Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 14

    Junior

    by Thomas Kemeny

  • Votes: 14

    Read Me

    by Roger Horberry

  • Votes: 14

    The Art of the Click

    by Fisher Glenn

  • Votes: 14

    How to Write Better Copy (How To

    by Steve Harrison

  • Votes: 5

    Everybody Writes

    by Ann Handley

  • Votes: 5

    Winning Minds

    by Simon Lancaster

  • Votes: 5

    Influence

    by Robert B. Cialdini

  • Votes: 4

    How to Write Sales Letters That Sell

    by Drayton Bird

    ""The ultimate how-to book of direct mail letter writing."" -- Victor Ross, former Chairman, Reader's Digest
  • Votes: 4

    Ogilvy on Advertising

    by David Ogilvy

    An advertising authority updates his analysis of the elements of successful advertising and assesses the advertising environment that has emerged during the past twenty years
  • Votes: 4

    The Choice Factory

    by Richard Shotton

  • Votes: 4

    Scientific Advertising

    by Claude Hopkins

  • Votes: 4

    The End of Advertising

    by Andrew Essex

  • Votes: 4

    The Solid Gold Mailbox

    by Walter Weintz

    Tells the stories of successful mail-order businesses, offers advice on creating effective copy, and discusses mailing lists, subsidiary sales, and marketing problems
  • Votes: 4

    How to Write a Good Advertisement

    by Victor O. Schwab

  • Votes: 3

    Several Short Sentences About Writing

    by Verlyn Klinkenborg

  • Votes: 3

    The Sense of Style

    by Steven Pinker

    "Charming and erudite . . . The wit and insight and clarity he brings . . . is what makes this book such a gem." --Time.com Why is so much writing so bad, and how can we make it better? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Do the kids today even care about good writing--and why should we care? In this entertaining and eminently practical book, the cognitive scientist, dictionary consultant, and New York Times-bestselling author Steven Pinker rethinks the usage guide for the twenty-first century. Using examples of great and gruesome modern prose while avoiding the scolding tone and Spartan tastes of the classic manuals, he shows how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right. The Sense of Style is for writers of all kinds, and for readers who are interested in letters and literature and are curious about the ways in which the sciences of mind can illuminate how language works at its best.