide are losing faith in the global order. The value that we are all connected and must protect world trade and regional order is losing its power. The countries and businesses prepared for this new every-country-for-itself ethic are those that will prevail. In Disunited Nations, Zeihan presents a series of counterintuitive arguments about the future of the world. Germany will decline as the most powerful country in Europe, with France taking its place. Every country should prepare for the collapse of China, not North Korea. We are already seeing, as he predicts, a shift in outlook on the Middle East: it is no longer Iran that is the region's most dangerous threat, but Saudi Arabia. Smart, interesting, and essential reading, Disunited Nations is a sure-to-be-controversial guidebook that analyzes the emerging shifts and resulting problems and issues that will arise in the next two decades. We are entering a period of chaos; no political or corporate leader can ignore Zeihan's insights or his message if they want to survive and thrive in this uncertain new time.

    Highly recommend pre-ordering this new book by @PeterZeihan if interested in geopolitics https://t.co/4qTrnNPX0e

  • Just Mercy

    Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction

    @dhmeyer @JustMercyFilm Amazing book too

  • @EricJorgenson I liked that book

  • Accelerate

    Nicole Forsgren PhD

    Does technology actually matter? And how can we apply technology to drive business value?For years, we¿ve been told that the performance of software delivery teams doesn¿t matter¿that it can¿t provide a competitive advantage to our companies. Through four years of groundbreaking research, Dr. Nicole Forsgren, Jez Humble, and Gene Kim set out to find a way to measure software delivery performance¿and what drives it¿using rigorous statistical methods. This book presents both the findings and the science behind that research.Readers will discover how to measure the performance of their teams, and what capabilities they should invest in to drive higher performance.

    I’m learning a tremendous amount from this book. Great read for anyone interested in software development. Thanks to @zackkanter for suggesting it. https://t.co/G1SdswNZYK

  • @paulg @rivatez This: https://t.co/JXvb7qxbit Because it led to this: https://t.co/gCMjnP407m

  • Among the oldest of India’s spiritual texts, the Upanishads are records of intensive question-and-answer sessions given by illumined sages to their students. Widely featured in philosophy courses, the Upanishads have puzzled and inspired wisdom seekers from Yeats to Schopenhauer. Eknath Easwaran makes this challenging text more accessible by selecting the passages most relevant to readers seeking timeless truths today. His accessible, highly readable translation and lively foreword place the teachings in a contemporary context for students and general readers alike.

    @paulg @rivatez This: https://t.co/JXvb7qxbit Because it led to this: https://t.co/gCMjnP407m

  • Blockbusters

    Anita Elberse

    What is behind the phenomenal success of entertainment businesses such as Warner Bros., Marvel Enterprises and Manchester United - along with such stars as Jay-Z and Lady Gaga? Which strategies give leaders in film, television, music, publishing, and sports an edge over their rivals? Anita Elberse, Harvard Business School's expert on the entertainment industry, has done pioneering research on the worlds of media and sports for more than a decade. Now, in this groundbreaking book, she explains a powerful truth about the fiercely competitive world of entertainment: building a business around blockbuster products - the movies, television shows, songs and books that are hugely expensive to produce and market - is the surest path to long-term success. Along the way, she reveals why entertainment executives often spend outrageous amounts of money in search of the next blockbuster, why superstars are paid unimaginable sums and how digital technologies are transforming the entertainment landscape. Full of inside stories emerging from her unprecedented access to some of the world's most successful entertainment brands, Blockbusters is destined to become required reading for anyone seeking to understand how the entertainment industry really works - and how to navigate today's high-stakes business world at large. 'Convincing . . . Elberse's Blockbusters builds on her already impressive academic résumé to create an accessible and entertaining book.' Financial Times

    Also recommend this book on the topic with similar conclusions. https://t.co/5pB9jAdZKV https://t.co/em01ILYoVt

  • Alchemy

    Rory Sutherland

    The legendary advertising guru—Ogilvy UK’s vice chairman—and star of three massively popular TED Talks, blends the science of human behavior with his vast experience in the art of persuasion in this incomparable book that decodes successful branding and marketing in the vein of Freakonomics, Thinking Fast and Slow, and The Power of Habit. When Rory Sutherland was a trainee working on a direct mail campaign at the famed advertising firm OgilvyOne, he noticed that very small changes in design often had immense effects on the number of consumer responses. Yet no one he worked with knew why. Sutherland began taking stock of each effective yet nebulous trick—”the thing which has no name”—he discovered. As he rose in the advertising industry, he began to understand why these things had no name: no one was interested in quantifying them, cataloguing them, or really investigating them. So, he did it himself. Like classic behavioral economists Daniel Kahneman and Richard Thaler, Sutherland peels away hidden, often irrational human behaviors that explain how the world around us functions. In How to Be an Alchemist he examines why certain ads work and the broader truths they tell us about who we are. Why do people prefer stripy toothpaste, and how might that help us design retirement plans that young people would actually buy? Why do we think orange juice is healthy, and how does the same principle guide our feelings about nuclear reactors? Why do budget airlines advertise services they don’t offer—and what might insurance companies learn from them about keeping healthcare costs low? Filled with startling and profound conclusions, Sutherland’s journey through the world of advertising and its surprising lessons for human behavior is insightful, brilliant, eye-opening, and irresistibly fun.

    I’ve been struggling to find a great non-fiction book lately, but Alchemy by @rorysutherland is off to a strong start. Looking forward to the rest. https://t.co/Oo0JaYshaI

  • An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity

    @mmcgrana Awesome book

  • The Road

    Cormac McCarthy

    The post-apocalyptic modern classic with an introduction by novelist John Banville. In a burned-out America, a father and his young son walk under a darkened sky, heading slowly for the coast. They have no idea what, if anything, awaits them there. The landscape is destroyed, nothing moves save the ash on the wind and cruel, lawless men stalk the roadside, lying in wait. Attempting to survive in this brave new world, the young boy and his protector have nothing but a pistol to defend themselves. They must keep walking. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, The Road is an incandescent novel, the story of a remarkable and profoundly moving journey. In this unflinching study of the best and worst of humankind, Cormac McCarthy boldly divines a future without hope, but one in which, miraculously, this young family finds tenderness. An exemplar of post-apocalyptic writing, The Road is a true modern classic, a masterful, moving and increasingly prescient novel.

    @bgurley @samhinkie Way ahead of you ;) Blood Meridien helped get me into reading fiction, the Road is an all timer for me, as is All the Pretty Horses. So cool.

  • With an introduction by novelist Rachel Kushner In the vanishing world of the Old West, two cowboys begin an epic adventure, and their own coming-of-age stories. In All the Pretty Horses, John Grady Cole’s search for a future takes him across the Mexican border to a job as a ranch hand and an ill-fated romance. The Crossing is the story of sixteen-year-old Billy Parham, who sets off on a perilous journey across the mountains of Mexico, accompanied only by a lone wolf. Eventually the two come together in Cities of the Plain, in a stunning tale of loyalty and love. A true classic of American literature, The Border Trilogy is Cormac McCarthy’s award-winning requiem for the American frontier. Beautiful and brutal, filled equally with sorrow and humour, it is a powerful story of two friends growing up in a world where blood and violence are conditions of life.

    @bgurley @samhinkie Way ahead of you ;) Blood Meridien helped get me into reading fiction, the Road is an all timer for me, as is All the Pretty Horses. So cool.

  • The Sports Gene

    David Epstein

    A Sports Illustrated senior writer's controversial exploration of the genetic underpinnings of athletic success explores the roles of both biology and training, arguing that nature and training are equally necessary components of athletic achievement while considering such topics as race, gender and genetic testing.

    My conversation with @DavidEpstein on a wide variety of topics, including his books Range and The Sports Gene: -withering technologies brought back to life -to study widely or deeply in one's field -martian tennis -practice Great conversation https://t.co/rHMp9Ha7p3 https://t.co/XFO8jkcpJH

  • The Prize

    Daniel Yergin

    Deemed "the best history of oil ever written" by Business Week and with more than 300,000 copies in print, Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power has been extensively updated to address the current energy crisis.

    @msuster It’s great but especially opening and closing chapters. Middle is a total slog. The prize by yergin is the 🐐

  • My conversation with @priyaparker on the art of gathering. If you ever host events of any kind, small or large, this interview and her book will make them better. Fascinating topic: -beginning, middle, and end -rules and boundaries -space + time https://t.co/5mD2jpMcWT https://t.co/yezgTiwWjR

  • @bpsandpieces Creativity inc by far of the ones I’ve read. Americana good but long. Chapter one of creative selection is amazing then you can put it down.

  • Creative Selection

    Ken Kocienda

    @bpsandpieces Creativity inc by far of the ones I’ve read. Americana good but long. Chapter one of creative selection is amazing then you can put it down.

  • @dhaber That’s a top 5 business book for sure. Maybe top 3.

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this instant and tenacious New York Times bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (Booklist, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. Bill Gates named Shoe Dog one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.” Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In Shoe Dog, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers. Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.

    What is best business story you’ve ever read (think Shoe Dog)? https://t.co/h1YfTq5iSs

  • Medical Nihilism

    Jacob Stegenga

    Medical nihilism is the view that we should have little confidence in the effectiveness of medical interventions. This book argues that medical nihilism is a compelling view of modern medicine. If we consider the frequency of failed medical interventions, the extent of misleading evidence inmedical research, the thin theoretical basis of many interventions, and the malleability of empirical methods in medicine, and if we employ our best inductive framework, then our confidence in the effectiveness of medical interventions ought to be low. Part I articulates theoretical and conceptual groundwork, in which Jacob Stegenga offers a defence of a hybrid theory of disease, which forms the basis of a novel account of effectiveness, and applies this to pharmacological science and to issues such as medicalization. Part II critically examinesdetails of medical research. Even the very best methods in medical research, such as randomized trials and meta-analyses, are malleable and suffer from various biases. Methods of measuring the effectiveness of medical interventions systematically overestimate benefits and underestimate harms. PartIII summarizes the arguments for medical nihilism and what this position entails for medical research and practice. To evaluate medical nihilism with care, Stegenga states the argument in formal terms. Medical nihilism suggests that medical research must be modified, that clinical practice should beless aggressive in its therapeutic approaches, and that regulatory standards should be enhanced.

    We need a review by @slatestarcodex of the new book Medical Nihilism. Really enjoying the book so far.

  • The River of Doubt

    Candice Millard

    At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth. The River of Doubt—it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever. Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. The River of Doubt brings alive these extraordinary events in a powerful nonfiction narrative thriller that happens to feature one of the most famous Americans who ever lived. From the soaring beauty of the Amazon rain forest to the darkest night of Theodore Roosevelt’s life, here is Candice Millard’s dazzling debut.

    @dougboneparth @iancassel Have you read “river of doubt?” Teddy was amazing

  • Fearless

    Eric Blehm

    Chronicles the life of Navy SEAL Team Six operator Adam Brown, a man whose heroism and devotion still stand as a beacon to his friends and family, even after his death in the Afghan Hindu Kush mountains in 2010.

    @LingleScott Loved the book

  • Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.

    Mostly these answers make me think of Neil Postman’s book “amusing ourselves to death” https://t.co/DghgpXIQKl

  • Creativity

    Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

    The classic study of the creative process from the national bestselling author of Flow creativity is about capturing those moments that make life worth living. Legendary psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi reveals what leads to these moments—be it the excitement of the artist at the easel or the scientist in the lab—so that this knowledge can be used to enrich people's lives. Drawing on nearly one hundred interviews with exceptional people, from biologists and physicists, to politicians and business leaders, to poets and artists, as well as his thirty years of research on the subject, Csikszentmihalyi uses his famous flow theory to explore the creative process. He discusses such ideas as why creative individuals are often seen as selfish and arrogant, and why the "tortured genius" is largely a myth. Most important, he explains why creativity needs to be cultivated and is necessary for the future of our country, if not the world.

    Favorite book in this topic is Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Love this passage and the idea of “the field.” Cultivating the field is critical. https://t.co/hU2Y3SYpAa

  • @ryanwkober https://t.co/0pp5vuMdaU

  • Obvious Adams

    Robert R Updegraff

    @howardlindzon @EpsilonTheory Have you read obvious Adams? It’s your spirit story.

  • Retail Disruptors

    Jan-Benedict Steenkamp

    Understand the strategies and business models used by hard discounters such as Aldi and Lidl, and learn techniques to remain competitive as they continue to disrupt the retail sphere.

    This book on the hard discounter biz model is very interesting. (Thanks to my favorite grocery expert @cristinagberta) https://t.co/qCe9Sk2o1X https://t.co/spN1RZGXFF

  • The Most Human Human

    Brian Christian

    Explores how computers are reshaping ideas about what it means to be human profiling the annual Turing Test to assess a computer's capacity for thought while analyzing related philosophical, biological, and moral issues.

    @jfc_3_ I had long travel yesterday so I read the most human human (really interesting) and started the big store.

  • Shadow Divers

    Robert Kurson

    Recounts the 1991 discovery of a sunken German U-boat by two recreational scuba divers, tracing how they devoted the following six years to researching the identities of the submarine and its crew, correcting historical texts, and breaking new grounds in the world of diving along the way. Reprint. 200,000 first printing.

    @lpolovets Probably the book I’ve recommended more than any other