Sahil Bloom

Sahil Bloom

Investor • Educator • Storyteller | Proud Stanford Alum | Gave up a grand slam on ESPN in 2012 and still waiting for it to land

10+ Book Recommendations by Sahil Bloom

  • The River of Doubt

    Candice Millard

    Chronicles the 1914 expedition of Theodore Roosevelt into the unexplored heart of the Amazon basin to explore and map the region surrounding a tributary called the River of Doubt, detailing the perilous conditions they faced.

    @KFroind River of Doubt was an awesome book about his adventures.

  • Team of Rivals

    Doris Kearns Goodwin

    An analysis of Abraham Lincoln's political talents identifies the character strengths and abilities that enabled his successful election, in an account that also describes how he used the same abilities to rally former opponents in winning the Civil War.

    @GreyZone5l3 Team of Rivals is one of my favorite books.

  • Factfulness

    Hans Rosling

    “One of the most important books I’ve ever read—an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world.” – Bill Gates “Hans Rosling tells thestory of ‘the secret silent miracle of human progress’ as only he can. But Factfulness does much more than that. It also explains why progress is so often secret and silent and teaches readershow to see it clearly.” —Melinda Gates Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends—what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school—we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers. In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspective—from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse). Our problem is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases. It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future. --- “This book is my last battle in my life-long mission to fight devastating ignorance...Previously I armed myself with huge data sets, eye-opening software, an energetic learning style and a Swedish bayonet for sword-swallowing. It wasn’t enough. But I hope this book will be.” Hans Rosling, February 2017.

    @GavinSBaker @jposhaughnessy Highly recommend reading Factfulness on this topic. Lovely reminders of our progress as a society and species. https://t.co/X2osInDtZr

  • Doing well with money isn't necessarily about what you know. It's about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money--investing, personal finance, and business decisions--is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don't make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life's most important topics.

    @CNBC @acorns @morganhousel I gave you and your book a shoutout in this piece. Cheers!

  • Fooled by Randomness

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    Selected by Amazon.com and the Financial Times as one of the best business books of the year, Fooled by Randomness is an instant classic. It's uniqueness has drawn to it a wide following - from the New Yorker to the Pentagon. Already published in 14 languages, this new edition, expanded by over 80 pages, includes up-to-date advances from behavioral finance and cognitive science This book is about luck or more precisely how we perceive and deal with luck in life and business. It is already a landmark work and its title has entered our vocabulary. In its second edition, Fooled by Randomness is now a cornerstone for anyone interested in random outcomes. Set against the backdrop of the most conspicuous forum in which luck is mistaken for skill the world of trading Fooled by Randomness is a captivating insight into one of the least understood factors of all our lives. Writting in an entertaining and narrative style, the author succeeds in tackling three major intellectual issues: the problem of induction, the survivorship biases, and our genetic unfitness to the modern word. In this second edition, Taleb manages to use stories and anecdotes to illustrate our overestimation of causality and the heuristics that make us view the world as far more explainable than it actually is. But no one can replicate what is obtained by chance. Are we capable of distinguishing the fortunate charlatan from the genuine visionary? Must we always try to uncover nonexistent messages in random events? It may be impossible to guard ourselves against the vagaries of the Goddess Fortuna, but after reading Fooled by Randomness we can be a little better prepared.

    15/ For more on the topic of survivorship bias, I highly recommend the below resources. Fooled by Randomness by @nntaleb: https://t.co/fB9ncIMlvE Great blog from @ShaneAParrish and @FarnamStreet: https://t.co/o1T85OJMl7

  • Antifragile

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    Shares insights into how adversity can bring out the best in individuals and communities, drawing on multiple disciplines to consider such topics as the superiority of city states over nation states and the drawbacks of debt.

    10/ For more interesting insights on the topic, I highly recommend reading @nntaleb's Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder. It is simply foundational! https://t.co/R85Kan6pWU

  • Elon Musk

    Ashlee Vance

    In the spirit of Steve Jobs and Moneyball, Elon Musk is both an illuminating and authorized look at the extraordinary life of one of Silicon Valley’s most exciting, unpredictable, and ambitious entrepreneurs—a real-life Tony Stark—and a fascinating exploration of the renewal of American invention and its new “makers.” Elon Musk spotlights the technology and vision of Elon Musk, the renowned entrepreneur and innovator behind SpaceX, Tesla, and SolarCity, who sold one of his Internet companies, PayPal, for $1.5 billion. Ashlee Vance captures the full spectacle and arc of the genius’s life and work, from his tumultuous upbringing in South Africa and flight to the United States to his dramatic technical innovations and entrepreneurial pursuits. Vance uses Musk’s story to explore one of the pressing questions of our age: can the nation of inventors and creators who led the modern world for a century still compete in an age of fierce global competition? He argues that Musk—one of the most unusual and striking figures in American business history—is a contemporary, visionary amalgam of legendary inventors and industrialists including Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Howard Hughes, and Steve Jobs. More than any other entrepreneur today, Musk has dedicated his energies and his own vast fortune to inventing a future that is as rich and far-reaching as the visionaries of the golden age of science-fiction fantasy. Thorough and insightful, Elon Musk brings to life a technology industry that is rapidly and dramatically changing by examining the life of one of its most powerful and influential titans.

    15/ If you're interested in learning more on the amazing story of @SpaceX and how @ElonMusk has implemented first principles thinking into almost everything he does, check out the fantastic book by @valleyhack. https://t.co/EBdCxj34sa

  • Antifragile

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    Shares insights into how adversity can bring out the best in individuals and communities, drawing on multiple disciplines to consider such topics as the superiority of city states over nation states and the drawbacks of debt.

    9/ Special thank you to @nntaleb, whose writing on this subject (and others) in Antifragile has been essential to managing my own information diet. Check out Antifragile and all of his other works. They are foundational. https://t.co/EaiVJy8Xt4

  • Andrew Carnegie

    David Nasaw

    Chronicles the life of the iconic business titan from his modest upbringing in mid-1800s Scotland through his rise to one of the world's richest men, offering insight into his work as a peace advocate and his motivations for giving away most of his fortune.

    @InvestorAmnesia Fascinating stuff. You prompted me to buy this Carnegie biography and dig in deeper on his life and story, which I have somehow never done! https://t.co/4jQ6HLdJOR

  • A cloth bag containing eight copies of the title.

    @caprashantmedhe @shiva_yb Good question. I need to think about the exact ordering, but they are all on this General Education page. Atlas Shrugged and The Alchemist definitely both in the top-5. When Breath Becomes Air as well. https://t.co/rpavsaVqyt

  • Siddhartha

    Hermann Hesse

    Blends elements of psychoanalysis and Asian religions to probe an Indian aristocrat's efforts to renounce sensual and material pleasures and discover ultimate spiritual truths

    @shiva_yb Siddhartha is easily a top-5 lifetime book for me.

  • The Box

    Marc Levinson

    In April 1956, a refitted oil tanker carried fifty-eight shipping containers from Newark to Houston. From that modest beginning, container shipping developed into a huge industry that made the boom in global trade possible. The Box tells the dramatic story of the container's creation, the decade of struggle before it was widely adopted, and the sweeping economic consequences of the sharp fall in transportation costs that containerization brought about. But the container didn't just happen. Its adoption required huge sums of money, both from private investors and from ports that aspired to be on the leading edge of a new technology. It required years of high-stakes bargaining with two of the titans of organized labor, Harry Bridges and Teddy Gleason, as well as delicate negotiations on standards that made it possible for almost any container to travel on any truck or train or ship. Ultimately, it took McLean's success in supplying U.S. forces in Vietnam to persuade the world of the container's potential. Drawing on previously neglected sources, economist Marc Levinson shows how the container transformed economic geography, devastating traditional ports such as New York and London and fueling the growth of previously obscure ones, such as Oakland. By making shipping so cheap that industry could locate factories far from its customers, the container paved the way for Asia to become the world's workshop and brought consumers a previously unimaginable variety of low-cost products from around the globe. Published in hardcover on the fiftieth anniversary of the first container voyage, this is the first comprehensive history of the shipping container. Now with a new chapter, The Box tells the dramatic story of how the drive and imagination of an iconoclastic entrepreneur turned containerization from an impractical idea into a phenomenon that transformed economic geography, slashed transportation costs, and made the boom in global trade possible.

    14/ Special thanks go out to @KelbyBalson, who originally tipped me off to this amazing story. As there is much more to this tale, I highly recommend reading The Box by Marc Levinson, which was a fantastic read. https://t.co/c3FxB5gbWS

  • The Black Swan

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    Examines the role of the unexpected, discussing why improbable events are not anticipated or understood properly, and how humans rationalize the black swan phenomenon to make it appear less random.

    11/ For more on the topic of VAR, its pitfalls, and the role of randomness in life, I highly recommend reading The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness by @nntaleb. Honestly, just read anything by him! Foundational classics. https://t.co/f3kVt2ZF8z https://t.co/cNHEXfMOEu

  • Contends that randomness and probability have a large impact on life, claims that people regularly fail to recognize that role, and tells how to differentiate between randomness in general and the financial markets in particular.

    11/ For more on the topic of VAR, its pitfalls, and the role of randomness in life, I highly recommend reading The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness by @nntaleb. Honestly, just read anything by him! Foundational classics. https://t.co/f3kVt2ZF8z https://t.co/cNHEXfMOEu

  • The Match King

    Frank Partnoy

    At the height of the roaring '20s, Swedish émigré Ivar Kreuger made a fortune raising money in America and loaning it to Europe in exchange for matchstick monopolies. His enterprise was a rare success story throughout the Great Depression. Yet after his suicide in 1932, it became clear that Kreuger was not all he seemed: evidence surfaced of fudged accounting figures, off-balance-sheet accounting, even forgery. He created a raft of innovative financial products— many of them precursors to instruments wreaking havoc in today's markets. In this gripping financial biography, Frank Partnoy recasts the life story of a remarkable yet forgotten genius in ways that force us to re-think our ideas about the wisdom of crowds, the invisible hand, and the free and unfettered market.

    15/ Ivar Kreuger was, in a sense, the tragic hero of his own story. Ambitious, innovative, and fearless to a fault, but also prone to overreach and poor judgement. @FrankPartnoy covered this story well in his fantastic book, The Match King. https://t.co/U4wZOnTvmy

  • Zero to One

    Peter Thiel

    The billionaire Silicon Valley entrepreneur behind such companies as PayPal and Facebook outlines an innovative theory and formula for building the companies of the future by creating and monopolizing new markets instead of competing in old ones. 200,000 first printing.

    @JohnBostick @farnamstreet @HowardMarksBook I re-read that once a year. Have a handful of books I try to come back and read regularly and that is one of them.

  • Distilling the wisdom of Marks' celebrated client memos into a single volume and, for the first time, making his time-tested investing philosophy available to general readers, this book has been widely acclaimed by professional, casual, aspiring, and armchair investors.

    15/ So that was Second-Order Thinking 101. For more, I highly recommend the below resources. Second-Order Thinking by @FarnamStreet: https://t.co/Lvz7SPhsWI Memo by @HowardMarksBook: https://t.co/5OdOErPDX1 The Most Important Thing by @HowardMarksBook: https://t.co/Cu2zrqAwG3