Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 129

    Still Life

    by Louise Penny

  • Votes: 98

    A Gentleman in Moscow

    by Amor Towles

    The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series "The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate." —The Wall Street Journal He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to. From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility—a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.
  • Votes: 70

    A Man Called Ove

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 36

    The Overstory

    by Richard Powers

    WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2018 A wondrous, exhilarating novel about nine strangers brought together by an unfolding natural catastrophe ‘The best novel ever written about trees, and really, just one of the best novels, period’ Ann Patchett An artist inherits a hundred years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut. A hard-partying undergraduate in the late 1980s electrocutes herself, dies, and is sent back into life by creatures of air and light. A hearing- and speech-impaired scientist discovers that trees are communicating with one another. An Air Force crewmember in the Vietnam War is shot out of the sky, then saved by falling into a banyan. This is the story of these and five other strangers, each summoned in different ways by the natural world, who are brought together in a last stand to save it from catastrophe. ‘Breathtaking’ Barbara Kingsolver, New York Times ‘It’s a masterpiece’ Tim Winton ‘It’s not possible for Powers to write an uninteresting book’ Margaret Atwood ‘An astonishing performance’ Benjamin Markovits, Guardian
  • Votes: 35

    The Warmth of Other Suns

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
  • Votes: 34

    Destiny of the Republic

    by Candice Millard

  • Votes: 30

    The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 30

    The Nickel Boys

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 27

    The Great Believers

    by Rebecca Makkai

    WINNER OF THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS WINNER OF THE STONEWALL BOOK AWARD - BARBARA GITTINGS LITERATURE AWARD FINALIST FOR THE LA TIMES FICTION AWARD 'Stirring, spellbinding and full of life' Téa Obreht, New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger's Wife In 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup: bringing an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDs epidemic grows around him. One by one, his friends are dying and after his friend Nico's funeral, he finds his partner is infected, and that he might even have the virus himself. The only person he has left is Fiona, Nico's little sister. Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago epidemic, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways the AIDS crisis affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. Yale and Fiona's stories unfold in incredibly moving and sometimes surprising ways, as both struggle to find goodness in the face of disaster.
  • Votes: 26

    The Splendid and the Vile

    by Erik Larson

  • Votes: 25

    Bossypants

    by Tina Fey

  • Votes: 22

    Eleanor

    by David Michaelis

  • Votes: 22

    Say Nothing

    by Patrick Radden Keefe

    "A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--
  • Votes: 20

    The Dutch House

    by Ann Patchett

  • Votes: 20

    The Alice Network

    by Kate Quinn

  • Votes: 19

    The Library Book

    by Susan Orlean

  • Votes: 19

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 17

    The Sympathizer

    by Viet Thanh Nguyen

  • Votes: 17

    A Woman of No Importance

    by Sonia Purnell

  • Votes: 15

    The Committed

    by Viet Thanh Nguyen

  • Votes: 15

    The Starless Sea

    by Erin Morgenstern

  • Votes: 14

    The Underground Railroad

    by Colson Whitehead

    Originally published: New York: Doubledday, 2016.
  • Votes: 14

    The Mystery of Mrs. Christie

    by Marie Benedict

  • Votes: 13

    City of Girls

    by Elizabeth Gilbert

  • Votes: 13

    The Nightingale

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 13

    Lilac Girls

    by Martha Hall Kelly

  • Votes: 13

    The Vineyards of Champagne

    by Juliet Blackwell

  • Votes: 13

    The Wife Between Us

    by Greer Hendricks

  • Votes: 13

    Lincoln in the Bardo

    by George Saunders

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. "My poor boy, he was too good for this earth," the president says at the time. "God has called him home." Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy's body. From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state--called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo--a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie's soul. Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction's ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end? Praise for Lincoln in the Bardo "A luminous feat of generosity and humanism."--Colson Whitehead, The New York Times Book Review "A masterpiece."--Zadie Smith "Ingenious . . . Saunders--well on his way toward becoming a twenty-first-century Twain--crafts an American patchwork of love and loss, giving shape to our foundational sorrows."--Vogue "Saunders is the most humane American writer working today."--Harper's Magazine "The novel beats with a present-day urgency--a nation at war with itself, the unbearable grief of a father who has lost a child, and a howling congregation of ghosts, as divided in death as in life, unwilling to move on."--Vanity Fair "A brilliant, Buddhist reimagining of an American story of great loss and great love."--Elle "Wildly imaginative"--Marie Claire "Mesmerizing . . . Dantesque . . . A haunting American ballad."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Exhilarating . . . Ruthless and relentless in its evocation not only of Lincoln and his quandary, but also of the tenuous existential state shared by all of us." --Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "It's unlike anything you've ever read, except that the grotesque humor, pathos, and, ultimately, human kindness at its core mark it as a work that could come only from Saunders."--The National
  • Votes: 13

    News of the World

    by Paulette Jiles

  • Votes: 13

    The Cold Millions

    by Jess Walter

    'A beautiful, lyric hymn to the power of social unrest in American history. Jess Walter is a national treasure' Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light We Cannot See _____________________________________________ It is 1909 in Spokane, Washington. The Dolan brothers are living by their wits, jumping freight trains and lining up for work at crooked job agencies. While sixteen-year-old Rye yearns for a steady job and a home, his dashing older brother Gig dreams of a better world, fighting alongside other union men for fair pay and decent treatment. When Rye finds himself drawn to suffragette Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, her passion sweeps him into the world of protest and dirty business. But a storm is coming, threatening to overwhelm them all . . . The Cold Millions is an intimate story of brotherhood, love, sacrifice and betrayal set against the panoramic backdrop of an early 20th century America. Jess Walter offers a stunning, kaleidoscopic portrait of a nation grappling with the chasm between rich and poor, dreams and reality, in a sensational tale that resonates powerfully with our own time. ___________________________________________ 'A work of irresistible characters, harrowing adventures and rip-roaring fun . . . One of the most captivating novels of the year' Washington Post 'Stunning' San Francisco Chronicle 'Warm and deeply humane, this transporting novel is a staggering achievement from a landmark writer' Esquire 'A vivid, propulsive, historical novel with a politically explosive backdrop that reverberates through our own' USA Today
  • Votes: 12

    The Only Woman in the Room

    by Marie Benedict

  • Votes: 11

    The Department of Sensitive Crimes

    by Alexander McCall Smith

  • Votes: 11

    White House Usher

    by Christopher B. Emery

  • Votes: 11

    A Tale for the Time Being

    by Ruth Ozeki

    A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki—shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award “A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be.” In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
  • Votes: 11

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 11

    The Boys in the Boat

    by Daniel James Brown

    Cast aside by his family at an early age, abandoned and left to fend for himself in the woods of Washington State, young Joe Rantz turns to rowing as a way of escaping his past. What follows is an extraordinary journey, as Joe and eight other working-class boys exchange the sweat and dust of life in 1930s America for the promise of glory at the heart of Hitler's Berlin. Stroke by stroke, a remarkable young man strives to regain his shattered self-regard, to dare again to trust in others - and to find his way back home. Told against the backdrop of the Great Depression, The Boys in the Boat is narrative non-fiction of the first order; a personal story full of lyricism and unexpected beauty that rises above the grand sweep of history, and captures instead the purest essence of what it means to be alive. 'The Boys in the Boat is not only a great and inspiring true story; it is a fascinating work of history' Nathaniel Philbrick, author of In the Heart of the Sea 'I really can't rave enough about this book . . . I read the last fifty pages with white knuckles, and the last twenty-five with tears in my eyes' David Laskin, author of The Children's Blizzard and The Long Way Home 'A thrilling, heart-thumping tale of a most remarkable band of rowing brothers' Timothy Egan, author of The Worst Hard Time
  • Votes: 11

    Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    WINNER OF THE 2020 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION - THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED AN POST BOOK AWARDS IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 'Richly sensuous... something special' The Sunday Times 'A thing of shimmering wonder' David Mitchell TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART. On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home? Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week. Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.
  • Votes: 10

    Nothing to See Here

    by Kevin Wilson

  • Votes: 10

    Never Cry Wolf

    by Farley Mowat

  • Votes: 10

    Maid

    by Stephanie Land

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Evicted meets Nickel and Dimed in Stephanie Land's memoir about working as a maid, a beautiful and gritty exploration of poverty in America. Includes a foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich. At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor. Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path. Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit.
  • Votes: 10

    The Other Einstein

    by Marie Benedict

  • Votes: 10

    The Midnight Library

    by Matt Haig

    THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A BBC TWO BETWEEN THE COVERS BOOK CLUB PICK Between life and death there is a library. When Nora Seed finds herself in the Midnight Library, she has a chance to make things right. Up until now, her life has been full of misery and regret. She feels she has let everyone down, including herself. But things are about to change. The books in the Midnight Library enable Nora to live as if she had done things differently. With the help of an old friend, she can now undo every one of her regrets as she tries to work out her perfect life. But things aren’t always what she imagined they’d be, and soon her choices place the library and herself in extreme danger. Before time runs out, she must answer the ultimate question: what is the best way to live?
  • Votes: 10

    Deacon King Kong

    by James McBride

    McBride brings to vivid life the people affected by a shooting. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters - caught in the tumultuous swirl of 1960s New York - overlap in unexpected ways
  • Votes: 10

    The Daughters of Erietown

    by Connie Schultz

  • Votes: 10

    Rules of Civility

    by Amor Towles

  • Votes: 9

    The Garden of Evening Mists

    by Tan Twan Eng

  • Votes: 9

    Leave the World Behind

    by Rumaan Alam

  • Votes: 9

    The River of Doubt

    by Candice Millard

    At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth. The River of Doubt—it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever. Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. The River of Doubt brings alive these extraordinary events in a powerful nonfiction narrative thriller that happens to feature one of the most famous Americans who ever lived. From the soaring beauty of the Amazon rain forest to the darkest night of Theodore Roosevelt’s life, here is Candice Millard’s dazzling debut.
  • Votes: 9

    Homegoing

    by Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
  • Votes: 8

    Lady Clementine

    by Marie Benedict

  • Votes: 8

    Killers of the Flower Moon

    by David Grann

    WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FACT CRIME SHORTLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NON-FICTION SHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION **SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE STARRING LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND ROBERT DE NIRO** ‘A riveting true story of greed, serial murder and racial injustice’ JON KRAKAUER ‘A fiercely entertaining mystery story and a wrenching exploration of evil’ KATE ATKINSON ‘A fascinating account of a tragic and forgotten chapter in the history of the American West’ JOHN GRISHAM From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z, now a major film starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattison, comes a true-life murder story which became one of the FBI’s first major homicide investigations. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. As the death toll climbed, the FBI took up the case. But the bureau badly bungled the investigation. In desperation, its young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. Together with the Osage he and his undercover team began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. ‘David Grann has a razor-keen instinct for suspense’ LOUISE ERDRICH
  • Votes: 8

    Squeeze Me

    by Carl Hiaasen

  • Votes: 7

    Becoming Duchess Goldblatt

    by Anonymous

  • Votes: 7

    A Drinking Life

    by Pete Hamill

  • Votes: 7

    Furious Hours

    by Casey Cep

  • Votes: 7

    Ready Player Two

    by Ernest Cline

  • Votes: 7

    Hidden Valley Road

    by Robert Kolker

    The heartrending story of a midcentury American family with twelve children, six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia, that became science's great hope in the quest to understand the disease. Don and Mimi Galvin seemed to be living the American dream. After World War II, Don's work with the Air Force brought them to Colorado, where their twelve children perfectly spanned the baby boom: the oldest born in 1945, the youngest in 1965. In those years, there was an established script for a family like the Galvins--aspiration, hard work, upward mobility, domestic harmony--and they worked hard to play their parts. But behind the scenes was a different story: psychological breakdown, sudden shocking violence, hidden abuse. By the mid-1970s, six of the ten Galvin boys, one after the other, were diagnosed as schizophrenic. How could all this happen to one family? What took place inside the house on Hidden Valley Road was so extraordinary that the Galvins became one of the first families to be studied by the National Institutes of Mental Health. Their story offers a shadow history of the science of schizophrenia, from the era of institutionalization, lobotomy, and the schizophrenogenic mother, to the search for genetic markers for the disease, always amidst profound disagreements about the nature of the illness itself. And unbeknownst to the Galvins, samples of their DNA informed decades of genetic research that continues today, offering paths to treatment, prediction, and even eradication of the disease for future generations. With clarity and compassion, bestselling and award-winning author Robert Kolker uncovers one family's unforgettable legacy of suffering, love and hope.
  • Votes: 6

    A Voyage Long and Strange

    by Tony Horwitz

  • Votes: 6

    What the Wind Knows

    by Amy Harmon

  • Votes: 6

    Year of Wonders

    by Geraldine Brooks

  • Votes: 6

    The Quiet Americans

    by Scott Anderson

  • Votes: 5

    The Taste of Sugar

    by Marisel Vera

  • Votes: 5

    A Prayer for Owen Meany

    by John Irving

    'A work of genius' Independent 'Marvellously funny . . . What better entertainment is there than a serious book which makes you laugh?' Spectator 'If you care about something you have to protect it. If you're lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it.' Eleven-year-old Owen Meany, playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire, hits a foul ball and kills his best friend's mother. Owen doesn't believe in accidents; he believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is both extraordinary and terrifying.
  • Votes: 5

    The Queen of Tuesday

    by Darin Strauss

  • Votes: 5

    The Winter Sea

    by Susanna Kearsley

  • Votes: 5

    The World Without Us

    by Alan Weisman

  • Votes: 5

    Stranger in the Shogun's City

    by Amy Stanley

  • Votes: 5

    Exhalation

    by Ted Chiang

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR A NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Exhalation by Ted Chiang is a collection of short stories that will make you think, grapple with big questions, and feel more human. The best kind of science fiction." --Barack Obama From the acclaimed author of Stories of Your Life and Others--the basis for the Academy Award -nominated film Arrival: a groundbreaking new collection of short fiction. "THE UNIVERSE BEGAN AS AN ENORMOUS BREATH BEING HELD." In these nine stunningly original, provocative, and poignant stories, Ted Chiang tackles some of humanity's oldest questions along with new quandaries only he could imagine. In "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate," a portal through time forces a fabric seller in ancient Baghdad to grapple with past mistakes and second chances. In "Exhalation," an alien scientist makes a shocking discovery with ramifications that are literally universal. In "Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom," the ability to glimpse into alternate universes necessitates a radically new examination of the concepts of choice and free will. Including stories being published for the first time as well as some of his rare and classic uncollected work, Exhalation is Ted Chiang at his best: profound, sympathetic--revelatory.
  • Votes: 5

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    by Bill Bryson

    The author of A Walk in the Woods traces the Big Bang through the rise of civilization, documenting his work with a host of the world's most advanced scientists and mathematicians to explain why things are the way they are. Reprint. 125,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 5

    SEVEN DAYS IN MAY

    by Fletcher Knebel

  • Votes: 5

    The Pillars of the Earth

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 5

    Educated

    by Tara Westover

    "An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University"--Amazon.com.
  • Votes: 5

    The Four Winds

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 4

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

  • Votes: 4

    All My Puny Sorrows

    by Miriam Toews

  • Votes: 4

    Paper Bullets

    by Jeffrey H. Jackson

  • Votes: 4

    The Midnight Bargain

    by C. L. Polk

  • Votes: 4

    Waterland

    by Graham Swift

  • Votes: 4

    The Black Count

    by Tom Reiss

  • Votes: 4

    The Great Alone

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 4

    Butterfly 3

    by Ashley Antoinette

  • Votes: 4

    A Discovery of Witches

    by Deborah Harkness

  • Votes: 4

    The Murmur of Bees

    by Sofía Segovia

  • Votes: 4

    The Zealot and the Emancipator

    by H. W. Brands

  • Votes: 4

    The Gown

    by Jennifer Robson

  • Votes: 4

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his quixotic passion and obsession for the beautiful former debutante Daisy Buchanan. The Great Gatsby explores themes of decadence, idealism, resistance to change, social upheaval, and excess, creating a portrait of the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties that has been described as a cautionary tale regarding the American Dream. Set on the prosperous Long Island of 1922, The Great Gatsby provides a critical social history of America during the Roaring Twenties within its fictional narrative. That era, known for profound economic prosperity, the development of jazz music flapper culture, new technologies in communication (motion pictures, broadcast radio, recorded music) forging a genuine mass culture; and bootlegging, along with other criminal activity, is plausibly depicted in Fitzgerald's novel. Fitzgerald uses many of these societal developments of the 1920s that were to build Gatsby's stories from many of the simple details like automobiles to broader themes like Fitzgerald's discreet allusions to the organized crime culture which was the source of Gatsby's fortune. Fitzgerald depicts the garish society of the Roaring Twenties by placing the book's plotline within the historical context of the era.
  • Votes: 4

    The Wright Brothers

    by David McCullough

  • Votes: 3

    Sherlock Holmes

    by Arthur Conan Sir Doyle

  • Votes: 3

    The Dharma Bums

    by Jack Kerouac

  • Votes: 3

    The Night Watchman

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 3

    The Glass House

    by Beatrice Colin

  • Votes: 3

    The Map of Salt and Stars

    by Zeyn Joukhadar

  • Votes: 3

    Deep Survival

    by Laurence Gonzales

  • Votes: 3

    This Time Next Year

    by Sophie Cousens

  • Votes: 3

    There There

    by Tommy Orange

  • Votes: 3

    Agent Sonya

    by Ben Macintyre

  • Votes: 3

    The Grammarians

    by Cathleen Schine

  • Votes: 3

    Remarkable Creatures

    by Tracy Chevalier

  • Votes: 3

    The Round House

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 3

    The Map That Changed the World

    by Simon Winchester

  • Votes: 3

    The Persian Pickle Club

    by Sandra Dallas

  • Votes: 3

    The Orphan Master's Son

    by Adam Johnson

    The son of an influential father who runs an orphan work camp, Pak Jun Do rises to prominence using instinctive talents and eventually becomes a professional kidnapper and romantic rival to Kim Jong Il.
  • Votes: 3

    The Ghost Map

    by Steven Johnson

  • Votes: 3

    American Nations

    by Colin Woodard

  • Votes: 3

    You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey

    by Amber Ruffin

  • Votes: 3

    Enjoy!

    by Joyce J. Penner

  • Votes: 3

    The Silk Roads

    by Peter Frankopan

  • Votes: 3

    A Lion Called Christian

    by Anthony Bourke

  • Votes: 3

    The Professor and the Madman

    by Simon Winchester

    The Professor and the Madman, masterfully researched and eloquently written, is an extraordinary tale of madness, genius, and the incredible obsessions of two remarkable men that led to the making of the Oxford English Dictionary -- and literary history. The compilation of the OED began in 1857, it was one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken. As definitions were collected, the overseeing committee, led by Professor James Murray, discovered that one man, Dr. W. C. Minor, had submitted more than ten thousand. When the committee insisted on honoring him, a shocking truth came to light: Dr. Minor, an American Civil War veteran, was also an inmate at an asylum for the criminally insane. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 3

    Interior Chinatown

    by Charles Yu

    2020 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "One of the funniest books of the year. . . . A delicious, ambitious Hollywood satire." —The Washington Post From the infinitely inventive author of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, a deeply personal novel about race, pop culture, immigration, assimilation, and escaping the roles we are forced to play. Willis Wu doesn’t perceive himself as the protagonist in his own life: he’s merely Generic Asian Man. Sometimes he gets to be Background Oriental Making a Weird Face or even Disgraced Son, but always he is relegated to a prop. Yet every day, he leaves his tiny room in a Chinatown SRO and enters the Golden Palace restaurant, where Black and White, a procedural cop show, is in perpetual production. He’s a bit player here, too, but he dreams of being Kung Fu Guy—the most respected role that anyone who looks like him can attain. Or is it? After stumbling into the spotlight, Willis finds himself launched into a wider world than he’s ever known, discovering not only the secret history of Chinatown, but the buried legacy of his own family. Infinitely inventive and deeply personal, exploring the themes of pop culture, assimilation, and immigration—Interior Chinatown is Charles Yu’s most moving, daring, and masterful novel yet. "Fresh and beautiful. . . . Interior Chinatown represents yet another stellar destination in the journey of a sui generis author of seemingly limitless skill and ambition.” —The New York Times Book Review
  • Votes: 3

    Command and Control

    by Eric Schlosser

    From famed investigative journalist Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation, comes Command and Control a ground-breaking account of the management of nuclear weapons A groundbreaking account of accidents, near-misses, extraordinary heroism and technological breakthroughs, Command and Control explores the dilemma that has existed since the dawn of the nuclear age: how do you deploy weapons of mass destruction without being destroyed by them? Schlosser reveals that this question has never been resolved, and while other headlines dominate the news, nuclear weapons still pose a grave risk to mankind. At the heart of Command and Control lies the story of an accident at a missile silo in rural Arkansas, where a handful of men struggled to prevent the explosion of a ballistic missile carrying the most powerful nuclear warhead ever built by the United States. Schlosser interweaves this minute-by-minute account with a historical narrative that spans more than fifty years. It depicts the urgent effort by American scientists, policymakers, and military officers to ensure that nuclear weapons can't be stolen, sabotaged, used without permission, or detonated inadvertently. Looking at the Cold War from a new perspective, Schlosser offers history from the ground up, telling the stories of bomber pilots, missile commanders, maintenance crews, and other ordinary servicemen who risked their lives to avert a nuclear holocaust. Drawing on recently declassified documents and interviews with men who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Command and Control takes readers into a terrifying but fascinating world that, until now, has been largely hidden from view. It reveals how even the most brilliant of minds can offer us only the illusion of control. Audacious, gripping and unforgettable, Command and Control is a tour de force of investigative journalism. Eric Schlosser is the author of Fast Food Nation and Reefer Madness, as well as the co-author of a children's book, Chew on This. His work has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the New Yorker, the Nation, and Vanity Fair. Two of his plays, Americans (2003) and We the People (2007), have been produced in London. 'A work with the multi-layered density of an ambitiously conceived novel' John Lloyd, Financial Times 'Command and Control is how non-fiction should be written ... By a miracle of information management, Schlosser has synthesized a huge archive of material, including government reports, scientific papers, and a substantial historical and polemical literature on nukes, and transformed it into a crisp narrative covering more than fifty years of scientific and political change. And he has interwoven that narrative with a hair-raising, minute-by-minute account of an accident at a Titan II missile silo in Arkansas, in 1980, which he renders in the manner of a techno-thriller' New Yorker 'The strength of Schlosser's writing derives from his ability to carry a wealth of startling detail on a confident narrative path' Ed Pilkington, Guardian 'Disquieting but riveting ... fascinating ... Schlosser's readers (and he deserves a great many) will be struck by how frequently the people he cites attribute the absence of accidental explosions and nuclear war to divine intervention or sheer luck rather than to human wisdom and skill. Whatever was responsible, we will clearly need many more of it in the years to come' Walter Russell Mead, New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Astoria

    by Peter Stark

  • Votes: 3

    The Emerald Mile

    by Kevin Fedarko

  • Votes: 3

    The Island of Sea Women

    by Lisa See

  • Votes: 3

    The Civil War Trilogy

    by Michael Shaara

  • Votes: 3

    If the Creek Don't Rise

    by Leah Weiss

  • Votes: 3

    Something

    by Dakota Krout

  • Votes: 3

    Beneath a Scarlet Sky

    by Mark Sullivan

    Soon to be a major television event from Pascal Pictures, starring Tom Holland. Based on the true story of a forgotten hero, the USA Today and #1 Amazon Charts bestseller Beneath a Scarlet Sky is the triumphant, epic tale of one young man's incredible courage and resilience during one of history's darkest hours. Pino Lella wants nothing to do with the war or the Nazis. He's a normal Italian teenager--obsessed with music, food, and girls--but his days of innocence are numbered. When his family home in Milan is destroyed by Allied bombs, Pino joins an underground railroad helping Jews escape over the Alps, and falls for Anna, a beautiful widow six years his senior. In an attempt to protect him, Pino's parents force him to enlist as a German soldier--a move they think will keep him out of combat. But after Pino is injured, he is recruited at the tender age of eighteen to become the personal driver for Adolf Hitler's left hand in Italy, General Hans Leyers, one of the Third Reich's most mysterious and powerful commanders. Now, with the opportunity to spy for the Allies inside the German High Command, Pino endures the horrors of the war and the Nazi occupation by fighting in secret, his courage bolstered by his love for Anna and for the life he dreams they will one day share. Fans of All the Light We Cannot See, The Nightingale, and Unbroken will enjoy this riveting saga of history, suspense, and love.
  • Votes: 3

    Never Let Me Go

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 3

    The Big Burn

    by Timothy Egan

  • Votes: 3

    The Great Quake Debate

    by Susan Hough

  • Votes: 3

    The Three Mothers

    by Anna Malaika Tubbs

  • Votes: 3

    Lost Roses

    by Martha Hall Kelly

  • Votes: 3

    The Painted Girls

    by Cathy Marie Buchanan

  • Votes: 3

    The Greater Journey

    by David McCullough

  • Votes: 3

    A Constellation of Vital Phenomena

    by Anthony Marra

  • Votes: 3

    FOLLOWING YOU

    by Eva Lesko Natiello

  • Votes: 3

    We Run the Tides

    by Vendela Vida

  • Votes: 3

    The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

    by V. E. Schwab

    In the vein of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Life After Life, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is New York Times bestselling author V. E. Schwab’s genre-defying tour de force. A Life No One Will Remember. A Story You Will Never Forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.
  • Votes: 3

    Nightingale

    by KRISTIN HANNAH

  • Votes: 3

    The Water Dancer

    by Ta-Nehisi Coates

  • Votes: 3

    Outlander

    by Diana Gabaldon

    THE FIRST NOVEL IN THE BESTSELLING OUTLANDER SERIES. As seen on Amazon Prime TV. What if your future was the past? 1946, and Claire Randall goes to the Scottish Highlands with her husband Frank. It’s a second honeymoon, a chance to learn how war has changed them and to re-establish their loving marriage. But one afternoon, Claire walks through a circle of standing stones and vanishes into 1743, where the first person she meets is a British army officer - her husband’s six-times great-grandfather. Unfortunately, Black Jack Randall is not the man his descendant is, and while trying to escape him, Claire falls into the hands of a gang of Scottish outlaws, and finds herself a Sassenach - an outlander - in danger from both Jacobites and Redcoats. Marooned amid danger, passion and violence, her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives. (Previously published as Cross Stitch)
  • Votes: 3

    Braiding Sweetgrass

    by Robin Wall Kimmerer

    'A hymn of love to the world ... A journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise' Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two ways of knowledge together. Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings - asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass - offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
  • Votes: 2

    The Thirteenth Tale

    by Diane Setterfield

  • Votes: 2

    The Way We Live

    by Stafford Cliff

  • Votes: 2

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    **THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLER** 'Interesting and provocative... It gives you a sense of how briefly we've been on this Earth' Barack Obama What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? Yuval Noah Harari challenges everything we know about being human in the perfect read for these unprecedented times. Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it: us. In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. 'I would recommend Sapiens to anyone who's interested in the history and future of our species' Bill Gates **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 2

    Fighter Boys

    by Patrick Bishop

  • Votes: 2

    The Once and Future Witches

    by Alix E. Harrow

  • Votes: 2

    Real Life

    by Brandon Taylor

  • Votes: 2

    Scent Keeper

    by Erica Bauermeister

  • Votes: 2

    The Glass Hotel

    by Emily St. John Mandel

    From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts, and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it. Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass and cedar palace on an island in British Columbia. Jonathan Alkaitis works in finance and owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it's the beginning of their life together. That same day, Vincent's half-brother, Paul, scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: "Why don't you swallow broken glass." Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship. Weaving together the lives of these characters, The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan, and the wilderness of northern Vancouver Island, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.
  • Votes: 2

    The Silent Patient

    by Alex Michaelides

  • Votes: 2

    We Were the Lucky Ones

    by Georgia Hunter

  • Votes: 2

    Six Wakes

    by Mur Lafferty

  • Votes: 2

    Whistling Past the Graveyard

    by Susan Crandall

  • Votes: 2

    The Library of Legends

    by Janie Chang

  • Votes: 2

    The Sum of Us

    by Heather McGhee

  • Votes: 2

    Longitude

    by Dava Sobel

  • Votes: 2

    The Storyteller

    by Jodi Picoult

  • Votes: 2

    Homeland Elegies

    by Ayad Akhtar

  • Votes: 2

    Children of Time

    by Adrian Tchaikovsky

    Adrian Tchaikovksy's award-winning novel Children of Time, is the epic story of humanity's battle for survival on a terraformed planet. Who will inherit this new Earth? The last remnants of the human race left a dying Earth, desperate to find a new home among the stars. Following in the footsteps of their ancestors, they discover the greatest treasure of the past age - a world terraformed and prepared for human life. But all is not right in this new Eden. In the long years since the planet was abandoned, the work of its architects has borne disastrous fruit. The planet is not waiting for them, pristine and unoccupied. New masters have turned it from a refuge into mankind's worst nightmare. Now two civilizations are on a collision course, both testing the boundaries of what they will do to survive. As the fate of humanity hangs in the balance, who are the true heirs of this new Earth?span
  • Votes: 2

    Ordinary Grace

    by William Kent Krueger

  • Votes: 2

    Whistlestop

    by John Dickerson

  • Votes: 2

    Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

    by Sarah Vowell

  • Votes: 2

    Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea

    by Gary Kinder

  • Votes: 2

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown

  • Votes: 2

    All Creatures Great and Small

    by James Herriot

  • Votes: 2

    The Hardest Job in the World

    by John Dickerson

  • Votes: 2

    The Book of Lost Friends

    by Lisa Wingate

  • Votes: 2

    The Museum of Desire

    by Jonathan Kellerman

  • Votes: 2

    Shuggie Bain

    by Douglas Stuart

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020 Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020 The Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year 2020 'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' – Observer It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest. Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place. Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell. 'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' – The judges of the Booker Prize
  • Votes: 2

    Transcendent Kingdom

    by Yaa Gyasi

  • Votes: 2

    The Do-Right

    by Lisa Sandlin

  • Votes: 2

    Sweetness in the Belly

    by Camilla Gibb

  • Votes: 2

    The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek

    by Kim Michele Richardson

    The New York Times and USA Today bestseller! "...a hauntingly atmospheric love letter to the first mobile library in Kentucky and the fierce, brave packhorse librarians who wove their way from shack to shack dispensing literacy, hope, and — just as importantly — a compassionate human connection."—Sara Gruen, author of Water for Elephants The hardscrabble folks of Troublesome Creek have to scrap for everything—everything except books, that is. Thanks to Roosevelt's Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project, Troublesome's got its very own traveling librarian, Cussy Mary Carter. Cussy's not only a book woman, however, she's also the last of her kind, her skin a shade of blue unlike most anyone else. Not everyone is keen on Cussy's family or the Library Project, and a Blue is often blamed for any whiff of trouble. If Cussy wants to bring the joy of books to the hill folks, she's going to have to confront prejudice as old as the Appalachias and suspicion as deep as the holler. Inspired by the true blue-skinned people of Kentucky and the brave and dedicated Kentucky Pack Horse library service of the 1930s, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a story of raw courage, fierce strength, and one woman's belief that books can carry us anywhere—even back home. Additional Praise for The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek: "A unique story about Appalachia and the healing power of the written word."—Kirkus "A timeless and significant tale about poverty, intolerance and how books can bring hope and light to even the darkest pocket of history."—Karen Abbott, New York Times bestselling author of Liar Temptress Soldier Spy "Emotionally resonant and unforgettable, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a lush love letter to the redemptive power of books."—Joshilyn Jackson, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of The Almost Sisters
  • Votes: 2

    Why It Matters

    by Brenda Corbett

  • Votes: 2

    Entangled Life

    by Merlin Sheldrake

    *THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER* *A NEW STATESMAN, DAILY TELEGRAPH, THE TIMES, BBC SCIENCE FOCUS, EVENING STANDARD, MAIL ON SUNDAY AND SUNDAY TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR 2020* 'A dazzling, vibrant, vision-changing book. I ended it wonderstruck at the fungal world. A remarkable work by a remarkable writer' Robert Macfarlane The more we learn about fungi, the less makes sense without them. Neither plant nor animal, they are found throughout the earth, the air and our bodies. They can be microscopic, yet also account for the largest organisms ever recorded. They enabled the first life on land, can survive unprotected in space and thrive amidst nuclear radiation. In fact, nearly all life relies in some way on fungi. These endlessly surprising organisms have no brain but can solve problems and manipulate animal behaviour with devastating precision. In giving us bread, alcohol and life-saving medicines, fungi have shaped human history, and their psychedelic properties have recently been shown to alleviate a number of mental illnesses. Their ability to digest plastic, explosives, pesticides and crude oil is being harnessed in break-through technologies, and the discovery that they connect plants in underground networks, the 'Wood Wide Web', is transforming the way we understand ecosystems. Yet over ninety percent of their species remain undocumented. Entangled Life is a mind-altering journey into a spectacular and neglected world, and shows that fungi provide a key to understanding both the planet on which we live, and life itself. 'Reads like an adventure story ... wondrous ... beguilingly weaves together lived experience and scientific research' Sunday Times 'An astonishing book that could alter our perceptions of fungi for ever. It seems somehow to tip the natural world upside down' Observer 'Dazzling ... reveals a world that's both more extraordinary and more delicate than could be imagined' Daily Mail
  • Votes: 2

    How To

    by Randall Munroe

  • Votes: 2

    Just Kids

    by Patti Smith

    It was the summer Coltrane died, the summer of love and riots, and the summer when a chance encounter in Brooklyn led two young people on a path of art, devotion, and initiation. Patti Smith would evolve as a poet and performer, and Robert Mapplethorpe would direct his highly provocative style toward photography. Bound in innocence and enthusiasm, they traversed the city from Coney Island to Forty-second Street, and eventually to the celebrated round table of Max's Kansas City, where the Andy Warhol contingent held court. In 1969, the pair set up camp at the Hotel Chelsea and soon entered a community of the famous and infamous—the influential artists of the day and the colorful fringe. It was a time of heightened awareness, when the worlds of poetry, rock and roll, art, and sexual politics were colliding and exploding. In this milieu, two kids made a pact to take care of each other. Scrappy, romantic, committed to create, and fueled by their mutual dreams and drives, they would prod and provide for one another during the hungry years. Just Kids begins as a love story and ends as an elegy. It serves as a salute to New York City during the late sixties and seventies and to its rich and poor, its hustlers and hellions. A true fable, it is a portrait of two young artists' ascent, a prelude to fame.
  • Votes: 2

    Times To Remember

    by Sandra Jane Warren

  • Votes: 2

    Life Among the Paiutes

    by Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins

  • Votes: 2

    The Arsenal of Democracy

    by A. J. Baime

  • Votes: 2

    Astrid and Veronika

    by Linda Olsson

  • Votes: 2

    The Summer Before the War

    by Helen Simonson

  • Votes: 2

    Marley

    by Jon Clinch

  • Votes: 2

    The Daughters of Kobani

    by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

  • Votes: 2

    The Night Circus

    by Erin Morgenstern

  • Votes: 2

    The Devil in the White City

    by Erik Larson

    An account of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 relates the stories of two men who shaped the history of the event--architect Daniel H. Burnham, who coordinated its construction, and serial killer Herman Mudgett.
  • Votes: 2

    Exit West

    by Mohsin Hamid

  • Votes: 2

    Lonesome Dove

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 2

    The Spy and the Traitor

    by Ben Macintyre

    The son of two KGB agents and the product of the best Soviet institutions, Oleg Gordievsky grew to see his nation's communism as both criminal and philistine. He took his first posting for Russian intelligence in 1968 and became the Soviet Union's top man in London, but from 1973 on he was secretly working for MI6. Desperate to keep the circle of trust close, MI6 never revealed Gordievsky's name to its counterparts in the CIA, which in turn grew obsessed with figuring out the identity of Britain's obviously top-level source. The CIA officer assigned to identify him was Aldrich Ames, who would become infamous for secretly spying for the Soviets. -- adapted from jacket.
  • Votes: 2

    Bag Man

    by Rachel Maddow

  • Votes: 2

    City of Thieves

    by David Benioff

    Documenting his grandparents' experiences during the siege of Leningrad, a young writer learns his grandfather's story about how a military deserter and he tried to secure pardons by gathering hard-to-find ingredients for a powerful colonel's daughter's wedding cake.
  • Votes: 2

    CIRCE

  • Votes: 2

    The Stationery Shop

    by Marjan Kamali

  • Votes: 1

    Bury the Chains

    by AdamHochschild

  • Votes: 1

    Stamped from the Beginning

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America--more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.
  • Votes: 1

    The Clockmaker's Daughter

    by Kate Morton

    INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “An ambitious, compelling historical mystery with a fabulous cast of characters…Kate Morton at her very best.” —Kristin Hannah “An elaborate tapestry…Morton doesn’t disappoint.” —The Washington Post "Classic English country-house Goth at its finest." —New York Post In the depths of a 19th-century winter, a little girl is abandoned on the streets of Victorian London. She grows up to become in turn a thief, an artist’s muse, and a lover. In the summer of 1862, shortly after her eighteenth birthday, she travels with a group of artists to a beautiful house on a bend of the Upper Thames. Tensions simmer and one hot afternoon a gunshot rings out. A woman is killed, another disappears, and the truth of what happened slips through the cracks of time. It is not until over a century later, when another young woman is drawn to Birchwood Manor, that its secrets are finally revealed. Told by multiple voices across time, this is an intricately layered, richly atmospheric novel about art and passion, forgiveness and loss, that shows us that sometimes the way forward is through the past.
  • Votes: 1

    The Worst Hard Time

    by Timothy Egan

  • Votes: 1

    Cold Mountain

    by Charles Frazier

  • Votes: 1

    The Traitor's Wife

    by Allison Pataki

  • Votes: 1

    A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian

    by Marina Lewycka

  • Votes: 1

    The Soul of an Octopus

    by Sy Montgomery

  • Votes: 1

    Mrs. Astor Regrets

    by Meryl Gordon

  • Votes: 1

    Severance

    by Ling Ma

    Maybe it’s the end of the world, but not for Candace Chen, a millennial, first-generation American and office drone meandering her way into adulthood in Ling Ma’s offbeat, wryly funny, apocalyptic satire, Severance. "A stunning, audacious book with a fresh take on both office politics and what the apocalypse might bring." —Michael Schaub, NPR.org “A satirical spin on the end times-- kind of like The Office meets The Leftovers.” --Estelle Tang, Elle NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY: NPR * The New Yorker ("Books We Loved") * Elle * Marie Claire * Amazon Editors * The Paris Review (Staff Favorites) * Refinery29 * Bustle * Buzzfeed * BookPage * Bookish * Mental Floss * Chicago Review of Books * HuffPost * Electric Literature * A.V. Club * Jezebel * Vulture * Literary Hub * Flavorwire Winner of the NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award * Winner of the Kirkus Prize for Fiction * Winner of the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award * Finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel * A New York Times Notable Book of 2018 * An Indie Next Selection Candace Chen, a millennial drone self-sequestered in a Manhattan office tower, is devoted to routine. With the recent passing of her Chinese immigrant parents, she’s had her fill of uncertainty. She’s content just to carry on: She goes to work, troubleshoots the teen-targeted Gemstone Bible, watches movies in a Greenpoint basement with her boyfriend. So Candace barely notices when a plague of biblical proportions sweeps New York. Then Shen Fever spreads. Families flee. Companies cease operations. The subways screech to a halt. Her bosses enlist her as part of a dwindling skeleton crew with a big end-date payoff. Soon entirely alone, still unfevered, she photographs the eerie, abandoned city as the anonymous blogger NY Ghost. Candace won’t be able to make it on her own forever, though. Enter a group of survivors, led by the power-hungry IT tech Bob. They’re traveling to a place called the Facility, where, Bob promises, they will have everything they need to start society anew. But Candace is carrying a secret she knows Bob will exploit. Should she escape from her rescuers? A send-up and takedown of the rituals, routines, and missed opportunities of contemporary life, Ling Ma’s Severance is a moving family story, a quirky coming-of-adulthood tale, and a hilarious, deadpan satire. Most important, it’s a heartfelt tribute to the connections that drive us to do more than survive.
  • Votes: 1

    Behold the Dreamers

    by Imbolo Mbue

    "Oprah's book club 2017 selection"--Cover.
  • Votes: 1

    The Tiger's Wife

    by Téa Obreht

  • Votes: 1

    The House of Broken Angels

    by Luis Alberto Urrea

  • Votes: 1

    Cleopatra

    by Stacy Schiff

  • Votes: 1

    Infinite Country

    by Patricia Engel

  • Votes: 1

    Annihilation

    by Jeff VanderMeer

    Describes the 12th expedition to “Area X,” a region cut off from the continent for decades, by a group of intrepid women scientists who try to ignore the high mortality rates of those on the previous 11 missions. Original. 75,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Imperfect Union

    by Steve Inskeep

  • Votes: 1

    Consider the Fork

    by Bee Wilson

  • Votes: 1

    The Good Good Pig

    by Sy Montgomery

  • Votes: 1

    The Dreamt Land

    by Mark Arax

  • Votes: 1

    The Immortal Irishman

    by Timothy Egan

  • Votes: 1

    Beautiful Ruins

    by Jess Walter

  • Votes: 1

    The Remains of the Day

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity
  • Votes: 1

    The Left Hand of Darkness

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 1

    The Kitchen Front

    by Jennifer Ryan

  • Votes: 1

    Under the Banner of Heaven

    by Jon Krakauer

    Traces the events that surrounded the 1984 murder of a woman and her child by fundamentalist Mormons Ron and Dan Lafferty, exploring the belief systems and traditions, including polygamy, that mark the faith's most extreme factions and what their practices reflect about the nature of religion in America. Reader's Guide available. Reprint. 300,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    The Detective in the Dooryard

    by Timothy A. Cotton

  • Votes: 1

    Dominicana

    by Angie Cruz

    “I have been eagerly waiting for a new book from Angie Cruz. So glad the time has come.” —Edwidge Danticat, author of Brother I’m Dying and Breath, Eyes, Memory “Gorgeous writing, gorgeous story.” —Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street “An essential read for our times.” —Cristina Garcia, author of Dreaming in Cuban Fifteen-year-old Ana Cancion never dreamed of moving to America, the way the girls she grew up with in the Dominican countryside did. But when Juan Ruiz proposes and promises to take her to New York City, she has to say yes. It doesn’t matter that he is twice her age, that there is no love between them. Their marriage is an opportunity for her entire close-knit family to eventually immigrate. So on New Year’s Day, 1965, Ana leaves behind everything she knows and becomes Ana Ruiz, a wife confined to a cold six-floor walk-up in Washington Heights. Lonely and miserable, Ana hatches a reckless plan to escape. But at the bus terminal, she is stopped by Cesar, Juan’s free-spirited younger brother, who convinces her to stay. As the Dominican Republic slides into political turmoil, Juan returns to protect his family’s assets, leaving Cesar to take care of Ana. Suddenly, Ana is free to take English lessons at a local church, lie on the beach at Coney Island, see a movie at Radio City Music Hall, go dancing with Cesar, and imagine the possibility of a different kind of life in America. When Juan returns, Ana must decide once again between her heart and her duty to her family.
  • Votes: 1

    The Collector and the Blind Girl

    by Geoff Hargreaves

  • Votes: 1

    The Godfather

    by Mario Puzo

    An inside fictional portrait journeys inside the world of the Cosa Nostra and its operations to chronicle the lives and fortunes of Mafia leader Vito Corleone, his family, and his underworld domain. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    The Outpost

    by Jake Tapper

  • Votes: 1

    Code Name Verity

    by Elizabeth Wein

  • Votes: 1

    Stasiland

    by Anna Funder

  • Votes: 1

    The Girl Who Fell From the Sky

    by Heidi W. Durrow

  • Votes: 1

    A Long Petal of the Sea

    by Isabel Allende

  • Votes: 1

    Rising Tide

    by John M. Barry

  • Votes: 1

    The Queen's Gambit

    by Walter Tevis

    NOW A MAJOR NETFLIX SERIES starring Anya Taylor-Joy from Academy-Award nominee Scott Frank and BAFTA nominee Allan Scott 'Superb' Time Out 'Mesmerizing' Newsweek 'Gripping' Financial Times 'Sheer entertainment. It is a book I reread every few years - for the pure pleasure and skill of it' Michael Ondaatje 'Don't pick this up if you want a night's sleep' Scotsman When she is sent to an orphanage at the age of eight, Beth Harmon soon discovers two ways to escape her surroundings, albeit fleetingly: playing chess and taking the little green pills given to her and the other children to keep them subdued. Before long, it becomes apparent that hers is a prodigious talent, and as she progresses to the top of the US chess rankings she is able to forge a new life for herself. But she can never quite overcome her urge to self-destruct. For Beth, there's more at stake than merely winning and losing. 'Few novelists have written about genius - and addiction - as acutely as Walter Tevis' The Telegraph
  • Votes: 1

    The Life of Elizabeth I

    by Alison Weir

  • Votes: 1

    Sphere

    by Michael Crichton

  • Votes: 1

    America's Hidden History

    by Kenneth C Davis

  • Votes: 1

    Man with a Van

    by Drew Pritchard

  • Votes: 1

    A Rumor of War

    by Philip Caputo

  • Votes: 1

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 1

    Billion Dollar Loser

    by Reeves Wiedeman

    This inside story of the rise and fall of WeWork reveals how the excesses of its founder shaped a corporate culture unlike any other. Christened a potential savior of Silicon Valley's startup culture, Adam Neumann was set to take WeWork, his office share company disrupting the commercial real estate market, public, cash out on the company's 47 billion dollar valuation, and break the string of major startups unable to deliver to shareholders. But as employees knew, and investors soon found out, WeWork's capital was built on promises that the company was more than a real estate purveyor, that in fact it was a transformational technology company. Veteran journalist Reeves Weideman dives deep into WeWork and it CEO's astronomical rise, from the marijuana and tequila-filled board rooms to cult-like company summer camps and consciousness-raising with Anthony Kiedis. Billion Dollar Loser is a character-driven business narrative that captures, through the fascinating psyche of a billionaire founder and his wife and co-founder, the slippery state of global capitalism.
  • Votes: 1

    The Last Days of Night

    by Graham Moore

  • Votes: 1

    How to Change Your Mind

    by Michael Pollan

    New York Times Book Review 10 Best Books of 2018 A New York Times Notable Book The #1 New York Times bestseller. A brilliant and brave investigation into the medical and scientific revolution taking place around psychedelic drugs--and the spellbinding story of his own life-changing psychedelic experiences When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third. Thus began a singular adventure into various altered states of consciousness, along with a dive deep into both the latest brain science and the thriving underground community of psychedelic therapists. Pollan sifts the historical record to separate the truth about these mysterious drugs from the myths that have surrounded them since the 1960s, when a handful of psychedelic evangelists inadvertently catalyzed a powerful backlash against what was then a promising field of research. A unique and elegant blend of science, memoir, travel writing, history, and medicine, How to Change Your Mind is a triumph of participatory journalism. By turns dazzling and edifying, it is the gripping account of a journey to an exciting and unexpected new frontier in our understanding of the mind, the self, and our place in the world. The true subject of Pollan's "mental travelogue" is not just psychedelic drugs but also the eternal puzzle of human consciousness and how, in a world that offers us both suffering and joy, we can do our best to be fully present and find meaning in our lives.
  • Votes: 1

    The Snakehead

    by Patrick Radden Keefe

  • Votes: 1

    How to Stop Time

    by Matt Haig

  • Votes: 1

    Mothering Sunday

    by Graham Swift

  • Votes: 1

    Mornings on Horseback

    by David McCullough

  • Votes: 1

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 1

    The Duchess Deal

    by Tessa Dare

  • Votes: 1

    The Thursday Murder Club

    by Richard Osman

    'Such a beacon of pleasure' KATE ATKINSON 'So smart and funny. Deplorably good' IAN RANKIN 'A gripping read' SUNDAY TIMES THE FIRST BOOK IN THE #1 BESTSELLING THURSDAY MURDER CLUB SERIES BY TV PRESENTER RICHARD OSMAN In a peaceful retirement village, four unlikely friends meet up once a week to investigate unsolved murders. But when a brutal killing takes place on their very doorstep, the Thursday Murder Club find themselves in the middle of their first live case. Elizabeth, Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron might be pushing eighty but they still have a few tricks up their sleeves. Can our unorthodox but brilliant gang catch the killer before it's too late? __________________________________ WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE THURSDAY MURDER CLUB 'Thrilling, moving, laugh-out-loud funny' MARK BILLINGHAM 'A great read, I really enjoyed it' GRAHAM NORTON 'As the bodies pile up, and more is revealed of the lives and loves of Joyce, Ibrahim, Ron and Elizabeth, you can't help cheering them on - and hoping to meet them again soon' THE TIMES, CRIME BOOK OF THE MONTH 'Mystery fans are going to be enthralled' HARLAN COBEN 'Pure escapism' THE GUARDIAN, BEST CRIME AND THRILLERS OF 2020 'One of the most enjoyable books of the year' DAILY EXPRESS 'Smart, compassionate, warm, moving and so VERY funny' MARIAN KEYES 'As gripping as it is funny' EVENING STANDARD 'Funny, clever and achingly British' ADAM KAY 'An exciting new talent in crime fiction' DAILY MAIL 'A warm, wise and witty warning never to underestimate the elderly' VAL MCDERMID 'Delight after delight from first page to last' RED MAGAZINE 'I completely fell in love with it' SHARI LAPENA 'This is properly brilliant. The pages fly and I can't stop smiling' STEVE CAVANAGH 'Charming, clever debut' STYLIST 'I laughed my arse off' BELINDA BAUER 'A witty and poignant tale' DAILY TELEGRAPH 'Clever, clever plot' FIONA BARTON 'An absolutely delightful read' PRIMA MAGAZINE 'Utterly charming' SARAH PINBOROUGH 'Funny and original' THE SUN 'Properly funny and totally charming... steeped in Agatha Christie joy' ARAMINTA HALL 'This is one of the most delightful novels of the year' DAILY MIRROR 'A bundle of joy' JANE FALLON
  • Votes: 1

    In the Woods

    by Tana French

  • Votes: 1

    The Guest Book

    by Sarah Blake

  • Votes: 1

    The World of Yesterday

    by Stefan Zweig

  • Votes: 1

    Cultural X Change

    by Tiyane Chiumya

  • Votes: 1

    LA Freak

    by elisha shapiro

  • Votes: 1

    Where the Past Begins

    by Amy Tan

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Dust

    by Philip Pullman

  • Votes: 1

    How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House

    by Cherie Jones

  • Votes: 1

    Big Lies in a Small Town

    by Diane Chamberlain

    ‘Fans of Jodi Picoult’s style will love how Diane Chamberlain writes’ - Candis Big Lies in a Small Town, by the internationally bestselling author Diane Chamberlain, is a sweeping novel about two women connected by a painting that holds many dark secrets. North Carolina, 2018: Morgan Christopher’s life has been derailed. Taking the fall for a crime she did not commit, she finds herself serving a three-year stint in the North Carolina Women’s Correctional Centre. Her dream of a career in the arts is put on hold – until a mysterious visitor makes her an offer that will see her released immediately. Her assignment: restore an old post office mural in a sleepy southern town. Morgan knows nothing about art restoration but, desperate to leave prison, she accepts. What she finds under the layers of grime is a painting that tells the story of madness, violence and a conspiracy of small-town secrets. North Carolina, 1940: Anna Dale, an artist from New Jersey, wins a national contest to paint a mural for the post office in Edenton, North Carolina. Alone in the world and desperate for work, she accepts. But what she doesn’t expect is to find herself immersed in a town where prejudices run deep, where people are hiding secrets behind closed doors and where the price for being different might just end in murder. What happened to Anna Dale? Are the clues hidden in the decrepit mural? Can Morgan overcome her own demons to discover what exists beneath the layers of lies?
  • Votes: 1

    Prairie Fire

    by Clay Martin

  • Votes: 1

    Edge of Eternity

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    Butter Honey Pig Bread

    by Francesca Ekwuyasi

    Longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize Spanning three continents, Butter Honey Pig Bread tells the interconnected stories of three Nigerian women: Kambirinachi and her twin daughters, Kehinde and Taiye. Kambirinachi believes that she is an Ogbanje, or an Abiku, a non-human spirit that plagues a family with misfortune by being born and then dying in childhood to cause a human mother misery. She has made the unnatural choice of staying alive to love her human family but lives in fear of the consequences of her decision. Kambirinachi and her two daughters become estranged from one another because of a trauma that Kehinde experiences in childhood, which leads her to move away and cut off all contact. She ultimately finds her path as an artist and seeks to raise a family of her own, despite her fear that she won’t be a good mother. Meanwhile, Taiye is plagued by guilt for what her sister suffered and also runs away, attempting to fill the void of that lost relationship with casual flings with women. She eventually discovers a way out of her stifling loneliness through a passion for food and cooking. But now, after more than a decade of living apart, Taiye and Kehinde have returned home to Lagos. It is here that the three women must face each other and address the wounds of the past if they are to reconcile and move forward. For readers of African diasporic authors such as Teju Cole and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Butter Honey Pig Bread is a story of choices and their consequences, of motherhood, of the malleable line between the spirit and the mind, of finding new homes and mending old ones, of voracious appetites, of queer love, of friendship, faith, and above all, family.
  • Votes: 1

    The March of Folly

    by Barbara W. Tuchman

  • Votes: 1

    Appalachian Fall

    by Jeff Young

  • Votes: 1

    The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

    by Stuart Turton

  • Votes: 1

    The Answer

    by David Icke

  • Votes: 1

    The White Tiger

    by Aravind Adiga

  • Votes: 1

    The Quintland Sisters

    by Shelley Wood

  • Votes: 1

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 1

    The Fatal Shore

    by Robert Hughes

    In this bestselling account of the colonization of Australia, Robert Hughes explores how the convict transportation system created the country we know today. Digging deep into the dark history of England's infamous efforts to move 160,000 men and women thousands of miles to the other side of the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Hughes has crafted a groundbreaking, definitive account of the settling of Australia. Tracing the European presence in Australia from early explorations through the rise and fall of the penal colonies, and featuring 16 pages of illustrations and 3 maps, The Fatal Shore brings to life the incredible true history of a country we thought we knew.
  • Votes: 1

    Mexican Gothic

    by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

  • Votes: 1

    Simon the Fiddler

    by Paulette Jiles

  • Votes: 1

    Angle of Repose

    by Wallace Stegner

  • Votes: 1

    The Feather Thief

    by Kirk Wallace Johnson

  • Votes: 1

    The Buried Giant

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature and author of the Booker Prize–winning novel The Remains of the Day comes a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory. In post-Arthurian Britain, the wars that once raged between the Saxons and the Britons have finally ceased. Axl and Beatrice, an elderly British couple, set off to visit their son, whom they haven't seen in years. And, because a strange mist has caused mass amnesia throughout the land, they can scarcely remember anything about him. As they are joined on their journey by a Saxon warrior, his orphan charge, and an illustrious knight, Axl and Beatrice slowly begin to remember the dark and troubled past they all share. By turns savage, suspenseful, and intensely moving, The Buried Giant is a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory.
  • Votes: 1

    Baggage

    by Jeremy Hance

  • Votes: 1

    The Upswing

    by Robert D. Putnam

  • Votes: 1

    This Tender Land

    by William Kent Krueger

  • Votes: 1

    The Tin Drum

    by Günter Grass

    To mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of this classic, a new translation of the Nobel Prize winner's story is offered, which includes a huge cast of intriguing characters, including Oskar Matzerath, the indomitable drummer; his family; Oskar's midget friends Bebra and Roswitha Raguna; and more. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    The Darkening Age

    by Catherine Nixey

    A bold new history of the rise of Christianity, showing how its radical followers helped to annihilate Greek and Roman civilization
  • Votes: 1

    The Sun Down Motel

    by Simone St. James

  • Votes: 1

    The Hours

    by Michael Cunningham

  • Votes: 1

    I Belong Only to Myself

    by Andrea Pakieser

  • Votes: 1

    The Silence

    by Don DeLillo

  • Votes: 1

    Folly Beach

    by Dorothea Benton Frank

  • Votes: 1

    Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead

    by Olga Tokarczuk

  • Votes: 1

    Under Chad's Spell

    by Mr. Michael Varga

  • Votes: 1

    No One Ever Asked

    by Katie Ganshert

    Challenging perceptions of discrimination and prejudice, this emotionally resonant drama for readers of Lisa Wingate and Jodi Picoult explores three different women navigating challenges in a changing school district—and in their lives. WINNER OF THE CHRISTY AWARD® When an impoverished school district loses its accreditation and the affluent community of Crystal Ridge has no choice but to open their school doors, the lives of three very different women converge: Camille Gray--the wife of an executive, mother of three, long-standing PTA chairwoman and champion fundraiser--faced with a shocking discovery that threatens to tear her picture-perfect world apart at the seams. Jen Covington, the career nurse whose long, painful journey to motherhood finally resulted in adoption but she is struggling with a happily-ever-after so much harder than she anticipated. Twenty-two-year-old Anaya Jones--the first woman in her family to graduate college and a brand new teacher at Crystal Ridge's top elementary school, unprepared for the powder-keg situation she's stepped into. Tensions rise within and without, culminating in an unforeseen event that impacts them all. This story explores the implicit biases impacting American society, and asks the ultimate question: What does it mean to be human? Why are we so quick to put labels on each other and categorize people as "this" or "that", when such complexity exists in each person?
  • Votes: 1

    Trinity

    by Leon Uris

    Recounts the interrelationships, clashes, and common concerns of the Catholic, hill-farming Larkins of Donegal, the aristocratic and British Hubbles, and the Scottish-Presbyterian MacLeods of Belfast during the years from the 1840's famine to the 1916 Easter Rising.
  • Votes: 1

    Mink River

    by Brian Doyle

  • Votes: 1

    The Greatest Generation

    by Tom Brokaw

    Focuses on the generation of Americans who were born in the 1920s, came of age during the Depression, fought in World War II, and came home to build a new America during the postwar era.
  • Votes: 1

    The Lost World of Thomas Jefferson

    by Daniel J. Boorstin

  • Votes: 1

    Outland

    by Dennis E. Taylor

  • Votes: 1

    My Dear Hamilton

    by Stephanie Dray

  • Votes: 1

    Tales of the South Pacific

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 1

    The Pigeon Tunnel

    by John le Carré

    “Recounted with the storytelling élan of a master raconteur — by turns dramatic and funny, charming, tart and melancholy.” -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times The New York Times bestselling memoir from John le Carré, the legendary author of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy; The Spy Who Came in from the Cold; and The Night Manager, now an Emmy-nominated television series starring Tom Hiddleston and Hugh Laurie. John le Carré’s new novel, A Legacy of Spies, is now available. From his years serving in British Intelligence during the Cold War, to a career as a writer that took him from war-torn Cambodia to Beirut on the cusp of the 1982 Israeli invasion to Russia before and after the collapse of the Berlin Wall, le Carré has always written from the heart of modern times. In this, his first memoir, le Carré is as funny as he is incisive, reading into the events he witnesses the same moral ambiguity with which he imbues his novels. Whether he's writing about the parrot at a Beirut hotel that could perfectly mimic machine gun fire or the opening bars of Beethoven’s Fifth; visiting Rwanda’s museums of the unburied dead in the aftermath of the genocide; celebrating New Year’s Eve 1982 with Yasser Arafat and his high command; interviewing a German woman terrorist in her desert prison in the Negev; listening to the wisdoms of the great physicist, dissident, and Nobel Prize winner Andrei Sakharov; meeting with two former heads of the KGB; watching Alec Guinness prepare for his role as George Smiley in the legendary BBC TV adaptations of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley’s People; or describing the female aid worker who inspired the main character in The Constant Gardener, le Carré endows each happening with vividness and humor, now making us laugh out loud, now inviting us to think anew about events and people we believed we understood. Best of all, le Carré gives us a glimpse of a writer’s journey over more than six decades, and his own hunt for the human spark that has given so much life and heart to his fictional characters.
  • Votes: 1

    Centennial

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 1

    American Wife

    by Curtis Sittenfeld

  • Votes: 1

    The Witch's Kind

    by Louisa Morgan

  • Votes: 1

    Empire of the Summer Moon

    by S. C. Gwynne

  • Votes: 1

    Lock Every Door

    by Riley Sager

  • Votes: 1

    The White Rose Resists

    by Amanda Barratt

  • Votes: 1

    Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

    by Caitlin Doughty

  • Votes: 1

    Everybody Lies

    by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

  • Votes: 1

    Brown Girl Dreaming

    by Jacqueline Woodson

  • Votes: 1

    The Giver of Stars

    by Jojo Moyes

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK USA Today's top 100 books to read while stuck at home social distancing “I’ve been a huge Jojo Moyes fan. Her characters are so compelling. . . It’s such a great narrative about personal strength and really captures how books bring communities together.” –Reese Witherspoon From the author of Me Before You, set in Depression-era America, a breathtaking story of five extraordinary women and their remarkable journey through the mountains of Kentucky and beyond. Alice Wright marries handsome American Bennett Van Cleve hoping to escape her stifling life in England. But small-town Kentucky quickly proves equally claustrophobic, especially living alongside her overbearing father-in-law. So when a call goes out for a team of women to deliver books as part of Eleanor Roosevelt’s new traveling library, Alice signs on enthusiastically. The leader, and soon Alice's greatest ally, is Margery, a smart-talking, self-sufficient woman who's never asked a man's permission for anything. They will be joined by three other singular women who become known as the Packhorse Librarians of Kentucky. What happens to them--and to the men they love--becomes an unforgettable drama of loyalty, justice, humanity and passion. These heroic women refuse to be cowed by men or by convention. And though they face all kinds of dangers in a landscape that is at times breathtakingly beautiful, at others brutal, they’re committed to their job: bringing books to people who have never had any, arming them with facts that will change their lives. Based on a true story rooted in America’s past, The Giver of Stars is unparalleled in its scope and epic in its storytelling. Funny, heartbreaking, enthralling, it is destined to become a modern classic--a richly rewarding novel of women’s friendship, of true love, and of what happens when we reach beyond our grasp for the great beyond. SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE!
  • Votes: 1

    In the Heart of the Sea

    by Nathaniel Philbrick

  • Votes: 1

    The Code of the Woosters

    by P. G. Wodehouse

  • Votes: 1

    The world of Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Quartet

    by Maurizio Francesco Pagano Russo

  • Votes: 1

    The Sport Of Kings

    by C. E. Morgan

  • Votes: 1

    The Latehomecomer

    by Kao Kalia Yang

  • Votes: 1

    Long Bright River

    by Liz Moore

  • Votes: 1

    Bastard

    by Max de Radiguès

  • Votes: 1

    The Golden Notebook

    by Doris Lessing

  • Votes: 1

    The Plague

    by Albert Camus

    The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    Before and Again

    by Barbara Delinsky

  • Votes: 1

    Monsters Among Us

    by Monica Rodden

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Kings of Shanghai

    by Jonathan Kaufman

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Delights

    by Ross Gay

  • Votes: 1

    Tinkers

    by Paul Harding

  • Votes: 1

    The Troubles

    by Tim Pat Coogan

  • Votes: 1

    The Tenth Muse

    by Catherine Chung

  • Votes: 1

    Care of Wooden Floors

    by Will Wiles

  • Votes: 1

    A Croft in the Hills

    by Katharine Stewart

  • Votes: 1

    The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit

    by Lucette Lagnado

  • Votes: 1

    The Snow Child

    by Eowyn Ivey

  • Votes: 1

    The Ratline

    by Philippe Sands

  • Votes: 1

    Denmark Vesey

    by David Robertson

  • Votes: 1

    Born on a Blue Day

    by Daniel Tammet

  • Votes: 1

    The Archive of Alternate Endings

    by Lindsey Drager

  • Votes: 1

    The Good Lord Bird

    by James McBride

  • Votes: 1

    The Jane Austen Society

    by Natalie Jenner

  • Votes: 1

    The Henna Artist

    by Alka Joshi

  • Votes: 1

    Fordlandia

    by Greg Grandin

  • Votes: 1

    The Measure of a Man

    by Gene A. Getz

  • Votes: 1

    The Volunteer

    by Jack Fairweather

  • Votes: 1

    AMORALMAN

    by Derek DelGaudio

  • Votes: 1

    Civil Rights in America

    by Daniel McLinden

  • Votes: 1

    The House in the Cerulean Sea

    by TJ Klune

    A NEW YORK TIMES AND USA TODAY BESTSELLER! A 2021 Alex Award winner! The 2021 RUSA Reading List: Fantasy Winner! An Indie Next Pick! One of Publishers Weekly's "Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2020" One of Book Riot’s “20 Must-Read Feel-Good Fantasies” Lambda Literary Award-winning author TJ Klune’s bestselling, breakout contemporary fantasy that's "1984 meets The Umbrella Academy with a pinch of Douglas Adams thrown in." (Gail Carriger) Linus Baker is a by-the-book case worker in the Department in Charge of Magical Youth. He's tasked with determining whether six dangerous magical children are likely to bring about the end of the world. Arthur Parnassus is the master of the orphanage. He would do anything to keep the children safe, even if it means the world will burn. And his secrets will come to light. The House in the Cerulean Sea is an enchanting love story, masterfully told, about the profound experience of discovering an unlikely family in an unexpected place—and realizing that family is yours. "1984 meets The Umbrella Academy with a pinch of Douglas Adams thrown in." —Gail Carriger, New York Times bestselling author of Soulless At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
  • Votes: 1

    Chinese Cinderella

    by Adeline Yen Mah

  • Votes: 1

    The Spymaster of Baghdad

    by Margaret Coker

  • Votes: 1

    The Ardent Swarm

    by Yamen Manai

  • Votes: 1

    Washington Black

    by Esi Edugyan

    - TOP TEN BOOK OF THE YEAR: New York Times, Washington Post, TIME, Entertainment Weekly, Slate - ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: Boston Globe, NPR, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, The Economist, Bustle - WINNER OF THE SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE - FINALIST FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE, THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE, THE ROGERS WRITERS' TRUST PRIZE "Enthralling" --Boston Globe "Extraordinary" --Seattle Times "A rip-roaring tale" --Washington Post A dazzling adventure story about a boy who rises from the ashes of slavery to become a free man of the world. George Washington Black, or "Wash," an eleven-year-old field slave on a Barbados sugar plantation, is terrified to be chosen by his master's brother as his manservant. To his surprise, the eccentric Christopher Wilde turns out to be a naturalist, explorer, inventor, and abolitionist. Soon Wash is initiated into a world where a flying machine can carry a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning--and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human. But when a man is killed and a bounty is placed on Wash's head, Christopher and Wash must abandon everything. What follows is their flight along the eastern coast of America, and, finally, to a remote outpost in the Arctic. What brings Christopher and Wash together will tear them apart, propelling Wash even further across the globe in search of his true self. From the blistering cane fields of the Caribbean to the frozen Far North, from the earliest aquariums of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black tells a story of self-invention and betrayal, of love and redemption, of a world destroyed and made whole again, and asks the question, What is true freedom?
  • Votes: 1

    Klara and the Sun

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 1

    Perfumes

    by Luca Turin

  • Votes: 1

    Isaac's Storm

    by Erik Larson

  • Votes: 1

    Rachel Maddow

    by Lisa Rogak

  • Votes: 1

    Palace Walk

    by Naguib Mahfouz

  • Votes: 1

    Third Degree

    by Greg Iles

  • Votes: 1

    Brave Companions

    by David McCullough

  • Votes: 1

    A Peace to End All Peace

    by David Fromkin

  • Votes: 1

    A Rising Man

    by Abir Mukherjee

  • Votes: 1

    The Forgotten Garden

    by Kate Morton

  • Votes: 1

    The Woman in the Water

    by Charles Finch

  • Votes: 1

    Domestic Manners of the Americans

    by Frances Milton Trollope

  • Votes: 1

    Tokyo Ueno Station

    by Yu Miri

  • Votes: 1

    The Winter King

    by Christine Cohen

  • Votes: 1

    The Marriage of Opposites

    by Alice Hoffman

  • Votes: 1

    My Brilliant Friend

    by Elena Ferrante

    "Mi briljante venninne" er ei historie fortalt av Elena, som har oppdaga at den beste venninna hennar gjennom eit langt liv er sporlaust forsvunnen. Lila har tatt med seg alt ho eig og klipt vekk ansiktet sitt frå samtlege familiefotografi. Historia om dei to begynner i eit fattig, men pulserande nabolag i utkanten av Napoli. Dei to kløktige jentene lærer å stole på kvarandre - og ingen andre - i dei røffe gatene som er kontrollert av mafiaen. Romanen er eit portrett av to sterke kvinner, men òg historia om eit nabolag, ein by og eit land som gjennomgår store endringar frå 50-åra og fram til vår tid.
  • Votes: 1

    Girls on the Line

    by Aimie K. Runyan

  • Votes: 1

    Americanah

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

  • Votes: 1

    The Neighbors (Modern Middle East Literature in Translation)

    by Ahmad Mahmoud

  • Votes: 1

    Nomadland

    by Jessica Bruder

  • Votes: 1

    The Voices of Nîmes

    by Suzannah Lipscomb

    Most of the women who ever lived left no trace of their existence on the record of history. Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century women of the middling and lower levels of society left no letters or diaries in which they expressed what they felt or thought. Criminal courts and magistrates kept few records of their testimonies, and no ecclesiastical court records are known to survive for the French Roman Catholic Church between 1540 and 1667. For the most part, we cannot hear the voices of ordinary French women - but this study allows us to do so. Based on the evidence of 1,200 cases brought before the consistories - or moral courts - of the Huguenot church of Languedoc between 1561 and 1615, The Voices of Nîmes allows us to access ordinary women's everyday lives: their speech, behaviour, and attitudes relating to love, faith, and marriage, as well as friendship and sex. Women appeared frequently before the consistory because one of the chief functions of moral discipline was the regulation of sexuality, and women were thought to be primarily responsible for sexual sin. This means that the registers include over a thousand testimonies by and about women, most of whom left no other record to posterity. Women also featured so prominently before the consistories because of an ironic, unintended consequence of the consistorial system: it empowered women. Women quickly learnt how to use the consistory: they denounced those who abused them, they deployed the consistory to force men to honour their promises, and they started rumours they knew would be followed up by the elders. The registers therefore offer unrivalled evidence of women's agency, in this intensely patriarchal society, in a range of different contexts, such as their enjoyment of their sexuality, choice of marriage partners, or idiosyncratic spiritual engagement. The consistorial registers, therefore, let us see how independent, self-determining, and vocal women could be in an age when they had limited legal rights, little official power, and few prospects. As a result, this book suggests we need to reconceptualize female power: women's power was not just hidden, manipulative, and devious, but also far more public than historians have previously recognized.
  • Votes: 1

    The Historians

    by Cecilia Ekbäck

  • Votes: 1

    Ramsey's Gold

    by Russell Blake

  • Votes: 1

    Serial Killers

    by Peter Vronsky

  • Votes: 1

    Katherine

    by Anya Seton

  • Votes: 1

    The Dry

    by Jane Harper

  • Votes: 1

    The Real Isadora

    by Victor Ilyitch Seroff

  • Votes: 1

    Last Bus to Wisdom

    by Ivan Doig

  • Votes: 1

    These Truths

    by Jill Lepore

    The challenge of retelling five hundred years of American history in a single volume has been so daunting that hardly any historian has attempted it in decades. When Jill Lepore's New York Times best-selling These Truths appeared in 2018, critics quickly hailed it as a classic--appealing not only to academics, but to thousands of astonished general readers. Picking up the book out of a feeling of civic duty, they opened its pages to discover a different kind of writing, and what the Washington Post called "an honest reckoning with America's past"--a story filled with women and men and people of every color and religion, one that wrestles with the state of American politics, the legacy of slavery, the persistence of inequality, and the nature of technological change. With These Truths, Harvard historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore has produced a book that will shape our view of American history for decades to come.
  • Votes: 1

    Two Truths and a Lie

    by Ellen McGarrahan

  • Votes: 1

    Considerations on the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline (Hackett Classics)

    by Charles de Secondat Montesquieu

  • Votes: 1

    The Great Depression

    by Benjamin Roth

  • Votes: 1

    Disappearing Earth

    by Julia Phillips

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST One August afternoon, two sisters--Sophia, eight, and Alyona, eleven--go missing from a beach on the far-flung Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia. Taking us through the year that follows, Disappearing Earth enters the lives of women and girls in this tightly knit community who are connected by the crime: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. We are transported to vistas of rugged beauty--open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, dense forests, the glassy seas that border Japan and Alaska--and into a region as complex as it is alluring, where social and ethnic tensions have long simmered, and where outsiders are often the first to be accused. In a story as propulsive as it is emotionally engaging, Julia Phillips's powerful novel brings us to a new understanding of the intricate bonds of family and community, in a Russia unlike any we have seen before.
  • Votes: 1

    The Glass Palace

    by Amitav Ghosh

  • Votes: 1

    The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

    by Gabrielle Zevin

    Special Free Preview! In the spirit of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Gabrielle Zevin’s enchanting novel is a love letter to the world of books--and booksellers--that changes our lives by giving us the stories that open our hearts and enlighten our minds. On the faded Island Books sign hanging over the porch of the Victorian cottage is the motto "No Man Is an Island; Every Book Is a World." A. J. Fikry, the irascible owner, is about to discover just what that truly means. A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice Island--from Lambiase, the well-intentioned police officer who’s always felt kindly toward Fikry; from Ismay, his sister-in-law who is hell-bent on saving him from his dreary self; from Amelia, the lovely and idealistic (if eccentric) Knightley Press sales rep who keeps on taking the ferry over to Alice Island, refusing to be deterred by A.J.’s bad attitude. Even the books in his store have stopped holding pleasure for him. These days, A.J. can only see them as a sign of a world that is changing too rapidly. And then a mysterious package appears at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in weight. It’s that unexpected arrival that gives A. J. Fikry the opportunity to make his life over, the ability to see everything anew. It doesn’t take long for the locals to notice the change overcoming A.J.; or for that determined sales rep, Amelia, to see her curmudgeonly client in a new light; or for the wisdom of all those books to become again the lifeblood of A.J.’s world; or for everything to twist again into a version of his life that he didn’t see coming. As surprising as it is moving, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is an unforgettable tale of transformation and second chances, an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love.
  • Votes: 1

    Mayflower

    by Nathaniel Philbrick

  • Votes: 1

    Trouble

    by Gary D. Schmidt

    “Henry Smith’s father told him that if you build your house far enough away from Trouble, then Trouble will never find you.” But Trouble comes careening down the road one night in the form of a pickup truck that strikes Henry’s older brother, Franklin. In the truck is Chay Chouan, a young Cambodian from Franklin’s preparatory school, and the accident sparks racial tensions in the school—and in the well-established town where Henry’s family has lived for generations. Caught between anger and grief, Henry sets out to do the only thing he can think of: climb Mt. Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine, which he and Franklin were going to climb together. Along with Black Dog, whom Henry has rescued from drowning, and a friend, Henry leaves without his parents’ knowledge. The journey, both exhilarating and dangerous, turns into an odyssey of discovery about himself, his older sister, Louisa, his ancestry, and why one can never escape from Trouble.
  • Votes: 1

    Blue Moon

    by Lee Child

  • Votes: 1

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    Early Riser

    by Jasper Fforde

  • Votes: 1

    Piranesi

    by Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.
  • Votes: 1

    Open

    by Andre Agassi

    He is one of the most beloved athletes in history and one of the most gifted men ever to step onto a tennis court – but from early childhood Andre Agassi hated the game.
  • Votes: 1

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.