Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 248

    Influence (rev)

    by Robert B. Cialdini

    "Learn the six psychological secrets behind our powerful impulse to comply." - cover.
  • Votes: 119

    Zero to One

    by Blake Masters

    WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. If you are copying these guys, you aren’t learning from them. It’s easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. Every new creation goes from 0 to 1. This book is about how to get there. ‘Peter Thiel has built multiple breakthrough companies, and Zero to One shows how.’ ELON MUSK, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla ‘This book delivers completely new and refreshing ideas on how to create value in the world.’ MARK ZUCKERBERG, CEO of Facebook ‘When a risk taker writes a book, read it. In the case of Peter Thiel, read it twice. Or, to be safe, three times. This is a classic.’ NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB, author of The Black Swan
  • Votes: 91

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    THE PHENOMENAL INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER – 1 MILLION COPIES SOLD Transform your life with tiny changes in behaviour – starting now. People think when you want to change your life, you need to think big. But world-renowned habits expert James Clear has discovered another way. He knows that real change comes from the compound effect of hundreds of small decisions – doing two push-ups a day, waking up five minutes early, or holding a single short phone call. He calls them atomic habits. In this ground-breaking book, Clears reveals exactly how these minuscule changes can grow into such life-altering outcomes. He uncovers a handful of simple life hacks (the forgotten art of Habit Stacking, the unexpected power of the Two Minute Rule, or the trick to entering the Goldilocks Zone), and delves into cutting-edge psychology and neuroscience to explain why they matter. Along the way, he tells inspiring stories of Olympic gold medalists, leading CEOs, and distinguished scientists who have used the science of tiny habits to stay productive, motivated, and happy. These small changes will have a revolutionary effect on your career, your relationships, and your life. ________________________________ ‘A supremely practical and useful book.’ Mark Manson, author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck ‘James Clear has spent years honing the art and studying the science of habits. This engaging, hands-on book is the guide you need to break bad routines and make good ones.’ Adam Grant, author of Originals ‘Atomic Habits is a step-by-step manual for changing routines.’ Books of the Month, Financial Times ‘A special book that will change how you approach your day and live your life.’ Ryan Holiday, author of The Obstacle is the Way
  • Votes: 64

    Bare Essentials

    by Dieter Brandes

  • Votes: 61

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 59

    The War of Art

    by Steven Pressfield

    "In this powerful, straight-from-the-hip examination of the internal obstacles to success, bestselling author Steven Pressfield shows readers how to identify, defeat, and unlock the inner barriers to creativity. The War of Art is an inspirational, funny, well-aimed kick in the pants guaranteed to galvanize every would-be artist, visionary, or entrepreneur." --from back cover.
  • Votes: 58

    Ender's Game

    by Orson Scott Card

    "The classic of modern science fiction"--Front cover.
  • Votes: 49

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 40

    Study Guide to Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (Bright Notes)

    by Intelligent Education

  • Votes: 37

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides a new hardcover edition of the classic best-selling self-help book, which includes principles that can be applied to both business and life itself, in a book that focuses on how to best affectively communicate with people.
  • Votes: 35

    The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman (2002-09-19)

    by Donald A. Norman

  • Votes: 34

    The Millionaire Fastlane

    by MJ DeMarco

    Is the financial plan of mediocrity -- a dream-stealing, soul-sucking dogma known as "The Slowlane" your plan for creating wealth? You know how it goes; it sounds a lil something like this: "Go to school, get a good job, save 10% of your paycheck, buy a used car, cancel the movie channels, quit drinking expensive Starbucks mocha lattes, save and penny-pinch your life away, trust your life-savings to the stock market, and one day, when you are oh, say, 65 years old, you can retire rich." The mainstream financial gurus have sold you blindly down the river to a great financial gamble: You've been hoodwinked to believe that wealth can be created by recklessly trusting in the uncontrollable and unpredictable markets: the housing market, the stock market, and the job market. This impotent financial gamble dubiously promises wealth in a wheelchair -- sacrifice your adult life for a financial plan that reaps dividends in the twilight of life. Accept the Slowlane as your blueprint for wealth and your financial future will blow carelessly asunder on a sailboat of HOPE: HOPE you can find a job and keep it, HOPE the stock market doesn't tank, HOPE the economy rebounds, HOPE, HOPE, and HOPE. Do you really want HOPE to be the centerpiece for your family's financial plan? Drive the Slowlane road and you will find your life deteriorate into a miserable exhibition about what you cannot do, versus what you can. For those who don't want a lifetime subscription to "settle-for-less" and a slight chance of elderly riches, there is an alternative; an expressway to extraordinary wealth that can burn a trail to financial independence faster than any road out there. Why jobs, 401(k)s, mutual funds, and 40-years of mindless frugality will never make you rich young. Why most entrepreneurs fail and how to immediately put the odds in your favor. The real law of wealth: Leverage this and wealth has no choice but to be magnetized to you. The leading cause of poorness: Change this and you change everything. How the rich really get rich - and no, it has nothing to do with a paycheck or a 401K match. Why the guru's grand deity - compound interest - is an impotent wealth accelerator. Why the guru myth of "do what you love" will most likely keep you poor, not rich. And 250+ more poverty busting distinctions... Demand the Fastlane, an alternative road-to-wealth; one that actually ignites dreams and creates millionaires young, not old. Change lanes and find your explosive wealth accelerator. Hit the Fastlane, crack the code to wealth, and find out how to live rich for a lifetime.
  • Votes: 33

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    The tragic story of the friendship between two migrant workers, George and mentally retarded Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm
  • Votes: 31

    The Name of the Wind

    by Patrick Rothfuss

    A hero named Kvothe, now living under an assumed name as the humble proprietor of an inn, recounts his transformation from a magically gifted young man into the most notorious wizard, musician, thief, and assassin in his world. Reprint.
  • Votes: 29

    Brideshead Revisited

    by Evelyn Waugh

  • Votes: 29

    Howards End

    by E. M. Forster

  • Votes: 29

    Tender Is the Night (Cover May Vary)

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    A story of Americans on the French Riviera in the 1930s is a portrait of psychological disintegration as a wealthy couple supports friends and hangers-on financially and emotionally at the cost of their own stability
  • Votes: 29

    The Go-Between

    by L.P. Hartley

  • Votes: 29

    The Good Soldiers

    by David Finkel

  • Votes: 29

    Pale Fire

    by Vladimir Nabokov

  • Votes: 29

    Sophie's World

    by Jostein Gaarder

  • Votes: 28

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

    A cloth bag containing eight copies of the title.
  • Votes: 28

    Memoirs of a Geisha

    by Arthur Golden

  • Votes: 28

    Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

    by Jane Austen

    As a mysterious plague falls upon the village of Meryton and zombies start rising from the dead, Elizabeth Bennett is determined to destroy the evil menace, but becomes distracted by the arrival of the dashing and arrogant Mr. Darcy.
  • Votes: 27

    Creativity, Inc.

    by Ed Catmull

  • Votes: 27

    The Elements of Style

    by William Strunk Jr.

  • Votes: 25

    The Kingkiller Chronicle Series 3 Books Collection Set by Patrick Rothfuss (The Name of the Wind, The Wise Man's Fear & The Slow Regard of Silent Things)

    by Patrick Rothfuss

  • Votes: 23

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 23

    Ultralearning

    by Scott Young

    Learn a new talent, stay relevant, reinvent yourself, and adapt to whatever the workplace throws your way. Ultralearning offers nine principles to master hard skills quickly. This is the essential guide to future-proof your career and maximize your competitive advantage through self-education. In these tumultuous times of economic and technological change, staying ahead depends on continual self-education—a lifelong mastery of fresh ideas, subjects, and skills. If you want to accomplish more and stand apart from everyone else, you need to become an ultralearner. The challenge of learning new skills is that you think you already know how best to learn, as you did as a student, so you rerun old routines and old ways of solving problems. To counter that, Ultralearning offers powerful strategies to break you out of those mental ruts and introduces new training methods to help you push through to higher levels of retention. Scott H. Young incorporates the latest research about the most effective learning methods and the stories of other ultralearners like himself—among them Benjamin Franklin, chess grandmaster Judit Polgár, and Nobel laureate physicist Richard Feynman, as well as a host of others, such as little-known modern polymath Nigel Richards, who won the French World Scrabble Championship—without knowing French. Young documents the methods he and others have used to acquire knowledge and shows that, far from being an obscure skill limited to aggressive autodidacts, ultralearning is a powerful tool anyone can use to improve their career, studies, and life. Ultralearning explores this fascinating subculture, shares a proven framework for a successful ultralearning project, and offers insights into how you can organize and exe - cute a plan to learn anything deeply and quickly, without teachers or budget-busting tuition costs. Whether the goal is to be fluent in a language (or ten languages), earn the equivalent of a college degree in a fraction of the time, or master multiple tools to build a product or business from the ground up, the principles in Ultralearning will guide you to success.
  • Votes: 23

    Super Thinking

    by Gabriel Weinberg

  • Votes: 23

    Think Again

    by Adam Grant

  • Votes: 23

    Principles

    by Ray Dalio

  • Votes: 23

    Think Like a Rocket Scientist

    by Ozan Varol

    A veteran of the Mars Rover project reveals the habits, ideas, and strategies that will help your once-impossible ambitions achieve liftoff. We're experiencing a second age of spaceflight, and the renaissance of rocket science is captivating the world. Movies and television shows set in this sphere consistently top the charts, and millions tune in to watch SpaceX launches. Although we glamorize rocket science, we assume that it's beyond comprehension by mere mortals who don't have a special kind of genius baked into their DNA (hence the common saying, "It's not rocket science"). Yet while the complex math and scientific details of building rockets may be out of our reach, the principles that guide the discipline don't have to be. In this mind-expanding book, Ozan Varol, an actual rocket scientist, shows how the strategies that built the Apollo 11 can help you achieve your own moon shot. Think Like a Rocket Scientist teaches you how to attack previously unsolved problems, how to overcome everyday obstacles to grand ambitions, and much more. A deeply knowledgeable scholar with a breezy, contrarian voice, Varol inspires us not only to dream big--but to achieve those dreams too.
  • Votes: 21

    How Will You Measure Your Life?

    by Clayton M. Christensen

    Akin to The Last Lecture in its revelatory perspective following life-altering events, "How Will You Measure Your Life?" presents a set of personal guidelines that have helped the author find meaning and happiness in his life.
  • Votes: 21

    The Art of Loving

    by Erich Fromm

    The landmark bestseller that changed the way we think about love: “Every line is packed with common sense, compassion, and realism” (Fortune). The Art of Loving is a rich and detailed guide to love—an achievement reached through maturity, practice, concentration, and courage. In the decades since the book’s release, its words and lessons continue to resonate. Erich Fromm, a celebrated psychoanalyst and social psychologist, clearly and sincerely encourages the development of our capacity for and understanding of love in all of its facets. He discusses the familiar yet misunderstood romantic love, the all-encompassing brotherly love, spiritual love, and many more. A challenge to traditional Western notions of love, The Art of Loving is a modern classic about taking care of ourselves through relationships with others by the New York Times–bestselling author of To Have or To Be? and Escape from Freedom. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erich Fromm including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.
  • Votes: 21

    Poor Charlie's Almanack

    by Peter D. Kaufman

  • Votes: 21

    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics

    by Aristotle

  • Votes: 20

    The Almanack of Naval Ravikant

    by Eric Jorgenson

    Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.
  • Votes: 20

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 19

    The Starfish and the Spider

    by Ori Brafman

  • Votes: 19

    Things Fall Apart

    by Chinua Achebe

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele
  • Votes: 18

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 17

    The Little Prince

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    When a pilot finds himself alone and stranded with a broken-down plane, a little prince is his only companion living on a strange deserted planet. Full of wisdom, humour and delight, this book while intended for children is also a favourite of adults for its quirkiness and insight.
  • Votes: 17

    The Complete Wheel of Time Series Set (1-14)

    by Robert Jordan

  • Votes: 17

    The Lessons of History

    by Will Durant

    A concise survey of the culture and civilization of mankind, The Lessons of History is the result of a lifetime of research from Pulitzer Prize–winning historians Will and Ariel Durant. With their accessible compendium of philosophy and social progress, the Durants take us on a journey through history, exploring the possibilities and limitations of humanity over time. Juxtaposing the great lives, ideas, and accomplishments with cycles of war and conquest, the Durants reveal the towering themes of history and give meaning to our own.
  • Votes: 17

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 17

    A Brightness Long Ago

    by Guy Gavriel Kay

  • Votes: 17

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 17

    The Last Lecture

    by Randy Pausch

    'A phenomenon' SUNDAY TIMES A lot of professors give talks titled 'The Last Lecture'. Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave, 'Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams', wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because time is all you have and you may find one day that you have less than you think). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living. In this book, Randy Pausch has combined the humour, inspiration, and intelligence that made his lecture such a phenomenon and given it an indelible form. It is a book that will be shared for generations to come.
  • Votes: 16

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Bantam Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

  • Votes: 14

    A Joosr Guide to... Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazzi and Tahl Raz

    by Joosr

  • Votes: 12

    The Laws of Medicine

    by Siddhartha Mukherjee

  • Votes: 12

    The Tycoons

    by Charles R. Morris

  • Votes: 11

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 10

    The Timeless Way of Building

    by Christopher Alexander

    This introductory volume to Alexander's other works, A Pattern of Language and The Oregon Experiment, explains concepts fundamental to his original approaches to the theory and application of architecture
  • Votes: 9

    The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward R. Tufte (2001-05-01)

  • Votes: 9

    Daring Greatly

    by Brené Brown

  • Votes: 8

    The Stranger

    by Albert Camus

    An ordinary man is unwittingly caught up in a senseless murder in Algeria
  • Votes: 8

    The Enemy (An Enemy Novel (1))

    by Charlie Higson

  • Votes: 8

    The Boys in the Boat

    by Daniel James Brown

    Cast aside by his family at an early age, abandoned and left to fend for himself in the woods of Washington State, young Joe Rantz turns to rowing as a way of escaping his past. What follows is an extraordinary journey, as Joe and eight other working-class boys exchange the sweat and dust of life in 1930s America for the promise of glory at the heart of Hitler's Berlin. Stroke by stroke, a remarkable young man strives to regain his shattered self-regard, to dare again to trust in others - and to find his way back home. Told against the backdrop of the Great Depression, The Boys in the Boat is narrative non-fiction of the first order; a personal story full of lyricism and unexpected beauty that rises above the grand sweep of history, and captures instead the purest essence of what it means to be alive. 'The Boys in the Boat is not only a great and inspiring true story; it is a fascinating work of history' Nathaniel Philbrick, author of In the Heart of the Sea 'I really can't rave enough about this book . . . I read the last fifty pages with white knuckles, and the last twenty-five with tears in my eyes' David Laskin, author of The Children's Blizzard and The Long Way Home 'A thrilling, heart-thumping tale of a most remarkable band of rowing brothers' Timothy Egan, author of The Worst Hard Time
  • Votes: 8

    Closer to the Ground

    by Dylan Tomine

  • Votes: 7

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

  • Votes: 7

    The Daily Stoic Journal

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 7

    When Things Fall Apart

    by Pema Chodron

  • Votes: 7

    The Lean Startup

    by Eric Ries

    Outlines a revisionist approach to management while arguing against common perceptions about the inevitability of startup failures, explaining the importance of providing genuinely needed products and services as well as organizing a business that can adapt to continuous customer feedback.
  • Votes: 7

    The Sovereign Individual

    by James Dale Davidson

  • Votes: 7

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.
  • Votes: 7

    Extreme Ownership

    by Jocko Willink

    An updated edition of the blockbuster bestselling leadership book that took America and the world by storm, two U.S. Navy SEAL officers who led the most highly decorated special operations unit of the Iraq War demonstrate how to apply powerful leadership principles from the battlefield to business and life. Sent to the most violent battlefield in Iraq, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin’s SEAL task unit faced a seemingly impossible mission: help U.S. forces secure Ramadi, a city deemed “all but lost.” In gripping firsthand accounts of heroism, tragic loss, and hard-won victories in SEAL Team Three’s Task Unit Bruiser, they learned that leadership—at every level—is the most important factor in whether a team succeeds or fails. Willink and Babin returned home from deployment and instituted SEAL leadership training that helped forge the next generation of SEAL leaders. After departing the SEAL Teams, they launched Echelon Front, a company that teaches these same leadership principles to businesses and organizations. From promising startups to Fortune 500 companies, Babin and Willink have helped scores of clients across a broad range of industries build their own high-performance teams and dominate their battlefields. Now, detailing the mind-set and principles that enable SEAL units to accomplish the most difficult missions in combat, Extreme Ownership shows how to apply them to any team, family or organization. Each chapter focuses on a specific topic such as Cover and Move, Decentralized Command, and Leading Up the Chain, explaining what they are, why they are important, and how to implement them in any leadership environment. A compelling narrative with powerful instruction and direct application, Extreme Ownership revolutionizes business management and challenges leaders everywhere to fulfill their ultimate purpose: lead and win.
  • Votes: 7

    Ready Player One

    by Ernest Cline

    Immersing himself in a mid-21st-century technological virtual utopia to escape an ugly real world of famine, poverty and disease, Wade Watts joins an increasingly violent effort to solve a series of puzzles by the virtual world's super-wealthy creator, who has promised that the winner will be his heir. (This book was previously listed in Forecast.)
  • Votes: 6

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 6

    Adrian Furnham's The Psychology of Money

    by Adrian Furnham

    Comprehensive and cross-cultural, this book examines such diverse subjects as: money and power, gender differences, morality and tax, the very rich, the poor, lottery winners, misers, gamblers, philanthropists and more.
  • Votes: 6

    Snow Crash

    by Neal Stephenson

    In twenty-first-century America, a teenaged computer hacker finds himself fighting a computer virus that battles virtual reality technology and a deadly drug that turns humans into zombies.
  • Votes: 6

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 6

    Think and Grow Rich

    by Napoleon Hill

    An updated edition of the best-selling guide features anecdotes about such modern figures as Bill Gates, Dave Thomas, and Sir John Templeton, explaining how their examples can enable modern readers to pursue wealth and overcome personal stumbling blocks. Original. 30,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 6

    A River Runs through It and Other Stories

    by Norman Maclean

  • Votes: 5

    The Saint, the Surfer, and the CEO

    by Robin Sharma

  • Votes: 5

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

    A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners, Guy Montag, suddenly realizes their merit.
  • Votes: 5

    John F. Kennedy

    by Michael O'Brien

    A portrait of the thirty-fifth president draws on newly released government archive material and the JFK library to offer insights into both his strengths and character flaws.
  • Votes: 5

    Pat the Bunny Deluxe Edition (Touch-And-Feel)

    by Dorothy Kunhardt

  • Votes: 5

    Snuggle Puppy! (Boynton on Board)

    by Sandra Boynton

  • Votes: 5

    Eric Carle's Very Little Library: The very hungry caterpillar (1st board book ed., 1994)

    Colorful and full of imagination, the world of Eric Carle is a delight! Sings songs, cook, and create with the book box based of the worl of Eric Carle.
  • Votes: 5

    We're Going on a Bear Hunt (Classic Board Books)

    by Helen Oxenbury

  • Votes: 5

    Belly Button Book (Boynton on Board)

    by Sandra Boynton

  • Votes: 5

    The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicle)

    by Patrick Rothfuss

  • Votes: 5

    The Night Before Christmas Hardcover

    by Clement Moore

  • Votes: 5

    Essentialism

    by Greg McKeown

    Outlines a systematic framework for enabling greater productivity without overworking, sharing strategies on how to eliminate unnecessary tasks while streamlining essential employee functions. By the co-author of the best-selling Multipliers. 75,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 4

    The Goal

    by Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    "Includes case study interviews"--Cover.
  • Votes: 4

    The Odyssey of Homer

    by Homer

  • Votes: 4

    The Plague

    by Albert Camus

    The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.
  • Votes: 4

    The Bell Jar

    by Sylvia Plath

    Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.
  • Votes: 4

    Shantaram

    by Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 4

    The Era of Bajirao (Marathi)

    by Uday S Kulkarni

  • Votes: 4

    The Startup Owner's Manual

    by Steve Blank

    More than 100,000 entrepreneurs rely on this book for detailed, step-by-step instructions on building successful, scalable, profitable startups. The National Science Foundation pays hundreds of startup teams each year to follow the process outlined in the book, and it's taught at Stanford, Berkeley, Columbia and more than 100 other leading universities worldwide. Why? The Startup Owner's Manual guides you, step-by-step, as you put the Customer Development process to work. This method was created by renowned Silicon Valley startup expert Steve Blank, co-creator with Eric Ries of the "Lean Startup" movement and tested and refined by him for more than a decade. This 608-page how-to guide includes over 100 charts, graphs, and diagrams, plus 77 valuable checklists that guide you as you drive your company toward profitability. It will help you: • Avoid the 9 deadly sins that destroy startups' chances for success • Use the Customer Development method to bring your business idea to life • Incorporate the Business Model Canvas as the organizing principle for startup hypotheses • Identify your customers and determine how to "get, keep and grow" customers profitably • Compute how you'll drive your startup to repeatable, scalable profits. The Startup Owner's Manual was originally published by K&S Ranch Publishing Inc. and is now available from Wiley. The cover, design, and content are the same as the prior release and should not be considered a new or updated product.
  • Votes: 4

    The History and Adventures of the Renowned Don Quixote,3

    by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

  • Votes: 4

    Dare to Lead

    by Brené Brown

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Brené Brown has taught us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong, and brave the wilderness. Now, based on new research conducted with leaders, change makers, and culture shifters, she’s showing us how to put those ideas into practice so we can step up and lead. Don’t miss the hourlong Netflix special Brené Brown: The Call to Courage! NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BLOOMBERG Leadership is not about titles, status, and wielding power. A leader is anyone who takes responsibility for recognizing the potential in people and ideas, and has the courage to develop that potential. When we dare to lead, we don’t pretend to have the right answers; we stay curious and ask the right questions. We don’t see power as finite and hoard it; we know that power becomes infinite when we share it with others. We don’t avoid difficult conversations and situations; we lean into vulnerability when it’s necessary to do good work. But daring leadership in a culture defined by scarcity, fear, and uncertainty requires skill-building around traits that are deeply and uniquely human. The irony is that we’re choosing not to invest in developing the hearts and minds of leaders at the exact same time as we’re scrambling to figure out what we have to offer that machines and AI can’t do better and faster. What can we do better? Empathy, connection, and courage, to start. Four-time #1 New York Times bestselling author Brené Brown has spent the past two decades studying the emotions and experiences that give meaning to our lives, and the past seven years working with transformative leaders and teams spanning the globe. She found that leaders in organizations ranging from small entrepreneurial startups and family-owned businesses to nonprofits, civic organizations, and Fortune 50 companies all ask the same question: How do you cultivate braver, more daring leaders, and how do you embed the value of courage in your culture? In this new book, Brown uses research, stories, and examples to answer these questions in the no-BS style that millions of readers have come to expect and love. Brown writes, “One of the most important findings of my career is that daring leadership is a collection of four skill sets that are 100 percent teachable, observable, and measurable. It’s learning and unlearning that requires brave work, tough conversations, and showing up with your whole heart. Easy? No. Because choosing courage over comfort is not always our default. Worth it? Always. We want to be brave with our lives and our work. It’s why we’re here.” Whether you’ve read Daring Greatly and Rising Strong or you’re new to Brené Brown’s work, this book is for anyone who wants to step up and into brave leadership.
  • Votes: 4

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

    The author uses the ancient Persian religious leader, Zarathustra (or Zoroaster) to voice his own views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the "Übermensch" or "superman."
  • Votes: 4

    Running Lean

    by Ash Maurya

  • Votes: 4

    The Startup Way

    by Eric Ries

    Entrepreneur and bestselling author of The Lean Startup, Eric Ries reveals how entrepreneurial principles can be used by businesses of all kinds, ranging from established companies to early-stage startups, to grow revenues, drive innovation, and transform themselves into truly modern organizations, poised to take advantage of the enormous opportunities of the twenty-first century. In The Lean Startup, Eric Ries laid out the practices of successful startups – building a minimal viable product, customer-focused and scientific testing based on a build-measure-learn method of continuous innovation, and deciding whether to persevere or pivot. In The Startup Way, he turns his attention to an entirely new group of organizations: established enterprises like iconic multinationals GE and Toyota, tech titans like Amazon and Facebook, and the next generation of Silicon Valley upstarts like Airbnb and Twilio. Drawing on his experiences over the past five years working with these organizations, as well as nonprofits, NGOs, and governments, Ries lays out a system of entrepreneurial management that leads organizations of all sizes and from every industry to sustainable growth and long-term impact. Filled with in-the-field stories, insights, and tools, The Startup Way is an essential road map for any organization navigating the uncertain waters of the century ahead.
  • Votes: 3

    Analysis of Esther Perel’s The State of Affairs by Milkyway Media

    by Milkyway Media

  • Votes: 3

    Let's Build A Company

    by Vibhore Goyal Harpreet Grover

  • Votes: 3

    The Obstacle Is the Way

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 3

    Anna Karenina

    by graf Leo Tolstoy

    Presents the nineteenth-century Russian novelist's classic in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society
  • Votes: 3

    The Dip

    by Seth Godin

    The author of Permission Marketing and Purple Cow shares insights into knowing when to support or fight corporate systems, explaining how to recognize and drop defunct practices to protect profits, job security, and professional satisfaction.
  • Votes: 3

    12 Rules for Life

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 3

    The Screw Tape Letters (Bantam Classics)

    by C.S. Lewis

  • Votes: 3

    Getting Things Done

    by David Allen

  • Votes: 3

    One Hundred Years of Solitude

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.
  • Votes: 3

    Player Piano

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 3

    Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880

    by W. E. B. Du Bois

    The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time. The pioneering work in the study of the role of Black Americans during Reconstruction by the most influential Black intellectual of his time.
  • Votes: 3

    Onto-Cartography

    by Levi R Bryant

    Defends and transforms naturalism and materialism to show how culture itself is formed by nature. Bryant endorses a pan-ecological theory of being, arguing that societies are ecosystems that can only be understood by considering nonhuman material agencies
  • Votes: 3

    Summary of Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

    by BookHabits

  • Votes: 3

    The Magic Mountain

    by Thomas Mann

    A sanitorium in the Swiss Alps reflects the societal ills of pre-twentieth-century Europe, and a young marine engineer rises from his life of anonymity to become a pivotal character in a story about how a human's environment affects self-identity. 10,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 3

    Dialogues on Mathematics

    by Alfréd Rényi