Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 22

    Sidewalk Flowers

    by JonArno Lawson

    Winner of the Governor General's Literary Award for Children's Illustrated Book A New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book of the Year In this wordless picture book, a little girl collects wildflowers while her distracted father pays her little attention. Each flower becomes a gift, and whether the gift is noticed or ignored, both giver and recipient are transformed by their encounter. “Written” by award-winning poet JonArno Lawson and brought to life by illustrator Sydney Smith, Sidewalk Flowers is an ode to the importance of small things, small people and small gestures.
  • Votes: 16

    Professional Crocodile

    by Giovanna Zoboli

  • Votes: 16

    The Arrival

    by Shaun Tan

  • Votes: 15

    Journey

    by Aaron Becker

    The winner of the prestigious Caldecott Honor, and described by the New York Times as 'a masterwork', Aaron Becker's stunning, wordless picture book debut about self-determination and unexpected friendship follows a little girl who draws a magic door on her bedroom wall. Through it she escapes into a world where wonder, adventure and danger abound. Red marker pen in hand, she creates a boat, a balloon and a flying carpet which carry her on a spectacular journey ... who knows where? When she is captured by a sinister emperor, only an act of tremendous courage and kindness can set her free. Can it also guide her home and to happiness? In this exquisitely illustrated book, an ordinary child is launched on an extraordinary, magical journey towards her greatest and most rewarding adventure of all...
  • Votes: 11

    Wolf in the Snow

    by Matthew Cordell

  • Votes: 10

    Dandelion's Dream

    by Yoko Tanaka

  • Votes: 9

    Spencer's New Pet

    by Jessie Sima

    From the creator of Not Quite Narwhal comes a classic tale of a boy and his dog—except in this unique story, one of them is a balloon! When Spencer gets a new pet, he’s excited to do all the things that pets do—taking walks in the park, going to the vet, and attending parties together. There’s just one hitch: Spencer’s new pet is a balloon. And that means No. Sharp. Objects. No drooling dogs at the park. No prickly porcupines at the vet. And absolutely no pinning tails on any donkeys! Spencer’s New Pet is a story of pure fun about a boy, his dog, and a friendship that endures life’s sharpest...and most unexpected twists.
  • Votes: 8

    Float by Daniel Miyares (2015-06-09)

    by Daniel Miyares

  • Votes: 8

    Tuesday

    by David Wiesner

  • Votes: 8

    The Snowman

    by Raymond Briggs

  • Votes: 7

    A Stone for Sascha

    by Aaron Becker

    A girl grieves the loss of her dog in an achingly beautiful wordless epic from the Caldecott Honor–winning creator of Journey. This year’s summer vacation will be very different for a young girl and her family without Sascha, the beloved family dog, along for the ride. But a wistful walk along the beach to gather cool, polished stones becomes a brilliant turning point in the girl’s grief. There, at the edge of a vast ocean beneath an infinite sky, she uncovers, alongside the reader, a profound and joyous truth. In his first picture book following the conclusion of his best-selling Journey trilogy, Aaron Becker achieves a tremendous feat, connecting the private, personal loss of one child to a cycle spanning millennia — and delivering a stunningly layered tale that demands to be pored over again and again.
  • Votes: 7

    Little Fox in the Forest

    by Stephanie Graegin

  • Votes: 6

    The Third Wave

    by Steve Case

    The #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller from Steve Case—the co-founder of AOL—presents “a compelling roadmap for the future…that can help us make sense of the technological changes reshaping our economy and the world. A fascinating read” (Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO and founder of LeanIn.org). Steve Case—a pioneer who made the Internet part of everyday life—was on the leading edge of a revolution in 1985 when he co-founded AOL, the first Internet company to go public and the most successful business of the 1990s. Back then Case was an entrepreneur in an industry that hadn’t really been invented yet, but he had a sense how dramatically the Internet would transform business and society. In The Third Wave, he uses his insights garnered from nearly four decades of working as an innovator, investor, and businessman to argue the importance of entrepreneurship and to chart a path for future innovators. We are entering, as Case explains, the “Third Wave” of the Internet. The first wave saw AOL and other companies lay the foundation for consumers to connect to the Internet. The second wave saw companies like Google and Facebook build on top of the Internet to create search and social networking capabilities, while apps like Snapchat and Instagram leveraged the smartphone revolution. Now, Case argues, we’re entering the Third Wave: a period in which entrepreneurs will vastly transform major “real world” sectors such as health, education, transportation, energy, and food—and in the process change the way we live our daily lives. Part memoir, part manifesto, and part playbook for the future, The Third Wave explains the ways in which newly emerging technology companies will have to rethink their relationships with customers, with competitors, and with governments; and offers advice for how entrepreneurs can make winning business decisions and strategies—and how all of us can make sense of this ever-changing digital age.
  • Votes: 5

    The Founder's Dilemmas

    by Noam Wasserman

    Often downplayed in the excitement of starting up a new business venture is one of the most important decisions entrepreneurs will face: should they go it alone, or bring in cofounders, hires, and investors to help build the business? More than just financial rewards are at stake. Friendships and relationships can suffer. Bad decisions at the inception of a promising venture lay the foundations for its eventual ruin. The Founder's Dilemmas is the first book to examine the early decisions by entrepreneurs that can make or break a startup and its team. Drawing on a decade of research, Noam Wasserman reveals the common pitfalls founders face and how to avoid them. He looks at whether it is a good idea to cofound with friends or relatives, how and when to split the equity within the founding team, and how to recognize when a successful founder-CEO should exit or be fired. Wasserman explains how to anticipate, avoid, or recover from disastrous mistakes that can splinter a founding team, strip founders of control, and leave founders without a financial payoff for their hard work and innovative ideas. He highlights the need at each step to strike a careful balance between controlling the startup and attracting the best resources to grow it, and demonstrates why the easy short-term choice is often the most perilous in the long term. The Founder's Dilemmas draws on the inside stories of founders like Evan Williams of Twitter and Tim Westergren of Pandora, while mining quantitative data on almost ten thousand founders. People problems are the leading cause of failure in startups. This book offers solutions.
  • Votes: 5

    One Summer Up North

    by John Owens

  • Votes: 5

    The Midnight Fair

    by Gideon Sterer

  • Votes: 5

    Letters to a Prisoner

    by Jacques Goldstyn

  • Votes: 5

    Cicada

    by Shaun Tan

    From the visionary Shaun Tan, an inspirational story for older picture book readers and beyond
  • Votes: 5

    Hank Finds an Egg

    by Rebecca Dudley

  • Votes: 4

    Tom

    by Tomie dePaola

    Aside from having the same name, Tommy and his grandfather Tom share a wonderful sense of humor, a happy array of adventures, and a warm and special relationship. Reprint.
  • Votes: 4

    Museum Trip

    by Barbara Lehman

  • Votes: 4

    Dog

    by Shaun Tan

    A beautifully poetic and gorgeously illustrated reflection on the relationship between dogs and humans. Dog is a stand-alone picture book of one of the most-loved stories from the bestselling and internationally acclaimed Tales from the Inner City by Shaun Tan, winner of the 2020 Kate Greenaway medal.
  • Votes: 4

    Pancakes for Breakfast

    by Tomie dePaola

  • Votes: 3

    Goodnight Moon

    by Margaret Wise Brown

    In this classic of children's literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day. In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. "Goodnight room, goodnight moon." And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room—to the picture of the three little bears sitting on chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one—the little bunny says goodnight. One of the most beloved books of all time, Goodnight Moon is a must for every bookshelf and a time-honored gift for baby showers and other special events.
  • Votes: 3

    Where's Walrus?

    by Stephen Savage

    Follows Walrus on a journey through the city, as he tries on different hats to disguise himself from the chasing zookeeper.
  • Votes: 3

    The Fish and the Cat

    by Marianne Dubuc

    The best-selling The Lion and the Bird featured the enchanting stories and art of Canadian children's book author Marianne Dubuc. The Fish and the Cat is a playful story of pursuit between a cat and pet fish that starts in the house, moves through the neighborhood, and ends in the sky with a chase around the stars and the moon. This wordless picture book, full of action and humor, encourages children to create their own stories and adventures.
  • Votes: 3

    Flotsam

    by David Wiesner

    When a young boy discovers a camera on the beach and develops the film, he finds with his microscope many layers of pictures within the photographs.
  • Votes: 3

    Draw the Line

    by Kathryn Otoshi

  • Votes: 3

    Good Night, Gorilla

    by Peggy Rathmann

    When an unobservant zookeeper goes home, all the animals he thinks he has left behind in the zoo follow him. On board pages.
  • Votes: 2

    Migrants

    by Issa Watanabe

    The migrants must leave the forest. Borders are crossed, sacrifices made, loved ones are lost. It takes such courage to reach the end. At last the journey is over and the migrants arrive. This is the new place. With forceful simplicity, Migrants narrates the journey of a group of animals leaving a leafless forest. Borders must be crossed, sacrifices made, loved ones left behind. Watanabe takes extraordinary care to show the individuality and humanity of each migrant--through the detailed patterns on their clothing, their care of each other as they set up camp, the symbol of the blue ibis showing the connection between past and future, life and death.
  • Votes: 2

    My Museum

    by Joanne Liu

    In a nearly wordless picture book, Max visits an art museum where he sees paintings, sculptures, and even some art he creates, himself.
  • Votes: 2

    Chicken And Cat

    by Sara Varon

  • Votes: 2

    Clown

    by Joe Dieffenbacher

  • Votes: 2

    You Matter

    by Christian Robinson

    A New York Times bestseller! They All Saw a Cat meets The Important Book in this sensitive and impactful picture book about seeing the world from different points of view by Caldecott and Coretta Scott King Honoree Christian Robinson. In this full, bright, and beautiful picture book, many different perspectives around the world are deftly and empathetically explored—from a pair of bird-watchers to the pigeons they’re feeding. Young readers will be drawn into the luminous illustrations inviting them to engage with the world in a new way and see how everyone is connected, and that everyone matters.
  • Votes: 2

    Welcome to the Zoo

    by Alison Jay

    Alison Jay has created her own zoo, in which the animals outwit the zoo keepers! Brimming with small stories and enchanting details to spot throughout, this wordless board book invites curious eyes to explore Alison Jay's beautiful and humorous illustrations.
  • Votes: 2

    The Wave

    by Todd Strasser

  • Votes: 2

    The Meaning of Culture

    by John Cowper Powys

    John Cowper Powys could never be straightforward or orthodox but here he sets off with a useful purpose. ‘The aim of this book,’ he declares, ‘is to narrow down a vague and somewhat evasive conception, which hitherto, like ‘’aristocracy’’ or ‘’liberty’’, has come to imply a number of contradictory and even paradoxical elements, and to give it, not, of course, a purely logical form, but a concrete, particular, recognizable form, malleable and yielding enough and relative enough, but with a definite and quite unambiguous temper, tone, quality, atmosphere, of its own.’ The book is in two parts: Analysis of Culture which deals with, in separate chapters, Philosophy, Literature, Poetry, Painting and Religion: Application of Culture which covers Happiness, Love, Nature, The Art of Reading, Human Relations, Destiny and Obstacles to Culture.John Cowper Powys hoped ‘that the fine word ‘’culture’’ . . . might lend itself to an easy, humane and liberal discussion – a sort of one-man Platonic symposium – and even turn out to contain, among its various implications, no unworthy clue to the narrow path of the wise upon earth.’ He succeeds completely, in his own idiosyncratic way, in achieving that.‘Mr Powys is to be congratulated on having written a book of the kind that most needs writing and most deserves to be read . . . Here in a dozen chapters of glowing and eloquent prose, Mr Powys describes for very reader that citadel which is himself, and explains to him how it may be strengthened and upheld and on what terms it is most worth upholding. . .’ Manchester Guardian
  • Votes: 2

    I Walk with Vanessa

    by Kerascoët

    Named by Parents Magazine as the "Best Book that Champions Kindness"! This simple yet powerful picture book--from a New York Times bestselling husband-and-wife team--tells the story of one girl who inspires a community to stand up to bullying. Inspired by real events, I Walk with Vanessa explores the feelings of helplessness and anger that arise in the wake of seeing a classmate treated badly, and shows how a single act of kindness can lead to an entire community joining in to help. By choosing only pictures to tell their story, the creators underscore the idea that someone can be an ally without having to say a word. With themes of acceptance, kindness, and strength in numbers, this timeless and profound feel-good story will resonate with readers young and old. A New York Public Library Best Book of the Year "This beautifully illustrated story shows young readers how to become caring and supportive upstanders. Love it!" --Trudy Ludwig, bestselling author of The Invisible Boy
  • Votes: 2

    Eric Carle's Very Little Library: The very hungry caterpillar (1st board book ed., 1994)

    Colorful and full of imagination, the world of Eric Carle is a delight! Sings songs, cook, and create with the book box based of the worl of Eric Carle.
  • Votes: 2

    The Girl and the Bicycle

    by Mark Pett

    From the creator of The Boy and the Airplane, a touching wordless picture book about a little girl, a shiny bicycle, and the meaning of persistence—with an unexpected payoff. A little girl sees a shiny new bicycle in the shop window. She hurries home to see if she has enough money in her piggy bank, but when she comes up short, she knocks on the doors of her neighbors, hoping to do their yardwork. They all turn her away except for a kindly old woman. The woman and the girl work through the seasons, side by side. They form a tender friendship. When the weather warms, the girl finally has enough money for the bicycle. She runs back to the store, but the bicycle is gone! What happens next shows the reward of hard work and the true meaning of generosity. Wordless, timeless, and classic, The Girl and the Bicycle carries a message of selflessness and sweet surprises and makes an ideal gift for graduations and other special occasions.
  • Votes: 2

    The Island by Armin Greder (2008-04-01)

    by Armin Greder