Shreya Shankar

Shreya Shankar

Systems for data & machine learning workflows. PhD student @ucbrise. Prev. 1st ML engineer @viaduct_ai, research @googlebrain, BS & MS @Stanford CS. She/her.

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7 Book Recommendations by Shreya Shankar

  • Patterns of Software

    Richard P. Gabriel

    Offers an behind-the-scenes look at software design, examining what makes for a successful programming language and the place of computer science in the everyday world, and analyzes the widespread influence of architect Christopher Alexander on the field. UP.

    4/ The book is "Patterns of Software," which I enjoyed for many reasons as an aspiring writer, history nerd, and design & architecture enthusiast. Richard P. Gabriel (you may know him as a Lisp guy or the "worse is better" guy) wrote it.

  • From the best-selling, award-winning author of 1491 and 1493--an incisive portrait of the two little-known twentieth-century scientists, Norman Borlaug and William Vogt, whose diametrically opposed views shaped our ideas about the environment, laying the groundwork for how people in the twenty-first century will choose to live in tomorrow's world. In forty years, Earth's population will reach ten billion. Can our world support that? What kind of world will it be? Those answering these questions generally fall into two deeply divided groups--Wizards and Prophets, as Charles Mann calls them in this balanced, authoritative, nonpolemical new book. The Prophets, he explains, follow William Vogt, a founding environmentalist who believed that in using more than our planet has to give, our prosperity will lead us to ruin. Cut back! was his mantra. Otherwise everyone will lose! The Wizards are the heirs of Norman Borlaug, whose research, in effect, wrangled the world in service to our species to produce modern high-yield crops that then saved millions from starvation. Innovate! was Borlaug's cry. Only in that way can everyone win! Mann delves into these diverging viewpoints to assess the four great challenges humanity faces--food, water, energy, climate change--grounding each in historical context and weighing the options for the future. With our civilization on the line, the author's insightful analysis is an essential addition to the urgent conversation about how our children will fare on an increasingly crowded Earth.

    In science we’ve built a culture of optimizing for a single metric (from leaderboards down to how we formulate a problem in mathematics), and this is out of touch with reality. excerpt from The Wizard and the Prophet (h/t @orbuch, thank you for the book rec) https://t.co/dNQpLmpPZx

  • it’s never too late to learn linalg — the book we used was “Linear Algebra Done Right” by Sheldon Axler. super approachable & doesn’t require fancy prereqs

  • Homegoing

    Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.

    for those of you who don’t know where to start, here are some of my favorite fiction books i read in the last 6 months: * Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi * Pachinko by Min Jin Lee * American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins * The Farm by Joanne Ramos * The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

  • Pachinko

    Min Jin Lee

    * Shortlisted for the National Book Award * * One of the New York Times's 10 Best Books of 2017. * Yeongdo, Korea 1911. In a small fishing village on the banks of the East Sea, a club-footed, cleft-lipped man marries a fifteen-year-old girl. The couple have one child, their beloved daughter Sunja. When Sunja falls pregnant by a married yakuza, the family face ruin. But then Isak, a Christian minister, offers her a chance of salvation: a new life in Japan as his wife. Following a man she barely knows to a hostile country in which she has no friends, no home, and whose language she cannot speak, Sunja's salvation is just the beginning of her story. Through eight decades and four generations, Pachinko is an epic tale of family, identity, love, death and survival.

    for those of you who don’t know where to start, here are some of my favorite fiction books i read in the last 6 months: * Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi * Pachinko by Min Jin Lee * American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins * The Farm by Joanne Ramos * The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

  • for those of you who don’t know where to start, here are some of my favorite fiction books i read in the last 6 months: * Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi * Pachinko by Min Jin Lee * American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins * The Farm by Joanne Ramos * The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

  • The Goldfinch

    Donna Tartt

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 2014 Aged thirteen, Theo Decker, son of a devoted mother and a reckless, largely absent father, survives an accident that otherwise tears his life apart. Alone and rudderless in New York, he is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. He is tormented by an unbearable longing for his mother, and down the years clings to the thing that most reminds him of her: a small, strangely captivating painting that ultimately draws him into the criminal underworld. As he grows up, Theo learns to glide between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love - and his talisman, the painting, places him at the centre of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle. The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling power. Combining unforgettably vivid characters and thrilling suspense, it is a beautiful, addictive triumph - a sweeping story of loss and obsession, of survival and self-invention, of the deepest mysteries of love, identity and fate.

    for those of you who don’t know where to start, here are some of my favorite fiction books i read in the last 6 months: * Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi * Pachinko by Min Jin Lee * American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins * The Farm by Joanne Ramos * The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt