Tren Griffin

Tren Griffin

I work for Microsoft. Previously I was a partner at Eagle River, a private equity firm established by Craig McCaw. I am on the board of directors of Kymeta.

60+ Book Recommendations by Tren Griffin

  • Money from Thin Air

    O. Casey Corr

    A portrait of visionary entrepreneur Craig McCaw discusses his seminal role in the development of the cellular communications industry and his latest work with Teledesic, a satellite network providing fast, economical worldwide Internet access. 20,000 first printing.

    @trmcdonald @chrisamccoy https://t.co/eltLynCCRy

  • Self-organized criticality, the spontaneous development of systems to a critical state, is the first general theory of complex systems with a firm mathematical basis. This theory describes how many seemingly desperate aspects of the world, from stock market crashes to mass extinctions, avalanches to solar flares, all share a set of simple, easily described properties. "...a'must read'...Bak writes with such ease and lucidity, and his ideas are so intriguing...essential reading for those interested in complex systems...it will reward a sufficiently skeptical reader." -NATURE "...presents the theory (self-organized criticality) in a form easily absorbed by the non-mathematically inclined reader." -BOSTON BOOK REVIEW "I picture Bak as a kind of scientific musketeer; flamboyant, touchy, full of swagger and ready to join every fray... His book is written with panache. The style is brisk, the content stimulating. I recommend it as a bracing experience." -NEW SCIENTIST

    Self organized criticality- The snowmobiler's death marks the latest in a series of deadly avalanches that have killed 29 people across the US this winter. The deadliest avalanche years occurred in 2008 and 2010, when there were 36 avalanche fatalities. https://t.co/VT2Hnc9dFQ

  • @jaltma The Misbehavior of Markets: A Fractal View of Financial Turbulence, https://t.co/x73pFUqlgf

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    @zackkanter @kevinakwok Both are important books. The John Malone book could be better since there is not enough material on why and how versus who and when.

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @amcafee @benedictevans The rise of software eclipsed hardware and new competing Tigers like Korea copied and improved the Japanese model. I was living in Seoul then and saw it happen. My book about the shift is: https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN

  • Self-organized criticality, the spontaneous development of systems to a critical state, is the first general theory of complex systems with a firm mathematical basis. This theory describes how many seemingly desperate aspects of the world, from stock market crashes to mass extinctions, avalanches to solar flares, all share a set of simple, easily described properties. "...a'must read'...Bak writes with such ease and lucidity, and his ideas are so intriguing...essential reading for those interested in complex systems...it will reward a sufficiently skeptical reader." -NATURE "...presents the theory (self-organized criticality) in a form easily absorbed by the non-mathematically inclined reader." -BOSTON BOOK REVIEW "I picture Bak as a kind of scientific musketeer; flamboyant, touchy, full of swagger and ready to join every fray... His book is written with panache. The style is brisk, the content stimulating. I recommend it as a bracing experience." -NEW SCIENTIST

    When people ask me for papers and books that have influenced how I think and act I tend to forget the work of Per Bak. That's an error on my part. "How Nature Works: The Science of Self-Organised Criticality." https://t.co/h7WeV5lsdF https://t.co/DwYN8DZkDz

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    I use a multiple in evaluating a business exactly never. I do have a tech circle of competence. I watch the cycle and calibrate when doing asset allocation. My cash right now is historically high. My investing approach like Munger's is expected value. https://t.co/TEMDQTaoCo https://t.co/IEKWhgq0Ph

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @irrvrntVC @brooksmorgan @anothercohen @PitchBook One of my blog posts: https://t.co/waYcBZL0KT Another: https://t.co/t3YTPXoRi8 My book which raises money for charity: https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Dr Robert Cialdini explains the six psychological principles that drive the human impulse to comply to the pressures of others and reveals how to defend oneself against manipulation.

    @jenntejada Best gift a parent can give: https://t.co/YLMVVM81so

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    @patrickbrun https://t.co/YwkGRETliB

  • Presents twelve stories of success or disasters among prominent companies, including the disastrous Ford Edsel, the rise of Xerox, and the scandal at General Electric.

    @m2jr You asked for a business book recommendation. What businesses did Drucker, Chandler or Porter actually run? Buffett recommends: Business Adventures, by John Brooks https://t.co/evE1ZBKEOK

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this instant and tenacious New York Times bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (Booklist, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. Bill Gates named Shoe Dog one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.” Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In Shoe Dog, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers. Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.

    @TSOH_Investing Shoe Dog is a book about important parts of running a real business. It's not an investing or finance book. Phil Knight worked with a ghost writer who told a story. Shoe Dog reminds me of this book about Les Schwab, which Buffett and Munger both recommend:https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS

  • @m2jr I'll be different and say: "Les Schwab Pride in Performance: Keep It Going" https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS This is a book about running a business rather than an investing or finance book. It is similar to Shoe Dog. Bill Gurley's business book list is solid: https://t.co/Q2KoA0sAhh

  • Complexity

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    @oleary_brandon https://t.co/ZHNUeqohFp

  • I met Mandelbrot only once at this lecture at before he passed away in 2010. He wrote the book "The Misbehavior of Markets: A Fractal View of Financial Turbulence." I suggest you read this book for yourself (even though it is not an easy book to read). https://t.co/g93VpBUQm0

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Dr Robert Cialdini explains the six psychological principles that drive the human impulse to comply to the pressures of others and reveals how to defend oneself against manipulation.

    @choffstein Charlie Munger: "Fairly late in life I stumbled into this book, Influence, by a psychologist named Bob Cialdini. It filled in a lot of holes in my crude system. You will never make a better investment.” https://t.co/q65GBtu5e9

  • More Than You Know

    Michael Mauboussin

    Since its first publication, Michael J. Mauboussin's popular guide to wise investing has been translated into eight languages and has been named best business book by BusinessWeek and best economics book by Strategy+Business. Now updated to reflect current research and expanded to include new chapters on investment philosophy, psychology, and strategy and science as they pertain to money management, this volume is more than ever the best chance to know more than the average investor. Offering invaluable tools to better understand the concepts of choice and risk, More Than You Know is a unique blend of practical advice and sound theory, sampling from a wide variety of sources and disciplines. Mauboussin builds on the ideas of visionaries, including Warren Buffett and E. O. Wilson, but also finds wisdom in a broad and deep range of fields, such as casino gambling, horse racing, psychology, and evolutionary biology. He analyzes the strategies of poker experts David Sklansky and Puggy Pearson and pinpoints parallels between mate selection in guppies and stock market booms. For this edition, Mauboussin includes fresh thoughts on human cognition, management assessment, game theory, the role of intuition, and the mechanisms driving the market's mood swings, and explains what these topics tell us about smart investing. More Than You Know is written with the professional investor in mind but extends far beyond the world of economics and finance. Mauboussin groups his essays into four parts-Investment Philosophy, Psychology of Investing, Innovation and Competitive Strategy, and Science and Complexity Theory-and he includes substantial references for further reading. A true eye-opener, More Than You Know shows how a multidisciplinary approach that pays close attention to process and the psychology of decision making offers the best chance for long-term financial results.

    On Covid, please remember: “A margin of safety is available for absorbing the effect of miscalculations or worse than average luck." “A lesson inherent in any probabilistic exercise: the frequency of correctness doesn't matter; it's magnitude of correctness that matters.” MM https://t.co/rXhwVOnMFy

  • Eat a Peach

    David Chang

    "The chef behind Momofuku and star of Netflix's Ugly Delicious gets uncomfortably real in his debut memoir"--

    6/ David Chang is saying in this interview that the independent restaurant business was struggling before Covid delivered a new gut punch. Chang has a new book out that I will read over the holidays. https://t.co/MVvI8JVahb Shades of Tony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential.

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this instant and tenacious New York Times bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (Booklist, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. Bill Gates named Shoe Dog one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.” Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In Shoe Dog, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers. Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.

    @TSOH_Investing Shoe Dog is a great business book and a fun story. The ghost writer was JR Moehringer, an American novelist and journalist. In 2000 he won the Pulitzer Prize for newspaper feature writing. https://t.co/kKC0s2sr2E

  • Information Rules

    Carl Shapiro

    As one of the first books to distill the economics of information and networks into practical business strategies, this is a guide to the winning moves that can help business leaders--from writers, lawyers and finance professional to executives in the entertainment, publishing and hardware and software industries-- navigate successfully through the information economy.

    @patrick_oshag Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy by Carl Shapiro and Hal R. Varian https://t.co/t2SuJBDQxl and this paper by Jim Gray on "Distributed Computing Economics" clarified my thinking rather than changing it. https://t.co/PPKyEt8APJ

  • Geodesic Network

    Peter W. Huber

    @patrick_oshag Another book that changed my views instead of just clarifying them was "The Geodesic Network: 1987 Report on Competition in the Telephone Industry by Peter Huber – January 1, 1987 https://t.co/5lNZh1G8aA

  • DIVPioneering work on an important new approach to economics. /div

    @patrick_oshag "Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in the Economy" by Brian Arthur (University of Michigan Press, 1994) https://t.co/QPLQaBXAhJ I may have read his earlier papers before this book. Bill Gurley, Michael Mauboussin and I started talking about increasing returns about then.

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @LibertyRPF This book was written by me in 1987 and published by Euromoney in 1988 pre-Internet. The manuscript was created on a Wang word processor by day and an Apple 2 at night (sent to the publisher on floppy disks). Most correspondence with Euromoney was by Telex.https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN https://t.co/oYP45UHiGO

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    If you are an investor and have not read Expectations Investing you only have yourself to blame: https://t.co/YwkGRETliB

  • Ah Mo

    Arthur Griffin

    These never before published native legends from the Pacific Northwest were collected by Judge Arthur Griffin and have been passed down through the generations in the Griffin Family since 1884.

    My Great Grandfather collected stories from Native Americans as part of his work as a lawyer to help them assert their treaty rights. His clients called him "Old Stone Axe." Those stories are collected in two books that I edited: https://t.co/XvlsNuucsN

  • The Global Negotiator

    Jeswald W. Salacuse

    In today's global business environment, an executive must have the skills and knowledge to navigate all stages of an international deal, from negotiations to managing the deal after it is signed. The aim of The Global Negotiator is to equip business executives with that exact knowledge. Whereas most books on negotiation end when the deal is made, Jeswald W. Salacuse will guide the reader from the first handshake with a potential foreign partner to the intricacies of making the international joint venture succeed and prosper, or should things go poorly, how to deal with getting out of a deal gone wrong. Salacuse illustrates the many ways in which an international deal may falter and the methods parties can use to save it, provides the necessary technical knowledge to structure specific business transactions, and explores the transformations to the international business landscape over the last decade.

    The stories in The Global Negotiator are almost always about events that happened in my life or my co-author's life. Our book is available free in this digital format: https://t.co/qMeWN739vJ Humans are storytelling creatures - both on the telling and the receiving sides. https://t.co/GqeuKmPA8w

  • Complexity

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with insights into ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion discusses politics, economics, and biology. 40,000 first printing.

    @ClarkSquareCap M. Mitchell Waldrop COMPLEXITY: THE EMERGING SCIENCE AT THE EDGE OF ORDER AND CHAOS https://t.co/ba6oL5c7BL

  • Damn Right

    Margaret A. Lowe Janet C. Lowe

    @John_Stepek Damn Right. https://t.co/yJ1oSuKvlR https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ.

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    This book presents the essential steps of Charlie Munger's investing strategy, condensed from interviews, speeches, writings, and shareholder letters and paired with commentary from fund managers, value investors, and business-case historians. Munger's approach is straightforward enough that ordinary investors can apply it to their portfolios.

    @John_Stepek Damn Right. https://t.co/yJ1oSuKvlR https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ.

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    20/ "A big operator like TCI could give a new network a big head start, and as valuable as its laid wires were, if the cable industry kept growing, the new networks now launching could be even more valuable." Cable Cowboy https://t.co/0KyE6kA6oN To be continued later today.

  • When people ask me for more theoretical material to read about the nature of the dispute between Wheezy and Birdman, I suggest they read "The Essential John Nash" which digs into Nash equilibrium" and "Nash bargaining." Get yourself a better BATNA baby! https://t.co/twfzaAKpaP

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @aGabrielJones @auren Started at zero in 1994. Seven years. Raised $1.3 billion. That 1994 was a while ago means bupkis when you are my age. You are mistaken about who pays a salary. Having the right VC is non-trivially important. My book is https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • Discusses the future of information technology and how these new technologies will change the way people work, learn, buy, and communicate with each other

    1/ "What is the best book about Microsoft as a business?" is a question I get asked a lot. The best account is chapter 3 in "The Road Ahead" written by Bill Gates. Perhaps I am biased because I helped with that book. The unauthorized biographies are incomplete and often fictional https://t.co/ZUhvM47YF7

  • Widely respected and admired, Philip Fisher is among the most influential investors of all time. His investment philosophies, introduced almost forty years ago, are not only studied and applied by today's financiers and investors, but are also regarded by many as gospel. This book is invaluable reading and has been since it was first published in 1958. The updated paperback retains the investment wisdom of the original edition and includes the perspectives of the author's son Ken Fisher, an investment guru in his own right in an expanded preface and introduction "I sought out Phil Fisher after reading his Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits...A thorough understanding of the business, obtained by using Phil's techniques...enables one to make intelligent investment commitments." —Warren Buffet

    9/ "The business grapevine is a remarkable thing. An accurate picture of the relative points of strength and weakness can be obtained from a representative cross-section of the opinions of those who in one way or another are concerned with any particular company.” Phil Fisher https://t.co/HvayPJzcxA

  • Discusses the future of information technology and how these new technologies will change the way people work, learn, buy, and communicate with each other

    @kylerhasson @yourMTLbroker Bill Gates wrote a few pages in his first book "The Road Ahead" about the business. I helped out with editorial suggestions on that book. The best first party account of what happened at Microsoft in terms of the business is this interview with Bill: https://t.co/HdBnavYUi8

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    2/ As an example, I wrote 300 blog posts at 25iQ. To raise money for charity, I selected ~ 40 blog posts, removed them from the web and published them in traditional book format. The essays were professionally edited, but ~ the same. What's the difference? https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • The Innovative University illustrates how higher education can respond to the forces of disruptive innovation , and offers a nuanced and hopeful analysis of where the traditional university and its traditions have come from and how it needs to change for the future. Through an examination of Harvard and BYU-Idaho as well as other stories of innovation in higher education, Clayton Christensen and Henry Eyring decipher how universities can find innovative, less costly ways of performing their uniquely valuable functions. Offers new ways forward to deal with curriculum, faculty issues, enrollment, retention, graduation rates, campus facility usage, and a host of other urgent issues in higher education Discusses a strategic model to ensure economic vitality at the traditional university Contains novel insights into the kind of change that is necessary to move institutions of higher education forward in innovative ways This book uncovers how the traditional university survives by breaking with tradition, but thrives by building on what it's done best.

    In his book "The Innovative University" Clayton Christensen explains that college is designed around four years to get a degree because at the time Harvard needed revenue from the extra year. https://t.co/1ob6nD3UgP

  • 'wichcraft

    Tom Colicchio

    Shares the secrets behind the 'wichcraft restaurant group's spin on the sandwich, with recipes for all of their most popular offerings and essays on stocking the sandwich pantry, the architecture of a structurally sound sandwich, and much more.

    @liz99212638 https://t.co/h2r4ShJ4ca https://t.co/T5HjQ18jLa

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    7/ One quaity I look for in a book is a real desire of the author to educate readers. I put writers like Michael Mauboussin and Jason Zweig at the top of my list on that dimension. Sometimes a great story makes the book valuable like Shoe Dog, Cable Cowboy or the Les Schwab book https://t.co/4q9idW3jeR

  • Margin of Safety

    Seth A. Klarman

    Tells how to avoid investment fads, explains the basic concepts of value-investment philosophy, and offers advice on portfolio management

    5/ Who said: "A margin of safety is [is intended to] allow for human error, bad luck, or extreme volatility in a complex, unpredictable and rapidly changing world.” Clue: He wrote a book with the title https://t.co/VYDwa1bYve Why is a used copy selling for more than $1,000?

  • "Sol Price: Retail Revolutionary and Social Innovator, recounts the extraordinary life of a man who profoundly impacted the shopping habits of consumers in the United States and throughout much of the world. Written by Sol's son Robert Price, this narrative--part biography and part memoir--provides a unique insight into his father's life... As a retail revolutionary, Sol's creative brilliance changed the way we shop, first with FedMart in 1954, the retail format copied by Walmart, Kmart, and Target in 1962, and then, with the Price Club, the warehouse club format adopted by Costco and Sam's Club in 1983. Self-service shopping in large florescent-lit buildings has become part of the American culture and is now the predominant mode of shopping thought most of the world" --Dust jacket.

    @MikeBoyd @ErnestWongBWM I haven't written that book yet. But there is https://t.co/bktoeGS1ny

  • @zck Everyone knows that the only lists worth reading have a dozen lessons. https://t.co/xcJJ3XE9XU

  • The Warren Buffett Way

    Robert G. Hagstrom

    I recommend "The Warren Buffett Way" a book by author Robert Hagstrom. The first edition, published in 1994, sold over a million copies and spent 21 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list. If you know anything about publishing business titles, that's a *lot* of books.

  • Ah Mo

    Arthur Griffin

    These never before published native legends from the Pacific Northwest were collected by Judge Arthur Griffin and have been passed down through the generations in the Griffin Family since 1884.

    @peg9136 The bedtime stories I was told as a child I rewrote in the form of a book entitled "Ah Mo." I rewrote the stories to make them less scary than the originals tho. 100% my book income goes to charity so there is no CAC or LTV! https://t.co/XvlsNuucsN

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.

    What are the best books and other resources that might help people manage cash better in their business right now? There must be many people thinking and worried about cash management this weekend. The best *story* about cash management might be Phil Knight's memoir Shoe Dog.

  • COMPLEXITY

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with their insights into the ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion

    Munger has recommended people read a book entitled Deep Simplicity: Bringing Order to Chaos and Complexity by John Gribbon. Bill Gurley recommends this book https://t.co/LpEddeYM9g You might also read https://t.co/ABJCJV8kUV Knowing what you don't or can't know is very valuable. https://t.co/2lcHtd6bTx

  • "It’s an interesting book, and, you know, selling tires, how do you make any money doing that?" Warren Buffett ~$25 used https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @ScarrottKalani @Visage_1 @jmj I have written a book on Korea and Taiwan, but nothing specific yet on Japan. https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN

  • Poor Charlie's Almanack

    Charles T. Munger

    @marty_wash 1. Poor Charlie's is a compilation of writing and speeches in the raw. 2. My book is a complete explanation of Charlie's system 3. Damn Right is a biography Each book is quite different.

  • Damn Right

    Janet Lowe

    Praise for Damn Right! From the author of the bestselling WARREN BUFFETT SPEAKS. . . "Charlie Munger, whose reputation is deep and wide, based on an extraordinary record of brilliantly successful business strategies, sees things that others don't. There is a method to his mastery and, through this book, we get a chance to learn about this rare individual." -MICHAEL EISNER, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company "Janet Lowe uncovers the iconoclastic genius and subtle charm behind Charlie Munger's curmudgeonly facade in this richly woven portrait of our era's heir to Ben Franklin. With a biographer's detachment, an historian's thoroughness, and a financial writer's common sense, Lowe produces a riveting account of the family, personal, and business life of the idiosyncratically complex and endlessly fascinating figure." -LAWRENCE CUNNINGHAM, Cardozo Law School, Author of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America "For years, Berkshire Hathaway shareholders and investors worldwide (me included) have struggled to learn more about Warren Buffett's cerebral sidekick. Now we can rest and enjoy reading Janet Lowe's book about this rare intellectual jewel called Charlie Munger." -ROBERT G. HAGSTROM, Author of The Warren Buffett Way "Charlie has lived by the creed that one should live a life that doesn't need explaining. But his life should be explained. In a city where heroism is too often confused with celebrity, Charlie is a true hero and mentor. He lives the life lessons that he has studiously extracted from other true heroes and mentors, from Ben Franklin to Ben Graham. This book illuminates those life lessons." -RONALD L. OLSON, Munger, Tolles & Olson llp "Janet Lowe's unprecedented access to Charlie Munger and Warren Buffett has resulted in a first-class book that investors, academics, and CEOs will find entertaining and highly useful."-TIMOTHY P. VICK, Money Manager and Author of How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett

    @marty_wash 1. Poor Charlie's is a compilation of writing and speeches in the raw. 2. My book is a complete explanation of Charlie's system 3. Damn Right is a biography Each book is quite different.

  • Money from Thin Air

    O. Casey Corr

    A portrait of visionary entrepreneur Craig McCaw discusses his seminal role in the development of the cellular communications industry and his latest work with Teledesic, a satellite network providing fast, economical worldwide Internet access. 20,000 first printing.

    @mgirdley It is not the book I would have written, but it is the only one that is available. T https://t.co/eltLynCCRy

  • Thirty-one short stories which provide a rich view of Maugham's prolific talent, wide-ranging vision, and engaging style.

    @RampCapitalLLC W. Somerset Maugham Collected Stories. https://t.co/K3QO2QO2Dx "The adventures of his alter ego Ashenden, a writer who (like Maugham himself) turned secret agent in World War I, as well as in stories set in such locales as South Pacific islands and colonial outposts in SE Asia." https://t.co/8eg2IwR4jA

  • 7 Powers

    Hamilton Helmer

    7 Powers details a strategy toolset that enables you to build an enduringly valuable company. It was developed by Hamilton Helmer drawing on his decades of experience as a strategy advisor, equity investor and Stanford University teacher. This is must reading for any business person and applies to all businesses, new or mature, large or small.

    1/ 25iQuiz: Can you name a business which typifies each of the "7 Powers" in the book of the same name? 1. Scale Economies 2. Network Economies 3. Counter-Positioning 4. Switching Costs 5. Branding 6. Cornered Resource 7. Process Power https://t.co/pdwHpWJhcb https://t.co/qxeP8iSG2M

  • GDP

    Diane Coyle

    Why did the size of the U.S. economy increase by 3 percent on one day in mid-2013—or Ghana's balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the U.K. financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008—just as the world’s financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece’s chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for apparently doing nothing more than trying to accurately report the size of his country’s economy? The answers to all these questions lie in the way we define and measure national economies around the world: Gross Domestic Product. This entertaining and informative book tells the story of GDP, making sense of a statistic that appears constantly in the news, business, and politics, and that seems to rule our lives—but that hardly anyone actually understands. Diane Coyle traces the history of this artificial, abstract, complex, but exceedingly important statistic from its eighteenth- and nineteenth-century precursors through its invention in the 1940s and its postwar golden age, and then through the Great Crash up to today. The reader learns why this standard measure of the size of a country’s economy was invented, how it has changed over the decades, and what its strengths and weaknesses are. The book explains why even small changes in GDP can decide elections, influence major political decisions, and determine whether countries can keep borrowing or be thrown into recession. The book ends by making the case that GDP was a good measure for the twentieth century but is increasingly inappropriate for a twenty-first-century economy driven by innovation, services, and intangible goods.

    @KyLaffoon If you have someone use GDP for what it isn't you get things like Lagarde saying low productivity to "be with us for a long time." Monetary economy excluding software, global supply chain isn't the economy https://t.co/fp2b7T77xf https://t.co/ykH78EcgBm https://t.co/egvC1HhFfv

  • More from Less

    Andrew McAfee

    From the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Second Machine Age, a compelling argument—masterfully researched and brilliantly articulated—that we have at last learned how to increase human prosperity while treading more lightly on our planet. Throughout history, the only way for humanity to grow was by degrading the Earth: chopping down forests, fouling the air and water, and endlessly digging out resources. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the reigning argument has been that taking better care of the planet means radically changing course: reducing our consumption, tightening our belts, learning to share and reuse, restraining growth. Is that argument correct? Absolutely not. In More from Less, McAfee argues that to solve our ecological problems we don’t need to make radical changes. Instead, we need to do more of what we’re already doing: growing technologically sophisticated market-based economies around the world. How can he possibly make this claim? Because of the evidence. America—a large, high-tech country that accounts for about 25% of the global economy—is now generally using less of most resources year after year, even as its economy and population continue to grow. What’s more, the US is polluting the air and water less, emitting fewer greenhouse gases, and replenishing endangered animal populations. And, as McAfee shows, America is not alone. Other countries are also transforming themselves in fundamental ways. What has made this turnabout possible? One thing, primarily: the collaboration between technology and capitalism, although good governance and public awareness have also been critical. McAfee does warn of issues that haven’t been solved, like global warming, overfishing, and communities left behind as capitalism and tech progress race forward. But overall, More from Less is a revelatory, paradigm-shifting account of how we’ve stumbled into an unexpectedly better balance with nature—one that holds out the promise of more abundant and greener centuries ahead.

    @KyLaffoon If you have someone use GDP for what it isn't you get things like Lagarde saying low productivity to "be with us for a long time." Monetary economy excluding software, global supply chain isn't the economy https://t.co/fp2b7T77xf https://t.co/ykH78EcgBm https://t.co/egvC1HhFfv

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    This book presents the essential steps of Charlie Munger's investing strategy, condensed from interviews, speeches, writings, and shareholder letters and paired with commentary from fund managers, value investors, and business-case historians. Munger's approach is straightforward enough that ordinary investors can apply it to their portfolios.

    3/ When I was writing my Charlie Munger book https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ I wanted the book to be funnier to make it easier to read. I asked a few people whether I should include a few jokes and they said "no." I included the jokes anyway. A book is personal. Write what *you* want.

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @pitdesi @micahjay1 I've written about many investors working at all stages and see themes but also see variations on those themes. I write about 37 venture capital investors in my book https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn and there are more on https://t.co/9ecXnywrjR. I'm sure your style works for you.

  • Aza Holmes, a high school student with obsessive-compulsive disorder, becomes focused on searching for a fugitive billionaire.

    @fxshaw @matvelloso The problem of infinite regress. https://t.co/4BvtZXDWB7

  • Bestselling author and veteran Wall Street Journal reporter Zuckerman answers the question investors have been asking for decades: How did Jim Simons do it? Simons is the greatest money maker in modern financial history. His track record bests those of legendary investors including Warren Buffett, Peter Lynch, Ray Dalio, and George Soros..

    I just finished the new book on Jim Simons (The Man Who Solved the Market). It is quite a good story and well written. If you expect to learn very much new about how the Renaissance system works, you will likely be disappointed. My 25iQ post on that is: https://t.co/sbchvhnR1b

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    @asinghtoo https://t.co/HghQCVjDPF

  • More from Less

    Andrew McAfee

    From the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Second Machine Age, a paradigm-shifting argument “full of fascinating information and provocative insights” (Publishers Weekly, starred review)—demonstrating that we are increasing prosperity while using fewer natural resources. Throughout history, the only way for humanity to grow was by degrading the Earth: chopping down forests, polluting the air and water, and endlessly using up resources. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the focus has been on radically changing course: reducing our consumption, tightening our belts, and learning to share and reuse. Is that argument correct? Absolutely not. In More from Less, McAfee argues that to solve our ecological problems we should do the opposite of what a decade of conventional wisdom suggests. Rather than reduce and conserve, we should rely on the cost-consciousness built into capitalism and the streamlining miracles of technology to create a more efficient world. America—a large, high-tech country that accounts for about 25% of the global economy—is now generally using less of most resources year after year, even as its economy and population continue to grow. What’s more, the US is polluting the air and water less, emitting fewer greenhouse gases, and replenishing endangered animal populations. And, as McAfee shows, America is not alone. Other countries are also transforming themselves in fundamental ways. What has made this turnabout possible? One thing, primarily: the collaboration between technology and capitalism, although good governance and public awareness have also been critical. McAfee does warn of issues that haven’t been solved, like global warming, overfishing, and communities left behind as capitalism and tech progress race forward. But overall, More from Less is a revelatory and “deeply engaging” (Booklist) account of how we’ve stumbled into an unexpectedly better balance with nature—one that holds out the promise of more abundant and greener centuries ahead.

    @TheStalwart @amcafee"More from Less: The Surprising Story of How We Learned to Prosper Using Fewer Resources―and What Happens Next" https://t.co/7QzubDrn1X