Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 234

    A Gentleman in Moscow

    by Amor Towles

    The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series "The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate." —The Wall Street Journal He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to. From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility—a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.
  • Votes: 98

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 89

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 64

    This Is Not a T-Shirt

    by Bobby Hundreds

    The story of The Hundreds and the precepts that made it an iconic streetwear brand by Bobby Hundreds himself Streetwear occupies that rarefied space where genuine "cool" coexists with big business; where a star designer might work concurrently with Nike, a tattoo artist, Louis Vuitton, and a skateboard company. It’s the ubiquitous style of dress comprising hoodies, sneakers, and T-shirts. In the beginning, a few brands defined this style; fewer still survived as streetwear went mainstream. They are the OGs, the “heritage brands.” The Hundreds is one of those persevering companies, and Bobby Hundreds is at the center of it all. The creative force behind the brand, Bobby Kim, a.k.a. Bobby Hundreds, has emerged as a prominent face and voice in streetwear. In telling the story of his formative years, he reminds us that The Hundreds was started by outsiders; and this is truly the story of streetwear culture. In This Is Not a T-Shirt, Bobby Hundreds cements his spot as a champion of an industry he helped create and tells the story of The Hundreds—with anecdotes ranging from his Southern California, punk-DIY-tinged youth to the brand’s explosive success. Both an inspiring memoir and an expert assessment of the history and future of streetwear, this is the tale of Bobby’s commitment to his creative vision and to building a real community.
  • Votes: 63

    Dark Matter

    by Blake Crouch

    A mindbending, relentlessly surprising thriller from the author of the bestselling Wayward Pines trilogy. “Are you happy with your life?” Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason’s never met smiles down at him and says, “Welcome back, my friend.” In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor, but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable. Something impossible. Is it this world or the other that’s the dream? And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could’ve imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe. Dark Matter is a brilliantly plotted tale that is at once sweeping and intimate, mind-bendingly strange and profoundly human—a relentlessly surprising science-fiction thriller about choices, paths not taken, and how far we’ll go to claim the lives we dream of.
  • Votes: 63

    The Inevitable

    by Kevin Kelly

    A New York Times Bestseller From one of our leading technology thinkers and writers, a guide through the twelve technological imperatives that will shape the next thirty years and transform our lives Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives—from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture—can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends—interacting, cognifying, flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning—and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly’s bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading—what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place—as this new world emerges. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 49

    A Man Called Ove

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 45

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 41

    The Remains of the Day

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity
  • Votes: 31

    Beyond Words

    by Carl Safina

  • Votes: 31

    Homegoing

    by Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
  • Votes: 30

    Piranesi

    by Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.
  • Votes: 30

    The Educated Mind

    by Kieran Egan

  • Votes: 29

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Professor Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical—and sometimes devastating—breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, and incorporating full-color illustrations throughout the text, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behavior from the legacy of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging, and provocative, Sapiens integrates history and science to challenge everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our heritage...and our future.
  • Votes: 28

    Harry Potter Books 1-7 Special Edition Boxed Set

    by J. K. Rowling

    A new special edition boxed set of the complete Harry Potter series, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. This collectible boxed set contains the complete bestselling Harry Potter series, books 1-7 by J.K. Rowling, brilliantly redesigned by Caldecott Medalist Brian Selznick. A perfect gift to introduce a new reader to this beloved series, as well as a gorgeous addition to any fan's bookshelf.
  • Votes: 27

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    The tragic story of the friendship between two migrant workers, George and mentally retarded Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm
  • Votes: 27

    Talent Wins

    by Ram Charan

    Intro: Memo to the CEO: your talent playbook -- Forge the tools of transformation -- Energize the board -- Design & redesign the work of the organization -- Reinvent HR as a source of competitive advantage -- Scale up individual talent -- Create an M & A strategy for talent -- Drive the talent playbook
  • Votes: 26

    Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    WINNER OF THE 2020 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION - THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED AN POST BOOK AWARDS IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 'Richly sensuous... something special' The Sunday Times 'A thing of shimmering wonder' David Mitchell TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART. On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home? Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week. Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.
  • Votes: 26

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 23

    No Rules Rules

    by Reed Hastings

    Netflix cofounder Reed Hastings reveals for the first time the unorthodox culture behind one of the world's most innovative, imaginative, and successful companies There's never before been a company like Netflix. Not only because it has led a revolution in the entertainment industries; or because it generates billions of dollars in annual revenue; or even because it is watched by hundreds of millions of people in nearly 200 countries. When Reed Hastings co-founded Netflix, he developed a set of counterintuitive and radical management principles, defying all tradition and expectation, which would allow the company to reinvent itself over and over on the way to becoming one of the most loved brands in the world. Rejecting the conventional wisdom under which other companies operate, Reed set new standards, valuing people over process, emphasizing innovation over efficiency, and giving employees context, not controls. At Netflix, adequate performance gets a generous severance and hard work is irrelevant. At Netflix, you don't try to please your boss, you give candid feedback instead. At Netflix, employees never need approval, and the company always pays top of market. When Hastings and his team first devised these principles, the implications were unknown and untested, but over just a short period of time they have led to unprecedented flexibility, speed, and boldness. The culture of freedom and responsibility has allowed the company to constantly grow and change as the world, and its members' needs, have also transformed. Here for the first time, Hastings and Erin Meyer, bestselling author of The Culture Map and one of the world's most influential business thinkers, dive deep into the controversial philosophies at the heart of the Netflix psyche, which have generated results that are the envy of the business world. Drawing on hundreds of interviews with current and past Netflix employees from around the globe and never-before-told stories of trial and error from his own career, No Rules Rules is the full, fascinating, and untold story of a unique company making its mark on the world.
  • Votes: 23

    Pet Sematary

    by Stephen King

    A family moves into a beautiful old home in rural Maine, not realizing the horror that awaits them from the pet cemetery and Indian burial ground behind the house.
  • Votes: 22

    In the Miso Soup

    by Ryu Murakami

  • Votes: 21

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

    A breathtakingly original rendering of the Trojan War, shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction 2012.
  • Votes: 20

    Rebecca

    by Daphne Du Maurier

  • Votes: 19

    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Harper Perennial Deluxe Editions)

    by Betty Smith

  • Votes: 18

    Revolutionary Road

    by Richard Yates

  • Votes: 14

    Land of Big Numbers

    by Te-Ping Chen

  • Votes: 12

    Hillbilly Elegy

    by J. D. Vance

  • Votes: 12

    Six of Crows

    by Leigh Bardugo

    Enter the Grishaverse with the #1 New York Times–bestselling Six of Crows. Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can't pull it off alone. . . . A convict with a thirst for revenge. A sharpshooter who can't walk away from a wager. A runaway with a privileged past. A spy known as the Wraith. A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums. A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes. Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Kaz's crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction—if they don't kill each other first. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo returns to the breathtaking world of the Grishaverse in this unforgettable tale about the opportunity—and the adventure—of a lifetime. “Six of Crows is a twisty and elegantly crafted masterpiece that thrilled me from the beginning to end.” –New York Times-bestselling author Holly Black “Six of Crows [is] one of those all-too-rare, unputdownable books that keeps your eyes glued to the page and your brain scrambling to figure out what’s going to happen next.” –Michael Dante DiMartino, co-creator of Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra “There's conflict between morality and amorality and an appetite for sometimes grimace-inducing violence that recalls the Game of Thrones series. But for every bloody exchange there are pages of crackling dialogue and sumptuous description. Bardugo dives deep into this world, with full color and sound. If you're not careful, it'll steal all your time.” —The New York Times Book Review Praise for the Grishaverse “A master of fantasy.” —The Huffington Post “Utterly, extremely bewitching.” —The Guardian “The best magic universe since Harry Potter.” —Bustle “This is what fantasy is for.” —The New York Times Book Review “[A] world that feels real enough to have its own passport stamp.” —NPR “The darker it gets for the good guys, the better.” —Entertainment Weekly “Sultry, sweeping and picturesque. . . . Impossible to put down.” —USA Today “There’s a level of emotional and historical sophistication within Bardugo’s original epic fantasy that sets it apart.” —Vanity Fair “Unlike anything I’ve ever read.” —Veronica Roth, bestselling author of Divergent “Bardugo crafts a first-rate adventure, a poignant romance, and an intriguing mystery!” —Rick Riordan, bestselling author of the Percy Jackson series “This is a great choice for teenage fans of George R.R. Martin and J.R.R. Tolkien.” —RT Book Reviews Read all the books in the Grishaverse! The Shadow and Bone Trilogy (previously published as The Grisha Trilogy) Shadow and Bone Siege and Storm Ruin and Rising The Six of Crows Duology Six of Crows Crooked Kingdom The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic #1 New York Times bestseller, October 18, 2015
  • Votes: 12

    Caste

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. "[Caste] should be at the top of every American's reading list."--Chicago Tribune "As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power--which groups have it and which do not." In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people's lives and behavior and the nation's fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people--including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball's Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others--she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.
  • Votes: 11

    Tavistock Institute

    by Daniel Estulin

  • Votes: 11

    The Meaning of Culture

    by John Cowper Powys

    John Cowper Powys could never be straightforward or orthodox but here he sets off with a useful purpose. ‘The aim of this book,’ he declares, ‘is to narrow down a vague and somewhat evasive conception, which hitherto, like ‘’aristocracy’’ or ‘’liberty’’, has come to imply a number of contradictory and even paradoxical elements, and to give it, not, of course, a purely logical form, but a concrete, particular, recognizable form, malleable and yielding enough and relative enough, but with a definite and quite unambiguous temper, tone, quality, atmosphere, of its own.’ The book is in two parts: Analysis of Culture which deals with, in separate chapters, Philosophy, Literature, Poetry, Painting and Religion: Application of Culture which covers Happiness, Love, Nature, The Art of Reading, Human Relations, Destiny and Obstacles to Culture.John Cowper Powys hoped ‘that the fine word ‘’culture’’ . . . might lend itself to an easy, humane and liberal discussion – a sort of one-man Platonic symposium – and even turn out to contain, among its various implications, no unworthy clue to the narrow path of the wise upon earth.’ He succeeds completely, in his own idiosyncratic way, in achieving that.‘Mr Powys is to be congratulated on having written a book of the kind that most needs writing and most deserves to be read . . . Here in a dozen chapters of glowing and eloquent prose, Mr Powys describes for very reader that citadel which is himself, and explains to him how it may be strengthened and upheld and on what terms it is most worth upholding. . .’ Manchester Guardian
  • Votes: 11

    A Fine Balance

    by Rohinton Mistry

    With a compassionate realism and narrative sweep that recall the work of Charles Dickens, this magnificent novel captures all the cruelty and corruption, dignity and heroism, of India. The time is 1975. The place is an unnamed city by the sea. The government has just declared a State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers--a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village--will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future. As the characters move from distrust to friendship and from friendship to love, A Fine Balance creates an enduring panorama of the human spirit in an inhuman state.
  • Votes: 11

    Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    by Gail Honeyman

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK A PENGUIN BOOK CLUB PICK "Beautifully written and incredibly funny. . . I fell in love with Eleanor; I think you will fall in love, too!" --Reese Witherspoon Smart, warm, uplifting, the story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes the only way to survive is to open her heart. No one's ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine. Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she's thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond's big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.
  • Votes: 11

    Shuggie Bain

    by Douglas Stuart

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020 Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020 The Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year 2020 'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' – Observer It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest. Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place. Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell. 'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' – The judges of the Booker Prize
  • Votes: 10

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 10

    Winter Counts

    by David Heska Wanbli Weiden

  • Votes: 10

    Never Let Me Go

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 10

    A Promised Land

    by Barack Obama

    In this anticipated first volume of his presidential memoirs, Barack Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world, describing in personal detail both his political education and the landmark moments of the first term of his historic presidency--a time of dramatic transformation and turmoil.
  • Votes: 9

    Saraf Lesama Ael Aza

    by Edgar Kerval

  • Votes: 9

    KASHMIRIS FIGHT FOR FREEDOM (2 VOL) Volume 1

    by MUHAMMAD YUSUF SARAF

  • Votes: 9

    A Life on Our Planet

    by Sir David Attenborough

  • Votes: 9

    True Story

    by Kate Reed Petty

  • Votes: 9

    Legendborn

    by Tracy Deonn

  • Votes: 9

    Midnight in Chernobyl

    by Adam Higginbotham

    A New York Times Best Book of the Year A Time Best Book of the Year A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of the Year 2020 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence Finalist One of NPR’s Best Books of 2019 Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters. Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth. Midnight in Chernobyl is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
  • Votes: 9

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    The #1 New York Times bestseller. Over 1 million copies sold! Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results No matter your goals, Atomic Habits offers a proven framework for improving--every day. James Clear, one of the world's leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results. If you're having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn't you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves again and again not because you don't want to change, but because you have the wrong system for change. You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. Here, you'll get a proven system that can take you to new heights. Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be easily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on the most proven ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, readers will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic gold medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to master their craft and vault to the top of their field. Learn how to: • make time for new habits (even when life gets crazy); • overcome a lack of motivation and willpower; • design your environment to make success easier; • get back on track when you fall off course; ...and much more. Atomic Habits will reshape the way you think about progress and success, and give you the tools and strategies you need to transform your habits--whether you are a team looking to win a championship, an organization hoping to redefine an industry, or simply an individual who wishes to quit smoking, lose weight, reduce stress, or achieve any other goal.
  • Votes: 9

    Mob Girl

    by Teresa Carpenter

    From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and author of Missing Beauty comes a fascinating inside look at the mafia. Growing up among racketeers on the Lower East Side of New York City, Arlyne Brickman associated with mobsters. Drawn to the glamorous and flashy lifestyle, she was soon dating "wiseguys" and running errands for them; but after years as a mob girlfriend, Arlyne began to get in on the action herself—eventually becoming a police informant and major witness in the government's case against the Colombo crime family.
  • Votes: 9

    Greenlights

    by Matthew McConaughey

    From the Academy Award®-winning actor, an unconventional memoir filled with raucous stories, outlaw wisdom, and lessons learned the hard way about living with greater satisfaction "Unflinchingly honest and remarkably candid, Matthew McConaughey's book invites us to grapple with the lessons of his life as he did--and to see that the point was never to win, but to understand."--Mark Manson, author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck I've been in this life for fifty years, been trying to work out its riddle for forty-two, and been keeping diaries of clues to that riddle for the last thirty-five. Notes about successes and failures, joys and sorrows, things that made me marvel, and things that made me laugh out loud. How to be fair. How to have less stress. How to have fun. How to hurt people less. How to get hurt less. How to be a good man. How to have meaning in life. How to be more me. Recently, I worked up the courage to sit down with those diaries. I found stories I experienced, lessons I learned and forgot, poems, prayers, prescriptions, beliefs about what matters, some great photographs, and a whole bunch of bumper stickers. I found a reliable theme, an approach to living that gave me more satisfaction, at the time, and still: If you know how, and when, to deal with life's challenges--how to get relative with the inevitable--you can enjoy a state of success I call "catching greenlights." So I took a one-way ticket to the desert and wrote this book: an album, a record, a story of my life so far. This is fifty years of my sights and seens, felts and figured-outs, cools and shamefuls. Graces, truths, and beauties of brutality. Getting away withs, getting caughts, and getting wets while trying to dance between the raindrops. Hopefully, it's medicine that tastes good, a couple of aspirin instead of the infirmary, a spaceship to Mars without needing your pilot's license, going to church without having to be born again, and laughing through the tears. It's a love letter. To life. It's also a guide to catching more greenlights--and to realizing that the yellows and reds eventually turn green too. Good luck.
  • Votes: 8

    Little Fires Everywhere

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 8

    She Said Destroy Vol. 1 TPB

    by Joe Corallo

  • Votes: 8

    A Thousand Ships

    by Natalie Haynes

  • Votes: 8

    Bad Blood

    by John Carreyrou

    'I couldn’t put down this thriller . . . the perfect book to read by the fire this winter.' Bill Gates, '5 books I loved in 2018' WINNER OF THE FINANCIAL TIMES/MCKINSEY BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2018 The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos, the multibillion-dollar biotech startup, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end, despite pressure from its charismatic CEO and threats by her lawyers. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. In Bad Blood, John Carreyrou tells the riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley. Now to be adapted into a film, with Jennifer Lawrence to star. 'Chilling . . . Reads like a West Coast version of All the President’s Men.' New York Times Book Review
  • Votes: 8

    Born a Crime

    by Trevor Noah

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man's coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Michiko Kakutani, New York Times * USA Today * San Francisco Chronicle * NPR * Esquire * Newsday * Booklist Trevor Noah's unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents' indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa's tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man's relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother--his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother's unconventional, unconditional love. Praise for Born a Crime "[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah's] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah's family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author's remarkable mother."--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "[An] unforgettable memoir."--Parade "What makes Born a Crime such a soul-nourishing pleasure, even with all its darker edges and perilous turns, is reading Noah recount in brisk, warmly conversational prose how he learned to negotiate his way through the bullying and ostracism. . . . What also helped was having a mother like Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. . . . Consider Born a Crime another such gift to her--and an enormous gift to the rest of us."--USA Today "[Noah] thrives with the help of his astonishingly fearless mother. . . . Their fierce bond makes this story soar."--People
  • Votes: 7

    Strangers on a Train

    by Patricia Highsmith

  • Votes: 7

    Future Home of the Living God

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 7

    By Becky Cooper - Mapping Manhattan

    by Becky Cooper

  • Votes: 7

    We Keep the Dead Close

    by Becky Cooper

  • Votes: 7

    Shoe Dog

    by Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.
  • Votes: 7

    You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey

    by Amber Ruffin

  • Votes: 7

    21 Lessons for the 21st Century

    by Yuval Noah Harari

  • Votes: 7

    A Little Life

    by Hanya Yanagihara

    "A little life, follows four college classmates --broke, adrift, and bouyed only by their friendship and ambition--as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves." --Back cover
  • Votes: 7

    Ready Player One

    by Ernest Cline

    Immersing himself in a mid-21st-century technological virtual utopia to escape an ugly real world of famine, poverty and disease, Wade Watts joins an increasingly violent effort to solve a series of puzzles by the virtual world's super-wealthy creator, who has promised that the winner will be his heir. (This book was previously listed in Forecast.)
  • Votes: 6

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides a new hardcover edition of the classic best-selling self-help book, which includes principles that can be applied to both business and life itself, in a book that focuses on how to best affectively communicate with people.
  • Votes: 6

    Talking to Strangers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

    Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and #1 bestselling author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, David and Goliath, and What the Dog Saw, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers---and why they often go wrong. How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true? Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland---throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world. In his first book since his #1 bestseller, David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell has written a gripping guidebook for troubled times.
  • Votes: 6

    The Testaments

    by Margaret Atwood

    In this electrifying sequel to The Handmaid's Tale, acclaimed author Margaret Atwood answers the question that has tantalised readers for decades: What happened to Offred?
  • Votes: 6

    Where the Lost Wander

    by Amy Harmon

  • Votes: 6

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 6

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    by Min Jin Lee

    NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST * A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW TOP TEN OF THE YEAR * NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2017 *A USA TODAY TOP TEN OF 2017 Roxane Gay's Favorite Book of 2017, Washington Post NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 BOSTON GLOBE BESTSELLER * USA TODAY BESTSELLER In this gorgeous, page-turning saga, four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan, exiled from a home they never knew. "There could only be a few winners, and a lot of losers. And yet we played on, because we had hope that we might be the lucky ones." In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant--and that her lover is married--she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son's powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations. Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty. From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan's finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee's complex and passionate characters--strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis--survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.
  • Votes: 6

    The Midnight Library

    by Matt Haig

    THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A BBC TWO BETWEEN THE COVERS BOOK CLUB PICK Between life and death there is a library. When Nora Seed finds herself in the Midnight Library, she has a chance to make things right. Up until now, her life has been full of misery and regret. She feels she has let everyone down, including herself. But things are about to change. The books in the Midnight Library enable Nora to live as if she had done things differently. With the help of an old friend, she can now undo every one of her regrets as she tries to work out her perfect life. But things aren’t always what she imagined they’d be, and soon her choices place the library and herself in extreme danger. Before time runs out, she must answer the ultimate question: what is the best way to live?
  • Votes: 5

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

    by Benjamin Franklin

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin was written by Benjamin Franklin from 1771 to 1790; however, Franklin himself appears to have called the work his Memoirs. Although it had a torturous publication history after Franklin's death, this work has become one of the most famous and influential examples of autobiography ever written.
  • Votes: 5

    The Nickel Boys

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 5

    American Baby

    by Gabrielle Glaser

  • Votes: 5

    Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky

    by Patrick Hamilton

  • Votes: 5

    How Green Was My Valley

    by Richard Llewellyn

  • Votes: 5

    A Song of Ice and Fire

    by George R.R. Martin

  • Votes: 5

    Surrender Your Sons

    by Adam Sass

  • Votes: 5

    Who will watch the kids? Bay Area child care programs shutting down, leaving working parents with a dilemma

  • Votes: 5

    How Beautiful We Were

    by Imbolo Mbue

  • Votes: 5

    A Death in the Family (Penguin Classics)

    by James Agee

  • Votes: 5

    Leviathan Wakes

    by James S. A. Corey

  • Votes: 5

    Whereabouts

    by Jhumpa Lahiri

  • Votes: 5

    A Home at the End of the World

    by Michael Cunningham

  • Votes: 5

    Misery

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 5

    Memorial Drive

    by Natasha Trethewey

    'A must-read classic' Mary Karr 'Trethewey writes elegantly, trenchantly, intimately as well about the fraught history of the south and what it means live at the intersection of America's struggle between blackness and whiteness. And what, in our troubled republic, is a subject more evergreen?' Mitchell S. Jackson Natasha Trethewey was born in Mississippi in the 60s to a black mother and a white father. When she was six, Natasha's parents divorced, and she and her mother moved to Atlanta. There, her mother met the man who would become her second husband, and Natasha's stepfather. While she was still a child, Natasha decided that she would not tell her mother about what her stepfather did when she was not there: the quiet bullying and control, the games of cat and mouse. Her mother kept her own secrets, secrets that grew harder to hide as Natasha came of age. When Natasha was nineteen and away at college, her stepfather shot her mother dead on the driveway outside their home. With penetrating insight and a searing voice that moves from the wrenching to the elegiac, Memorial Drive is a compelling and searching look at a shared human experience of sudden loss and absence, and a piercing glimpse at the enduring ripple effects of white racism and domestic abuse. Luminous, urgent, and visceral, it cements Trethewey's position as one of the most important voices in America today.
  • Votes: 5

    Plain Bad Heroines

    by Emily M. Danforth

  • Votes: 5

    Magic Lessons

    by Alice Hoffman

  • Votes: 5

    Lonesome Dove

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 5

    Jitterbug Perfume

    by Tom Robbins

  • Votes: 5

    All Our Shimmering Skies

  • Votes: 5

    A Game of Thrones / A Clash of Kings / A Storm of Swords / A Feast of Crows / A Dance with Dragons

    by George R. R. Martin

  • Votes: 5

    Dear Edward

    by Ann Napolitano

  • Votes: 5

    Apeirogon

    by Colum McCann

  • Votes: 5

    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

    April 2017 marks 20 years since Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad Poor Dad first made waves in the Personal Finance arena. It has since become the #1 Personal Finance book of all time... translated into dozens of languages and sold around the world. Rich Dad Poor Dad is Robert's story of growing up with two dads -- his real father and the father of his best friend, his rich dad -- and the ways in which both men shaped his thoughts about money and investing. The book explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich and explains the difference between working for money and having your money work for you. 20 Years... 20/20 Hindsight In the 20th Anniversary Edition of this classic, Robert offers an update on what we've seen over the past 20 years related to money, investing, and the global economy. Sidebars throughout the book will take readers "fast forward" -- from 1997 to today -- as Robert assesses how the principles taught by his rich dad have stood the test of time. In many ways, the messages of Rich Dad Poor Dad, messages that were criticized and challenged two decades ago, are more meaningful, relevant and important today than they were 20 years ago. As always, readers can expect that Robert will be candid, insightful... and continue to rock more than a few boats in his retrospective. Will there be a few surprises? Count on it. Rich Dad Poor Dad... * Explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich * Challenges the belief that your house is an asset * Shows parents why they can't rely on the school system to teach their kids about money * Defines once and for all an asset and a liability * Teaches you what to teach your kids about money for their future financial success
  • Votes: 5

    Tuesdays with Morrie

    by Mitch Albom

    Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague? Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it? For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Mitch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final 'class': lessons in how to live. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world. Praise for Tuesdays with Morrie: 'This is a true story that shines and leaves you forever warmed by its afterglow' Amy Tan 'A moving tribute to embracing life' Glasgow Herald 'An extraordinary contribution to the literature of death' Boston Globe 'A beautifully written book of great clarity and wisdom that lovingly captures the simplicity beyond life's complexities' M Scott Peck
  • Votes: 5

    Know My Name

    by Chanel Miller

  • Votes: 5

    Concrete Rose

    by Angie Thomas

  • Votes: 5

    Lovecraft Country

    by Matt Ruff

    Soon to be a New HBO® Series from J.J. Abrams (Executive Producer of Westworld), Misha Green (Creator of Underground) and Jordan Peele (Director of Get Out) The critically acclaimed cult novelist makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in this brilliant and wondrous work of the imagination that melds historical fiction, pulp noir, and Lovecraftian horror and fantasy. Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, 22-year-old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George—publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide—and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite—heir to the estate that owned one of Atticus’s ancestors—they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours. At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn—led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb—which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his—and the whole Turner clan’s—destruction. A chimerical blend of magic, power, hope, and freedom that stretches across time, touching diverse members of two black families, Lovecraft Country is a devastating kaleidoscopic portrait of racism—the terrifying specter that continues to haunt us today.
  • Votes: 5

    1984

    by George Orwell

  • Votes: 5

    The Four Winds

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 5

    Norwegian Wood

    by Haruki Murakami

  • Votes: 5

    American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Jeanine Cummins

  • Votes: 4

    Tehanu (4) (Earthsea Cycle)

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 4

    Surrender with Meher Baba

    by Laurent Weichberger

  • Votes: 4

    The Book Of Nothing

    by John D. Barrow

    How do you begin to understand the concept of nothing? Where does it begin and where does it end? From the zeros of the mathematician to the void of the philosophers, from Shakespeare to the empty set, from the ether to the quantum vacuum, from being and nothingness to creatio ex nihilo, there is much ado about nothing at the heart of things. Recent exciting discoveries in astronomy are shown to shed new light on the nature of the vacuum and its dramatic effect upon the explanation of the Universe. This remarkable book ranges over every nook and cranny of nothingness to reveal how the human mind has had to make something of nothing in every field of human enquiry.
  • Votes: 4

    The Case against Education

    by Bryan Caplan

    "Caplan argues that the primary function of education is not to enhance students' skill but to certify their intelligence, work ethic, and conformity--in other words, to signal the qualities of a good employee. [He examines] why students hunt for easy As and casually forget most of what they learn after the final exam, why decades of growing access to education have not resulted in better jobs for the average worker but instead in runaway credential inflation, how employers reward workers for costly schooling they rarely if ever use, and why cutting education spending is the best remedy"--Dust jacket flap.
  • Votes: 4

    If I Had Your Face

    by Frances Cha

  • Votes: 4

    Oona Out of Order

    by Margarita Montimore

  • Votes: 4

    Microsoft Azure Architect Technologies and Design Complete Study Guide

    by Benjamin Perkins

    Become a proficient Microsoft Azure solutions architect Azure certifications are critical to the millions of IT professionals Microsoft has certified as MCSE and MCSA in Windows Server in the last 20 years. All of these professionals need to certify in key Azure exams to stay current and advance in their careers. Exams AZ-303 and AZ-304 are the key solutions architect exams that experienced Windows professionals will find most useful at the intermediate and advanced points of their careers. Microsoft Azure Architect Technologies and Design Complete Study Guide Exams AZ-303 and AZ-304 covers the two critical Microsoft Azure exams that intermediate and advanced Microsoft IT professionals will need to show proficiency as their organizations move to the Azure cloud. • Understand Azure • Set up your Microsoft Cloud network • Solve real-world problems • Get the confidence to pass the exam By learning all of these things plus using the Study Guide review questions and practice exams, the reader will be ready to take the exam and perform the job with confidence.
  • Votes: 4

    Olive Kitteridge

    by Elizabeth Strout

    The world of Olive Kitteridge, a retired school teacher in a small coastal town in Maine, is revealed in stories that explore her diverse roles in many lives, including a lounge singer haunted by a past love, her stoic husband, and her own resentful son.
  • Votes: 4

    Of Human Bondage (Bantam Classics)

    by W. Somerset Maugham

  • Votes: 4

    Sweet Taste of Liberty

    by W. Caleb McDaniel

  • Votes: 4

    Dirty Laundry Pile

    by Paul B. Janeczko

  • Votes: 4

    Quit Like a Woman

    by Holly Whitaker

    "For years, Holly Whitaker wore her workaholic-party-girl persona as a badge of honor, while privately feeling increasingly miserable. She believed that if she could just eat cleaner, save more money, and be more perfect, her life would finally snap into place. Yet all of her attempts to fix herself just added up to more chaos and the chaos added up to more pain and so she added more wine. When she finally had enough and started looking around for help, she was shocked to find that the only systems in place to support her quitting drinking were archaic, patriarchal, and ineffective for the unique needs of women. The Alcoholics Anonymous model focused on strict anonymity, making the ego the enemy, and surrendering power, voice, and agency to a male concept of God. But Holly instinctively knew that what she needed was a deeper understanding of her own identity, the courage to take control of her own life, and to be embraced by a supportive and vocal community. What's more, she could not ignore the ways that alcohol companies were targeting women, just as the tobacco industry had successfully done generations before. Holly became resolute--not only did she have to find her way out of her own addiction, she felt a calling to create something bigger, so that women anywhere on the drinking continuum might find their way as well. The result is her company, Tempest, which provides the education to address the root cause of addiction, the tools to break the cycle of addiction, and the community necessary to build a life free from alcohol. Written in a unique voice that is relatable, honest, and witty, Quit Like a Woman is a groundbreaking look at the insidious role alcohol plays in our lives. Holly offers up a clear-eyed recovery model that banishes the punitive approach to quitting espoused by male-centric programs like AA and provides a positive alternative to living our best lives without the crutch of intoxication. Holly details what makes us sick, keeps us out of our power, and what is possible when we remove alcohol and destroy our belief system around it"--
  • Votes: 4

    A Distant Mirror

    by Barbara W. Tuchman

  • Votes: 4

    Holy Envy

    by Barbara Brown Taylor

  • Votes: 4

    Representations of the Intellectual

    by Edward W. Said

  • Votes: 4

    Icebound

    by Andrea Pitzer

    In the bestselling tradition of Hampton Sides’s In the Kingdom of Ice, a riveting and cinematic tale of Dutch polar explorer William Barents and his three harrowing Arctic expeditions—the last of which resulted in a relentlessly challenging year-long fight for survival. The human story has always been one of perseverance—often against remarkable odds. The most astonishing survival tale of all might be that of 16th-century Dutch explorer William Barents and his crew of sixteen, who ventured farther north than any Europeans before and, on their third polar exploration, lost their ship off the frozen coast of Nova Zembla to unforgiving ice. The men would spend the next year fighting off ravenous polar bears, gnawing hunger, and endless winter. In Icebound, Andrea Pitzer masterfully combines a gripping tale of survival with a sweeping history of the great Age of Exploration—a time of hope, adventure, and seemingly unlimited geographic frontiers. At the story’s center is William Barents, one of the 16th century’s greatest navigators whose larger-than-life ambitions and obsessive quest to chart a path through the deepest, most remote regions of the Arctic ended in both tragedy and glory. Journalist Pitzer did extensive research, learning how to use four-hundred-year-old navigation equipment, setting out on three Arctic expeditions to retrace Barents’s steps, and visiting replicas of Barents’s ship and cabin. “A visceral, thrilling account full of tantalizing surprises” (Andrea Barrett, author of The Voyage of the Narwhal ), Pitzer’s reenactment of Barents’s ill-fated journey shows us how the human body can function at twenty degrees below, the history of mutiny, the art of celestial navigation, and the intricacies of building shelters. But above all, it gives us a first-hand glimpse into the true nature of human courage.
  • Votes: 4

    Crooked House

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 4

    Victoria

    by Julia Baird

  • Votes: 4

    The Last Thing to Burn By Will Dean & The Push Mother. Daughter. Angel. Monster? By Ashley Audrain 2 Books Collection Set

    by Will Dean

  • Votes: 4

    No Longer Human

    by Osamu Dazai

  • Votes: 4

    All Quiet on the Western Front

    by Erich Maria Remarque

  • Votes: 4

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 4

    Smart Spacetime

    by Mark Burgess

    `The err is human, to explain is [Mark Burgess]' --Patrick Debois `One of the best reads and written by one of the best minds!' --Glenn O'Donnell (about In Search of Certainty) What if space is not like we learn in mathematics,but more like a network? What happens to the ability to measure things as you shrink or expand? Since Einstein, space and time were the province of theoretical physicists and science fiction writers, but today they are of equal importance in Information Technology, Artificial Intelligence, and even Biology. This book tells a new and radical story of space and time, rooted in fundamental physics but going beyond to underpin some of the biggest questions in science and technology. This is a book about physics, it's about computers, artificial intelligence, and many other topics on surface. It's about everything that has to do with information. It draws on examples from every avenue of life, and pulls apart preconceptions that have been programmed into us from childhood. It re-examines ideas like distance,time, and speed, and asks if we really know what those things are. If they are really so fundamental and universal concepts then can we also see them and use them in computers, or in the growing of a plant? Conversely, can we see phenomena we know from computers in physics? We can learn a lot by comparing the way we describe physics with the way we describe computers---and that throws up a radical view: the concept ofvirtualization, and what it might mean for physics. `I think that it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to say that [Mark Burgess] is the closest thing to Richard Feynman within our industry' --Cameron Haight `...magnificent; a tour de force of connecting the dots of many disciplines... Mark's combination of originality, synthesis and practicality knows no equal.' --Paul Borrill
  • Votes: 4

    Cynical Theories

    by Helen Pluckrose

  • Votes: 4

    Factfulness

    by Hans Rosling

    “One of the most important books I’ve ever read—an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world.” – Bill Gates “Hans Rosling tells thestory of ‘the secret silent miracle of human progress’ as only he can. But Factfulness does much more than that. It also explains why progress is so often secret and silent and teaches readershow to see it clearly.” —Melinda Gates Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends—what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school—we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers. In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspective—from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse). Our problem is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases. It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future. --- “This book is my last battle in my life-long mission to fight devastating ignorance...Previously I armed myself with huge data sets, eye-opening software, an energetic learning style and a Swedish bayonet for sword-swallowing. It wasn’t enough. But I hope this book will be.” Hans Rosling, February 2017.
  • Votes: 4

    Washington Black

    by Esi Edugyan

    - TOP TEN BOOK OF THE YEAR: New York Times, Washington Post, TIME, Entertainment Weekly, Slate - ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: Boston Globe, NPR, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, The Economist, Bustle - WINNER OF THE SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE - FINALIST FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE, THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE, THE ROGERS WRITERS' TRUST PRIZE "Enthralling" --Boston Globe "Extraordinary" --Seattle Times "A rip-roaring tale" --Washington Post A dazzling adventure story about a boy who rises from the ashes of slavery to become a free man of the world. George Washington Black, or "Wash," an eleven-year-old field slave on a Barbados sugar plantation, is terrified to be chosen by his master's brother as his manservant. To his surprise, the eccentric Christopher Wilde turns out to be a naturalist, explorer, inventor, and abolitionist. Soon Wash is initiated into a world where a flying machine can carry a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning--and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human. But when a man is killed and a bounty is placed on Wash's head, Christopher and Wash must abandon everything. What follows is their flight along the eastern coast of America, and, finally, to a remote outpost in the Arctic. What brings Christopher and Wash together will tear them apart, propelling Wash even further across the globe in search of his true self. From the blistering cane fields of the Caribbean to the frozen Far North, from the earliest aquariums of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black tells a story of self-invention and betrayal, of love and redemption, of a world destroyed and made whole again, and asks the question, What is true freedom?
  • Votes: 4

    Homeland Elegies

    by Ayad Akhtar

  • Votes: 4

    No Filter

    by Sarah Frier

    Award-winning reporter Sarah Frier reveals an inside, never-before-told, behind-the-scenes look at how Instagram defied the odds to become one of the most culturally defining apps of the decade. Since its creation in 2010, Instagram’s fun and simple interface has captured our collective imagination, swiftly becoming a way of life. In No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram, technology reporter Sarah Frier explains how Instagram’s founders married art and technology to overcome skeptics and to hook the public on visual storytelling. At first, Instagram initially attracted artisans, but then the platform exploded in popularity among the masses, creating an entire industry of digital influencers that’s now worth tens of billions of dollars. Eighteen months after Instagram’s launch and explosive growth, the founders—Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger—made the gut-wrenching decision to sell the company to Facebook. For most companies, that would be the end of the story; but for Instagram, it was only the beginning. Instagram borrowed some lessons from Facebook and rejected others, until eventually its success stirred tension with Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg, just as Facebook became embroiled in a string of public crises. Frier unearths the details that led to the cofounders’ departure, bringing to light dramatic moments unknown to the public until now. At its heart, No Filter draws on unprecedented exclusive access—from the founders of Instagram, as well as employees, executives, and competitors; hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio; Anna Wintour of Vogue; Kris Jenner of the Kardashian-Jenner empire; and a plethora of influencers, from fashionistas with millions of followers to owners of famous dogs worldwide—to show how Instagram has fundamentally changed the way we communicate, shop, eat, and travel. The book brings readers inside users’ strategies to craft their personal image and fame, explaining how the company’s product decisions have affected the structure of our society. From teenagers to the pope, No Filter tells the captivating story of how Instagram not only created a new industry but also changed our lives.
  • Votes: 4

    The Thursday Murder Club

    by Richard Osman

  • Votes: 4

    Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orisha, 1)

    by Tomi Adeyemi

  • Votes: 4

    Star Wars

    by Charles Soule

  • Votes: 4

    A Good Girl's Guide to Murder

    by Holly Jackson

  • Votes: 4

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    A satire on totalitarianism in which farm animals overthrow their human owner and set up their own government
  • Votes: 4

    Wild Rain

    by Beverly Jenkins

  • Votes: 4

    Braiding Sweetgrass

    by Robin Wall Kimmerer

    'A hymn of love to the world ... A journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise' Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two ways of knowledge together. Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings - asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass - offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
  • Votes: 4

    Doctor Sleep

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 4

    Estimating clinical severity of COVID-19 from the transmission dynamics in Wuhan, China

  • Votes: 4

    Kindred

    by Octavia E. Butler

    Dana, a black woman, finds herself repeatedly transported to the antebellum South, where she must make sure that Rufus, the plantation owner's son, survives to father Dana's ancestor.
  • Votes: 4

    Killers of the Flower Moon

    by David Grann

    WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FACT CRIME SHORTLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NON-FICTION SHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION **SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE STARRING LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND ROBERT DE NIRO** ‘A riveting true story of greed, serial murder and racial injustice’ JON KRAKAUER ‘A fiercely entertaining mystery story and a wrenching exploration of evil’ KATE ATKINSON ‘A fascinating account of a tragic and forgotten chapter in the history of the American West’ JOHN GRISHAM From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z, now a major film starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattison, comes a true-life murder story which became one of the FBI’s first major homicide investigations. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. As the death toll climbed, the FBI took up the case. But the bureau badly bungled the investigation. In desperation, its young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. Together with the Osage he and his undercover team began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. ‘David Grann has a razor-keen instinct for suspense’ LOUISE ERDRICH
  • Votes: 4

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 4

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut

    A special fiftieth anniversary edition of Kurt Vonnegut’s masterpiece, “a desperate, painfully honest attempt to confront the monstrous crimes of the twentieth century” (Time), featuring a new introduction by Kevin Powers, author of the National Book Award finalist The Yellow Birds Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous World War II firebombing of Dresden, the novel is the result of what Kurt Vonnegut described as a twenty-three-year struggle to write a book about what he had witnessed as an American prisoner of war. It combines historical fiction, science fiction, autobiography, and satire in an account of the life of Billy Pilgrim, a barber’s son turned draftee turned optometrist turned alien abductee. As Vonnegut had, Billy experiences the destruction of Dresden as a POW. Unlike Vonnegut, he experiences time travel, or coming “unstuck in time.” An instant bestseller, Slaughterhouse-Five made Kurt Vonnegut a cult hero in American literature, a reputation that only strengthened over time, despite his being banned and censored by some libraries and schools for content and language. But it was precisely those elements of Vonnegut’s writing—the political edginess, the genre-bending inventiveness, the frank violence, the transgressive wit—that have inspired generations of readers not just to look differently at the world around them but to find the confidence to say something about it. Authors as wide-ranging as Norman Mailer, John Irving, Michael Crichton, Tim O’Brien, Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Strout, David Sedaris, Jennifer Egan, and J. K. Rowling have all found inspiration in Vonnegut’s words. Jonathan Safran Foer has described Vonnegut as “the kind of writer who made people—young people especially—want to write.” George Saunders has declared Vonnegut to be “the great, urgent, passionate American writer of our century, who offers us . . . a model of the kind of compassionate thinking that might yet save us from ourselves.” Fifty years after its initial publication at the height of the Vietnam War, Vonnegut's portrayal of political disillusionment, PTSD, and postwar anxiety feels as relevant, darkly humorous, and profoundly affecting as ever, an enduring beacon through our own era’s uncertainties. “Poignant and hilarious, threaded with compassion and, behind everything, the cataract of a thundering moral statement.”—The Boston Globe
  • Votes: 4

    How to Build a Car: The Autobiography of the World’s Greatest Formula 1 Designer

    by Adrian Newey

    'Adrian has a unique gift for understanding drivers and racing cars. He is ultra competitive but never forgets to have fun. An immensely likeable man.' Damon Hill
  • Votes: 4

    Crooked Kingdom

    by Leigh Bardugo

  • Votes: 4

    And Then There Were None

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 4

    Range

    by David Epstein

    Many experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. Epstein examined the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists, and discovered that in most fields-- especially those that are complex and unpredictable-- generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists juggle many interests rather than focusing on one-- but they're also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can't see. -- adapted from jacket
  • Votes: 3

    Behind Blue Eyes

    by Mark S Miller

  • Votes: 3

    Bonhoeffer

  • Votes: 3

    THE HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE OR POLYGAMY AND MONOGOMY COMPARED BY A CHRISTIAN PHILANTHROPIST

  • Votes: 3

    Pestilence

    by Laura Thalassa

  • Votes: 3

    The Last Flight

    by Julie Clark

  • Votes: 3

    Falling Into The Pit of Success

  • Votes: 3

    Death Note, Vol. 6

    by Tsugumi Ohba

  • Votes: 3

    Violet Bent Backwards Over the Grass

    by Lana Del Rey

    THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED DEBUT BOOK OF POETRY FROM LANA DEL REY, VIOLET BENT BACKWARDS OVER THE GRASS 'Violet Bent Backwards Over the Grass is the title poem of the book and the first poem I wrote of many. Some of which came to me in their entirety, which I dictated and then typed out, and some that I worked laboriously picking apart each word to make the perfect poem. They are eclectic and honest and not trying to be anything other than what they are and for that reason I’m proud of them, especially because the spirit in which they were written was very authentic. Lana Del Rey Lana’s breathtaking first book solidifies her further as 'the essential writer of her times' (The Atlantic). The collection features more than thirty poems, many exclusive to the book: Never to Heaven, The Land of 1,000 Fires, Past the Bushes Cypress Thriving, LA Who Am I to Love You?, Tessa DiPietro, Happy, Paradise Is Very Fragile, Bare Feet on Linoleum and many more. This beautiful hardcover edition showcases Lana’s typewritten manuscript pages alongside her original photography. The result is an extraordinary poetic landscape that reflects the unguarded spirit of its creator. Violet Bent Backwards Over the Grass is also brought to life in an unprecedented spoken word audiobook which features Lana Del Rey reading fourteen select poems from the book accompanied by music from Grammy Award-winning musician Jack Antonoff.
  • Votes: 3

    The Invisible Library (The Invisible Library Novel)

    by Genevieve Cogman

  • Votes: 3

    Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    by Paulo Freire

  • Votes: 3

    We Were the Lucky Ones

    by Georgia Hunter

  • Votes: 3

    Truly Like Lightning

    by David Duchovny

  • Votes: 3

    CAPTAIN JESUS Funny Birthday Personalized Name Boat Gift

    by David Degan

  • Votes: 3

    ShuggieBain

  • Votes: 3

    All The Young Men

    by Ruth Coker Burks

  • Votes: 3

    The Totally Awesome Book of Crazy Stories

    by Bill O'Neill

  • Votes: 3

    In the Wild Light

    by Jeff Zentner

  • Votes: 3

    Middlemarch (Penguin Classics)

    by George Eliot

  • Votes: 3

    Wherever Seeds May Fall (First Contact)

    by Peter Cawdron

  • Votes: 3

    Sweet Girl (The Girls)

    by Rachel Hollis

  • Votes: 3

    House of X/Powers of X

    by Pepe Larraz

  • Votes: 3

    Think and Grow Rich

    by Napoleon Hill

    An updated edition of the best-selling guide features anecdotes about such modern figures as Bill Gates, Dave Thomas, and Sir John Templeton, explaining how their examples can enable modern readers to pursue wealth and overcome personal stumbling blocks. Original. 30,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 3

    Fruits Basket Collector's Edition, Vol. 1 (Fruits Basket Collector's Edition, 1)

    by Natsuki Takaya

  • Votes: 3

    Walter Wink

    by Walter Wink

  • Votes: 3

    Forgotten All-Star

    by Jennifer DeRoss

  • Votes: 3

    A Sky Full of Stars

    by Dani Atkins

    A love story about four strangers whose lives are changed by the death of a professional stargazer. From Dani Atkins, winner of the Romantic Novel of the Year Award 2018.
  • Votes: 3

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Recipes From Victorian Lancaster County Households

    by S.H. Levan

  • Votes: 3

    A Head Full of Ghosts

    by Paul Tremblay

    The lives of the Barretts, a suburban New England family, are torn apart when fourteen-year-old Marjorie begins to display signs of acute schizophrenia. To her parents' despair, the doctors are unable to halt Marjorie's descent into madness. As their stable home devolves into a house of horrors, they reluctantly turn to a local Catholic priest for help, and soon find themselves the unwitting stars of The Possession, a hit reality television show.
  • Votes: 3

    Wonder Island

    by Bonny Eakins

  • Votes: 3

    Year of Yes

    by Shonda Rhimes

  • Votes: 3

    Vegetables Illustrated

    by America's Test Kitchen

  • Votes: 3

    Collected Stories (Everyman's Library)

    by W. Somerset Maugham

    Thirty-one short stories which provide a rich view of Maugham's prolific talent, wide-ranging vision, and engaging style.
  • Votes: 3

    Breakout

    by David Sudnow

  • Votes: 3

    I, Too, Am America

    by Langston Hughes

  • Votes: 3

    House of Earth and Blood (Crescent City)

    by Sarah J. Maas

  • Votes: 3

    The Long Way

    by Bernard Moitessier

    Bernard Moitessier is a writer and one of France's most famous sailors.
  • Votes: 3

    Howl's Moving Castle

    by Diana Wynne Jones

  • Votes: 3

    East of Eden (Oprah's Book Club)

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 3

    George Saunders Collection 3 Books Set (A Swim in a Pond in the Rain, Tenth of December, Lincoln in the Bardo)

    by George Saunders

  • Votes: 3

    The story of the NIH grants programs

    by Stephen Parks Strickland

  • Votes: 3

    Kafka on the Shore

    by Haruki Murakami

  • Votes: 3

    My Dark Vanessa

    by Kate Elizabeth Russell

  • Votes: 3

    Black Sun (Between Earth and Sky)

    by Rebecca Roanhorse

  • Votes: 3

    HBR's 10 Must Reads on Technology and Strategy Collection (7 Books)

    by Harvard Business Review

  • Votes: 3

    Network Effect

    by Martha Wells

  • Votes: 3

    Green Eggs and Ham

    by Dr.Seuss

  • Votes: 3

    The Overstory

    by Richard Powers

    WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2018 A wondrous, exhilarating novel about nine strangers brought together by an unfolding natural catastrophe ‘The best novel ever written about trees, and really, just one of the best novels, period’ Ann Patchett An artist inherits a hundred years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut. A hard-partying undergraduate in the late 1980s electrocutes herself, dies, and is sent back into life by creatures of air and light. A hearing- and speech-impaired scientist discovers that trees are communicating with one another. An Air Force crewmember in the Vietnam War is shot out of the sky, then saved by falling into a banyan. This is the story of these and five other strangers, each summoned in different ways by the natural world, who are brought together in a last stand to save it from catastrophe. ‘Breathtaking’ Barbara Kingsolver, New York Times ‘It’s a masterpiece’ Tim Winton ‘It’s not possible for Powers to write an uninteresting book’ Margaret Atwood ‘An astonishing performance’ Benjamin Markovits, Guardian
  • Votes: 3

    Good Omens

    by Neil Gaiman

    ____________________ COMING TO AMAZON PRIME ON 31ST MAY - STARRING DAVID TENNANT, MICHAEL SHEEN AND BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH 'Marvellously benign, ridiculously inventive and gloriously funny' Guardian ____________________ 'Armageddon only happens once, you know. They don't let you go around again until you get it right' According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, Judgement Day is almost upon us and the world's going to end in a week . . . Now people have been predicting the end of the world almost from its very beginning, so it's only natural to be sceptical when a new date is set for Judgement Day. But what if, for once, the predictions are right, and the apocalypse really is due to arrive next Saturday, just after tea? You could spend the time left drowning your sorrows, giving away all your possessions in preparation for the rapture, or laughing it off as (hopefully) just another hoax. Or you could just try to do something about it. It's a predicament that Aziraphale, a somewhat fussy angel, and Crowley, a fast-living demon now finds themselves in. They've been living amongst Earth's mortals since The Beginning and, truth be told, have grown rather fond of the lifestyle and, in all honesty, are not actually looking forward to the coming Apocalypse. And then there's the small matter that someone appears to have misplaced the Antichrist . . .
  • Votes: 3

    Flamer

    by Mike Curato

  • Votes: 3

    Outliers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 3

    Gone With the Wind

    by Margaret Mitchell

  • Votes: 3

    The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

    by Stuart Turton

  • Votes: 3

    Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

    by Jane Austen

    As a mysterious plague falls upon the village of Meryton and zombies start rising from the dead, Elizabeth Bennett is determined to destroy the evil menace, but becomes distracted by the arrival of the dashing and arrogant Mr. Darcy.
  • Votes: 3

    The War on Normal People

    by Andrew Yang

    From entrepreneur Andrew Yang, the founder of Venture for America, an eye-opening look at how new technologies are erasing millions of jobs before our eyes-and a rallying cry for the urgent steps America must take, including Universal Basic Income, to stabilize our economy. The shift toward automation is about to create a tsunami of unemployment. Not in the distant future--now. One recent estimate predicts 13 million American workers will lose their jobs within the next seven years-jobs that won't be replaced. In a future marked by restlessness and chronic unemployment, what will happen to American society? In The War on Normal People, Andrew Yang paints a dire portrait of the American economy. Rapidly advancing technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics and automation software are making millions of Americans' livelihoods irrelevant. The consequences of these trends are already being felt across our communities in the form of political unrest, drug use, and other social ills. The future looks dire-but is it unavoidable? In The War on Normal People, Yang imagines a different future -- one in which having a job is distinct from the capacity to prosper and seek fulfillment. At this vision's core is Universal Basic Income, the concept of providing all citizens with a guaranteed income-and one that is rapidly gaining popularity among forward-thinking politicians and economists. Yang proposes that UBI is an essential step toward a new, more durable kind of economy, one he calls "human capitalism."
  • Votes: 3

    My Brilliant Friend

    by Elena Ferrante

    "Mi briljante venninne" er ei historie fortalt av Elena, som har oppdaga at den beste venninna hennar gjennom eit langt liv er sporlaust forsvunnen. Lila har tatt med seg alt ho eig og klipt vekk ansiktet sitt frå samtlege familiefotografi. Historia om dei to begynner i eit fattig, men pulserande nabolag i utkanten av Napoli. Dei to kløktige jentene lærer å stole på kvarandre - og ingen andre - i dei røffe gatene som er kontrollert av mafiaen. Romanen er eit portrett av to sterke kvinner, men òg historia om eit nabolag, ein by og eit land som gjennomgår store endringar frå 50-åra og fram til vår tid.
  • Votes: 3

    Take a Hint, Dani Brown

    by Talia Hibbert

  • Votes: 3

    Between the World and Me

    by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    Hailed by Toni Morrison as "required reading," a bold and personal literary exploration of America's racial history by "the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States" (The New York Observer)#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review O: The Oprah Magazine The Washington Post People Entertainment Weekly Vogue Los Angeles Times San Francisco Chronicle Chicago Tribune New York.
  • Votes: 3

    Flowers for Algernon

    by Daniel Keyes

  • Votes: 3

    The Classic Baby Lit Collection Boxed Set - Romeo & Juliet, Wizard of Oz, Sherlock Holmes, Pride & Prejudice, Moby Dick, Jane Eyre, Alice in Wonderland, Jungle Book

    by Suzanne Gibbs Taylor

  • Votes: 3

    The Value of Everything

    by Mariana Mazzucato

    Who really creates wealth in our world? And how do we decide the value of what they do? At the heart of today's financial and economic crisis is a problem hiding in plain sight. In modern capitalism, value-extraction - the siphoning off of profits, from shareholders' dividends to bankers' bonuses - is rewarded more highly than value-creation: the productive process that drives a healthy economy and society. We misidentify takers as makers, and have lost sight of what value really means. Once a central plank of economic thought, this concept of value - what it is, why it matters to us - is simply no longer discussed. Yet, argues Mariana Mazzucato in this penetrating and passionate new book, if we are to reform capitalism - to radically transform an increasingly sick system rather than continue feeding it - we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Who is creating it, who is extracting it, and who is destroying it? Answers to these questions are key if we want to replace the current parasitic system with a type of capitalism that is more sustainable, more symbiotic: that works for us all. The Value of Everything will reignite a long-needed debate about the kind of world we really want to live in.
  • Votes: 3

    Every Last Fear

    by Alex Finlay

  • Votes: 3

    Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, 1)

    by Sarah J. Maas

  • Votes: 3

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 3

    WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us

    by Tim O'Reilly

    ‘The man who can really make a whole industry happen.’ Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google ‘A punchy and provocative book . . . WTF? is an insightful and heartfelt plea, daring us to reimagine a better economy and society.’ Financial Times Renowned as ‘the Oracle of Silicon Valley’, Tim O’Reilly has spent three decades exploring the world-transforming power of information technology. Now, the leading thinker of the internet age turns his eye to the future – and asks the questions that will frame the next stage of the digital revolution: · Will increased automation destroy jobs or create new opportunities? · What will the company of tomorrow look like? · Is a world dominated by algorithms to be welcomed or feared? · How can we ensure that technology serves people, rather than the other way around? · How can we all become better at mapping future trends? Tim O’Reilly’s insights create an authoritative, compelling and often surprising portrait of the world we will soon inhabit, highlighting both the many pitfalls and the enormous opportunities that lie ahead. ‘Tim O’Reilly has been at the cutting edge of the internet since it went commercial.’ New York Times ‘O’Reilly’s ability to quickly identify nascent trends is unparalleled.’ Wired
  • Votes: 3

    Faithless in Death

    by J. D. Robb

  • Votes: 3

    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories

    by Ken Liu

    Presents the author's selection of his best short stories, as well as a new piece, in a collection that includes "The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary," "Mono No Aware" and "The Waves."
  • Votes: 3

    Transcendent Kingdom

    by Yaa Gyasi

    **From the bestselling author of Homegoing comes a searing novel of love and loss, addiction and redemption, straight from the heart of contemporary America** As a child Gifty would ask her parents to tell the story of their journey from Ghana to Alabama, seeking escape in myths of heroism and romance. When her father and brother succumb to the hard reality of immigrant life in the American South, their family of four becomes two - and the life Gifty dreamed of slips away. Years later, desperate to understand the opioid addiction that destroyed her brother's life, she turns to science for answers. But when her mother comes to stay, Gifty soon learns that the roots of their tangled traumas reach farther than she ever thought. Tracing her family's story through continents and generations will take her deep into the dark heart of modern America. ______________________________________________________ 'I would say that Transcendent Kingdom is a novel for our time (and it is) but it is so much more than that. It is a novel for all times. The splendor and heart and insight and brilliance contained in the pages holds up a light the rest of us can follow' Ann Patchett 'Absolutely transcendent. A gorgeously woven narrative . . . not a word or idea out of place. THE RANGE. I am quite angry this is so good' Roxane Gay 'A stirringly gifted writer' New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 3

    The Forty Rules of Love

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 3

    Outlander

    by Diana Gabaldon

    THE FIRST NOVEL IN THE BESTSELLING OUTLANDER SERIES. As seen on Amazon Prime TV. What if your future was the past? 1946, and Claire Randall goes to the Scottish Highlands with her husband Frank. It’s a second honeymoon, a chance to learn how war has changed them and to re-establish their loving marriage. But one afternoon, Claire walks through a circle of standing stones and vanishes into 1743, where the first person she meets is a British army officer - her husband’s six-times great-grandfather. Unfortunately, Black Jack Randall is not the man his descendant is, and while trying to escape him, Claire falls into the hands of a gang of Scottish outlaws, and finds herself a Sassenach - an outlander - in danger from both Jacobites and Redcoats. Marooned amid danger, passion and violence, her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives. (Previously published as Cross Stitch)
  • Votes: 3

    Fable

    by Adrienne Young

  • Votes: 2

    Good Neighbors

    by Sarah Langan

  • Votes: 2

    City Spies (1)

    by James Ponti

  • Votes: 2

    Song of Solomon

    by Toni Morrison

    Macon Dead, Jr., called "Milkman," the son of the wealthiest African American in town, moves from childhood into early manhood, searching, among the disparate, mysterious members of his family, for his life and reality. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. Reader's Guide available. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 2

    The Ugly Cry

    by Danielle Henderson

  • Votes: 2

    Lincoln in the Bardo

    by George Saunders

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. "My poor boy, he was too good for this earth," the president says at the time. "God has called him home." Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy's body. From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state--called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo--a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie's soul. Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction's ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end? Praise for Lincoln in the Bardo "A luminous feat of generosity and humanism."--Colson Whitehead, The New York Times Book Review "A masterpiece."--Zadie Smith "Ingenious . . . Saunders--well on his way toward becoming a twenty-first-century Twain--crafts an American patchwork of love and loss, giving shape to our foundational sorrows."--Vogue "Saunders is the most humane American writer working today."--Harper's Magazine "The novel beats with a present-day urgency--a nation at war with itself, the unbearable grief of a father who has lost a child, and a howling congregation of ghosts, as divided in death as in life, unwilling to move on."--Vanity Fair "A brilliant, Buddhist reimagining of an American story of great loss and great love."--Elle "Wildly imaginative"--Marie Claire "Mesmerizing . . . Dantesque . . . A haunting American ballad."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Exhilarating . . . Ruthless and relentless in its evocation not only of Lincoln and his quandary, but also of the tenuous existential state shared by all of us." --Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "It's unlike anything you've ever read, except that the grotesque humor, pathos, and, ultimately, human kindness at its core mark it as a work that could come only from Saunders."--The National
  • Votes: 2

    Where God Was Born

    by Bruce Feiler

  • Votes: 2

    The Walled City

    by Ryan Graudin

  • Votes: 2

    Sacre Blues

    by Taras Grescoe

  • Votes: 2

    5 Must Read Books on Supply Chain Management

  • Votes: 2

    The Last Days at Forcados High School

    by A.H. Mohammed

  • Votes: 2

    No One Is Talking About This

    by Patricia Lockwood

  • Votes: 2

    A Far Cry from Kensington (New Directions Paperbook)

    by Muriel Spark

  • Votes: 2

    Sex With God

    by Suzanne DeWitt Hall

  • Votes: 2

    2666

    by Roberto Bolaño

    THE POSTHUMOUS MASTERWORK FROM "ONE OF THE GREATEST AND MOST INFLUENTIAL MODERN WRITERS" (JAMES WOOD, THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW) Composed in the last years of Roberto Bolaño's life, 2666 was greeted across Europe and Latin America as his highest achievement, surpassing even his previous work in its strangeness, beauty, and scope. Its throng of unforgettable characters includes academics and convicts, an American sportswriter, an elusive German novelist, and a teenage student and her widowed, mentally unstable father. Their lives intersect in the urban sprawl of SantaTeresa—a fictional Juárez—on the U.S.-Mexico border, where hundreds of young factory workers, in the novel as in life, have disappeared.
  • Votes: 2

    Out Magazine (February, 2016) Tom Daley and Dustin Lance Black Cover

    by Tom Daley

  • Votes: 2

    We Are Legion (We Are Bob)

    Bobiverse fans: a signed limited edition of all three books in a boxed set, signed by the author, is now available on Amazon. Look for The Bobiverse [Signed Limited Edition] on Amazon Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street. Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets. The stakes are high: no less than the first claim to entire worlds. If he declines the honor, he'll be switched off, and they'll try again with someone else. If he accepts, he becomes a prime target. There are at least three other countries trying to get their own probes launched first, and they play dirty. The safest place for Bob is in space, heading away from Earth at top speed. Or so he thinks. Because the universe is full of nasties, and trespassers make them mad - very mad.
  • Votes: 2

    Mister Fake Fiance

    by Nadia Lee

    Ever had a secret so big your dad tries to use it to marry you off? No, just me? To avoid my father and hide my secret, I move to another city, take a job with marketing VP David Darling, and spend my weekends baking and watching corporate training videos rather than going out. Then I get an urgent Saturday call from David. It isn't a run-of-the-mill office emergency. It comes with a pink Rolls Royce and a Cinderella makeover! It should've been just one night of me playing the love of his life, but the press gets involved. David might've fanned the flames by declaring that I'm his in front of the reporters. Now the whole world thinks we're engaged, but before he can set the record straight, I propose to let the situation stay as is for three months. A fake engagement would get his psycho ex off his back, and it'd stop my dad from trying to force me into a loveless marriage. The only problem is, David keeps slipping through my carefully erected walls to make me feel special. And I don't know what I'm going to do when he finds out what I'm keeping secret...
  • Votes: 2

    A World Without Work

    by Daniel Susskind

  • Votes: 2

    Small Gods

    by Terry Pratchett

  • Votes: 2

    Revival

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 2

    Time 100 Most Influential People Melinda Gates on cover, May 1, 2017

  • Votes: 2

    Columbine

    by Dave Cullen

  • Votes: 2

    The Good Earth (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Pearl S. Buck

  • Votes: 2

    Selected Poems

    by Gwendolyn Brooks

  • Votes: 2

    Dept. of Speculation (Vintage Contemporaries)

    by Jenny Offill

  • Votes: 2

    The Founder's Dilemmas

    by Noam Wasserman

    Often downplayed in the excitement of starting up a new business venture is one of the most important decisions entrepreneurs will face: should they go it alone, or bring in cofounders, hires, and investors to help build the business? More than just financial rewards are at stake. Friendships and relationships can suffer. Bad decisions at the inception of a promising venture lay the foundations for its eventual ruin. The Founder's Dilemmas is the first book to examine the early decisions by entrepreneurs that can make or break a startup and its team. Drawing on a decade of research, Noam Wasserman reveals the common pitfalls founders face and how to avoid them. He looks at whether it is a good idea to cofound with friends or relatives, how and when to split the equity within the founding team, and how to recognize when a successful founder-CEO should exit or be fired. Wasserman explains how to anticipate, avoid, or recover from disastrous mistakes that can splinter a founding team, strip founders of control, and leave founders without a financial payoff for their hard work and innovative ideas. He highlights the need at each step to strike a careful balance between controlling the startup and attracting the best resources to grow it, and demonstrates why the easy short-term choice is often the most perilous in the long term. The Founder's Dilemmas draws on the inside stories of founders like Evan Williams of Twitter and Tim Westergren of Pandora, while mining quantitative data on almost ten thousand founders. People problems are the leading cause of failure in startups. This book offers solutions.
  • Votes: 2

    Inspired

    by Marty Cagan

  • Votes: 2

    The Palace of Illusions

    by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

  • Votes: 2

    Half a World Away

    by Mike Gayle

  • Votes: 2

    One Shot

    by Lee Child

  • Votes: 2

    Adrian Furnham's The Psychology of Money

    by Adrian Furnham

    Comprehensive and cross-cultural, this book examines such diverse subjects as: money and power, gender differences, morality and tax, the very rich, the poor, lottery winners, misers, gamblers, philanthropists and more.
  • Votes: 2

    Leven met wind mee

    by Jelle Hermus

    ‘Dramaloosheid’ – zo noemt Jelle het. Een leuk en moeiteloos leven met minder tegenwind en veel minder ellende. In ‘Leven met wind mee’ laat Jelle Hermus zien hoe je de kwaliteit van je leven drastisch verbetert met één simpele gewoonte die alles verandert. Na zijn succesvolle debuut ‘Steeds leuker’ gaat Jelle Hermus in dit praktische boek een stap verder en een laag dieper. Leer over scheten, meditatie en de kracht van innerlijke rust. En laat je meenemen op reis langs een simpeler leven vol kalmte, compassie en dolle pret. Want het leven hoeft niet zo moeilijk te zijn. En zodra je leert om je eigen drama te verminderen, kun je zomaar met een wezenloze glimlach op je snoet over straat lopen. Best fijn. Jelle Hermus is oprichter van het succesvolle platform soChicken.nl, waar jaarlijks meer dan 9 miljoen mensen broeden op een leuker leven. Het is zijn missie om onze samenleving liefdevoller te maken. Zijn eerste boek, Steeds leuker, werd verkozen tot Beste Spirituele Boek 2018: ‘Jelle Hermus heeft een nieuwe manier en een nieuwe taal. Het leukere leven dat hij in het vooruitzicht stelt, is heel goed bereikbaar.’
  • Votes: 2

    More Better Deals

    by Joe R. Lansdale

    Full of grit, wit and dark humour, More Better Deals showcases Edgar award-winning author Joe Lansdale's brilliant writing and delivers another unputdownable thriller. 'A folklorist's eye for telling detail and a front-porch raconteur's sense of pace.' New York Times Book Review Ed Edwards works in the dirty, tough world of used car sales, but feels sure he is destined for more in life. Dreaming of a brighter future for himself and his plucky little sister, Ed wants to get out of the game. And when Dave, his lazy, grease-stained boss, sends him to repossess a Cadillac, the better deal Ed has been searching for suddenly seems in reach. The Cadillac in question belongs to Frank Craig and his beautiful wife, Nancy, owners of a local drive-in and pet cemetery. Ed knows Nancy well - too well. In the throes of their salacious affair, Nancy has suggested they kill Frank and claim his insurance policy. It is a tantalising offer: Ed can finally say goodbye to cars and maybe even send his sister to college. But does he have what it takes to seal the deal?
  • Votes: 2

    Sadie

    by Courtney Summers

  • Votes: 2

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 2

    Forget Me Not

    by Ellie Terry

    Astronomy-loving Calliope June has Tourette syndrome, so she sometimes makes faces or noises that she doesn't mean to make. When she and her mother move yet again, she tries to hide her TS. But it isn't long before the kids at her new school realize she's different. Only Calliope's neighbor, who is also the popular student body president, sees her as she truly is--an interesting person and a good friend. But is he brave enough to take their friendship public? As Calliope navigates school, she must also face her mother's new relationship and the fact that they might be moving--again--just as she starts to make friends and finally accept her differences. Ellie Terry's affecting debut will speak to a wide audience about being true to oneself.
  • Votes: 2

    Metamorphosis

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 2

    Homi Bhabha

    by Andrew McLaverty-Robinson

  • Votes: 2

    Bag Man

    by Rachel Maddow

  • Votes: 2

    Crude Sentiments

    by tiffany marie nunez

  • Votes: 2

    All the Ugly and Wonderful Things

    by Bryn Greenwood

  • Votes: 2

    The Power of Now

    by Eckhart Tolle

    The author shares the secret of his own self-realization and the philosophy for living in the present he has developed.
  • Votes: 2

    Zlatna Kniga Na Daritelite Za Narodna Prosveta, Volume 1 (Bulgarian Edition)

    by Anonymous

  • Votes: 2

    The Deep End (Diary of a Wimpy Kid Book 15)

    by Jeff Kinney

  • Votes: 2

    Late to the Party

    by Kelly Quindlen

  • Votes: 2

    Bear Prince

    by Emma Alisyn

  • Votes: 2

    IF TOMORROW COMES [If Tomorrow Comes ] BY Sheldon, Sidney(Author)Mass Market Paperbound 02-Nov-1988

    by Sidney Sheldon

  • Votes: 2

    Silver Sparrow

    by Tayari Jones

  • Votes: 2

    Aftershocks

    by Nadia Owusu

  • Votes: 2

    Open Book

    by Jessica Simpson

    The #1 New York Times Bestseller Jessica reveals for the first time her inner monologue and most intimate struggles. Guided by the journals she's kept since age fifteen, and brimming with her unique humor and down-to-earth humanity, Open Book is as inspiring as it is entertaining. This was supposed to be a very different book. Five years ago, Jessica Simpson was approached to write a motivational guide to living your best life. She walked away from the offer, and nobody understood why. The truth is that she didn’t want to lie. Jessica couldn’t be authentic with her readers if she wasn’t fully honest with herself first. Now America’s Sweetheart, preacher’s daughter, pop phenomenon, reality tv pioneer, and the billion-dollar fashion mogul invites readers on a remarkable journey, examining a life that blessed her with the compassion to help others, but also burdened her with an almost crippling need to please. Open Book is Jessica Simpson using her voice, heart, soul, and humor to share things she’s never shared before. First celebrated for her voice, she became one of the most talked-about women in the world, whether for music and fashion, her relationship struggles, or as a walking blonde joke. But now, instead of being talked about, Jessica is doing the talking. Her book shares the wisdom and inspirations she’s learned and shows the real woman behind all the pop-culture cliché’s — “chicken or fish,” “Daisy Duke,” "football jinx," “mom jeans,” “sexual napalm…” and more. Open Book is an opportunity to laugh and cry with a close friend, one that will inspire you to live your best, most authentic life, now that she is finally living hers.
  • Votes: 2

    Mexican Gothic

    by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

  • Votes: 2

    Keep Sharp

    by Sanjay Gupta M.D.

  • Votes: 2

    How I Stopped Being a Fatty (On the Outside)

    by Chris Wayne

  • Votes: 2

    Submission Impossible (Masters and Mercenaries

    by Lexi Blake

  • Votes: 2

    Notes from Underground

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Written in 1864, this classic novel recounts the apology and confession of a minor nineteenth-century official, an almost comical account of the man's separation from society and his descent "underground"
  • Votes: 2

    Never Far Away

    by Michael Koryta

  • Votes: 2

    On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    by Ocean Vuong

    "Brilliant, heartbreaking, tender, and highly original - poet Ocean Vuong's debut novel is a sweeping and shattering portrait of a family, and a testament to the redemptive power of storytelling. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. Written when the speaker, Little Dog, is in his late twenties, the letter unearths a family's history that began before he was born--a history whose epicenter is rooted in Vietnam--and serves as a doorway into parts of his life his mother has never known, all of it leading to an unforgettable revelation. At once a witness to the fraught yet undeniable love between a single mother and her son, it is also a brutally honest exploration of race, class, and masculinity"--
  • Votes: 2

    Only When It Rained

    by Narendra Chauhan

  • Votes: 2

    Courting Mr. Lincoln

    by Louis Bayard

  • Votes: 2

    Shattered Sea Series 3 Books Collection Set by Joe Abercrombie (Half a King, Half the World, Half a War)

    by Joe Abercrombie

  • Votes: 2

    Lockdown in Hell World

    by Luke O'Neil

  • Votes: 2

    Call Down the Hawk (The Dreamer Trilogy, Book 1) (1)

    by Maggie Stiefvater

  • Votes: 2

    Wicked Truths (The Hunt Legacy Duology Book 2)

    by Jodi Ellen Malpas

  • Votes: 2

    I'll Never Tell

    by Catherine McKenzie

  • Votes: 2

    Indebted

    by Amy Bartol

  • Votes: 2

    Haroun and the Sea of Stories

    by Salman Rushdie

  • Votes: 2

    Sharp Objects

    by Gillian Flynn

    AN HBO® LIMITED SERIES STARRING AMY ADAMS FROM THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF GONE GIRL Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, reporter Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her tiny hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. For years, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows: a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed in her old bedroom in her family's Victorian mansion, Camille finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Dogged by her own demons, she must unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past if she wants to get the story—and survive this homecoming.
  • Votes: 2

    Nation and Narration

    by Homi K. Bhabha

  • Votes: 2

    Boyd

    by Robert Coram

    John Boyd may be the most remarkable unsung hero in all of American military history. Some remember him as the greatest U.S. fighter pilot ever -- the man who, in simulated air-to-air combat, defeated every challenger in less than forty seconds. Some recall him as the father of our country's most legendary fighter aircraft -- the F-15 and F-16. Still others think of Boyd as the most influential military theorist since Sun Tzu. They know only half the story. Boyd, more than any other person, saved fighter aviation from the predations of the Strategic Air Command. His manual of fighter tactics changed the way every air force in the world flies and fights. He discovered a physical theory that forever altered the way fighter planes were designed. Later in life, he developed a theory of military strategy that has been adopted throughout the world and even applied to business models for maximizing efficiency. And in one of the most startling and unknown stories of modern military history, the Air Force fighter pilot taught the U.S. Marine Corps how to fight war on the ground. His ideas led to America's swift and decisive victory in the Gulf War and foretold the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. On a personal level, Boyd rarely met a general he couldn't offend. He was loud, abrasive, and profane. A man of daring, ferocious passion and intractable stubbornness, he was that most American of heroes -- a rebel who cared not for his reputation or fortune but for his country. He was a true patriot, a man who made a career of challenging the shortsighted and self-serving Pentagon bureaucracy. America owes Boyd and his disciples -- the six men known as the "Acolytes" -- a great debt. Robert Coram finally brings to light the remarkable story of a man who polarized all who knew him, but who left a legacy that will influence the military -- and all of America -- for decades to come . . .
  • Votes: 2

    The Mermaid of Black Conch

    by Monique Roffey

  • Votes: 2

    Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego (Norton Library)

    by Sigmund Freud

  • Votes: 2

    Asking for It

    by Kate Harding

  • Votes: 2

    Pebble in the Dark

    by Antony Botting

  • Votes: 2

    Alas, Babylon

    by Pat Frank

  • Votes: 2

    Jon Krakauer

    by Jon Krakauer

  • Votes: 2

    Chasing Cassandra

    by Lisa Kleypas

  • Votes: 2

    The History of Wonderwell The House and the Family That Built and Loved It

    by Megan Carnarius

  • Votes: 2

    UFO Hunters Book Two

    by William J. Birnes

  • Votes: 2

    They Went Left

    by Monica Hesse

  • Votes: 2

    The Island of Sea Women

    by Lisa See

  • Votes: 2

    Only As the Day Is Long

    by Dorianne Laux

  • Votes: 2

    All Boys Aren't Blue

    by George M. Johnson

  • Votes: 2

    Tied Up in Tinsel

    by Ngaio Marsh

  • Votes: 2

    Joyland (Hard Case Crime)

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 2

    Dombey and Son (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 2

    How to Save a Life

    by Lynette Rice

  • Votes: 2

    India

    by John Keay

  • Votes: 2

    Savages by Shirley Conran (1987, Hardcover) First Edition First Print 1st/1st

    by unknown

  • Votes: 2

    Clap When You Land

    by Elizabeth Acevedo

    The stunning new novel in verse from the 2019 Carnegie Medal winning and Waterstones Book Prize shortlisted author of THE POET X Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people... In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash. Separated by distance-and Papi's secrets-the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered. And then, when it seems like they've lost everything of their father, they learn of each other. Papi's death uncovers all the painful truths he kept hidden, and the love he divided across an ocean. And now, Yahaira and Camino are both left to grapple with what this new sister means to them, and what it will now take to keep their dreams alive. In a dual narrative novel in verse that brims with both grief and love, award-winning and bestselling author Elizabeth Acevedo writes about the devastation of loss, the difficulty of forgiveness, and the bittersweet bonds that shape our lives.
  • Votes: 2

    Meet Me in Another Life

    by Catriona Silvey

  • Votes: 2

    Lore

    by Alexandra Bracken

  • Votes: 2

    CIRCE

  • Votes: 2

    Infinite Jest

    by David Foster Wallace

    A gargantuan, mind-altering comedy about the Pursuit of Happiness in America Set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring the most endearingly screwed-up family to come along in recent fiction, Infinite Jest explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to so dominate our lives; about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people; and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are. Equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, Infinite Jest bends every rule of fiction without sacrificing for a moment its own entertainment value. It is an exuberant, uniquely American exploration of the passions that make us human - and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do.
  • Votes: 2

    Gideon the Ninth (The Locked Tomb Trilogy Book 1)

    by Tamsyn Muir

  • Votes: 2

    Oathbringer

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 2

    Blood of Empire (Gods of Blood and Powder, 3)

    by Brian McClellan

  • Votes: 2

    Firefly Lane

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 2

    The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

    by V. E. Schwab

    In the vein of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Life After Life, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is New York Times bestselling author V. E. Schwab’s genre-defying tour de force. A Life No One Will Remember. A Story You Will Never Forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.
  • Votes: 2

    Our Films, Their Films

    by Satyajit Ray

  • Votes: 2

    Paradise Lost

    by John Milton

  • Votes: 2

    The Sword of Truth, Boxed Set I, Books 1-3

    by Terry Goodkind

  • Votes: 2

    A Christmas Carol

    by Charles Dickens

    A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future
  • Votes: 2

    A Court of Thorns and Roses Series Sarah J. Maas 4 Books Collection Set (A Court of Thorns and Roses, A Court of Mist and Fury, A Court of Wings and Ruin, A Court of Frost and Starlight)

    by Sarah J. Maas

  • Votes: 2

    Station Eleven

    by Emily St. John Mandel

  • Votes: 2

    Anne of Green Gables, Complete 8-Book Box Set

    by L. M. Montgomery

  • Votes: 2

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor Emil Frankl

    Viennese psychiatrist tells his grim experiences in a German concentration camp which led him to logotherapy, an existential method of psychiatry.
  • Votes: 2

    Chain of Gold (1) (The Last Hours)

    by Cassandra Clare

  • Votes: 2

    Behind Closed Doors

    by B. A. Paris

  • Votes: 2

    Grown

    by Tiffany D Jackson

  • Votes: 2

    American Gods

    by Neil Gaiman

    Now a STARZ® Original Series produced by FremantleMedia North America starring Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, and Pablo Schreiber. Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow’s best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday. A trickster and a rogue, Wednesday seems to know more about Shadow than Shadow does himself. Life as Wednesday’s bodyguard, driver, and errand boy is far more interesting and dangerous than Shadow ever imagined. Soon Shadow learns that the past never dies . . . and that beneath the placid surface of everyday life a storm is brewing—an epic war for the very soul of America—and that he is standing squarely in its path. “Mystery, satire, sex, horror, poetic prose—American Gods uses all these to keep the reader turning the pages.”—Washington Post
  • Votes: 2

    You Deserve Each Other

    by Sarah Hogle

  • Votes: 2

    Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself

    by David Lipsky

    Shares the author's travels with the late David Foster Wallace based on interviews from the 1996 "Infinite Jest" book tour, covering such topics as Wallace's literary process, struggles with fame, and battle with mental illness.
  • Votes: 2

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

    A fireman in charge of burning books meets a revolutionary school teacher who dares to read. Depicts a future world in which all printed reading material is burned.
  • Votes: 2

    Beach Read

    by Emily Henry

  • Votes: 2

    Rhythm of War

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 2

    Heavy

    by Kiese Laymon

  • Votes: 2

    Inner Engineering

    by Sadhguru

    "The founder of the Isha Foundation, an all-volunteer organization involved in large-scale humanitarian, educational, and environmental projects, Sadhguru is a thought leader on a epic scale. His mission is to improve the quality and experience of life, from the individual to the global. He has distilled a system of practices from the ancient yogic sciences that will deepen your perception and bring about a shift in the very way you experience your life, work, relationships, and the world you inhabit. It is a profound system of self-exploration and transformation, based on the radical premise that it is possible for a human being to evolve consciously. Unlike biological evolution, which happens without your conscious participation, spiritual evolution can happen consciously. All it takes is willingness."
  • Votes: 2

    Robert Langdon Series Collection 7 Books Set By Dan Brown (Angels And Demons, The Da Vinci Code, The Lost Symbol, Inferno, Origin, Digital Fortress, Deception Point)

    by Dan Brown

  • Votes: 2

    Recursion

    by Blake Crouch

    A breath-taking exploration of memory and what it means to be human, Recursion is the follow-up novel to the smash-hit thriller, Dark Matter, by Blake Crouch. What if someone could rewrite your entire life?'My son has been erased.' Those are the last words the woman tells Barry Sutton, before she leaps from the Manhattan rooftop. Deeply unnerved, Barry begins to investigate her death, only to learn that this wasn't an isolated case. All across the country, people are waking up to lives different than the ones they fell asleep to. Are they suffering from False Memory Syndrome, a mysterious, new disease that afflicts people with vivid memories of a life they never lived? Or is something far more sinister behind the fracturing of reality all around him?Miles away, neuroscientist Helena Smith is developing a technology that allows us to preserve our most intense memories, and relive them. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent.Barry's search for the truth leads him on an impossible, astonishing journey, as he discovers that Helena's work has yielded a terrifying gift - the ability not just to preserve memories, but to remake them . . . at the risk of destroying what it means to be human.
  • Votes: 2

    Little Women (150th Anniversary Edition)

    by Louisa M Alcott

  • Votes: 2

    The Undercover Economist

    by Tim Harford

    A noted economist furnishes an entertaining introduction to the key principles and fundamental concepts of economics, as well as their influence on the history of the modern world, accompanied by real-life examples of economics at work. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    They Both Die at the End

    by Adam Silvera

  • Votes: 2

    In Five Years

    by Rebecca Serle

  • Votes: 2

    Ugly Love

    by Colleen Hoover

  • Votes: 2

    Chaos Monkeys Intl

    by Antonio Garcia Martinez

    Imagine a chimpanzee rampaging through a data center powering everything from Google to Facebook. Infrastructure engineers use a software version of this “chaos monkey” to test online services’ robustness—their ability to survive random failure and correct mistakes before they actually occur. Tech entrepreneurs are society’s chaos monkeys, disruptors testing and transforming every aspect of our lives, from transportation (Uber) and lodging (Airbnb) to television (Netflix) and dating (Tinder). One of Silicon Valley’s most provocative chaos monkeys is Antonio García Martínez. After stints on Wall Street and as CEO of his own startup, García Martínez joined Facebook’s nascent advertising team, turning its users’ data into profit for COO Sheryl Sandberg and Chairman and CEO Mark “Zuck” Zuckerberg. Forced out in the wake of an internal product war over the future of the company’s monetization strategy, García Martínez eventually landed at rival Twitter. He also fathered two children with a woman he barely knew, brewed illegal beer on the Facebook campus (accidentally flooding Zuckerberg’s desk), lived on a sailboat, raced sports cars on the 101, and enthusiastically pursued the life of an overpaid Silicon Valley cad. Now this gleeful contrarian unravels the chaotic evolution of social media and online marketing and reveals how it is invading our lives and shaping our future. Weighing in on everything from startups and credit derivatives to Big Brother and data tracking, social media monetization, and digital “privacy,” García Martínez shares his scathing observations and outrageous antics, taking us on a humorous, subversive tour of the fascinatingly insular tech industry. Chaos Monkeys lays bare the hijinks, trade secrets, and power plays of the visionaries, grunts, sociopaths, opportunists, accidental tourists, and money cowboys who are revolutionizing our world. The question is, how will we survive?
  • Votes: 2

    Circling The Midnight Sun

    From seasoned traveller and bestselling author James Raffan comes a book that will transform the way we think about northerners and the north Over the course of three years, James Raffan circumnavigated the globe at 66.6 degrees latitude: the Arctic Circle. Armed with his passion for the north, his interest in diverse cultures and his unquenchable sense of adventure, he set out to put a human face on climate change. What he discovered was by turns shocking, frustrating, entertaining and enlightening. In Circling the Midnight Sun, Raffan presents a warm-hearted, engaging portrait of the circumpolar world, and above all a deeply affecting story of societies and landscapes in the throes of enormous change. Compelling and utterly original, this is both an adventure story and a book that will change your view of the north forever.
  • Votes: 2

    Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur Vol. 1

    by Amy Reeder

  • Votes: 2

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 2

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

    Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this multi-million-copy New York Times bestseller is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control – from the author of The Laws of Human Nature. In the book that People magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum. Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.
  • Votes: 2

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 2

    Betty

    by Tiffany McDaniel

  • Votes: 2

    Blacktop Wasteland

    by S. A. Cosby

    A husband, a father, a son, a business owner...And the best getaway driver east of the Mississippi. “Sensationally good—new, fresh, real, authentic, twisty, with characters and dilemmas that will break your heart. More than recommended.” —Lee Child Beauregard “Bug” Montage is an honest mechanic, a loving husband, and a hard-working dad. Bug knows there’s no future in the man he used to be: known from the hills of North Carolina to the beaches of Florida as the best wheelman on the East Coast. He thought he'd left all that behind him, but as his carefully built new life begins to crumble, he finds himself drawn inexorably back into a world of blood and bullets. When a smooth-talking former associate comes calling with a can't-miss jewelry store heist, Bug feels he has no choice but to get back in the driver's seat. And Bug is at his best where the scent of gasoline mixes with the smell of fear. Haunted by the ghost of who he used to be and the father who disappeared when he needed him most, Bug must find a way to navigate this blacktop wasteland...or die trying. Like Ocean’s Eleven meets Drive, with a Southern noir twist, S. A. Cosby’s Blacktop Wasteland is a searing, operatic story of a man pushed to his limits by poverty, race, and his own former life of crime.
  • Votes: 2

    What Unites Us

    by Dan Rather

    AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “I find myself thinking deeply about what it means to love America, as I surely do.” —Dan Rather At a moment of crisis over our national identity, venerated journalist Dan Rather has emerged as a voice of reason and integrity, reflecting on—and writing passionately about—what it means to be an American. Now, with this collection of original essays, he reminds us of the principles upon which the United States was founded. Looking at the freedoms that define us, from the vote to the press; the values that have transformed us, from empathy to inclusion to service; the institutions that sustain us, such as public education; and the traits that helped form our young country, such as the audacity to take on daunting challenges in science and medicine, Rather brings to bear his decades of experience on the frontlines of the world’s biggest stories. As a living witness to historical change, he offers up an intimate view of history, tracing where we have been in order to help us chart a way forward and heal our bitter divisions. With a fundamental sense of hope, What Unites Us is the book to inspire conversation and listening, and to remind us all how we are, finally, one.
  • Votes: 2

    You Should See Me in a Crown

    by Leah Johnson

  • Votes: 2

    The Once and Future Witches

    by Alix E. Harrow

  • Votes: 2

    Designing Freedom

    by Stafford Beer

  • Votes: 2

    Dear Martin

    by Nic Stone

  • Votes: 2

    Aztec

    by Gary Jennings

    The epic tale of an Aztec survivor of the Spanish conquest and his times as a warrior, scribe, travelling merchant, confidant of Motecuhzoma II, and envoy to the invading Spaniards.
  • Votes: 2

    Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby

  • Votes: 2

    A Brightness Long Ago

    by Guy Gavriel Kay

  • Votes: 2

    Ninth House (Alex Stern)

    by Leigh Bardugo

    The mesmerizing adult debut from Leigh Bardugo, a tale of power, privilege, dark magic, and murder set among the Ivy League elite Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug-dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. In fact, by age twenty, she is the sole survivor of a horrific, unsolved multiple homicide. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most prestigious universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her? Still searching for answers, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies. Their eight windowless “tombs” are the well-known haunts of the rich and powerful, from high-ranking politicos to Wall Street’s biggest players. But their occult activities are more sinister and more extraordinary than any paranoid imagination might conceive. They tamper with forbidden magic. They raise the dead. And, sometimes, they prey on the living.
  • Votes: 2

    Heartless

    by Marissa Meyer

  • Votes: 2

    Ender's Game (The Ender Quintet)

    by Orson Scott Card

    From New York Times bestselling author Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game is the classic Hugo and Nebula award-winning science fiction novel of a young boy's recruitment into the midst of an interstellar war. In order to develop a secure defense against a hostile alien race's next attack, government agencies breed child geniuses and train them as soldiers. A brilliant young boy, Andrew "Ender" Wiggin lives with his kind but distant parents, his sadistic brother Peter, and the person he loves more than anyone else, his sister Valentine. Peter and Valentine were candidates for the soldier-training program but didn't make the cut—young Ender is the Wiggin drafted to the orbiting Battle School for rigorous military training. Ender's skills make him a leader in school and respected in the Battle Room, where children play at mock battles in zero gravity. Yet growing up in an artificial community of young soldiers Ender suffers greatly from isolation, rivalry from his peers, pressure from the adult teachers, and an unsettling fear of the alien invaders. His psychological battles include loneliness, fear that he is becoming like the cruel brother he remembers, and fanning the flames of devotion to his beloved sister. Is Ender the general Earth needs? But Ender is not the only result of the genetic experiments. The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Ender's two older siblings are every bit as unusual as he is, but in very different ways. Between the three of them lie the abilities to remake a world. If, that is, the world survives. Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game is the winner of the 1985 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 1986 Hugo Award for Best Novel. THE ENDER UNIVERSE Ender Quintet series Ender’s Game / Ender in Exile / Speaker for the Dead / Xenocide / Children of the Mind Ender’s Shadow series Ender’s Shadow / Shadow of the Hegemon / Shadow Puppets / Shadow of the Giant / Shadows in Flight Children of the Fleet The First Formic War (with Aaron Johnston) Earth Unaware / Earth Afire / Earth Awakens The Second Formic War (with Aaron Johnston) The Swarm /The Hive Ender novellas A War of Gifts /First Meetings
  • Votes: 2

    After

    by Bruce Greyson

  • Votes: 2

    Deacon King Kong

    by James McBride

    McBride brings to vivid life the people affected by a shooting. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters - caught in the tumultuous swirl of 1960s New York - overlap in unexpected ways
  • Votes: 2

    A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Trouble Begins

    by Lemony Snicket

    The first Series of Unfortunate Events gift/box-set of this New York Times best-selling series. The set includes The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, and The Wide Window.
  • Votes: 2

    Hidden Valley Road

    by Robert Kolker

    The heartrending story of a midcentury American family with twelve children, six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia, that became science's great hope in the quest to understand the disease. Don and Mimi Galvin seemed to be living the American dream. After World War II, Don's work with the Air Force brought them to Colorado, where their twelve children perfectly spanned the baby boom: the oldest born in 1945, the youngest in 1965. In those years, there was an established script for a family like the Galvins--aspiration, hard work, upward mobility, domestic harmony--and they worked hard to play their parts. But behind the scenes was a different story: psychological breakdown, sudden shocking violence, hidden abuse. By the mid-1970s, six of the ten Galvin boys, one after the other, were diagnosed as schizophrenic. How could all this happen to one family? What took place inside the house on Hidden Valley Road was so extraordinary that the Galvins became one of the first families to be studied by the National Institutes of Mental Health. Their story offers a shadow history of the science of schizophrenia, from the era of institutionalization, lobotomy, and the schizophrenogenic mother, to the search for genetic markers for the disease, always amidst profound disagreements about the nature of the illness itself. And unbeknownst to the Galvins, samples of their DNA informed decades of genetic research that continues today, offering paths to treatment, prediction, and even eradication of the disease for future generations. With clarity and compassion, bestselling and award-winning author Robert Kolker uncovers one family's unforgettable legacy of suffering, love and hope.
  • Votes: 2

    An Anonymous Girl

    by Greer Hendricks

  • Votes: 2

    Shogun

    by James Clavell

  • Votes: 2

    10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 1

    Conversations with Friends

    by Sally Rooney

  • Votes: 1

    East West Street

    by Philippe Sands

  • Votes: 1

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    Reckless Road

    by Christine Feehan

    Refuel your passion with a new installment of the Torpedo Ink series by #1 New York Times bestselling author Christine Feehan. While Gedeon "Player" Lazaroff is one of Torpedo Ink motorcycle club's roughest members, he's also one of the calmest. Little rattles Player, except for the times his gift gets the better of him. When that happens, he has to just lie down in the dark and hope for the best. But on a night when he's on the verge of losing it, he meets a woman who manages to soothe his fractured mind. Zyah is a striking, ethereal beauty who seduces him with every word and move. Their night together is one of pure, exquisite bliss. But when Player gets confused and thinks their intimate encounter was nothing more than a dream, his careless dismissal leaves her humiliated and angry. Now, Player will have to devote his every breath to convincing Zyah to give him a second chance. Because she might be the only one who can save him from himself.... Find out why readers are OBSESSED with Christine Feehan 'The queen of paranormal romance' USA Today 'After Bram Stoker, Anne Rice and Joss Whedon, Christine Feehan is the person most credited with popularizing the neck gripper' Time 'Feehan has a knack for bringing vampiric Carpathians to vivid, virile life in her Dark Carpathian novels'Publishers Weekly 'The erotic, gripping series that's defined an entire genre! Must reading that always satisfies!' J.R. Ward
  • Votes: 1

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

    by Mark Manson

    #1 New York Times Bestseller Over 2 million copies sold In this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people. For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected American society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up. Manson makes the argument, backed both by academic research and well-timed poop jokes, that improving our lives hinges not on our ability to turn lemons into lemonade, but on learning to stomach lemons better. Human beings are flawed and limited—"not everybody can be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and some of it is not fair or your fault." Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them. Once we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, once we stop running and avoiding and start confronting painful truths, we can begin to find the courage, perseverance, honesty, responsibility, curiosity, and forgiveness we seek. There are only so many things we can give a f**k about so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real-talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.
  • Votes: 1

    Emotional First Aid

    by Guy Winch Ph.D.

  • Votes: 1

    Begin Again

    by Max Lucado

  • Votes: 1

    Nine Dragons (A Harry Bosch Novel, 14)

    by Michael Connelly

  • Votes: 1

    Stoner (New York Review Books Classics)

    by John Williams

  • Votes: 1

    Forty Million Dollar Slaves

    by William C. Rhoden

  • Votes: 1

    Phantom Limb

    by Lucinda Berry

  • Votes: 1

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    Edmund Dantes, unjustly convicted of aiding the exiled Napoleon, escapes after fourteen years of imprisonment and seeks his revenge in Paris.
  • Votes: 1

    Goodnight Moon

    by Margaret Wise Brown

    In this classic of children's literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day. In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. "Goodnight room, goodnight moon." And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room—to the picture of the three little bears sitting on chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one—the little bunny says goodnight. One of the most beloved books of all time, Goodnight Moon is a must for every bookshelf and a time-honored gift for baby showers and other special events.
  • Votes: 1

    Antiracism and Universal Design for Learning

    by Andratesha Fritzgerald

  • Votes: 1

    Let the Great World Spin

    by Colum McCann

  • Votes: 1

    Smith of Wootton Major

    by J R R Tolkien

  • Votes: 1

    She Come By It Natural

    by Sarah Smarsh

  • Votes: 1

    Ordinary Grace

    by William Kent Krueger

  • Votes: 1

    The Coffee Bean

    by Jon Gordon

  • Votes: 1

    Talking as Fast as I Can

    by Lauren Graham

  • Votes: 1

    This Is My America

    by Kim Johnson

  • Votes: 1

    What Pet Should I Get? (Classic Seuss)

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    The Warmth of Other Suns

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
  • Votes: 1

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    Sure, the Velociraptors Are Still On the Loose, But That’s No Reason Not to Reopen Jurassic Park

  • Votes: 1

    Historia Do Cerco De Lisboa (Portuguese Edition)

    by Jose Saramago

  • Votes: 1

    Make Your Mark

    by Jocelyn K. Glei

    Offers insights and advice from twenty-one entrepreneurs and experts on building a creative business.
  • Votes: 1

    Things I Did When No One Was Watching

    by G. K. Jourdane

  • Votes: 1

    Stamped

    by Jason Reynolds

  • Votes: 1

    Then You Happened

    by K. Bromberg

  • Votes: 1

    Modern Mythology

    by Nadia McGhee

  • Votes: 1

    Braced for Love (Brothers in Arms)

    by Connealy

  • Votes: 1

    You Were There Too

    by Colleen Oakley

  • Votes: 1

    Pat the Bunny Deluxe Edition (Touch-And-Feel)

    by Dorothy Kunhardt

  • Votes: 1

    Finding History Where You Least Expect It

    by Jill M. Gradwell

  • Votes: 1

    INSTANBUL Turkey

    by Album studio

  • Votes: 1

    My Man Jeeves

    by P. G. Wodehouse

  • Votes: 1

    Mastering Your Mean Girl

    by Melissa Ambrosini

  • Votes: 1

    The Heroes of Olympus Paperback Boxed Set (10th Anniversary Edition)

    by Rick Riordan

  • Votes: 1

    My Favourite People Call Me Mummy

    by Doctor Cliff Journals Publishing

  • Votes: 1

    Can You Ever Forgive Me?

    by Lee Israel

  • Votes: 1

    Manufacturing Consent

    by Edward S. Herman

    Examines the political role played by the media in shaping events, assesses the relationship between the media and the corporations that control and finance them, and discusses the fine distinctions between news and propaganda.
  • Votes: 1

    Daughter of the Reich

    by Louise Fein

  • Votes: 1

    Cryptonomicon

    by Neal Stephenson

  • Votes: 1

    DIY Wine Corks

    by Melissa Averinos

  • Votes: 1

    Glimpsed

    by G.F. Miller

  • Votes: 1

    Kolymsky Heights

    by Lionel Davidson

  • Votes: 1

    Notes from the Fireground

    by Thomas Dunne

  • Votes: 1

    Post Corona

    by Scott Galloway

    From bestselling author and NYU Business School professor Scott Galloway comes a keenly insightful, urgent analysis of who stands to win and who's at risk to lose in a post-pandemic world The COVID-19 outbreak has turned bedrooms into offices, pitted young against old, and widened the gaps between rich and poor, red and blue, the mask wearers and the mask haters. Some businesses--like home exercise company Peloton, video conference software maker Zoom, and Amazon--woke up to find themselves crushed under an avalanche of consumer demand. Others--like the restaurant, travel, hospitality, and live entertainment industries--scrambled to escape obliteration. But as New York Times bestselling author Scott Galloway argues, the pandemic has not been a change agent so much as an accelerant of trends already well underway. In Post Corona, he outlines the contours of the crisis and the opportunities that lie ahead. Some businesses, like the powerful tech monopolies, will thrive as a result of the disruption. Other industries, like higher education, will struggle to maintain a value proposition that no longer makes sense when we can't stand shoulder to shoulder. And the pandemic has accelerated deeper trends in government and society, exposing a widening gap between our vision of America as a land of opportunity, and the troubling realities of our declining wellbeing. Combining his signature humor and brash style with sharp business insights and the occasional dose of righteous anger, Galloway offers both warning and hope in equal measure. As he writes, "Our commonwealth didn't just happen, it was shaped. We chose this path--no trend is permanent and can't be made worse or corrected."
  • Votes: 1

    Vesper Flights

    by Helen Macdonald

  • Votes: 1

    Return Fire (Moving Target, Book 2) (2)

    by Christina Diaz Gonzalez

  • Votes: 1

    Days Of Wonder

    by Keith Stuart

  • Votes: 1

    The Complete Book of Solitaire and Patience Games

    by Albert H. Morehead

  • Votes: 1

    Die Now to Live Forever

    by Sanjay Singh

  • Votes: 1

    The All Souls Trilogy Boxed Set (All Souls Series)

    by Deborah Harkness

  • Votes: 1

    The Curse of a Mobile Strategy

  • Votes: 1

    Imperium

    by Francis Parker Yockey

  • Votes: 1

    Alexs Adventures In Numberland

    by Alex Bellos

  • Votes: 1

    Want to Go Private? by Sarah Darer Littman (2013-07-30)

    by Sarah Darer Littman

  • Votes: 1

    The Fellowship of the Ring

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 1

    No More Laughing at the Deaf Boy

    by Geoffrey Ball

  • Votes: 1

    SHRIMAN YOGI

    by Ranjeet Desai

  • Votes: 1

    Helium (Button Poetry)

    by Rudy Francisco

  • Votes: 1

    Irresistible

    by Adam Alter

    "An urgent and expert investigation into behavioral addiction, the dark flipside of today's unavoidable digital technologies, and how we can turn the tide to regain control. Behavioral addiction may prove to be one of the most important fields of social, medical, and psychological research in our lifetime. The idea that behaviors can be being addictive is new, but the threat is near universal. Experts are just beginning to acknowledge that we are all potential addicts. Adam Alter, a professor of psychology and marketing at NYU, is at the cutting edge of research into what makes these products so compulsive, and he documents the hefty price we're likely to pay if we continue blindly down our current path. People have been addicted to substances for thousands of years, but for the past two decades, we've also been hooked on technologies, such as Instagram, Netflix, and Facebook--inventions that we've adopted because we assume they'll make our lives better. These inventions have profound upsides, but their extraordinary appeal isn't an accident. Technology companies and marketers have teams of engineers and researchers devoted to keeping us engaged. They know how to push our buttons, and how to coax us into using their products for hours, days, and weeks on end. Tracing the very notion of addiction through history right up until the present day, Alter shows that we're only just beginning to understand the epidemic of behavioral addiction gripping society. He takes us inside the human brain at the very moment we score points on a smartphone game, or see that someone has liked a photo we've posted on Instagram. But more than that, Alter heads the problem off at the pass, letting us know what we can do to step away from the screen. He lays out the options we have address this problem before it truly consumes us. After all, who among us has struggled to ignore the ding of a new email, the next episode in a TV series, or the desire to play a game just one more time? Adam Alter's previous book, Drunk Tank Pink:And Other Unexpected Forces that Shape How We Think, Feel, and Behaveis available in paperback from Penguin"--
  • Votes: 1

    The Mauritanian (originally published as Guantánamo Diary)

    by Mohamedou Ould Slahi

  • Votes: 1

    A Fairly Honourable Defeat (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)

    by Iris Murdoch

  • Votes: 1

    How to Stop Time

    by Matt Haig

  • Votes: 1

    Charlotte Brontë

    by Claire Harman

  • Votes: 1

    The Laws of Human Nature

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 1

    Empireland

    by Sathnam Sanghera

  • Votes: 1

    Kingdom of the Wicked (Kingdom of the Wicked, 1)

    by Kerri Maniscalco

  • Votes: 1

    From Blood and Ash

    by Jennifer L. Armentrout

  • Votes: 1

    Project Hail Mary

    by Andy Weir

  • Votes: 1

    Exhalation

    by Ted Chiang

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR A NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Exhalation by Ted Chiang is a collection of short stories that will make you think, grapple with big questions, and feel more human. The best kind of science fiction." --Barack Obama From the acclaimed author of Stories of Your Life and Others--the basis for the Academy Award -nominated film Arrival: a groundbreaking new collection of short fiction. "THE UNIVERSE BEGAN AS AN ENORMOUS BREATH BEING HELD." In these nine stunningly original, provocative, and poignant stories, Ted Chiang tackles some of humanity's oldest questions along with new quandaries only he could imagine. In "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate," a portal through time forces a fabric seller in ancient Baghdad to grapple with past mistakes and second chances. In "Exhalation," an alien scientist makes a shocking discovery with ramifications that are literally universal. In "Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom," the ability to glimpse into alternate universes necessitates a radically new examination of the concepts of choice and free will. Including stories being published for the first time as well as some of his rare and classic uncollected work, Exhalation is Ted Chiang at his best: profound, sympathetic--revelatory.
  • Votes: 1

    I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

    by Erika L. Sánchez

  • Votes: 1

    The Brazil Effect The Foreign Woman

    by Yesh Yonas

  • Votes: 1

    Who Is Michelle Obama? (Who Was?)

    by Megan Stine

  • Votes: 1

    Shrimad Bhagwat Geeta

    by Rajkot Gurukul

  • Votes: 1

    Always Red

    by Isabelle Ronin

  • Votes: 1

    Sense and Sensibility (Penguin Classics)

    by Jane Austen

  • Votes: 1

    Lord, Please Don't Take Me in August

    by Myra B. Armstead

  • Votes: 1

    From The Wreck

    by Jane Rawson

  • Votes: 1

    Cracks in the Armor (The Clipped Wings Series)

    by Helena Hunting

  • Votes: 1

    Freaky Deaky

    by Elmore Leonard

  • Votes: 1

    If Beale Street Could Talk :--a Novel

    by James A. Baldwin

  • Votes: 1

    Treasure Island (Signet Classics)

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Votes: 1

    We Were Liars

    by E. Lockhart

    A New York Times Bestseller. A beautiful and distinguished family. A private island. A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy. A group of four friends-the Liars-whose friendship turns destructive. A revolution. An accident. A secret. Lies upon lies. True love. The truth. We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from New York Times bestselling author, National Book Award finalist, and Printz Award honouree E. Lockhart. Read it. And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.
  • Votes: 1

    Rod Serling

    by Nicholas Parisi

  • Votes: 1

    By Douglas Stuart Shuggie Bain Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2020 Hardcover - 6 Aug 2020

    by Douglas Stuart

  • Votes: 1

    Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

    by Caitlin Doughty

  • Votes: 1

    A Kingdom of Flesh and Fire

    by Jennifer L. Armentrout

  • Votes: 1

    Biology Is Technology

    by Robert H. Carlson

  • Votes: 1

    Red at the Bone

    by Jacqueline Woodson

  • Votes: 1

    Mayflies

    by Andrew O'Hagan

  • Votes: 1

    Around the World in Eighty Days (Illustrated First Edition)

    by Jules Verne

  • Votes: 1

    The Shanghai Moon (Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novels)

    by S. Rozan

  • Votes: 1

    When I Was Invisible

    by Dorothy Koomson

  • Votes: 1

    In Search of Memory

    by Eric R. Kandel

  • Votes: 1

    Malice (The Faithful and the Fallen, 1)

    by John Gwynne

  • Votes: 1

    Gemina (The Illuminae Files)

    by Amie Kaufman

  • Votes: 1

    Long Walk To Freedom

    by Nelson Mandela

    These memoirs from one of the great leaders of our time are 'essential reading for anyone who wants to understand history - and then go out and change it' Barack Obama The riveting memoirs of the outstanding moral and political leader of our time, Long Walk to Freedom brilliantly re-creates the drama of the experiences that helped shape Nelson Mandela's destiny. Emotive, compelling and uplifting, Long Walk to Freedom is the exhilarating story of an epic life; a story of hardship, resilience and ultimate triumph told with the clarity and eloquence of a born leader. 'Enthralling . . . Mandela emulates the few great political leaders such as Lincoln and Gandhi, who go beyond mere consensus and move out ahead of their followers to break new ground' Sunday Times 'The authentic voice of Mandela shines through this book . . . humane, dignified and magnificently unembittered' The Times 'Burns with the luminosity of faith in the invincible nature of human hope and dignity . . . Unforgettable' Andre Brink
  • Votes: 1

    The Snow Leopard

    by Peter Matthiessen

    An unforgettable spiritual journey through the Himalayas by renowned writer Peter Matthiessen (1927-2014), the National Book Award-winning author of the new novel In Paradise In 1973, Peter Matthiessen and field biologist George Schaller traveled high into the remote mountains of Nepal to study the Himalayan blue sheep and possibly glimpse the rare and beautiful snow leopard. Matthiessen, a student of Zen Buddhism, was also on a spiritual quest to find the Lama of Shey at the ancient shrine on Crystal Mountain. As the climb proceeds, Matthiessen charts his inner path as well as his outer one, with a deepening Buddhist understanding of reality, suffering, impermanence, and beauty. This Penguin Classics edition features an introduction by acclaimed travel writer and novelist Pico Iyer. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 1

    Goat Days

    by Benyamin & Joseph Koyippally (Tr.)

  • Votes: 1

    Have You Seen Luis Velez?

    by Catherine Ryan Hyde

  • Votes: 1

    Abaddon's Gate (The Expanse, 3)

    by James S. A. Corey

  • Votes: 1

    Susan Ryeland Series 2 Books Collection Set By Anthony Horowitz (Magpie Murders, Moonflower Murders)

    by Anthony Horowitz

  • Votes: 1

    Our Mutual Friend (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    The City of Brass

    by S. A Chakraborty

  • Votes: 1

    Memorias del Sancocho (Spanish Edition)

    by Rafael Álvarez de los Santos

  • Votes: 1

    The Silence of the Lambs (Hannibal Lecter)

    by Thomas Harris

  • Votes: 1

    When These Mountains Burn

    by David Joy

  • Votes: 1

    Send for Me

    by Lauren Fox

  • Votes: 1

    Half of a Yellow Sun

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    THE WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION ‘WINNER OF WINNERS’ Winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction 2007, this is a heartbreaking, exquisitely written literary masterpiece
  • Votes: 1

    Dracula

    by Bram Stoker

  • Votes: 1

    Ashes of Chaos (Legacy of the Nine Realms Book 2)

    by Amelia Hutchins

  • Votes: 1

    One Second After (A John Matherson Novel, 1)

    by William R. Forstchen

  • Votes: 1

    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

    by Jonathan Safran Foer

  • Votes: 1

    Keep Calm and Listen To Matthew McConaughey

    by rachel

  • Votes: 1

    Permanent Record

    by Mary H. K. Choi

    A New York Times bestseller! From the New York Times bestselling author of Emergency Contact, which Rainbow Rowell called “smart and funny,” comes an unforgettable new romance about how social media influences relationships every day. On paper, college dropout Pablo Rind doesn’t have a whole lot going for him. His graveyard shift at a twenty-four-hour deli in Brooklyn is a struggle. Plus, he’s up to his eyeballs in credit card debt. Never mind the state of his student loans. Pop juggernaut Leanna Smart has enough social media followers to populate whole continents. The brand is unstoppable. She graduated from child stardom to become an international icon and her adult life is a queasy blur of private planes, step-and-repeats, aspirational hotel rooms, and strangers screaming for her just to notice them. When Leanna and Pablo meet at 5:00 a.m. at the bodega in the dead of winter it’s absurd to think they’d be A Thing. But as they discover who they are, who they want to be, and how to defy the deafening expectations of everyone else, Lee and Pab turn to each other. Which, of course, is when things get properly complicated.
  • Votes: 1

    Today Matters

    by John C. Maxwell

  • Votes: 1

    City of Miracles

    by Robert Jackson Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas

    by James Patterson

  • Votes: 1

    Os sete maridos de Evelyn Hugo (Portuguese Edition)

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 1

    Maverick Messiah

    by Ramesh Kandula

  • Votes: 1

    The Mastery of Love

    by Don Miguel Ruiz

  • Votes: 1

    Raven's Course (Peacekeepers of Sol Book 3)

    by Glynn Stewart

  • Votes: 1

    Think Like a Monk

    by Jay Shetty

  • Votes: 1

    Harpist in The Wind

    by Patricia A. McKillip

  • Votes: 1

    Ten Things About Writing

    by Joanne Harris

  • Votes: 1

    The House in the Cerulean Sea Sneak Peek

    by TJ Klune

    Download a FREE sneak peek today: "1984 meets The Umbrella Academy with a pinch of Douglas Adams thrown in." (Gail Carriger) A magical island. A dangerous task. A burning secret. An enchanting love story, masterfully told, The House in the Cerulean Sea is about the profound experience of discovering an unlikely family in an unexpected place—and realizing that family is yours. The House in the Cerulean Sea is Lambda Literary Award-winning author TJ Klune’s breakout contemporary fantasy. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
  • Votes: 1

    NOS4A2 [TV Tie-in]

    by Joe Hill

  • Votes: 1

    Writers & Lovers

    by Lily King

    An extraordinary new novel of art, love, and ambition from Lily King, the New York Times bestselling author of Euphoria Following the breakout success of her critically acclaimed and award-winning novel Euphoria, Lily King returns with an unforgettable portrait of an artist as a young woman. Blindsided by her mother's sudden death, and wrecked by a recent love affair, Casey Peabody has arrived in Massachusetts in the summer of 1997 without a plan. Her mail consists of wedding invitations and final notices from debt collectors. A former child golf prodigy, she now waits tables in Harvard Square and rents a tiny, moldy room at the side of a garage where she works on the novel she's been writing for six years. At thirty-one, Casey is still clutching onto something nearly all her old friends have let go of: the determination to live a creative life. When she falls for two very different men at the same time, her world fractures even more. Casey's fight to fulfill her creative ambitions and balance the conflicting demands of art and life is challenged in ways that push her to the brink. Writers & Lovers follows Casey--a smart and achingly vulnerable protagonist--in the last days of a long youth, a time when every element of her life comes to a crisis. Written with King's trademark humor, heart, and intelligence, Writers & Lovers is a transfixing novel that explores the terrifying and exhilarating leap between the end of one phase of life and the beginning of another.
  • Votes: 1

    A Cut-Like Wound (The Inspector Gowda Series)

    by Anita Nair

  • Votes: 1

    Mahasamar- 8 Nirbandh

  • Votes: 1

    Peacework

    by Henri Nouwen

  • Votes: 1

    The Winds of War

    by Herman Wouk

  • Votes: 1

    꽃을 보듯 너를 본다 I see you like a flower Korean Text Poem 나태주 Na Tae-joo

  • Votes: 1

    Illuminae Files Series Collection 3 Books Set By Jay Kristoff, Amie Kaufman (Illuminae, Gemina, Obsidio)

    by Jay Kristoff

  • Votes: 1

    Bel Canto (Harper Perennial Deluxe Editions)

    by Ann Patchett

  • Votes: 1

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 1

    Norse Mythology

    by Neil Gaiman

  • Votes: 1

    Forever Theirs

    by Katee Robert

  • Votes: 1

    Of Fire and Stars (Of Fire and Stars, 1)

    by Audrey Coulthurst

  • Votes: 1

    The Open Society and Its Enemies (Princeton Classics)

    by Karl R. Popper

  • Votes: 1

    If He Had Been with Me

    by Laura Nowlin

  • Votes: 1

    Fifteen Dogs

    by André Alexis

  • Votes: 1

    My Several Lives-Memoirs of a Social Inventor,

    by Conant James A.

  • Votes: 1

    Spook

    by Mary Roach

  • Votes: 1

    Our Chemical Hearts

    by Krystal Sutherland

  • Votes: 1

    Being Mortal

    by Atul Gawande

    A prominent surgeon argues against modern medical practices that extend life at the expense of quality of life while isolating the dying, outlining suggestions for freer, more fulfilling approaches to death that enable more dignified and comfortable choices.
  • Votes: 1

    Moxie

    by Jennifer Mathieu

  • Votes: 1

    The Twilight of the Idols and the Anti-Christ

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Votes: 1

    Number the Stars

    by Lois Lowry

    It is 1943 and for 10 year old Annemarie life is still fun. But there are worries too - the Nazis have occupied Copenhagen and there are food shortages, curfews and the threat of being stopped by soldiers and Annemarie's best friend is a Jew.
  • Votes: 1

    Devotions

    by Mary Oliver

    "Throughout her celebrated career, Mary Oliver has touched countless readers with her brilliantly crafted verse, expounding on her love for the physical world and the powerful bonds between all living things. Identified as "far and away, this country's best selling poet" by Dwight Garner, she now returns with a stunning and definitive collection of her writing from the last fifty years. Carefully curated, these 200 plus poems feature Oliver's work from her very first book of poetry, No Voyage and Other Poems, published in 1963 at the age of 28, through her most recent collection, Felicity, published in 2015."--
  • Votes: 1

    Rhapsody (The Symphony of Ages)

    by Elizabeth Haydon

  • Votes: 1

    Innovating Out of Crisis

    by Shigetaka Komori

    "Japanese edition published in 2013 as Tamashii no Keiei by Toyo Keizai Shinposha, Tokyo, Japan."
  • Votes: 1

    Norman Mailer

    by Norman Mailer

  • Votes: 1

    Mission in the Old Testament

    by Walter C. Jr. Kaiser

  • Votes: 1

    Gavroche D'Apr's Les MIS'Rables de Victor Hugo (LES GRANDS TEXTES A HAUTEUR D') (French Edition)

    by Paraillous Alain

  • Votes: 1

    A Thousand Moons

    by Sebastian Barry

  • Votes: 1

    This Is How You Lose the Time War

    by Amal El-Mohtar

    “[An] exquisitely crafted tale...Part epistolary romance, part mind-blowing science fiction adventure, this dazzling story unfolds bit by bit, revealing layers of meaning as it plays with cause and effect, wildly imaginative technologies, and increasingly intricate wordplay...This short novel warrants multiple readings to fully unlock its complexities.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review). From award-winning authors Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone comes an enthralling, romantic novel spanning time and space about two time-traveling rivals who fall in love and must change the past to ensure their future. Among the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandment finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading. Thus begins an unlikely correspondence between two rival agents hellbent on securing the best possible future for their warring factions. Now, what began as a taunt, a battlefield boast, becomes something more. Something epic. Something romantic. Something that could change the past and the future. Except the discovery of their bond would mean the death of each of them. There’s still a war going on, after all. And someone has to win. That’s how war works, right? Cowritten by two beloved and award-winning sci-fi writers, This Is How You Lose the Time War is an epic love story spanning time and space.
  • Votes: 1

    Leah on the Offbeat

    by Becky Albertalli

  • Votes: 1

    Homo Deus

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods. Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda. What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus. With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future.
  • Votes: 1

    Power vs. Force

    by David R. Hawkins M.D. Ph.D

  • Votes: 1

    Stephen king it Notebook

    by OT Creations

  • Votes: 1

    A Dance of Blades (Shadowdance 2)

    by David Dalglish

  • Votes: 1

    When No One Is Watching

    by Alyssa Cole

    Rear Window meets Get Out in this gripping thriller from a critically acclaimed and New York Times Notable author, in which the gentrification of a Brooklyn neighborhood takes on a sinister new meaning… Sydney Green is Brooklyn born and raised, but her beloved neighborhood seems to change every time she blinks. Condos are sprouting like weeds, FOR SALE signs are popping up overnight, and the neighbors she’s known all her life are disappearing. To hold onto her community’s past and present, Sydney channels her frustration into a walking tour and finds an unlikely and unwanted assistant in one of the new arrivals to the block—her neighbor Theo. But Sydney and Theo’s deep dive into history quickly becomes a dizzying descent into paranoia and fear. Their neighbors may not have moved to the suburbs after all, and the push to revitalize the community may be more deadly than advertised. When does coincidence become conspiracy? Where do people go when gentrification pushes them out? Can Sydney and Theo trust each other—or themselves—long enough to find out before they too disappear?
  • Votes: 1

    A Monster Calls

    by Patrick Ness

  • Votes: 1

    The World That We Knew

    by Alice Hoffman

  • Votes: 1

    Rocket Randy

    by Mr. Cody Turner

  • Votes: 1

    There There

    by Tommy Orange

  • Votes: 1

    Frida in America

    by Celia Stahr

  • Votes: 1

    Such a Fun Age

    by Kiley Reid

  • Votes: 1

    Say Nothing

    by Patrick Radden Keefe

    "A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--
  • Votes: 1

    The Poetics of Space by Gaston Bachelard New Edition (1992)

  • Votes: 1

    Orlando

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 1

    The Collapsing Empire (The Interdependency, 1)

    by John Scalzi

  • Votes: 1

    A Stone in the Sea (Bleeding Stars) (Volume 1)

    by A.L. Jackson

  • Votes: 1

    Miss Lonelyhearts

    by Nathanael West

  • Votes: 1

    A Love Letter to Whiskey

    by Kandi Steiner

    It's crazy how fast the buzz comes back after you've been sober for so long. Whiskey stood there, on my doorstep, just like he had one year before. Except this time, there was no rain, no anger, no wedding invitation - it was just us. It was just him - the old friend, the easy smile, the twisted solace wrapped in a glittering bottle. It was just me - the alcoholic, pretending like I didn't want to taste him, realizing too quickly that months of being clean didn't make me crave him any less. But we can't start here. No, to tell this story right, we need to go back. Back to the beginning. Back to the very first drop. This is my love letter to Whiskey. I only hope he reads it.
  • Votes: 1

    The Fault in Our Stars

    by John Green

  • Votes: 1

    Marrying Mr. Wrong

    by Claire Kingsley

  • Votes: 1

    American Kompromat

    by Craig Unger

  • Votes: 1

    Mistborn

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 1

    Demelza

    by Winston Graham

  • Votes: 1

    Superminds

    by Thomas W. Malone

  • Votes: 1

    The developer of Journey bucks the trend of "predatory" monetisation | GamesIndustry.biz

  • Votes: 1

    The German Cookbook

    by Alfons Schuhbeck

    The only comprehensive collection of German recipes - from authentic traditional dishes to contemporary cuisine Germany is made up of a series of distinct regional culinary cultures. From Hamburg on the north coast to Munich in the Alpine south, and from Frankfurt in the west to Berlin in the east, Germany's cities and farmland yield a remarkable variety of ingredients and influences. This authoritative book showcases this diversity, with 500 recipes including both beloved traditional cuisine and contemporary dishes representing the new direction of German cooking - from snacks to desserts, meat, poultry, and fish, to potatoes, dumplings, and noodles. An introduction showcasing the culinary cultural history of the country introduces the origins of the classic recipes. These recipes have been tested for accuracy in a home kitchen, making them fully accessible to a wide range of cooking abilities. Icons indicate everything from vegetarian, gluten-, and dairy-free options to recipes with five ingredients or fewer and simple one-pot dishes. The German Cookbook is the latest in Phaidon's bestselling series of authoritative cookbooks on global cuisines.
  • Votes: 1

    Another Forgotten Child by Cathy Glass(2015-06-02)

    by Cathy Glass

  • Votes: 1

    Made You Up

    by Francesca Zappia

  • Votes: 1

    Once a Man Indulges

    by Tony Kelsey

  • Votes: 1

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 1

    Angie Thomas 2-Book Box Set

    by Angie Thomas

  • Votes: 1

    Fangirl

    by Rainbow Rowell

  • Votes: 1

    Love and Sleep

    by John Crowley

  • Votes: 1

    Confessions of a Public Speaker

    by Scott Berkun

    In this hilarious and highly practical book, author and professional speaker Scott Berkun reveals the techniques behind what great communicators do, and shows how anyone can learn to use them well. For managers and teachers -- and anyone else who talks and expects someone to listen -- Confessions of a Public Speaker provides an insider's perspective on how to effectively present ideas to anyone. It's a unique, entertaining, and instructional romp through the embarrassments and triumphs Scott has experienced over 15 years of speaking to crowds of all sizes. With lively lessons and surprising confessions, you'll get new insights into the art of persuasion -- as well as teaching, learning, and performance -- directly from a master of the trade. Highlights include: Berkun's hard-won and simple philosophy, culled from years of lectures, teaching courses, and hours of appearances on NPR, MSNBC, and CNBC Practical advice, including how to work a tough room, the science of not boring people, how to survive the attack of the butterflies, and what to do when things go wrong The inside scoop on who earns $30,000 for a one-hour lecture and why The worst -- and funniest -- disaster stories you've ever heard (plus countermoves you can use) Filled with humorous and illuminating stories of thrilling performances and real-life disasters, Confessions of a Public Speaker is inspirational, devastatingly honest, and a blast to read.
  • Votes: 1

    Hope Between the Pages (Doors to the Past)

    by Pepper Basham

  • Votes: 1

    Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky (A Tristan Strong Novel, Book 1) (Tristan Strong, 1)

    by Kwame Mbalia

  • Votes: 1

    Announcing .NET Interactive - Try .NET includes .NET Notebooks and more - Scott Hanselman

  • Votes: 1

    Before the Mayflower

    by Lerone Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    Outpost

    by Dan Richards

  • Votes: 1

    El hombre en busca del sentido ultimo

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 1

    Marriage and Murder (Solving for Pie

    by Penny Reid

  • Votes: 1

    Becoming

    by Michelle Obama

    Journal/Notebook/Diary Life is a constant journey of learning, growing, blooming and becoming the best version of yourself. Use the "Becoming" journal to write down your reflections, dreams, to-do lists, meeting, conference or school notes - or just enjoy creative writing. The "Becoming" journal makes a great gift for all occasions - baby and bridal showers, birthdays, holidays, conference giveaways, and more. Glossy cover 100 lined pages Wide-ruled lines Large 8x10 size CLICK ON OUR AUTHOR'S NAME, THE OTHER SIDE OF BUSINESS, TO CHECK OUT MORE BEAUTIFUL JOURNALS FOR WEDDINGS, BABY SHOWERS, INSPIRATION, TRAVEL, SORORITIES, RECIPES, GRADUATION, KIDS AND MORE!
  • Votes: 1

    If the Creek Don't Rise

    by Leah Weiss

  • Votes: 1

    Cyteen by Cherryh, C.J.(September 1, 1995) Paperback

  • Votes: 1

    My Name Is Asher Lev

    by Chaim Potok

    The novelist records the anguish and triumphs of a young painter as he emerges into the great world of art and rejects all else.
  • Votes: 1

    The Good Soldier Svejk

    by Jaroslav Hasek

  • Votes: 1

    Gone to the Woods

    by Gary Paulsen

  • Votes: 1

    Angle of Repose

    by Wallace Stegner

  • Votes: 1

    Lost in Math

    by Sabine Hossenfelder

  • Votes: 1

    Charcoal Joe

    by Walter Mosley

  • Votes: 1

    Palpasa Café

    by Narayan Wagle

  • Votes: 1

    [Capitalist Realism

    by Mark Fisher

  • Votes: 1

    The Cuckoo's Calling (Cormoran Strike)

    by Robert Galbraith

  • Votes: 1

    Rise and Kill First

    by Ronen Bergman

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The first definitive history of the Mossad, Shin Bet, and the IDF's targeted killing programs, hailed by The New York Times as "an exceptional work, a humane book about an incendiary subject." WINNER OF THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD IN HISTORY NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY JENNIFER SZALAI, THE NEW YORK TIMES NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Economist * The New York Times Book Review * BBC History Magazine * Mother Jones * Kirkus Reviews The Talmud says: "If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first." This instinct to take every measure, even the most aggressive, to defend the Jewish people is hardwired into Israel's DNA. From the very beginning of its statehood in 1948, protecting the nation from harm has been the responsibility of its intelligence community and armed services, and there is one weapon in their vast arsenal that they have relied upon to thwart the most serious threats: Targeted assassinations have been used countless times, on enemies large and small, sometimes in response to attacks against the Israeli people and sometimes preemptively. In this page-turning, eye-opening book, journalist and military analyst Ronen Bergman--praised by David Remnick as "arguably [Israel's] best investigative reporter"--offers a riveting inside account of the targeted killing programs: their successes, their failures, and the moral and political price exacted on the men and women who approved and carried out the missions. Bergman has gained the exceedingly rare cooperation of many current and former members of the Israeli government, including Prime Ministers Shimon Peres, Ehud Barak, Ariel Sharon, and Benjamin Netanyahu, as well as high-level figures in the country's military and intelligence services: the IDF (Israel Defense Forces), the Mossad (the world's most feared intelligence agency), Caesarea (a "Mossad within the Mossad" that carries out attacks on the highest-value targets), and the Shin Bet (an internal security service that implemented the largest targeted assassination campaign ever, in order to stop what had once appeared to be unstoppable: suicide terrorism). Including never-before-reported, behind-the-curtain accounts of key operations, and based on hundreds of on-the-record interviews and thousands of files to which Bergman has gotten exclusive access over his decades of reporting, Rise and Kill First brings us deep into the heart of Israel's most secret activities. Bergman traces, from statehood to the present, the gripping events and thorny ethical questions underlying Israel's targeted killing campaign, which has shaped the Israeli nation, the Middle East, and the entire world. "A remarkable feat of fearless and responsible reporting . . . important, timely, and informative."--John le Carré
  • Votes: 1

    Lifeblood (An Everlife Novel)

    by Gena Showalter

  • Votes: 1

    Where Demons Dance

    by Emma Briedis

  • Votes: 1

    Dealing with Dragons

    by Patricia C. Wrede

  • Votes: 1

    There's a Wocket in my Pocket (Bright & Early Books(R))

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    Twelve Pillars

    by E. James Rohn

    Who would guess that when Michael Jones' car broke down on the side of the road that it would be the beginning of a life-changing relationship? Walking to the nearest house, Michael stumbles across a plantation style mansion on an estate named "Twelve Pillars". Charlie, the maintenance man, helps Michael get back on the road again and also strikes up a relationship with him - and along the way teaches Michael the secrets of success - the Twelve Pillars of Success - that have made the owner of the house, Mr. Davis, a wealthy and successful man. This new novel by Jim Rohn and Chris Widener will inspire you to take your life to the next level and beyond. It will challenge and encourage you to become the best that you can be!
  • Votes: 1

    Let's Get Back to the Party

    by Zak Salih

  • Votes: 1

    Things You Save in a Fire

    by Katherine Center

  • Votes: 1

    To Sir Phillip, With Love

    by Julia Quinn

  • Votes: 1

    State of Fear

    by Michael Crichton

  • Votes: 1

    Her Body and Other Parties

    by Carmen Maria Machado

  • Votes: 1

    Dark Sky (A Joe Pickett Novel)

    by C. J. Box

  • Votes: 1

    Where She Went

    by Gayle Forman

  • Votes: 1

    Forest Primeval

    by Vievee Francis

    "Another Anti-Pastoral," the opening poem of Forest Primeval, confesses that sometimes "words fail." With a "bleat in [her] throat," the poet identifies with the voiceless and wild things in the composed, imposed peace of the Romantic poets with whom she is in dialogue. Vievee Francis’s poems engage many of the same concerns as her poetic predecessors—faith in a secular age, the city and nature, aging, and beauty. Words certainly do not fail as Francis sets off into the wild world promised in the title. The wild here is not chaotic but rather free and finely attuned to its surroundings. The reader who joins her will emerge sensitized and changed by the enduring power of her work.
  • Votes: 1

    Baltimore Blues

    by Laura Lippman

  • Votes: 1

    Hop on Pop (I Can Read It All By Myself)

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    Warriors of the Storm

    by Bernard Cornwell

  • Votes: 1

    To Be Taught, If Fortunate

    by Becky Chambers

  • Votes: 1

    Now That You Have Seen Me

    by C.L. Roberts

  • Votes: 1

    Five Chimneys

    by Olga Lengyel

  • Votes: 1

    Jesus and John Wayne

    by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

  • Votes: 1

    Two Ravens

    by Louis Two Ravens Irwin

  • Votes: 1

    Once We Were Here

    by Christopher Cosmos

  • Votes: 1

    Djinn City

    by Saad Z. Hossain

  • Votes: 1

    THINK STRAIGHT

    by Darius Foroux

  • Votes: 1

    "They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else"

    by Ronald Grigor Suny

  • Votes: 1

    Baptism of Fire (The Witcher, 3)

    by Andrzej Sapkowski

  • Votes: 1

    Walking with Ghosts

    by Gabriel Byrne

  • Votes: 1

    Cruel Paradise (Beautifully Cruel Book 2)

    by J.T. Geissinger

  • Votes: 1

    Stone of Fire (ARKANE Book 1)

    by J.F. Penn

  • Votes: 1

    The Sun Is Also a Star

    by Nicola Yoon

  • Votes: 1

    Strange the Dreamer (Strange the Dreamer (1))

    by Laini Taylor

  • Votes: 1

    H Is for Hawk

    by Helen Macdonald

    One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of the Year One of Slate's 50 Best Nonfiction Books of the Last 25 Years ON MORE THAN 25 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR LISTS: including TIME (#1 Nonfiction Book), NPR, O, The Oprah Magazine (10 Favorite Books), Vogue (Top 10), Vanity Fair, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, Seattle Times, San Francisco Chronicle (Top 10), Miami Herald, St. Louis Post Dispatch, Minneapolis Star Tribune (Top 10), Library Journal (Top 10), Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews, Slate, Shelf Awareness, Book Riot, Amazon (Top 20) The instant New York Times bestseller and award-winning sensation, Helen Macdonald's story of adopting and raising one of nature's most vicious predators has soared into the hearts of millions of readers worldwide. Fierce and feral, her goshawk Mabel's temperament mirrors Helen's own state of grief after her father's death, and together raptor and human "discover the pain and beauty of being alive" (People). H Is for Hawk is a genre-defying debut from one of our most unique and transcendent voices.
  • Votes: 1

    Great Circle

    by Maggie Shipstead

  • Votes: 1

    Freshwater

    by Akwaeke Emezi

    An extraordinary debut novel exploring the metaphysics of identity and mental health, centering on a young Nigerian woman as she struggles to reconcile the proliferation of multiple selves within her
  • Votes: 1

    Dari Buku ke Buku

    by P. Swantoro

  • Votes: 1

    Rumi's Little Book of Love and Laughter

    by Coleman Barks

  • Votes: 1

    Written in Red (A Novel of the Others) by Anne Bishop(2014-03-04)

    by Anne Bishop

  • Votes: 1

    The Undying

    by Anne Boyer

    Award-winning poet and essayist Anne Boyer delivers a one-of-a-kind meditation on pain, vulnerability, mortality, medicine, art, time, space, exhaustion, and economics—sharing her true story of coping with cancer, both the illness and the industry, in The Undying. A week after her forty-first birthday, the acclaimed poet Anne Boyer was diagnosed with highly aggressive triple-negative breast cancer. For a single mother living paycheck to paycheck who had always been the caregiver rather than the one needing care, the catastrophic illness was both a crisis and an initiation into new ideas about mortality and the gendered politics of illness. A twenty-first-century Illness as Metaphor, as well as a harrowing memoir of survival, The Undying explores the experience of illness as mediated by digital screens, weaving in ancient Roman dream diarists, cancer hoaxers and fetishists, cancer vloggers, corporate lies, John Donne, pro-pain ”dolorists,” the ecological costs of chemotherapy, and the many little murders of capitalism. It excoriates the pharmaceutical industry and the bland hypocrisies of ”pink ribbon culture” while also diving into the long literary line of women writing about their own illnesses and ongoing deaths: Audre Lorde, Kathy Acker, Susan Sontag, and others. A genre-bending memoir in the tradition of The Argonauts, The Undying will break your heart, make you angry enough to spit, and show you contemporary America as a thing both desperately ill and occasionally, perversely glorious. Includes black-and-white illustrations
  • Votes: 1

    Zero Contact (The Oracle)

    by MW Kaisla

  • Votes: 1

    Wake Up

    by Piers Morgan

    If, like me, you’re sick and tired of being told how to think, speak, eat and behave, then this book is for you. If, like me, you think common sense is being thrown out of the window, then this book is for you. If, like me, you think the world’s going absolutely nuts, then this book is for you.
  • Votes: 1

    Compass Rose (A Compass Rose Novel, 1)

    by Anna Burke

  • Votes: 1

    Jackdaws

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    An Author’s Guide to Goodreads

    by Barb Drozdowich

  • Votes: 1

    Gods of Jade and Shadow

    by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

  • Votes: 1

    Driving engineers to an arbitrary date is a value destroying mistake

  • Votes: 1

    America Is Not the Heart

    by Elaine Castillo

    LONGLISTED FOR THE CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE 'This book is it: one of the best debut novels (and novels, period) of recent years' Elle 'Blazingly fearless' Observer 'Radical... I was startled at how moved I was' Guardian How many lives can one person lead in a single lifetime? When Hero De Vera arrives in America, disowned by her parents in the Philippines, she's already on her third. Her uncle, Pol, who has offered her a fresh start and a place to stay in the Bay Area, knows not to ask about the first and second. And his younger wife, Paz, has learned enough about the might and secrecy of the De Vera family to keep her head down. Only their daughter Roni asks Hero why her hands seem to scream with hurt at the steering wheel of the car she drives to collect her from school, and only Rosalyn, the fierce but open-hearted beautician, has any hope of bringing Hero back from the dead.
  • Votes: 1

    Gates of Fire

    by Steven Pressfield

    Chronicles the battle of three hundred Spartan warriors against a huge force of Persian soldiers in 480 B.C. against the background of life in ancient Sparta and its extraordinary culture.
  • Votes: 1

    Packing for Mars

    by Mary Roach

  • Votes: 1

    These Violent Delights

    by Chloe Gong

  • Votes: 1

    Being Reshma

    by Reshma Qureshi

  • Votes: 1

    Hood Feminism

    by Mikki Kendall

  • Votes: 1

    Tell Me Lies

    by Carola Lovering

  • Votes: 1

    The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet

    by David Mitchell

    Dispatched to the influential Japanese port of Dejima in 1799, ambitious clerk Jacob de Zoet resolves to earn enough money to deserve his wealthy fiancâee, an effort that is challenged by his relationship with the midwife daughter of a samurai.
  • Votes: 1

    Celine

    by Peter Heller

  • Votes: 1

    Live in Love

    by Lauren Akins

  • Votes: 1

    Miss Benson's Beetle

    by Rachel Joyce

  • Votes: 1

    Mockingjay (Hunger Games)

    by Suzanne Collins

  • Votes: 1

    Lincoln on the Verge

    by Ted Widmer

  • Votes: 1

    Love After Love

    by Ingrid Persaud

  • Votes: 1

    A Walk to Remember

    by Nicholas Sparks

    NOVEL LEARNING SERIES(TM) A WALK TO REMEMBER by Nicholas Sparks STUDENT EDITION "When I was seventeen, my life changed forever . . . " So begins Nicholas Sparks's touching tale of Landon Carter, a teenage boy living in the small town of Beaufort, North Carolina in the late 1950s. Landon is a typical teenager who just wants to have a fun senior year before heading off to college. The last thing he anticipated is Jamie Sullivan, the sweet, pious daughter of the town's Baptist minister. But on the evening of Beaufort's annual Christmas pageant, Landon will undergo a change of heart that will forever alter the course of his life. In the months that follow, Landon discovers truths that it takes most people a lifetime to learn-truths about the nature of beauty, the joy of giving, the pain of loss, and, most of all, the transformational power of love. With a NOVEL LEARNING SERIES(TM) Student Guide · Questions about the text after every few chapters check your comprehension · Quizzes throughout help you prepare for standardized tests with SAT- and ACT-style questions using vocabulary and grammar from the book · Sample writing prompts and essays at the end guide you through the elements of an above-average, average, and below-average essay-and explain why!
  • Votes: 1

    Séance Tea Party

    by Reimena Yee

    Lora wants to stay a kid forever, and she'll do anything to make that happen . . . including befriending Alexa, the ghost who haunts her house. A middle-grade graphic novel about growing up that's perfect for fans of Ghosts and Making Friends. Growing up sounds terrible. No one has time to do anything fun, or play outside, or use their imagination. Everything is suddenly so serious. People are more interested in their looks and what others think about them than having fun adventures. Who wants that? Not Lora. After watching her circle of friends seemingly fade away, Lora is determined to still have fun on her own. A tea party with a twist leaves Lora to re-discovering Alexa, the ghost that haunts her house -- and Lora's old imaginary friend! Lora and Alexa are thrilled to meet kindred spirits and they become best friends . . . but unfortunately, not everything can last forever. Reimena Yee brings to life a story about growing up, childhood, and what it means to let go. A fantastical story following lovable characters as they each realize what it means to be who you are.
  • Votes: 1

    Miracle Creek

    by Angie Kim

    WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FIRST NOVEL The “gripping... page-turner” (Time) hitting all the best of summer reading lists, Miracle Creek is perfect for book clubs and fans of Liane Moriarty and Celeste Ng How far will you go to protect your family? Will you keep their secrets? Ignore their lies? In a small town in Virginia, a group of people know each other because they’re part of a special treatment center, a hyperbaric chamber that may cure a range of conditions from infertility to autism. But then the chamber explodes, two people die, and it’s clear the explosion wasn’t an accident. A powerful showdown unfolds as the story moves across characters who are all maybe keeping secrets, hiding betrayals. Chapter by chapter, we shift alliances and gather evidence: Was it the careless mother of a patient? Was it the owners, hoping to cash in on a big insurance payment and send their daughter to college? Could it have been a protester, trying to prove the treatment isn’t safe? “A stunning debut about parents, children and the unwavering hope of a better life, even when all hope seems lost" (Washington Post), Miracle Creek uncovers the worst prejudice and best intentions, tense rivalries and the challenges of parenting a child with special needs. It’s “a quick-paced murder mystery that plumbs the power and perils of community” (O Magazine) as it carefully pieces together the tense atmosphere of a courtroom drama and the complexities of life as an immigrant family. Drawing on the author’s own experiences as a Korean-American, former trial lawyer, and mother of a “miracle submarine” patient, this is a novel steeped in suspense and igniting discussion. Recommended by Erin Morgenstern, Jean Kwok, Jennifer Weiner, Scott Turow, Laura Lippman, and more-- Miracle Creek is a brave, moving debut from an unforgettable new voice.
  • Votes: 1

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 1

    Ketamine

    by Karl Jansen

  • Votes: 1

    Let's Get Lost (Harlequin Teen)

    by Adi Alsaid

  • Votes: 1

    An Ember in the Ashes

    by Sabaa Tahir

  • Votes: 1

    American War

    by Omar El Akkad

  • Votes: 1

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.
  • Votes: 1

    Breed

    by Colet Abedi

  • Votes: 1

    Stamped from the Beginning

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America--more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.
  • Votes: 1

    Winter's Orbit

    by Everina Maxwell

  • Votes: 1

    A Room of One's Own

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 1

    Resurrection Blues

    by Arthur Miller

  • Votes: 1

    Red Pill

    by Hari Kunzru

  • Votes: 1

    Chain of Iron (2) (The Last Hours)

    by Cassandra Clare

  • Votes: 1

    Detransition, Baby

    by Torrey Peters

  • Votes: 1

    Armada (Hardcover)--by Ernest Cline [2015 Edition]

  • Votes: 1

    Looking for Lorraine

    by Imani Perry

  • Votes: 1

    I Am Pilgrim

    by Terry Hayes

    “I Am Pilgrim is simply one of the best suspense novels I’ve read in a long time.” —David Baldacci, #1 New York Times bestselling author “A big, breathless tale of nonstop suspense.” —Janet Maslin, The New York Times “The pages fly by ferociously fast. Simply unputdownable.” —Booklist A breakneck race against time…and an implacable enemy. An anonymous young woman murdered in a run-down hotel, all identifying characteristics dissolved by acid. A father publicly beheaded in the blistering heat of a Saudi Arabian public square. A notorious Syrian biotech expert found eyeless in a Damascus junkyard. Smoldering human remains on a remote mountainside in Afghanistan. A flawless plot to commit an appalling crime against humanity. One path links them all, and only one man can make the journey. Pilgrim.
  • Votes: 1

    Assata

    by Assata Shakur

  • Votes: 1

    Can You See Me Now?

    by Trisha Sakhlecha

    From Trisha Sakhlecha, Can You See Me Now? is a gripping psychological suspense thriller about a young Indian woman, now a government minister, whose past secrets are about to reverberate into the present and shatter her life. Perfect for fans of Lisa Jewell and Erin Kelly. Fifteen years ago, three sixteen-year-old girls meet at Wescott, an exclusive private school in India. Two, Sabah and Noor, are the most popular girls in their year. One, Alia, is a new arrival from England, who feels her happiness depends on their acceptance. Before she knows it, Sabah and Noor’s intoxicating world of privilege and intimacy opens up to Alia and, for the first time, after years of neglect from her parents, she feels she is exactly where, and with whom, she belongs. But with intimacy comes jealousy, and with privilege, resentment, and Alia finds that it only takes one night for her bright new world to shatter around her. Now Alia, a cabinet minister in the Indian government, is about to find her secrets have no intention of staying buried . . .
  • Votes: 1

    The Bastard of Istanbul

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 1

    Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance

    by Ruth Emmie Lang

  • Votes: 1

    Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life

    by aa

  • Votes: 1

    Salt Houses

    by Hala Alyan

  • Votes: 1

    Salvaje y Libre

    by Herrmann Libros Watzlawek

  • Votes: 1

    The Paris Library

    by Janet Skeslien Charles

  • Votes: 1

    Ask the Dust

    by John Fante

  • Votes: 1

    Rumi

    by Rumi

  • Votes: 1

    Neuroscience

    by Mark Bear

  • Votes: 1

    The Northern Lights

    by Daryl Pederson

  • Votes: 1

    Bleeding Edge

    by Thomas Pynchon

  • Votes: 1

    In Cold Blood

    by Truman Capote

  • Votes: 1

    Don't Make Me Think, Revisited

    by Steve Krug

    Offers observations and solutions to fundamental Web design problems, as well as a new chapter about mobile Web design.
  • Votes: 1

    Austerlitz (Modern Library (Paperback))

    by W.G. Sebald

  • Votes: 1

    Milk and Honey

    by Rupi Kaur

  • Votes: 1

    All the Bright Places

    by Jennifer Niven

  • Votes: 1

    Trick Mirror

    by Jia Tolentino

    ‘A whip-smart, challenging book. It filled me with hope’ Zadie Smith From one of the brightest young chroniclers of US culture comes this dazzling collection of essays on the internet, the self, feminism and politics.
  • Votes: 1

    Washington Square (Signet Classics)

    by Henry James

  • Votes: 1

    Lullaby Beach

  • Votes: 1

    Dark Horses

    by Susan Mihalic

  • Votes: 1

    Kings of the Wyld

    by Nicholas Eames

    A retired group of legendary mercenaries get the band back together for one last impossible mission in this award-winning debut epic fantasy. "Fantastic, funny, ferocious." - Sam Sykes Clay Cooper and his band were once the best of the best, the most feared and renowned crew of mercenaries this side of the Heartwyld. Their glory days long past, the mercs have grown apart and grown old, fat, drunk, or a combination of the three. Then an ex-bandmate turns up at Clay's door with a plea for help--the kind of mission that only the very brave or the very stupid would sign up for. It's time to get the band back together. WINNER OF THE DAVID GEMMELL MORNINGSTAR AWARD FOR BEST FANTASY DEBUT.WINNER OF THE REDDIT/FANTASY AWARD FOR BEST DEBUT FANTASY NOVEL. For more from Nicholas Eames, check out: Bloody Rose
  • Votes: 1

    A Whole Life

    by Robert Seethaler

  • Votes: 1

    Steal Like an Artist

    by Austin Kleon

    You don’t need to be a genius, you just need to be yourself. That’s the message from Austin Kleon, a young writer and artist who knows that creativity is everywhere, creativity is for everyone. A manifesto for the digital age, Steal Like an Artist is a guide whose positive message, graphic look and illustrations, exercises, and examples will put readers directly in touch with their artistic side. When Mr. Kleon was asked to address college students in upstate New York, he shaped his speech around the ten things he wished someone had told him when he was starting out. The talk went viral, and its author dug deeper into his own ideas to create Steal Like an Artist, the book. The result is inspiring, hip, original, practical, and entertaining. And filled with new truths about creativity: Nothing is original, so embrace influence, collect ideas, and remix and re-imagine to discover your own path. Follow your interests wherever they take you. Stay smart, stay out of debt, and risk being boring—the creative you will need to make room to be wild and daring in your imagination.
  • Votes: 1

    El hombre que amaba a los perros (Coleccion Andanzas) (Spanish Edition)

    by Leonardo Padura

  • Votes: 1

    A Visit from the Goon Squad

    by Jennifer Egan

    Working side-by-side for a record label, former punk rocker Bennie Salazar and the passionate Sasha hide illicit secrets from one another while interacting with a motley assortment of equally troubled people from 1970s San Francisco to the post-war future.
  • Votes: 1

    Solaris

    by Stanislaw Lem

  • Votes: 1

    Crazy Rich Asians

    by Kevin Kwan

    A hilarious and heartwarming New York Times bestselling novel—now a major motion picture! “This 48-karat beach read is crazy fun.” —Entertainment Weekly When New Yorker Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home and quality time with the man she hopes to marry. But Nick has failed to give his girlfriend a few key details. One, that his childhood home looks like a palace; two, that he grew up riding in more private planes than cars; and three, that he just happens to be the country’s most eligible bachelor. On Nick’s arm, Rachel may as well have a target on her back the second she steps off the plane, and soon, her relaxed vacation turns into an obstacle course of old money, new money, nosy relatives, and scheming social climbers.
  • Votes: 1

    If It Bleeds

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    Be Kind to Yourself

    by Cindy Bunch

  • Votes: 1

    A House at the Bottom of a Lake

    by Josh Malerman

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Bird Box and Malorie comes a haunting tale of love and mystery, as the date of a lifetime becomes a maddening exploration of the depths of the heart. “Malerman expertly conjures a fairy tale nostalgia of first love, and we follow along, all too willingly, ignoring the warning signs even as the fear takes hold.”—Lit Reactor The story begins: young lovers, anxious to connect, agree to a first date, thinking outside of the box. At seventeen years old, James and Amelia can feel the rest of their lives beginning. They have got this summer and this summer alone to experience the extraordinary. But they didn’t expect to find it in a house at the bottom of a lake. The house is cold and dark, but it’s also their own. Caution be damned, until being carefree becomes dangerous. For the teens must decide: swim deeper into the house—all the while falling deeper in love? Whatever they do, they will never be able to turn their backs on what they discovered together. And what they learned: Just because a house is empty, doesn’t mean nobody’s home.
  • Votes: 1

    Priestdaddy

    by Patricia Lockwood

    NEW STATESMAN AND OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017 'Destined to be a classic . . . this year's must-read memoir' Mary Karr, author of The Liars' Club 'Irrepressible . . . joyous, funny and filthy . . . Lockwood blows the roof off every paragraph' Joe Dunthorne, author of Submarine The childhood of Patricia Lockwood, the poet dubbed' The Smutty-Metaphor Queen of Lawrence, Kansas' by The New York Times, was unusual in many respects. There was the location: an impoverished, nuclear waste-riddled area of the American Midwest. There was her mother, a woman who speaks almost entirely in strange riddles and warnings of impending danger. Above all, there was her gun-toting, guitar-riffing, frequently semi-naked father, who underwent a religious conversion on a submarine and found a loophole which saw him approved for the Catholic priesthood by the future Pope Benedict XVI, despite already having a wife and children. When an unexpected crisis forces Lockwood and her husband to move back into her parents' rectory, she must learn to live again with the family's simmering madness, and to reckon with the dark side of her religious upbringing. Pivoting from the raunchy to the sublime, from the comic to the serious, Priestdaddy is an unforgettable story of how we balance tradition against hard-won identity - and of how, having journeyed in the underworld, we can emerge with our levity and our sense of justice intact. 'Beautiful, funny and poignant. I wish I'd written this book' Jenny Lawson, author of Furiously Happy 'A revelatory debut . . . Lockwood's prose is nothing short of ecstatic . . . her portrait of her epically eccentric family is funny, warm, and stuffed to bursting with emotional insight' Joss Whedon 'Praise God, this is why books were invented' Emily Berry, author of Dear Boy and Stranger, Baby
  • Votes: 1

    There's no better time to read War and Peace. Really.

  • Votes: 1

    If I Ran the Zoo (Classic Seuss)

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    Valentine

    by Elizabeth Wetmore

    With the haunting emotional power of Elizabeth Strout and Barbara Kingsolver, and the atmospheric suspense of The Girls: a compulsive debut novel about that explores the aftershock of a brutal crime on the women of a small Texas oil town.
  • Votes: 1

    No Heaven for Good Boys

    by Keisha Bush

  • Votes: 1

    Extraterrestrial Civilizations by Asimov, Isaac (1988) Hardcover

  • Votes: 1

    Empire of Storms (Throne of Glass, 5)

    by Sarah J. Maas

  • Votes: 1

    Stealing Fire

    by Steven Kotler

  • Votes: 1

    Army of None

    by Paul Scharre

    A Pentagon defense expert and former U.S. Army Ranger explores what it would mean to give machines authority over the ultimate decision of life or death.
  • Votes: 1

    Battle Ground (Dresden Files)

    by Jim Butcher

  • Votes: 1

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    by Hunter S. Thompson

  • Votes: 1

    Smoke Bitten (A Mercy Thompson Novel)

    by Patricia Briggs

  • Votes: 1

    Fun Home

    by Alison Bechdel

    A memoir done in the form of a graphic novel by a cult favorite comic artist offers a darkly funny family portrait that details her relationship with her father--a funeral home director, high school English teacher, and closeted homosexual.
  • Votes: 1

    Five Stars

    by Carmine Gallo

  • Votes: 1

    Good

    by S. Walden

    Cadence Miller is a good girl. She just happens to make one terrible mistake her junior year in high school which costs her ten months in juvenile detention. Now a senior, she's lost everything: her best friend, the trust of her parents, driving privileges, Internet access. It's a lonely existence. But there is one bright spot: Mark Connelly, her very cute, very off-limits 28-year-old calculus teacher. She falls hard for him-a ridiculous schoolgirl crush headed nowhere. She can't help it. He's the only good thing at Crestview High. She doesn't expect him to reciprocate her feelings. How inappropriate, right? But he does. And he shows her. And that's when her life goes from bad to good. (New Adult Contemporary Romance/Book 1 in the Too Good series)
  • Votes: 1

    Uprooted by Naomi Novik (2016-05-05)

    by Naomi Novik

  • Votes: 1

    The Road to Serfdom

    by Hayek

  • Votes: 1

    Convenience Store Woman

    by Sayaka Murata

  • Votes: 1

    Against a Tide of Evil

    by Mukesh Kapila

  • Votes: 1

    Golden Boy

    by Tara Sullivan

  • Votes: 1

    How We Met

  • Votes: 1

    Satantango

    by László Krasznahorkai

  • Votes: 1

    City of the Lost

    by Kelley Armstrong

  • Votes: 1

    No Exit

    by Taylor Adams

  • Votes: 1

    Black Fatigue

    by Mary-Frances Winters

  • Votes: 1

    Behold the Dreamers

    by Imbolo Mbue

    "Oprah's book club 2017 selection"--Cover.
  • Votes: 1

    Finding Cultural Holes

  • Votes: 1

    The Story of Civilization [Volumes 1 to 11] (Hardcover Set 1963-1975)

    by Will & Ariel Durant

  • Votes: 1

    Return to Virgin River

    by Robyn Carr

    Treat yourself this Christmas by staying in with this holiday read! #1 New York Times bestselling author Robyn Carr returns to the beloved town of Virgin River with a brand-new story about fresh starts, new friends and the magic of Christmas. Kaylee Sloan’s home in Southern California is full of wonderful memories of the woman who raised her. But the memories are prolonging her grief over her mother’s recent death. A successful author, Kaylee hoped she could pour herself into her work. Instead she has terrible writer’s block and a looming deadline. Determined to escape distractions and avoid the holiday season, Kaylee borrows a cabin in Virgin River. She knows the isolation will help her writing, and as she drives north through the mountains and the majestic redwoods, she immediately feels inspired. Until she arrives at a building that has just gone up in flames. Devastated, she heads to Jack’s Bar to plan her next steps. The local watering hole is the heart of the town, and once she crosses the threshold, she’s surprised to be embraced by people who are more than willing to help a friend—or a stranger—in need. Kaylee’s world is expanding in ways she never dreamed possible. And when she rescues a kitten followed by a dog with a litter of puppies, she finds her heart opening up to the animals who need her. And then there’s the dog trainer who knows exactly how to help her. As the holidays approach, Kaylee’s dread turns to wonder. Because there’s no better place to spend Christmas than Virgin River.
  • Votes: 1

    Invisible Girl

    by Lisa Jewell

  • Votes: 1

    Mediocre

    by Ijeoma Oluo

  • Votes: 1

    Introducing the Honourable Phryne Fisher (Phryne Fisher Mysteries)

    by Kerry Greenwood

  • Votes: 1

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 1

    If We Were Villains

    by M. L. Rio

  • Votes: 1

    Call of the Bone Ships

    by RJ Barker

    'Swashbuckling awesomeness . . . a definite winner' John Gwynne, author of Malice A brilliantly imagined saga of honour, glory and warfare, Call of the Bone Ships is the captivating epic fantasy sequel to RJ Barker's The Bone Ships. Dragons have returned to the Hundred Isles. But their return heralds only war and destruction. When a horde of dying slaves are discovered in the bowels of a ship, Shipwife Meas and the crew of the Tide Child find themselves drawn into a vicious plot that will leave them questioning their loyalties and fighting for their lives.
  • Votes: 1

    INDIAN POLITY

    by M. Laxmikanth

  • Votes: 1

    People of Abandoned Character

    by Clare Whitfield

  • Votes: 1

    The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success

    by Deepak Chopra

  • Votes: 1

    Hiding in Plain Sight

    by Sarah Kendzior

    Instant New York Times Bestseller Washington Post Bestseller USA Today Bestseller Indie Bound Bestseller Authors Round the South Bestseller Midwest Indie Bestseller New York Times bestselling author Sarah Kendzior documents the truth about the calculated rise to power of Donald Trump since the 1980s and how the erosion of our liberties made an American demagogue possible. The story of Donald Trump’s rise to power is the story of a buried American history – buried because people in power liked it that way. It was visible without being seen, influential without being named, ubiquitous without being overt. Sarah Kendzior’s Hiding in Plain Sight pulls back the veil on a history spanning decades, a history of an American autocrat in the making. In doing so, she reveals the inherent fragility of American democracy – how our continual loss of freedom, the rise of consolidated corruption, and the secrets behind a burgeoning autocratic United States have been hiding in plain sight for decades. In Kendzior’s signature and celebrated style, she expertly outlines Trump’s meteoric rise from the 1980s until today, interlinking key moments of his life with the degradation of the American political system and the continual erosion of our civil liberties by foreign powers. Kendzior also offers a never-before-seen look at her lifelong tendency to be in the wrong place at the wrong time – living in New York through 9/11 and in St. Louis during the Ferguson uprising, and researching media and authoritarianism when Trump emerged using the same tactics as the post-Soviet dictatorships she had long studied. It is a terrible feeling to sense a threat coming, but it is worse when we let apathy, doubt, and fear prevent us from preparing ourselves. Hiding in Plain Sight confronts the injustice we have too long ignored because the truth is the only way forward.
  • Votes: 1

    Lost Gods

    by Brom

  • Votes: 1

    Madame Bovary

    by Gustave Flaubert

    A powerful nineteenth-century French classic depicting the moral degeneration of a weak-willed woman
  • Votes: 1

    A Better Life

    by Rebecca Smith

  • Votes: 1

    Love Is a Mix Tape

    by Rob Sheffield

  • Votes: 1

    Deez Nuts

    by Karen Lynn Feiling

  • Votes: 1

    Destiny of the Republic

    by Candice Millard

  • Votes: 1

    Open Water

    by Caleb Azumah Nelson

    'A beautiful and powerful novel about the true and sometimes painful depths of love' Candice Carty-Williams, bestselling author of QUEENIE Two young people meet at a pub in South East London. Both are Black British, both won scholarships to private schools where they struggled to belong, both are now artists - he a photographer, she a dancer - trying to make their mark in a city that by turns celebrates and rejects them. Tentatively, tenderly, they fall in love. But two people who seem destined to be together can still be torn apart by fear and violence. At once an achingly beautiful love story and a potent insight into race and masculinity, Open Water asks what it means to be a person in a world that sees you only as a Black body, to be vulnerable when you are only respected for strength, to find safety in love, only to lose it. With gorgeous, soulful intensity, Caleb Azumah Nelson has written the most essential British debut of recent years. 'A love song to Black art and thought' Yaa Gyasi, bestselling author of HOMEGOING 'An amazing debut novel. You should read this book. Let's hear it for Caleb Azumah Nelson, also known as the future' Benjamin Zephaniah 'A very touching and heartfelt book' Diana Evans, award-winning author of ORDINARY PEOPLE 'Caleb is a star in the making' Nikesh Shukla, editor of THE GOOD IMMIGRANT 'A stunning piece of art' Bolu Babalola, bestselling author of LOVE IN COLOUR 'For those that are missing the tentative depiction of love in Normal People, Caleb Azumah Nelson's Open Water is set to become one of 2021's unmissable books. Utterly transporting, it'll leave you weeping and in awe.' Stylist 'An exhilarating new voice in British fiction' Vogue 'An intense, elegant debut' Guardian
  • Votes: 1

    Ask and It Is Given

    by Esther Hicks

  • Votes: 1

    Strange Rites

    by Tara Isabella Burton

    A sparklingly strange odyssey through the kaleidoscope of America's new spirituality: the cults, practices, high priests and prophets of our supposedly post-religion age. In Strange Rites, Tara Isabella Burton takes a tour through contemporary American religiosity. As the once dominant totems of civic connection and civil discourse--traditional churches--continue to sink into obsolescence, people are looking elsewhere for the intensity and unity that religion once provided. We're making our own personal faiths - theistic or not - mixing and matching our spiritual, ritualistic, personal, and political practices in order to create our own bespoke religious selves. We're not just building new religions in 2019, we're buying them, from Gwyneth Paltrow's gospel of Goop, to the brilliantly cultish SoulCycle, to those who believe in their special destiny on Mars. In so doing, we're carrying on a longstanding American tradition of religious eclecticism, DIY-innovation and "unchurched" piety (and highly effective capitalism). Our era is not the dawn of American secularism, but rather a brand-bolstered resurgence of American pluralism, revved into overdrive by commerce and personalized algorithms, all to the tune of "Hallellujah"--America's most popular and spectacularly misunderstood wedding song.
  • Votes: 1

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown

  • Votes: 1

    Bo Sanchez Radio

    by Bo Sanchez

  • Votes: 1

    Utopia Avenue

    by David Mitchell

  • Votes: 1

    Heartstopper

    by Alice Oseman

  • Votes: 1

    I Hunt Killers

    by Barry Lyga

    You’re seventeen years old and your father is the most notorious serial killer America has ever produced. He brought you up. Taught you everything he knows. Everyone in your ordinary American town knows who you are. So even though Dear Old Dad is safely behind bars, when the killing starts all over again, you are the first person the police come to see... They don’t know whether it’s nature or nurture. And neither do you...
  • Votes: 1

    A Brief History of Seven Killings

    by Marlon James

  • Votes: 1

    The Silent Patient

    by Alex Michaelides

  • Votes: 1

    Empire of the Summer Moon

    by S. C. Gwynne

  • Votes: 1

    Beautifully Broken Pieces

    by Catherine Cowles

  • Votes: 1

    Daughters of the Witching Hill

    by Mary Sharratt

  • Votes: 1

    On a Hiding to Nothing. 25 Years at Sunderland AFC

    by Patrick Hollis

  • Votes: 1

    If You Want to Make God Laugh

    by Bianca Marais

  • Votes: 1

    A Time to Kill

    by John Grisham

  • Votes: 1

    Middlesex

    by Jeffrey Eugenides

    In the spring of 1974, Calliope Stephanides, a student at a girl's school in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, finds herself drawn to a chain-smoking, strawberry-blonde classmate with a gift for acting. The passion that furtively develops between them, as well as Callie's failure to develop, leads Callie to suspect that she is not like other girls. In fact, she is not a girl at all; due to a rare genetic mutation Callie is part girl, part boy.
  • Votes: 1

    Can't Hurt Me

    by David Goggins

    For David Goggins, childhood was a nightmare - poverty, prejudice, and physical abuse colored his days and haunted his nights. But through self-discipline, mental toughness, and hard work, Goggins transformed himself from a depressed, overweight young man with no future into a U.S. Armed Forces icon and one of the world's top endurance athletes. The only man in history to complete elite training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller, he went on to set records in numerous endurance events, inspiring Outside magazine to name him The Fittest (Real) Man in America. In this curse-word-free edition of Can't Hurt Me, he shares his astonishing life story and reveals that most of us tap into only 40% of our capabilities. Goggins calls this The 40% Rule, and his story illuminates a path that anyone can follow to push past pain, demolish fear, and reach their full potential.
  • Votes: 1

    American Royals

    by Katharine McGee

    In an alternate America, princesses Beatrice and Samantha Washington and the two girls wooing their brother, Prince Jefferson, become embroiled in high drama in the most glorious court in the world.
  • Votes: 1

    IQ84

    by Mike Dickenson

  • Votes: 1

    HHhH

    by Laurent Binet

  • Votes: 1

    The Collected Autobiographies of Maya Angelou (Modern Library (Hardcover))

    by Maya Angelou

  • Votes: 1

    The Roommate

    by Rosie Danan

    Clara Wheaton is suffering the plight of the average millennial woman. She's overeducated, underemployed, and single. When her childhood crush invites her to move into his spare bedroom, the offer sounds irresistible but unfortunately, it's too good to be true. After a bait-and-switch, Clara finds herself sharing a lease with charming, handsome stranger Josh. He seems to perfect for her liking, until she googles him, and the internet reveals his profession. Will living with him turn into a scandal? Or will pooling their resources help them - and others - get lucky for a change.
  • Votes: 1

    Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man, Expanded Edition

    by Steve Harvey

  • Votes: 1

    Walking with the Wind

    by John Lewis

  • Votes: 1

    A Memory Called Empire (Teixcalaan, 1)

    by Arkady Martine

  • Votes: 1

    [Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?

    by Roz Chast

  • Votes: 1

    Die Verwandlung (German Edition)

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 1

    White Nights

    by Ann Cleeves

  • Votes: 1

    A Sky Beyond the Storm (An Ember in the Ashes)

    by Sabaa Tahir

  • Votes: 1

    All Souls Trilogy Collection Deborah Harkness 3 Books Set (The Book of Life, Shadow of Night, A discovery of witches )

    by Deborah Harkness

  • Votes: 1

    Yellow Wife

    by Sadeqa Johnson

  • Votes: 1

    Pulang (Indonesian Edition)

    by Leila S. Chudori

  • Votes: 1

    Lovely War

    by Julie Berry

  • Votes: 1

    Colony

    by Benjamin Cross

  • Votes: 1

    Everything Inside

    by Edwidge Danticat

    From the internationally acclaimed, best-selling author of Brother, I'm Dying, a collection of vividly imagined stories about community, family, and love. AUGUST 2020 REESE'S BOOK CLUB PICK WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER OF THE STORY PRIZE WINNER OF THE 2020 VILCEK PRIZE IN LITERATURE Rich with hard-won wisdom and humanity, set in locales from Miami and Port-au-Prince to a small unnamed country in the Caribbean and beyond, Everything Inside is at once wide in scope and intimate, as it explores the forces that pull us together, or drive us apart, sometimes in the same searing instant. In these eight powerful, emotionally absorbing stories, a romance unexpectedly sparks between two wounded friends; a marriage ends for what seem like noble reasons, but with irreparable consequences; a young woman holds on to an impossible dream even as she fights for her survival; two lovers reunite after unimaginable tragedy, both for their country and in their lives; a baby's christening brings three generations of a family to a precarious dance between old and new; a man falls to his death in slow motion, reliving the defining moments of the life he is about to lose. This is the indelible work of a keen observer of the human heart--a master.
  • Votes: 1

    Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick

    by Zora Neale Hurston

  • Votes: 1

    Plainsong

    by Kent Haruf

  • Votes: 1

    The Four Agreements

    by Don Miguel Ruiz

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 1

    Eloquent Rage

    by Brittney Cooper

    An Emma Watson "Our Shared Shelf" Selection for November/December 2018 • NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2018 BY: The New York Public Library • Mashable • The Atlantic • Bustle • The Root • NPR • Fast Company ("10 Best Books for Battling Your Sexist Workplace") Rebecca Solnit, The New Republic: "Funny, wrenching, pithy, and pointed." Roxane Gay: "I encourage you to check out Eloquent Rage out now." Joy Reid, Cosmopolitan: "A dissertation on black women’s pain and possibility." America Ferrera: "Razor sharp and hilarious. There is so much about her analysis that I relate to and grapple with on a daily basis as a Latina feminist." Damon Young: "Like watching the world’s best Baptist preacher but with sermons about intersectionality and Beyoncé instead of Ecclesiastes." Melissa Harris Perry: “I was waiting for an author who wouldn’t forget, ignore, or erase us black girls...I was waiting and she has come in Brittney Cooper.” Michael Eric Dyson: “Cooper may be the boldest young feminist writing today...and she will make you laugh out loud.” So what if it’s true that Black women are mad as hell? They have the right to be. In the Black feminist tradition of Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper reminds us that anger is a powerful source of energy that can give us the strength to keep on fighting. Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon. Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother's eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor fuckboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one's own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again. A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF 2018 BY: Glamour • Chicago Reader • Bustle • Autostraddle
  • Votes: 1

    Rules for a Knight

    by Ethan Hawke

    ‘Never announce you are a Knight, simply behave as one. You are better than no one, and no one is better than you.’ When Sir Thomas Lemuel Hawke was a boy, his grandfather taught him how to be a knight. Now, on the eve of a battle from which he fears he may not return, Sir Thomas writes a letter to his children so that he may pass on all his hard-won lessons, deepest aspirations and most instructive failures. Full of adventure and wit, the letter provides a guide for living a good and noble life – a reminder that without a little agony none of us would bother to learn a thing; that we must work together as brothers or perish together as fools; that a friend loves you because you are true to yourself, not because you agree with him. And, most importantly, it shows that there is no obstacle that enough love cannot move.
  • Votes: 1

    Real World Cloud Migrations

  • Votes: 1

    Phantastische Nacht (German Edition)

    by Stefan Zweig

  • Votes: 1

    By Katie Couric - The Best Advice I Ever Got

    by Katie Couric

  • Votes: 1

    Consider Phlebas (Culture)

    by Iain M. Banks

  • Votes: 1

    Helmet-based ventilation is superior to face mask for patients with respiratory distress - UChicago Medicine

  • Votes: 1

    Slotcouplet

  • Votes: 1

    The Name of the Wind

    by Patrick Rothfuss

    A hero named Kvothe, now living under an assumed name as the humble proprietor of an inn, recounts his transformation from a magically gifted young man into the most notorious wizard, musician, thief, and assassin in his world. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    Invasion of the Body Snatches

    by Brenda Nightstar

  • Votes: 1

    Ignite Me (Shatter Me Book 3)

    by Tahereh Mafi

  • Votes: 1

    Twitter and Tear Gas

    by Zeynep Tufekci

    A firsthand account and incisive analysis of modern protest, revealing internet-fueled social movements' greatest strengths and frequent challenges To understand a thwarted Turkish coup, an anti-Wall Street encampment, and a packed Tahrir Square, we must first comprehend the power and the weaknesses of using new technologies to mobilize large numbers of people. An incisive observer, writer, and participant in today's social movements, Zeynep Tufekci explains in this accessible and compelling book the nuanced trajectories of modern protests--how they form, how they operate differently from past protests, and why they have difficulty persisting in their long-term quests for change. Tufekci speaks from direct experience, combining on-the-ground interviews with insightful analysis. She describes how the internet helped the Zapatista uprisings in Mexico, the necessity of remote Twitter users to organize medical supplies during Arab Spring, the refusal to use bullhorns in the Occupy Movement that started in New York, and the empowering effect of tear gas in Istanbul's Gezi Park. These details from life inside social movements complete a moving investigation of authority, technology, and culture--and offer essential insights into the future of governance.
  • Votes: 1

    Firekeeper's Daughter

    by Angeline Boulley

  • Votes: 1

    A Brief History of Time

    by Stephen Hawking

    An anniversary edition of a now-classic survey of the origin and nature of the universe features a new introduction by the author and a new chapter on the possibility of time travel and "wormholes" in space
  • Votes: 1

    True Grit

    by Charles Portis

  • Votes: 1

    Stay Close

    by Harlan Coben

  • Votes: 1

    Virtually Yours

    by Sarvenaz Tash

  • Votes: 1

    Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

    by Becky Albertalli

  • Votes: 1

    Someone We Know

    by Shari Lapena

    'The queen of the one-sit read’ Linwood Barclay 'Shari Lapena is one of the best thriller writers in the business' Steve Cavanagh ‘A masterful whodunnit, perfectly paced and expertly plotted, that had me guessing all the way through’ C L Taylor ****** The gripping new thriller from the No. 1 bestselling author of The Couple Next Door. It can be hard keeping secrets in a tight-knit neighbourhood. In a tranquil, leafy suburb of ordinary streets – one where everyone is polite and friendly – an anonymous note has been left at some of the houses. ‘I’m so sorry. My son has been getting into people’s houses. He’s broken into yours.’ Who is this boy, and what might he have uncovered? As whispers start to circulate, suspicion mounts. And when a missing local woman is found murdered, the tension reaches breaking point. Who killed her? Who knows more than they’re telling? And how far will all these very nice people go to protect their secrets? Maybe you don’t know your neighbour as well as you thought you did . . . ****** Readers are obsessed with Shari Lapena: 'I was reading with my mouth open as I raced towards the final page.' 'I read it in one sitting, as I simply could not put it down.' 'An incredibly gripping read.' 'Fantastic book, from the first page I was hooked, couldn't put it down!' 'An excellent atmospheric thriller, full of intrigue and suspense.' THE END OF HER, THE NEW UNPUTDOWNABLE THRILLER FROM SHARI LAPENA, IS COMING IN JULY AND AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOW
  • Votes: 1

    My Name Is Why

    by Lemn Sissay

    THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED FOR THE GORDON BURN PRIZE 'EXTRAORDINARY' The Times, 'BEAUTIFUL' Dolly Alderton, 'SHATTERING' Observer, 'INCREDIBLE' Benjamin Zephaniah, 'UNPUTDOWNABLE' Sunday Times, 'ASTOUNDING' Matt Haig 'POWERFUL' Elif Shafak At the age of seventeen, after a childhood in a foster family followed by six years in care homes, Norman Greenwood was given his birth certificate. He learned that his real name was not Norman. It was Lemn Sissay. He was British and Ethiopian. And he learned that his mother had been pleading for his safe return to her since his birth. This is Lemn's story: a story of neglect and determination, misfortune and hope, cruelty and triumph. Sissay reflects on his childhood, self-expression and Britishness, and in doing so explores the institutional care system, race, family and the meaning of home. Written with all the lyricism and power you would expect from one of the nation's best-loved poets, this moving, frank and timely memoir is the result of a life spent asking questions, and a celebration of the redemptive power of creativity.
  • Votes: 1

    War Doctor

    by David Nott

  • Votes: 1

    Drunken Angel

    by Alan Kaufman

  • Votes: 1

    Roots

    by Alex Haley

    WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION BY DAVID OLUSOGA Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award Tracing his ancestry through six generations - slaves and freedmen, farmers and blacksmiths, lawyers and architects - back to Africa, Alex Haley discovered a sixteen-year-old youth, Kunta Kinte. It was this young man, who had been torn from his homeland and in torment and anguish brought to the slave markets of the New World, who held the key to Haley's deep and distant past.
  • Votes: 1

    Education of a Wandering Man

    by Louis L'Amour

  • Votes: 1

    Avenged

    by Amy Tintera

    With the romance of The Selection and the epic stakes of Red Queen, Amy Tintera’s New York Times-bestselling Ruined trilogy continues with the thrilling young adult fantasy Avenged. Emelina Flores has come home to Ruina. After rescuing her sister, Olivia, from imprisonment in rival kingdom Lera, Em and Olivia together vow to rebuild Ruina to its former glory. But their fight has only begun. Olivia is determined to destroy everyone who acts against Ruina. Em isn’t as sure. Ever since Em posed as Prince Casimir’s betrothed in Lera, she’s started to see another side to this war. And now that Cas has taken the throne, Em believes a truce is within reach. But Olivia suspects that Em’s romantic feelings for Cas are just coloring her judgement. Em is determined to bring peace to her home. But when winning the war could mean betraying her family, Em faces an impossible choice between loyalty and love. Em must stay one step ahead of her enemies—and her blood—before she’s the next victim in this battle for sovereignty.
  • Votes: 1

    The River of Doubt

    by Candice Millard

    At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth. The River of Doubt—it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever. Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. The River of Doubt brings alive these extraordinary events in a powerful nonfiction narrative thriller that happens to feature one of the most famous Americans who ever lived. From the soaring beauty of the Amazon rain forest to the darkest night of Theodore Roosevelt’s life, here is Candice Millard’s dazzling debut.
  • Votes: 1

    A Court of Silver Flames (A Court of Thorns and Roses, 5)

    by Sarah J. Maas