Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 21

    Untamed

    by Glennon Doyle

    WHAT CAME BEFORE HER NEW #1 BESTSELLER UNTAMED ... 'IT'S AS IF SHE REACHED INTO HER HEART, CAPTURED THE RAW EMOTIONS THERE, AND TRANSLATED THEM INTO WORDS THAT ANYONE WHO'S EVER KNOWN PAIN OR SHAME CAN RELATE TO' OPRAH WINFREY, Oprah's Book Club 'EPIC' ELIZABETH GILBERT | 'BLEW ME AWAY' BRENÉ BROWN ... Just when Glennon Doyle was beginning to feel she had it all figured out - three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list - her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, rock bottom was a familiar place to Glennon. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life. Love Warrior is the story of one marriage, but it is also the story of the healing that is possible for any of us when we refuse to settle for good enough and begin to face pain and love head-on. Love Warrior is a gorgeous and inspiring tale of how we are born to be warriors: strong, powerful, and brave; able to confront the pain and claim the love that exists for us all. This chronicle of a beautiful, brutal journey speaks to anyone who yearns for deeper, truer relationships and a more abundant, authentic life. AN OPRAH BOOK CLUB SELECTION
  • Votes: 17

    Educated

    by Tara Westover

    "An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University"--Amazon.com.
  • Votes: 11

    The Yellow House

    by Sarah M. Broom

    A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR NONFICTION 'A major book that I suspect will come to be considered among the essential memoirs of this vexing decade' New York Times Book Review In 1961, Sarah M. Broom's mother Ivory Mae bought a shotgun house in the then-promising neighborhood of New Orleans East and built her world inside of it. It was the height of the Space Race and the neighborhood was home to a major NASA plant - the postwar optimism seemed assured. Widowed, Ivory Mae remarried Sarah's father Simon Broom; their combined family would eventually number twelve children. But after Simon died, six months after Sarah's birth, the house would become Ivory Mae's thirteenth and most unruly child. A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom's The Yellow House tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America's most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother's struggle against a house's entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina. The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser known natives, guided deftly by one of its native daughters, to demonstrate how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure. Located in the gap between the 'Big Easy' of tourist guides and the New Orleans in which Broom was raised, The Yellow House is a brilliant memoir of place, class, race, the seeping rot of inequality, and the internalized shame that often follows. It is a transformative, deeply moving story from an unparalleled new voice of startling clarity, authority and power.
  • Votes: 11

    Becoming

    by Michelle Obama

    Journal/Notebook/Diary Life is a constant journey of learning, growing, blooming and becoming the best version of yourself. Use the "Becoming" journal to write down your reflections, dreams, to-do lists, meeting, conference or school notes - or just enjoy creative writing. The "Becoming" journal makes a great gift for all occasions - baby and bridal showers, birthdays, holidays, conference giveaways, and more. Glossy cover 100 lined pages Wide-ruled lines Large 8x10 size CLICK ON OUR AUTHOR'S NAME, THE OTHER SIDE OF BUSINESS, TO CHECK OUT MORE BEAUTIFUL JOURNALS FOR WEDDINGS, BABY SHOWERS, INSPIRATION, TRAVEL, SORORITIES, RECIPES, GRADUATION, KIDS AND MORE!
  • Votes: 11

    The Glass Castle

    by Jeannette Walls

    Now a major motion picture starring Brie Larson, Naomi Watts and Woody Harrelson. This is a startling memoir of a successful journalist's journey from the deserted and dusty mining towns of the American Southwest, to an antique filled apartment on Park Avenue. Jeanette Walls narrates her nomadic and adventurous childhood with her dreaming, 'brilliant' but alcoholic parents. At the age of seventeen she escapes on a Greyhound bus to New York with her older sister; her younger siblings follow later. After pursuing the education and civilisation her parents sought to escape, Jeanette eventually succeeds in her quest for the 'mundane, middle class existence' she had always craved. In her apartment, overlooked by 'a portrait of someone else's ancestor' she recounts poignant remembered images of star watching with her father, juxtaposed with recollections of irregular meals, accidents and police-car chases and reveals her complex feelings of shame, guilt, pity and pride toward her parents.
  • Votes: 9

    The End of Policing

    by Alex S. Vitale

    LOS ANGELES TIMES BESTSELLER The problem is not overpolicing, it is policing itself. Why we need to defund the police and how we get there. Recent weeks have seen an explosion of protest against police brutality and repression. Among activists, journalists and politicians, the conversation about how to respond and improve policing has focused on accountability, diversity, training, and community relations. Unfortunately, these reforms will not produce results, either alone or in combination. The core of the problem must be addressed: the nature of modern policing itself. This book attempts to spark public discussion by revealing the tainted origins of modern policing as a tool of social control. It shows how the expansion of police authority is inconsistent with community empowerment, social justice— even public safety. Drawing on groundbreaking research from across the world, and covering virtually every area in the increasingly broad range of police work, Alex Vitale demonstrates how law enforcement has come to exacerbate the very problems it is supposed to solve. In contrast, there are places where the robust implementation of policing alternatives—such as legalization, restorative justice, and harm reduction—has led to a decrease in crime, spending, and injustice. The best solution to bad policing may be an end to policing.
  • Votes: 8

    Master Of The Senate

    by Robert A. Caro

    'The greatest biography of our era ... Essential reading for those who want to comprehend power and politics' The Times Robert A. Caro's legendary, multi-award-winning biography of US President Lyndon Johnson is a uniquely riveting and revelatory account of power, political genius and the shaping of twentieth-century America. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, Master of the Senate takes Johnson's story through one of its most remarkable periods- his twelve years, from 1949 to 1960, in the United States Senate. Once the most august and revered body in politics, by the time Johnson arrived the Senate had become a parody of itself and an obstacle that for decades had blocked desperately needed liberal legislation. Caro shows how Johnson's brilliance, charm and ruthlessness enabled him to become the youngest and most powerful Majority Leader in history and how he used his incomparable legislative genius - seducing both Northern liberals and Southern conservatives - to pass the first Civil Rights legislation since Reconstruction.
  • Votes: 7

    Killers of the Flower Moon

    by David Grann

    WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FACT CRIME SHORTLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NON-FICTION SHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION **SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE STARRING LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND ROBERT DE NIRO** ‘A riveting true story of greed, serial murder and racial injustice’ JON KRAKAUER ‘A fiercely entertaining mystery story and a wrenching exploration of evil’ KATE ATKINSON ‘A fascinating account of a tragic and forgotten chapter in the history of the American West’ JOHN GRISHAM From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z, now a major film starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattison, comes a true-life murder story which became one of the FBI’s first major homicide investigations. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. As the death toll climbed, the FBI took up the case. But the bureau badly bungled the investigation. In desperation, its young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. Together with the Osage he and his undercover team began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. ‘David Grann has a razor-keen instinct for suspense’ LOUISE ERDRICH
  • Votes: 6

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 5

    The Color of Law

    by Richard Rothstein

    Lauded by Ta-Nehisi Coates for his "brilliant" and "fine understanding of the machinery of government policy" (The Atlantic), Richard Rothstein has painstakingly documented how American cities, from San Francisco to Boston, became so racially divided. Rothstein describes how federal, state, and local governments systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning, public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities, subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs, tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation, and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. He demonstrates that such policies still influence tragedies in places like Ferguson and Baltimore. Scholars have separately described many of these policies, but until now, no author has brought them together to explode the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces. Like The New Jim Crow, Rothstein's groundbreaking history forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.
  • Votes: 4

    Open Book

    by Jessica Simpson

    The #1 New York Times Bestseller Jessica reveals for the first time her inner monologue and most intimate struggles. Guided by the journals she's kept since age fifteen, and brimming with her unique humor and down-to-earth humanity, Open Book is as inspiring as it is entertaining. This was supposed to be a very different book. Five years ago, Jessica Simpson was approached to write a motivational guide to living your best life. She walked away from the offer, and nobody understood why. The truth is that she didn’t want to lie. Jessica couldn’t be authentic with her readers if she wasn’t fully honest with herself first. Now America’s Sweetheart, preacher’s daughter, pop phenomenon, reality tv pioneer, and the billion-dollar fashion mogul invites readers on a remarkable journey, examining a life that blessed her with the compassion to help others, but also burdened her with an almost crippling need to please. Open Book is Jessica Simpson using her voice, heart, soul, and humor to share things she’s never shared before. First celebrated for her voice, she became one of the most talked-about women in the world, whether for music and fashion, her relationship struggles, or as a walking blonde joke. But now, instead of being talked about, Jessica is doing the talking. Her book shares the wisdom and inspirations she’s learned and shows the real woman behind all the pop-culture cliché’s — “chicken or fish,” “Daisy Duke,” "football jinx," “mom jeans,” “sexual napalm…” and more. Open Book is an opportunity to laugh and cry with a close friend, one that will inspire you to live your best, most authentic life, now that she is finally living hers.
  • Votes: 4

    I'll Be Gone in the Dark

    by Michelle McNamara

  • Votes: 3

    Inspired

    by Marty Cagan

  • Votes: 3

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 3

    Six

    by Toby Marlow

    SIX the musical by Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss has been hailed as, ‘the most uplifting piece of new British musical theatre’ (The Evening Standard) and is the phenomenon everyone is losing their head over! Critically acclaimed across the UK with a soundtrack storming up the UK popcharts, the sell-out intoxicating musical tells the story of the six wives of Henry VIII. This official songbook remixes five hundred years of historical heartbreak into a celebration of 21st century girl power, with piano/vocal arrangements of all nine songs from the show. Special content includes an introduction from the songwriters, lyric pages and an 8-page colour section of cast photos. This is the full eBook edition of the SIX : The Musical songbook in fixed-layout format. Contents: Ex-Wives No Way Don’t Lose Ur Head Heart of Stone Haus of Holbein Get Down All You Wanna Do I Don’t Need Your Love Six
  • Votes: 2

    Our Lady of Perpetual Hunger

    by Lisa Donovan

    "Lisa Donovan is anyone's definition of a strong woman. She has built several lauded restaurants from the ground up, including Sean Brock's Husk empire; she raised two brilliant children with no money; she is a rape survivor; she is a profoundly talented artist. But from her early childhood, she had been told at every juncture that she wasn't enough: she came from a poor Southern family that despised its own Zuni/ Mexican roots and repeatedly silenced its women. And yet through their pain, the women of Donovan's family had found strength and passion through food. They expressed their love by making beautiful things in the kitchen, and they inspired Donovan's accomplished career. But the path never grew smooth. For all the accolades she received along the way, the restaurant industry seemed only to allow men to claim the top mantles. Donovan watched male chefs co-opt recipes, stories, and cultures that had been built by women until she had enough ... [This] is Donovan's reclaiming of her own story and of the story of the women who came before her. It's also an unforgettable Southern journey of class, gender, and race as told through food"--
  • Votes: 2

    Born to Run

    by Christopher McDougall

    At the heart of Born to Run lies a mysterious tribe of Mexican Indians, the Tarahumara, who live quietly in canyons and are reputed to be the best distance runners in the world; in 1993, one of them, aged 57, came first in a prestigious 100-mile race wearing a toga and sandals. A small group of the world's top ultra-runners (and the awe-inspiring author) make the treacherous journey into the canyons to try to learn the tribe's secrets and then take them on over a course 50 miles long. With incredible energy and smart observation, McDougall tells this story while asking what the secrets are to being an incredible runner. Travelling to labs at Harvard, Nike, and elsewhere, he comes across an incredible cast of characters, including the woman who recently broke the world record for 100 miles and for her encore ran a 2:50 marathon in a bikini, pausing to down a beer at the 20 mile mark.
  • Votes: 2

    American Dreamer

    by Tim Tran

    "Oregon history is rich with stories of courageous individuals who overcame tremendous odds. Few stories are more compelling and inspirational, however, than that of Tim Tran. In "American Dreamer," Tim shares the remarkable journey that brought him from communist Vietnam to personal and professional success in Oregon. It should be required reading for anyone who doubts that the American dream is alive and well." -- Kerry Tymchuk, Executive Director, Oregon Historical Society
  • Votes: 2

    Wishful Drinking

    by Carrie Fisher

    In Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher tells the true and intoxicating story of her life with inimitable wit. Born to celebrity parents, she was picked to play a princess in a little movie called Star Warswhen only 19 years old. "But it isn't all sweetness and light sabres." Alas, aside from a demanding career and her role as a single mother (not to mention the hyperspace hairdo), Carrie also spends her free time battling addiction and weathering the wild ride of manic depression. It's an incredible tale - from having Elizabeth Taylor as a stepmother, to marrying (and divorcing) Paul Simon, and from having the father of her daughter leave her for a man, to ultimately waking up one morning and finding a friend dead beside her in bed.
  • Votes: 2

    Confessions of a Crime Scene Investigator

    by Bill Moloney

    "Confessions of a Crime Scene Investigator" chronicles the career of New York State Police Crime Scene Unit Investigator Bill Moloney. 26 of Moloney's 30 years were spent responding to and investigating the scenes of every imaginable way a life can be taken. It is a gritty, dirty, and sobering profession that reflects none of the glamour so often highlighted on television. Story after story paints the picture of a satisfying, yet unpleasant and frequently stomach-turning job that will make you laugh, cry and cheer.But "Confessions" goes beyond the telling of funny, sad and heroic anecdotes. Its graphic depictions of daily life in the crime scene world uncover profound revelations on how we should live life. Yes, being around so much death can teach us so very much about life and how to live it!Bill Moloney has been a member of the state's busiest crime scene unit since 1989. As a forensic investigator, he has responded to thousands of crime scenes, testified as an expert in high profile cases, taught crime scene investigation to fellow law enforcement officials, been recognized for outstanding crime scene service, and worked with world renowned professionals like Dr. Michael Baden and Dr. Henry Lee. The New York StatePolice promoted him to the rank of Senior Investigator and supervisor of this decorated crime scene unit. Recent retirement from the State Police has afforded him the opportunity to tell his remarkable story.
  • Votes: 2

    Nothing General About It

    by Maurice Benard

    Instant New York Times bestseller! "This shocking true story is General Hospital on anabolic steroids." — Mehmet Oz, M.D., Emmy Award-winning host of The Dr. Oz Show The Emmy Award-winning star of General Hospital chronicles his astonishing and emotional life journey in this powerful memoir—an inspiring story of success, show business, and family, and his struggle with mental illness. Maurice Benard has been blessed with family, fame, and a successful career. For twenty-five years, he has played one of the most well-known characters on daytime television: General Hospital’s Michael “Sonny” Corinthos, Jr. In his life outside the screen, he is a loving husband and the father of four. But his path has not been without hardship. When he was only twenty, Maurice was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. In Nothing General About It, Maurice looks back to his youth in a small town and his tenuous relationship with his father. He describes how his bipolar disorder began to surface in childhood, how he struggled to understand the jolting mood swings he experienced, and how a doctor finally saved his life. For years Maurice was relentless in his goal to be a successful actor. But even after he “made it,” he still grappled with terrifying lows, breakdowns, and setbacks, all while trying desperately to maintain his relationship with his wife, who endured his violent, unpredictable episodes. Maurice holds nothing back as he bravely talks about what it was like to be medicated and institutionalized, and of how he learned to manage his manic episodes while on the set of GH. Nothing General About It is also an incredible love story about an enduring marriage that demonstrates what those vows—for better, for worse, in sickness and in health—truly mean. Maurice also pays tribute to the community that has been there for him through thick and thin, and ruminates on the importance of both inherited and created family. A shocking, riveting, and utterly candid memoir of love, adversity, and ultimately hope, Nothing General About It offers insights and advice for everyone trying to cope with mental illness, and is a motivational story that offers lessons in perseverance—of the importance of believing in and fighting for yourself through the darkest times. Nothing General About It includes a 16-page insert featuring approximately 50 photographs.
  • Votes: 2

    Woody Guthrie

    by Gustavus Stadler

    Dismantles the Woody Guthrie we have been taught--the rough-and-ready ramblin' man--to reveal an artist who discovered how intimacy is crucial for political struggle Woody Guthrie is often mythologized as the classic American "ramblin' man," a real-life Steinbeckian folk hero who fought for working-class interests and inspired Bob Dylan. Biographers and fans frame him as a foe of fascism and focus on his politically charged folk songs. What's left unexamined is how the bulk of Guthrie's work--most of which is unpublished or little known--delves into the importance of intimacy in his personal and political life. Featuring an insert with personal photos of Guthrie's family and previously unknown paintings, Woody Guthrie: An Intimate Life is a fresh and contemporary analysis of the overlapping influences of sexuality, politics, and disability on the art and mind of an American folk icon. Part biography, part cultural history of the Left, Woody Guthrie offers a stunning revelation about America's quintessential folk legend, who serves as a guiding light for leftist movements today. In his close relationship with dancer Marjorie Mazia, Guthrie discovered a restorative way of thinking about the body, which provided a salve for the trauma of his childhood and the slowly debilitating effects of Huntington's disease. Rejecting bodily shame and embracing the power of sexuality, he came to believe that intimacy was the linchpin for political struggle. By closely connecting to others, society could combat the customary emotional states of capitalist cultures: loneliness and isolation. Using intimacy as one's weapon, Guthrie believed we could fight fascism's seductive call.