Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 156

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    An obese New Orleans misanthrope who constantly rebukes society, Ignatius Reilly gets a job at his mother's urging but ends up leading a workers' revolt, in a twentieth anniversary edition of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 62

    The Prince of Tides

    by Pat Conroy

  • Votes: 46

    Their Eyes Were Watching God

    by Zora Neale Hurston

    Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel by African-American writer Zora Neale Hurston. It is considered a classic of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, and it is likely Hurston's best known work.
  • Votes: 41

    Dispatches from Pluto

    by Richard Grant

    New Yorkers Grant and his girlfriend Mariah decided on a whim to buy an old plantation house in the Mississippi Delta. This is their journey of discovery to a remote, isolated strip of land, three miles beyond the tiny community of Pluto. They learn to hunt, grow their own food, and fend off alligators, snakes, and varmints galore. They befriend an array of unforgettable local characters, capture the rich, extraordinary culture of the Delta, and delve deeply into the Delta's lingering racial tensions. As the nomadic Grant learns to settle down, he falls not just for his girlfriend but for the beguiling place they now call home.
  • Votes: 33

    The Color Purple

    by Alice Walker

  • Votes: 30

    The Moviegoer

    by Walker Percy

  • Votes: 29

    Kingfish

    by Richard Downing White

    A portrait of one of America's most colorful political figures documents the career of Louisiana governor Huey Long, reassessing his controversial and paradoxical roles as demagogue or charismatic visionary in light of the Depression era that brought himinto the limelight.
  • Votes: 29

    The Sound and the Fury

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 26

    Invisible Man

    by Ralph Ellison

  • Votes: 26

    Fight Club

    by Chuck Palahniuk

    Every weekend, in basements and parking lots across the country, young men with good white-collar jobs and absent fathers take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded for as long as they have to. Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything. Fight Club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter and dark, anarchic genius. And it's only the beginning of his plans for revenge on a world where cancer support groups have the corner on human warmth.
  • Votes: 24

    Why New Orleans Matters

    by Tom Piazza

  • Votes: 24

    A Man in Full

    by Tom Wolfe

  • Votes: 23

    The Temple Bombing

    by Melissa Fay Greene

  • Votes: 22

    The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty

    by Eudora Welty

  • Votes: 22

    The Taste of Country Cooking

    by Edna Lewis

  • Votes: 21

    Rising Tide

    by John M. Barry

  • Votes: 21

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 20

    Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction
  • Votes: 20

    A Confederacy of Dunes

    by John Kennedy Toole

  • Votes: 18

    All the King's Men

    by Robert Penn Warren

    Willie Stark's obsession with political power leads to the ultimate corruption of his gubernatorial administration.
  • Votes: 16

    The Old Testament

    by Michael D. Coogan

  • Votes: 15

    The Warmth of Other Suns

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
  • Votes: 13

    Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer

    by Warren St. John

    A zany journey into the heart of football mania follows the author's odyssey by RV with the world's most obsessive sports fanatics to follow Alabama fans and their Crimson Tide team from game to game across the South, profiling the colorful individuals--including a couple who skipped their own daughter's wedding to attend a game--over the course of a full football season. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 12

    One Foot in Eden

    by Ron Rash

  • Votes: 12

    Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

    by John Berendt

  • Votes: 11

    Strangers in Their Own Land

    by Arlie Russell Hochschild

  • Votes: 8

    This Little Light of Mine

    by Darcy Pattison

  • Votes: 8

    The Mind of the South

    by W.J. Cash

  • Votes: 8

    Confederates in the Attic

    by Tony Horwitz

  • Votes: 8

    As I Lay Dying

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 7

    Light in August

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 6

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 5

    The Water Is Wide

    by Pat Conroy

  • Votes: 5

    The Deepest South of All

    by Richard Grant

  • Votes: 4

    Hellhound on His Trail

    by Hampton Sides

  • Votes: 4

    A Summons to Memphis

    by Peter Taylor

  • Votes: 3

    Mama Makes Up Her Mind

    by Bailey White

  • Votes: 3

    The Children

    by David Halberstam

  • Votes: 3

    The Complete Stories by Flannery O'Connor (2008-07-10)

    by Flannery O'Connor

  • Votes: 3

    Love in the Ruins

    by Walker Percy

  • Votes: 3

    It Never Rains in Tiger Stadium

    by John Ed Bradley

  • Votes: 3

    The Firm

    by Duff McDonald

    A behind-the-scenes, revelatory history of the controversial consulting firm traces its decades-long influence in both business and political arenas, citing its role in the establishment of mainstream practices and modern understandings about capitalism while evaluating the failures that have compromised its reputation. 60,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 3

    The Battle for Alabama's Wilderness

    by John Nevitt Randolph

    Using newspaper reports, Congressional testimony, interviews, and his own recollections, John Randolph traces the development of Alabama's environmental movement from its beginnings with the establishment of The Alabama Conservancy in the late 1960s and early '70s to the preservation efforts of present-day activist groups, such as the Alabama Environmental Council, the Cahaba River Society, and the Alabama Wilderness Alliance.
  • Votes: 3

    The Keepers of the House

    by Shirley Ann Grau

  • Votes: 3

    Deep South

    by Paul Theroux

  • Votes: 3

    The Yellow House

    by Sarah M. Broom

    A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR NONFICTION 'A major book that I suspect will come to be considered among the essential memoirs of this vexing decade' New York Times Book Review In 1961, Sarah M. Broom's mother Ivory Mae bought a shotgun house in the then-promising neighborhood of New Orleans East and built her world inside of it. It was the height of the Space Race and the neighborhood was home to a major NASA plant - the postwar optimism seemed assured. Widowed, Ivory Mae remarried Sarah's father Simon Broom; their combined family would eventually number twelve children. But after Simon died, six months after Sarah's birth, the house would become Ivory Mae's thirteenth and most unruly child. A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom's The Yellow House tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America's most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother's struggle against a house's entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina. The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser known natives, guided deftly by one of its native daughters, to demonstrate how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure. Located in the gap between the 'Big Easy' of tourist guides and the New Orleans in which Broom was raised, The Yellow House is a brilliant memoir of place, class, race, the seeping rot of inequality, and the internalized shame that often follows. It is a transformative, deeply moving story from an unparalleled new voice of startling clarity, authority and power.
  • Votes: 3

    North Toward Home

    by Willie Morris

  • Votes: 2

    The World That Made New Orleans

    by Ned Sublette

  • Votes: 2

    The Making of the Atomic Bomb

    by Richard Rhodes

  • Votes: 2

    A Clear View of the Southern Sky

    by Mary Hood

  • Votes: 2

    The Killer Angels

    by Michael Shaara

    It is the third summer of the war, June 1863, and Robert Lee's Confederate Army slips across the Potomac to draw out the Union Army. Lee's army is 70,000 strong and has won nearly every battle it has fought. The Union Army is 80,000 strong and accustomed to defeat and retreat. Thus begins the Battle of Gettysburg, the four most bloody and courageous days of America's history. Two armies fight for two goals - one for freedom, the other for a way of life. This is a classic, Pulitzer Prize-Winning, historical novel set during the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Votes: 2

    My Soul Is Rested

    by Howell Raines

  • Votes: 2

    A Walk on the Wild Side

    by Nelson Algren

  • Votes: 2

    Jitterbug Perfume

    by Tom Robbins

  • Votes: 2

    Dixieland Delight

    by Clay Travis

  • Votes: 2

    Blue Highways

    by William Least Heat Moon

  • Votes: 2

    A Turn in the South

    by V. S. Naipaul

  • Votes: 2

    The Heart

    by Maylis de Kerangal

  • Votes: 2

    Last Train to Memphis

    by Peter Guralnick

  • Votes: 2

    Caste

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. "[Caste] should be at the top of every American's reading list."--Chicago Tribune "As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power--which groups have it and which do not." In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people's lives and behavior and the nation's fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people--including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball's Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others--she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.
  • Votes: 2

    The Awakening

    by Nora Roberts

  • Votes: 2

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

    The classic study of human nature which depicts the degeneration of a group of schoolboys marooned on a desert island.
  • Votes: 1

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    A Walk Across America PAR PETER JENKINS

    by SETH ROFFMAN

  • Votes: 1

    The Perfect Pafko

    by Robert Booth

  • Votes: 1

    Goodnight Moon

    by Margaret Wise Brown

    In this classic of children's literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day. In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. "Goodnight room, goodnight moon." And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room—to the picture of the three little bears sitting on chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one—the little bunny says goodnight. One of the most beloved books of all time, Goodnight Moon is a must for every bookshelf and a time-honored gift for baby showers and other special events.
  • Votes: 1

    Salvage the Bones

    by Jesmyn Ward

  • Votes: 1

    What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

    by Elizabeth Catte

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Juror

    by John Grisham

  • Votes: 1

    A Southern Belle Primer

    by Maryln Schwartz

  • Votes: 1

    One Mississippi

    by Mark Childress

  • Votes: 1

    It Came From Memphis

    by Robert Gordon

  • Votes: 1

    Respect Yourself

    by F. J. Nkengasong

  • Votes: 1

    Travels with Charley in Search of America

    by John Steinbeck

    Steinbeck records his emotions and experiences during a journey of rediscovery in his native land
  • Votes: 1

    The Indigo Girl

    by Natasha Boyd

  • Votes: 1

    Hillbilly Elegy

    by J. D. Vance

  • Votes: 1

    Cold Mountain

    by Charles Frazier

  • Votes: 1

    The Land Where the Blues Began

    by Alan Lomax

  • Votes: 1

    The Courting of Marcus Dupree by Willie Morris (1983-10-01)

    by Willie Morris

  • Votes: 1

    The Little Friend

    by Donna Tartt

  • Votes: 1

    Murder in the Bayou

    by Ethan Brown

  • Votes: 1

    Suttree

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Zeitoun

    by Dave Eggers

  • Votes: 1

    The Third Life of Grange Copeland

    by Alice Walker

  • Votes: 1

    Stars and Bars by William Boyd (1985-03-06)

  • Votes: 1

    Cadillac Jack

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 1

    Friday Night Lights

    by H.G. Bissinger

  • Votes: 1

    The Accidental Tourist

    by Anne Tyler

  • Votes: 1

    Heavy

    by Kiese Laymon

  • Votes: 1

    New Orleans

    by T. R. Johnson

  • Votes: 1

    The Chitlin' Circuit

    by Preston Lauterbach

  • Votes: 1

    The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

    by Christopher Paul Curtis

  • Votes: 1

    Beale Street Dynasty

    by Preston Lauterbach

  • Votes: 1

    Old Money, New South

    by Dean W. Arnold

  • Votes: 1

    Sanctuary

    by Paola Mendoza

  • Votes: 1

    Where Dead Voices Gather

    by Nick Tosches

  • Votes: 1

    Ecology of a Cracker Childhood

    by Janisse Ray

  • Votes: 1

    Southern Provisions

    by David S. Shields

  • Votes: 1

    A Gathering of Old Men

    by Ernest J. Gaines

  • Votes: 1

    Men We Reaped

    by Jesmyn Ward

  • Votes: 1

    Ghosts of the Confederacy

    by Gaines M. Foster

  • Votes: 1

    The Ponder Heart

    by Eudora Welty

  • Votes: 1

    The Great Deluge

    by Douglas Brinkley

  • Votes: 1

    The Hamlet

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 1

    Car Wheels on a Gravel Road

    by Lucinda Cdpoly 558338 Williams

  • Votes: 1

    Sundown Towns

    by James W. Loewen

  • Votes: 1

    Southern Belly

    by John T. Edge

  • Votes: 1

    If I Ever Get Back to Georgia, I'm Gonna Nail My Feet to the Ground

    by Lewis Grizzard

  • Votes: 1

    Up Jumped the Devil

    by Bruce Conforth

  • Votes: 1

    A Time to Kill

    by John Grisham

  • Votes: 1

    Natchez Burning

    by Greg Iles

  • Votes: 1

    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

    by Mildred D. Taylor

  • Votes: 1

    Blues People

    by Leroi Jones

    "The path the slave took to 'citizenship' is what I want to look at. And I make my analogy through the slave citizen's music -- through the music that is most closely associated with him: blues and a later, but parallel development, jazz... [If] the Negro represents, or is symbolic of, something in and about the nature of American culture, this certainly should be revealed by his characteristic music." So says Amiri Baraka in the Introduction to Blues People, his classic work on the place of jazz and blues in American social, musical, economic, and cultural history. From the music of African slaves in the United States through the music scene of the 1960's, Baraka traces the influence of what he calls "negro music" on white America -- not only in the context of music and pop culture but also in terms of the values and perspectives passed on through the music. In tracing the music, he brilliantly illuminates the influence of African Americans on American culture and history.
  • Votes: 1

    Outliers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 1

    Praying for Sheetrock

    by Melissa Fay Greene

  • Votes: 1

    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

    by J.K. Rowling

  • Votes: 1

    Parting the Waters

    by Taylor Branch

  • Votes: 1

    Shearwater Pottery

    by Dod Stewart

  • Votes: 1

    Beloved

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 1

    Dreaming in Clay on the Coast of Mississippi

    by Christopher Maurer

  • Votes: 1

    Culture of Honor

    by Danny Silk

  • Votes: 1

    The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

    by Carson McCullers

  • Votes: 1

    Brother Ray

    by Ray Charles

    The world-famous musician talks about his childhood, his blindness, the years on the road developing and perfecting his musical style, and his attitudes toward women, drugs, religion, and death.
  • Votes: 1

    The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine

    by John D. Folse

  • Votes: 1

    Black Like Me

    by John Howard Griffin

  • Votes: 1

    Masters Of The Broken Watches

    by Razi Imam

  • Votes: 1

    White Flight

    by Kevin M. Kruse

  • Votes: 1

    The Potlikker Papers

    by John T. Edge

  • Votes: 1

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 1

    Crazy in Alabama

    by Mark Childress

  • Votes: 1

    Lolita

    by Vladimir Nabokov

  • Votes: 1

    Constitution of the Confederate States of America

    by The Confederate Provisional Government

  • Votes: 1

    The Education of Little Tree

    by Forrest Carter

  • Votes: 1

    Good Man

    by Nathan Clarkson