Quentin Hardy

Quentin Hardy

Head of Editorial, Google Cloud. Formerly New York Times, Forbes, Wall Street Journal. Views & comments are mine, not Google's.

8 Book Recommendations by Quentin Hardy

  • Icebound

    Andrea Pitzer

    In the bestselling tradition of Hampton Sides’s In the Kingdom of Ice, a riveting and cinematic tale of Dutch polar explorer William Barents and his three harrowing Arctic expeditions—the last of which resulted in a relentlessly challenging year-long fight for survival. The human story has always been one of perseverance—often against remarkable odds. The most astonishing survival tale of all might be that of 16th-century Dutch explorer William Barents and his crew of sixteen, who ventured farther north than any Europeans before and, on their third polar exploration, lost their ship off the frozen coast of Nova Zembla to unforgiving ice. The men would spend the next year fighting off ravenous polar bears, gnawing hunger, and endless winter. In Icebound, Andrea Pitzer masterfully combines a gripping tale of survival with a sweeping history of the great Age of Exploration—a time of hope, adventure, and seemingly unlimited geographic frontiers. At the story’s center is William Barents, one of the 16th century’s greatest navigators whose larger-than-life ambitions and obsessive quest to chart a path through the deepest, most remote regions of the Arctic ended in both tragedy and glory. Journalist Pitzer did extensive research, learning how to use four-hundred-year-old navigation equipment, setting out on three Arctic expeditions to retrace Barents’s steps, and visiting replicas of Barents’s ship and cabin. “A visceral, thrilling account full of tantalizing surprises” (Andrea Barrett, author of The Voyage of the Narwhal ), Pitzer’s reenactment of Barents’s ill-fated journey shows us how the human body can function at twenty degrees below, the history of mutiny, the art of celestial navigation, and the intricacies of building shelters. But above all, it gives us a first-hand glimpse into the true nature of human courage.

    Midway through, excellent read buy it https://t.co/wN7swkcK8y https://t.co/EgnNdcDkk9

  • From The New York Times cybersecurity reporter Nicole Perlroth, the untold story of the cyberweapons market-the most secretive, invisible, government-sponsored market on earth-and a terrifying first look at a new kind of global warfare. Zero day: a software bug that allows a hacker to break in and scamper through the world's computer networks invisibly until discovered. One of the most coveted tools in a spy's arsenal, a zero day has the power to tap into any iPhone, dismantle safety controls at a chemical plant, and shut down the power in an entire nation-just ask the Ukraine. Zero days are the blood diamonds of the security trade, pursued by nation states, defense contractors, cybercriminals, and security defenders alike. In this market, governments aren't regulators; they are clients-paying huge sums to hackers willing to turn over gaps in the Internet, and stay silent about them. For decades, the United States was the only player in this market. Now, it is just the biggest. Our primary adversaries are now in this market too, each with its own incentive to exploit the Internet's vast security holes for their own spy operations, or all-out cyberwar. This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends is cybersecurity reporter Nicole Perlroth's discovery, unpacked. A intrepid journalist unravels an opaque, code-driven market from the outside in-encountering spies, hackers, arms dealers, mercenaries, and a few unsung heroes along the way. As the stakes get higher and higher in the rush to push the world's critical infrastructure online, This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends is the urgent and alarming discovery of one of the world's most extreme threats.

    I tore through @nicoleperlroth's brilliant and chilling book, you should preorder it and she should be proud. https://t.co/ROh4zbV0wr https://t.co/bRbbSdUqAa

  • The Body of Il Duce

    Sergio Luzzatto

    An exploration of the history and legacy of Italian fascism as reflected by the body of Benito Mussolini discusses how the dictator's brutal execution, the graphic display of his corpse, and his body's subsequent burial, exhuming, theft, concealment, and eventual enshrinement reflected the nation's struggle to become a republic. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

    @sbisson @tadethompson @Hugo_Book_Club So many. These among them. https://t.co/YvpdmhPnWe

  • Whistleblower

    Susan Fowler

    In 2017, twenty-five-year-old Susan Fowler published a blog post detailing the sexual harassment and retaliation she'd experienced as an entry-level engineer at Uber. The post went viral, leading not only to the ouster of Uber's CEO and twenty other employees, but 'starting a bonfire on creepy sexual behaviour in Silicon Valley that... spread to Hollywood and engulfed Harvey Weinstein' (Maureen Dowd, The New York Times). The moving story of a woman's lifelong fight to do what she loves - despite repeatedly being told no or treated as less-than - Whistleblower is both a riveting read and a source of inspiration for anyone seeking to stand up against inequality in their own workplace.

    @sbisson @tadethompson @Hugo_Book_Club So many. These among them. https://t.co/YvpdmhPnWe

  • Borges

    Jorge Luis Borges

    The non-fiction work of the great Latin American poet and writer is collected here with essays, reviews, lectures, and political commentary on everything from Ellery Queen to the Kabbalah. Reprint.

    @sbisson @tadethompson @Hugo_Book_Club So many. These among them. https://t.co/YvpdmhPnWe

  • The Body of Il Duce

    Sergio Luzzatto

    An exploration of the history and legacy of Italian fascism as reflected by the body of Benito Mussolini discusses how the dictator's brutal execution, the graphic display of his corpse, and his body's subsequent burial, exhuming, theft, concealment, and eventual enshrinement reflected the nation's struggle to become a republic. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

    Good book. https://t.co/LbB06TmiLH

  • Ask the Dust

    John Fante

    @mj_hyland @mtaeckens A fine book.

  • Naked Lunch

    William S. Burroughs

    @ambernoelle "Naked Lunch" programmed me to dream its ending, two days before I finished the book. That was intriguing.