Scott Galloway

Scott Galloway

Product of big government @ucla @ucberkeley | Prof Marketing @NYUStern | Right of Center-Left | ProfGShow, Pivot podcasts | Strategy Sprint https://t.co/bJbNXSMbhS

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10+ Book Recommendations by Scott Galloway

  • The Cult of We

    Eliot Brown

    The riveting inside story of WeWork and the brash founder who briefly turned it into the country's most valuable startup before his own epic unraveling, from the Wall Street Journal reporters whose scoops hastened the company's downfall. In 2001, Adam Neumann arrived in New York after five years as a conscript in the Israeli navy. Just over fifteen years later, he had transformed himself into the charismatic CEO of a company worth $47 billion--at least on paper. With his long hair and feel-good mantras, the 6-foot-five Neumann, who grew up in part on a kibbutz, looked the part of a messianic Silicon Valley entrepreneur. The vision he offered was mesmerizing: a radical reimagining of work space for a new generation, with its fluid jobs and lax office culture. He called it WeWork. Though the company was merely subleasing "amenity"-filled office space to freelancers and small startups, Neumann marketed it like a revolutionary product--and investors swooned. As billions of funding dollars poured in, Neumann's ambitions grew limitless. WeWork wasn't just an office space provider, he boasted. It would build schools, create WeWork cities, even colonize Mars. Could he, Neumann wondered from the ice bath he'd installed in his office, become the first trillionaire or a world leader? In pursuit of its founder's grandiose vision, the company spent money faster than it could bring it in. From his private jet, sometimes clouded with marijuana smoke, the CEO scoured the globe for more capital. In late 2019, just weeks before WeWork's highly publicized IPO, a Hail Mary effort to raise cash, everything fell apart. Neumann was ousted from his company--but still was poised to walk away a billionaire. Calling to mind the recent demise of Theranos and the hubris of the dotcom era bust, WeWork's extraordinary rise and staggering implosion were fueled by disparate characters in a financial system blind to its risks, from a Japanese billionaire with designs on becoming the Warren Buffet of tech, to leaders at JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs who seemed intoxicated by a Silicon Valley culture where sensible business models lost out to youthful CEOs who promised "disruption." Why did some of the biggest names in banking and venture capital buy the hype? And what does the future hold for Silicon Valley "unicorns"? Wall Street Journal reporters Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell explore these questions in this definitive account of WeWork's unraveling.

    The book is great ... https://t.co/RIz5IiKehK https://t.co/KXmtjFxvbn

  • The Cult of We

    Eliot Brown

    The riveting inside story of WeWork and the brash founder who briefly turned it into the country's most valuable startup before his own epic unraveling, from the Wall Street Journal reporters whose scoops hastened the company's downfall. In 2001, Adam Neumann arrived in New York after five years as a conscript in the Israeli navy. Just over fifteen years later, he had transformed himself into the charismatic CEO of a company worth $47 billion--at least on paper. With his long hair and feel-good mantras, the 6-foot-five Neumann, who grew up in part on a kibbutz, looked the part of a messianic Silicon Valley entrepreneur. The vision he offered was mesmerizing: a radical reimagining of work space for a new generation, with its fluid jobs and lax office culture. He called it WeWork. Though the company was merely subleasing "amenity"-filled office space to freelancers and small startups, Neumann marketed it like a revolutionary product--and investors swooned. As billions of funding dollars poured in, Neumann's ambitions grew limitless. WeWork wasn't just an office space provider, he boasted. It would build schools, create WeWork cities, even colonize Mars. Could he, Neumann wondered from the ice bath he'd installed in his office, become the first trillionaire or a world leader? In pursuit of its founder's grandiose vision, the company spent money faster than it could bring it in. From his private jet, sometimes clouded with marijuana smoke, the CEO scoured the globe for more capital. In late 2019, just weeks before WeWork's highly publicized IPO, a Hail Mary effort to raise cash, everything fell apart. Neumann was ousted from his company--but still was poised to walk away a billionaire. Calling to mind the recent demise of Theranos and the hubris of the dotcom era bust, WeWork's extraordinary rise and staggering implosion were fueled by disparate characters in a financial system blind to its risks, from a Japanese billionaire with designs on becoming the Warren Buffet of tech, to leaders at JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs who seemed intoxicated by a Silicon Valley culture where sensible business models lost out to youthful CEOs who promised "disruption." Why did some of the biggest names in banking and venture capital buy the hype? And what does the future hold for Silicon Valley "unicorns"? Wall Street Journal reporters Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell explore these questions in this definitive account of WeWork's unraveling.

    Great book abt #WeWork — out this month https://t.co/FDzzkvCBjM https://t.co/5Yj7iuDtfU

  • New book by @WhitneyTilson out today https://t.co/d3TaPmkGNr https://t.co/aSqO2FnrBX

  • Amazon Unbound

    Brad Stone

    From the bestselling author of The Everything Store, an unvarnished picture of Amazon’s unprecedented growth and its billionaire founder, Jeff Bezos, revealing the most important business story of our time. Almost ten years ago, Bloomberg journalist Brad Stone captured the rise of Amazon, an internet pioneer quietly changing the way we shop online, in his bestseller The Everything Store. But ever since, Amazon has expanded exponentially, inventing novel products like Alexa and disrupting countless industries, while its workforce has quintupled in size and its valuation has soared to well over a trillion dollars. Jeff Bezos’s empire, once housed in a garage, now spans the globe. Between services like Whole Foods, Prime Video, and Amazon’s cloud computing unit, AWS, plus Bezos’s ownership of The Washington Post, it’s impossible to go a day without encountering its impact. We live in a world run, supplied, and controlled by Amazon and its iconoclast founder. In Amazon Unbound, Brad Stone presents a deeply reported, vividly drawn portrait of how a retail upstart became one of the most powerful and feared entities in the global economy. With unprecedented access to current and former executives, employees, regulators, and critics, Stone shows how seismic changes inside the company over the past decade led to dramatic innovations, as well as to missteps that turned public sentiment against its sharp-elbowed business practices and gameshow treatment of its search for a second headquarters. Stone also probes the evolution of Bezos himself—who started as a geeky technologist totally devoted to building Amazon, but who transformed to become a fit, disciplined billionaire with global ambitions; who ruled Amazon with an iron fist, even as he found his personal life splashed over the tabloids. As his empire expands, the book investigates how Bezos gradually pulled away from day-to-day activities at Amazon to focus on his many interests outside of it, announcing his momentous transition from CEO to executive chairman. Definitive, timely, and revelatory, Stone has provided an unvarnished portrait of a man and company that we couldn’t imagine modern life without.

    Brad's new book on #Amazon is out today, looking forward to reading it: https://t.co/lRUW9kwiyT @BradStone

  • The Magic Years

    Jonathan Taplin

    "This memoir traces Taplin's life and its intersection with several significant cultural moments, from his early days tour managing The Band, through his producing Mean Streets and several other films, all the way up to his present-day work advocating for a healthier cultural and digital commons"--

    Great book — it’s rare that someone can tell a first-person account of the earliest Dylan concerts, the civil rights movement, JFK’s assassination, MLK’s rallies, the Beatles’ first arrival in America Jonathan is also the author of "Move Fast & Break Things" about #Facebook https://t.co/Na7U0gkpuh

  • Remarkable Retail

    Steve Dennis

    Physical retail isn't dead--but boring retail is! Remarkable Retail equips the savvy retailer with eight essential strategies to bounce back from the covid-19 downturn and thrive in the years to come. Digital technology has profoundly altered the competitive landscape for retailers. Although the shutdown of 2020 didn't cause this trend, it has dramatically accelerated it, collapsing retailers' transformation timeline into a matter of months, not years. In Remarkable Retail, industry thought leader Steve Dennis argues that it's no longer enough merely to offer convenience, decent prices, or an okay shopping experience. Even very good is no longer good enough. To win and keep customers today, retailers must be nothing short of remarkable. In most retail categories, digital channels are now central to the consumer's journey, but that doesn't mean people aren't also shopping in stores; they're just using them differently, often browsing in one channel and buying in the other. The line between digital and physical stores has been virtually erased; The customer is the channel. Retailers who resist this fact are doomed to perish. The future belongs to those who find new ways to create a remarkable, harmonized customer experience at every touchpoint. Although we saw some high-profile retail brands become casualties of the pandemic, it turns out many of those had underlying conditions, while retailers who had already embarked upon the road to remarkable not only survived but actually emerged in better health than before. Packed with illuminating case studies from some of modern retail's biggest success stories, quick pivots and impressive rebounds, Remarkable Retail presents eight essential strategies for visionary leaders who are prepared to reimagine their way of doing business. A remarkable retailer is digitally enabled, human centered, harmonized, mobile, personal, connected, memorable, and radical. In an age where consumers have short attention spans, myriad options, and a digitally integrated relationship with every brand, Remarkable Retail is your crucial roadmap to creating a powerful retail experience that keeps your customers coming back for more.

    Great book if you’re in retail - by @StevenPDennis https://t.co/aw8jQ9MdkW

  • Physicians who care for patients with life-threatening illnesses face daunting communication challenges. Patients and family members can react to difficult news with sadness, distress, anger, or denial. This book defines the specific communication tasks involved in talking with patients with life-threatening illnesses and their families. Topics include delivering bad news, transition to palliative care, discussing goals of advance-care planning and do-not-resuscitate orders, existential and spiritual issues, family conferences, medical futility, and other conflicts at the end of life. Drs. Anthony Back, Robert Arnold, and James Tulsky bring together empirical research as well as their own experience to provide a roadmap through difficult conversations about life-threatening issues. The book offers both a theoretical framework and practical conversational tools that the practicing physician and clinician can use to improve communication skills, increase satisfaction, and protect themselves from burnout.

    Upcoming #ProfGPod guest Jennifer @aaker has a new book out — Humor, Seriously: Why Humor Is a Secret Weapon in Business and Life Preorder a hardcover today & you'll get an early digital edition—add your info at https://t.co/J1kWrAR3id

  • "From the New York Times bestselling author of The Four, Scott Galloway, a provocative book of hard-won wisdom for achieving a fulfilling career and life, based on his viral video of the same name. Scott Galloway teaches brand strategy at NYU's Stern School of Business, but often his class veers to life strategy. His students are smart and hardworking, but they struggle with life's biggest questions, just like the rest of us. What's the formula for a life well lived? How can you have a meaningful career, not just a lucrative one? Is work/life balance really possible? What does it take to make a long-term relationship succeed? Galloway explores these and many other questions in the take-no-prisoners style that has made him a sought-after commentator and YouTube star"--

    @ChapmanSeton https://t.co/oe1TY6ieIa

  • From the author of How Emotions Are Made, a myth-busting primer on the brain in the tradition of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. Have you ever wondered why you have a brain? Let renowned neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett demystify that big gray blob between your ears. In seven short essays (plus a bite-sized story about how brains evolved), this slim, entertaining, and accessible collection reveals mind-expanding lessons from the front lines of neuroscience research. You'll learn where brains came from, how they're structured (and why it matters), and how yours works in tandem with other brains to create everything you experience. Along the way, you'll also learn to dismiss popular myths such as the idea of a "lizard brain" and the alleged battle between thoughts and emotions, or even between nature and nurture, to determine your behavior. Sure to intrigue casual readers and scientific veterans alike, Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain is full of surprises, humor, and important implications for human nature--a gift of a book that you will want to savor again and again.

    "For your whole life, outside of your awareness, you make deposits of a sort into other people’s body budgets, as well as withdrawals, and others do the same for you." @LFeldmanBarrett Great new book: https://t.co/tYOFV0RF43

  • Monopolies Suck

    Sally Hubbard

    An urgent and witty manifesto, Monopolies Suck shows how monopoly power is harming everyday Americans and practical ways we can all fight back. Something’s not right. No matter how hard you work, life seems to only get harder. When your expenses keep going up but your income stays flat, when you’re price-gouged buying medicine for your child’s life-threatening allergy, when you live in a hyped-up state of fear and anxiety, monopoly power is playing a key role. In Monopolies Suck, antitrust expert and director at the Open Markets Institute, Sally Hubbard, shows us the seven ways big corporations rule our lives—and what must be done to stop them. Throughout history, monopolists who controlled entire industries like railroads and oil were aptly called “robber barons” because they extracted wealth from everyone else—and today’s monopolies are no different. By charging high prices, skirting taxes, and reducing our pay and economic opportunities, they are not only stealing our money, but also robbing us of innovation and choice, as market dominance prevents new companies from challenging them. They’re robbing us of the ability to take care of our sick, a healthy food supply, and a habitable planet by using business practices that deplete rather than generate. They’re a threat to our private lives, fair elections, a robust press, and ultimately, the American Dream that so many of us are striving for. In this slim, accessible guide, Sally Hubbard gives us an easy-to-understand overview of the history of monopolies and antitrust law, and urges us to use our voices, votes, and wallets to protest monopoly power. Emboldened by the previous century when we successfully broke up monopoly power in the US, we have the tools to dismantle corporate power again today—before their lobbying threatens to undermine our economy and democracy for generations to come.

    Great book —  helps regular people understand how monopolies make their lives harder every day so they can power real change https://t.co/C91hFa7Zor

  • Post Corona

    Scott Galloway

    From bestselling author and NYU Business School professor Scott Galloway comes a keenly insightful, urgent analysis of who stands to win and who's at risk to lose in a post-pandemic world The COVID-19 outbreak has turned bedrooms into offices, pitted young against old, and widened the gaps between rich and poor, red and blue, the mask wearers and the mask haters. Some businesses--like home exercise company Peloton, video conference software maker Zoom, and Amazon--woke up to find themselves crushed under an avalanche of consumer demand. Others--like the restaurant, travel, hospitality, and live entertainment industries--scrambled to escape obliteration. But as New York Times bestselling author Scott Galloway argues, the pandemic has not been a change agent so much as an accelerant of trends already well underway. In Post Corona, he outlines the contours of the crisis and the opportunities that lie ahead. Some businesses, like the powerful tech monopolies, will thrive as a result of the disruption. Other industries, like higher education, will struggle to maintain a value proposition that no longer makes sense when we can't stand shoulder to shoulder. And the pandemic has accelerated deeper trends in government and society, exposing a widening gap between our vision of America as a land of opportunity, and the troubling realities of our declining wellbeing. Combining his signature humor and brash style with sharp business insights and the occasional dose of righteous anger, Galloway offers both warning and hope in equal measure. As he writes, "Our commonwealth didn't just happen, it was shaped. We chose this path--no trend is permanent and can't be made worse or corrected."

    My third book is out — already my favorite child. Audiobook read by yours truly. Get your copy 👉 https://t.co/eS7W2NMDOX #PostCorona https://t.co/JIJlGb0iOJ

  • From the author of How Emotions Are Made, a myth-busting primer on the brain in the tradition of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. Have you ever wondered why you have a brain? Let renowned neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett demystify that big gray blob between your ears. In seven short essays (plus a bite-sized story about how brains evolved), this slim, entertaining, and accessible collection reveals mind-expanding lessons from the front lines of neuroscience research. You'll learn where brains came from, how they're structured (and why it matters), and how yours works in tandem with other brains to create everything you experience. Along the way, you'll also learn to dismiss popular myths such as the idea of a "lizard brain" and the alleged battle between thoughts and emotions, or even between nature and nurture, to determine your behavior. Sure to intrigue casual readers and scientific veterans alike, Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain is full of surprises, humor, and important implications for human nature--a gift of a book that you will want to savor again and again.

    All the books are out! Dr. Barrett is a neuroscientist who makes complex science understandable 👇 https://t.co/QseJR8ydCF

  • Leading Sustainably

    Trista Bridges

    "The business world is at an important crossroads. The age of the stakeholder is rapidly superseding that of the shareholder as climate change and political and societal shifts upend years of seeming prosperity. To move past this agitated age, business and society must learn to lead sustainably by putting purpose on equal footing with profit. The first step is made by understanding what is meant by sustainability and how it offers an opportunity for both business and society. Inspired by the launch of the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals, the book captures the ideas of more than 100 thought leaders and change makers from around the world about how business is putting sustainability at the core of strategy and operations to survive, thrive, and realign its interests with society's. Leading Sustainably looks at how sustainability in a business context has evolved overtime and offers powerful insights, key facts, and guidance on building sustainability capability within companies, measuring and managing impact, understanding the transformation in sustainable innovation and finance, and other topics critical to better aligning businesses' core activities with sustainable principles. The book introduces five vignettes that profile best-in-class examples of companies that have been sustainable from the start and numerous case studies on business sustainability efforts around the world, spanning industries from hospitality to waste management, fashion to finance and more. Finally, Leading Sustainably provides frameworks and in-depth direction that firms can leverage when accelerating their transition to more sustainable business models. The book is a perfect guide for mid-level to senior managers who seek to understand this fast changing business environment, how to factor sustainability into their decision-making, and why the SDGs have changed everything"--

    Great book by Strategy Sprint student @tristabridges — what traditional businesses can learn from mission-driven companies https://t.co/jKSZ5Ks18Z

  • Selling Naked

    Jesse Horwitz

    Good book by @JesseHorwitz — incl thoughts from yours truly on DTC marketing https://t.co/8N3DKXFkAP

  • @wbuffettjr Right, try this: https://t.co/dPsRPEAIlN

  • No Filter

    Sarah Frier

    Award-winning reporter Sarah Frier reveals an inside, never-before-told, behind-the-scenes look at how Instagram defied the odds to become one of the most culturally defining apps of the decade. Since its creation in 2010, Instagram’s fun and simple interface has captured our collective imagination, swiftly becoming a way of life. In No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram, technology reporter Sarah Frier explains how Instagram’s founders married art and technology to overcome skeptics and to hook the public on visual storytelling. At first, Instagram initially attracted artisans, but then the platform exploded in popularity among the masses, creating an entire industry of digital influencers that’s now worth tens of billions of dollars. Eighteen months after Instagram’s launch and explosive growth, the founders—Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger—made the gut-wrenching decision to sell the company to Facebook. For most companies, that would be the end of the story; but for Instagram, it was only the beginning. Instagram borrowed some lessons from Facebook and rejected others, until eventually its success stirred tension with Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg, just as Facebook became embroiled in a string of public crises. Frier unearths the details that led to the cofounders’ departure, bringing to light dramatic moments unknown to the public until now. At its heart, No Filter draws on unprecedented exclusive access—from the founders of Instagram, as well as employees, executives, and competitors; hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio; Anna Wintour of Vogue; Kris Jenner of the Kardashian-Jenner empire; and a plethora of influencers, from fashionistas with millions of followers to owners of famous dogs worldwide—to show how Instagram has fundamentally changed the way we communicate, shop, eat, and travel. The book brings readers inside users’ strategies to craft their personal image and fame, explaining how the company’s product decisions have affected the structure of our society. From teenagers to the pope, No Filter tells the captivating story of how Instagram not only created a new industry but also changed our lives.

    My copy is sitting in our closed office, but I look forward to reading @sarahfrier's book on Instagram. First chapter reads great, story of Systrom in Florence with a Holga is gripping. Congrats Sarah! https://t.co/GlKA6g8Kx7 https://t.co/vQHKdC82Yg