Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 43

    The Design of Everyday Things

    by Don Norman

  • Votes: 38

    Don't Make Me Think, Revisited

    by Steve Krug

    Offers observations and solutions to fundamental Web design problems, as well as a new chapter about mobile Web design.
  • Votes: 29

    Designing for the Digital Age

    by Kim Goodwin

    Whether you’re designing consumer electronics, medical devices, enterprise Web apps, or new ways to check out at the supermarket, today’s digitally-enabled products and services provide both great opportunities to deliver compelling user experiences and great risks of driving your customers crazy with complicated, confusing technology. Designing successful products and services in the digital age requires a multi-disciplinary team with expertise in interaction design, visual design, industrial design, and other disciplines. It also takes the ability to come up with the big ideas that make a desirable product or service, as well as the skill and perseverance to execute on the thousand small ideas that get your design into the hands of users. It requires expertise in project management, user research, and consensus-building. This comprehensive, full-color volume addresses all of these and more with detailed how-to information, real-life examples, and exercises. Topics include assembling a design team, planning and conducting user research, analyzing your data and turning it into personas, using scenarios to drive requirements definition and design, collaborating in design meetings, evaluating and iterating your design, and documenting finished design in a way that works for engineers and stakeholders alike.
  • Votes: 27

    The Humane Interface

    by Jef Raskin

    Cognetics and the locus of attention - Meanings, modes, monotony, and myths - Quantification - Unification - Navigation and other aspects of humane interfaces - Interface issues outside the user interface.
  • Votes: 27

    The Elements of Typographic Style

    by Robert Bringhurst

  • Votes: 27

    The Design Thinking Playbook

    by Michael Lewrick

    A radical shift in perspective to transform your organization to become more innovative The Design Thinking Playbook is an actionable guide to the future of business. By stepping back and questioning the current mindset, the faults of the status quo stand out in stark relief—and this guide gives you the tools and frameworks you need to kick off a digital transformation. Design Thinking is about approaching things differently with a strong user orientation and fast iterations with multidisciplinary teams to solve wicked problems. It is equally applicable to (re-)design products, services, processes, business models, and ecosystems. It inspires radical innovation as a matter of course, and ignites capabilities beyond mere potential. Unmatched as a source of competitive advantage, Design Thinking is the driving force behind those who will lead industries through transformations and evolutions. This book describes how Design Thinking is applied across a variety of industries, enriched with other proven approaches as well as the necessary tools, and the knowledge to use them effectively. Packed with solutions for common challenges including digital transformation, this practical, highly visual discussion shows you how Design Thinking fits into agile methods within management, innovation, and startups. Explore the digitized future using new design criteria to create real value for the user Foster radical innovation through an inspiring framework for action Gather the right people to build highly-motivated teams Apply Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Big Data Analytics, and Lean Start-up using new tools and a fresh new perspective Create Minimum Viable Ecosystems (MVEs) for digital processes and services which becomes for example essential in building Blockchain applications Practical frameworks, real-world solutions, and radical innovation wrapped in a whole new outlook give you the power to mindfully lead to new heights. From systems and operations to people, projects, culture, digitalization, and beyond, this invaluable mind shift paves the way for organizations—and individuals—to do great things. When you’re ready to give your organization a big step forward, The Design Thinking Playbook is your practical guide to a more innovative future.
  • Votes: 27

    How Design Makes the World

    by Scott Berkun

    Everything we use, from social media, to our homes, to our highways, was designed by someone. But how did they decide on what was good for the rest of us? What did they get right and where have they let us down? And what can we learn from the way these experts think that can help us in how we make decisions in our own lives? In How Design Makes The World, bestselling author and designer Scott Berkun takes readers on a journey exploring how designers of all kinds, from software engineers, to urban planners, have succeeded and failed us. By examining daily experiences like going to work, shopping for food, or even just using social media on their phones, readers will learn to see the world in a new and powerful way. They'll ask better questions of the things they buy, use, and make, and discover how easy it is to use ideas from great designers to improve their everyday lives.
  • Votes: 26

    Conversational Design

    by Erika Hall

  • Votes: 22

    The Inmates Are Running the Asylum

    by Alan Cooper

    Alan Cooper calls for a Software Revolution - his best-selling book now in trade paperback with new foreword and afterword.
  • Votes: 21

    UX Strategy

    by Jaime Levy

    User experience (UX) strategy requires a careful blend of business strategy and UX design, but until now, there hasn't been an easy-to-apply framework for executing it. This hands-on guide introduces lightweight strategy tools and techniques to help you and your team craft innovative multi-device products that people want to use. Whether you're an entrepreneur, UX/UI designer, product manager, or part of an intrapreneurial team, this book teaches simple-to-advanced strategies that you can use in your work right away. Along with business cases, historical context, and real-world examples throughout, you'll also gain different perspectives on the subject through interviews with top strategists. Define and validate your target users through provisional personas and customer discovery techniques Conduct competitive research and analysis to explore a crowded marketplace or an opportunity to create unique value Focus your team on the primary utility and business model of your product by running structured experiments using prototypes Devise UX funnels that increase customer engagement by mapping desired user actions to meaningful metrics
  • Votes: 20

    What CEOs Need To Know About Design

    by Audrey Crane

  • Votes: 20

    Creativity, Inc.

    by Ed Catmull

  • Votes: 16

    Lean UX

    by Jeff Gothelf

  • Votes: 13

    Practical Design Discovery

    by Dan Brown

  • Votes: 9

    The Mom Test

    by Rob Fitzpatrick

    The Mom Test is a quick, practical guide that will save you time, money, and heartbreak. They say you shouldn't ask your mom whether your business is a good idea, because she loves you and will lie to you. This is technically true, but it misses the point. You shouldn't ask anyone if your business is a good idea. It's a bad question and everyone will lie to you at least a little . As a matter of fact, it's not their responsibility to tell you the truth. It's your responsibility to find it and it's worth doing right . Talking to customers is one of the foundational skills of both Customer Development and Lean Startup. We all know we're supposed to do it, but nobody seems willing to admit that it's easy to screw up and hard to do right. This book is going to show you how customer conversations go wrong and how you can do better.
  • Votes: 9

    Just Enough Research

    by Erika Hall

  • Votes: 9

    Sense and Respond

    by Jeff Gothelf

  • Votes: 9

    Interviewing Users

    by Steve Portigal

  • Votes: 4

    Badass

    by Kathy Sierra

  • Votes: 3

    Understanding Comics

    by Scott McCloud

  • Votes: 3

    Emotional Design

    by Don Norman

  • Votes: 3

    Org Design for Design Orgs

    by Peter Merholz

    Design has become the key link between users and today’s complex and rapidly evolving digital experiences, and designers are starting to be included in strategic conversations about the products and services that enterprises ultimately deliver. This has led to companies building in-house digital/experience design teams at unprecedented rates, but many of them don’t understand how to get the most out of their investment. This practical guide provides guidelines for creating and leading design teams within your organization, and explores ways to use design as part of broader strategic planning. You’ll discover: Why design’s role has evolved in the digital age How to infuse design into every product and service experience The 12 qualities of effective design organizations How to structure your design team through a Centralized Partnership Design team roles and evolution The process of recruiting and hiring designers How to manage your design team and promote professional growth
  • Votes: 3

    The Elements of User Experience

    by Jesse James Garrett

    Provides an overview of the complexities of interactive Web design for non-designers, explaining the processes, methods, and vocabulary of user experience design.
  • Votes: 3

    Contextual Design

    by Karen Holtzblatt

  • Votes: 2

    From Chaos to Concept

    by Kevin C Braun

    This book is written for product design, software development, graphic design, and UX professionals with a focus on creating measurably better user experiences. If you want to design solutions to meet business goals and delight your users, you can look to this resource which covers the following areas: Creating and documenting goals, strategies, objectives, and tactics Defining or refining personas based on your measurable objectives (OKRs) Creating and iterating on scenarios based your prioritized personas A team approach to defining the product and roadmap to address critical use cases Team based divergent ideation and solution exploration Team based convergent solution definition Wireframing potential solutions for rapid research and iteration Using quantitative and qualitative methods to understand usage and test with users Exploring approaches to taxonomy and information architecture Using psychology and human factors to drive your design decisions Developing performant, accessible, maintainable experiences Using analytics to measure the results and inform the next iteration How this process differs based on the size of the company or team that is employing it
  • Votes: 1

    Designing with the Mind in Mind

    by Jeff Johnson

    Early user interface (UI) practitioners were trained in cognitive psychology, from which UI design rules were based. But as the field evolves, designers enter the field from many disciplines. Practitioners today have enough experience in UI design that they have been exposed to design rules, but it is essential that they understand the psychology behind the rules in order to effectively apply them. In Designing with the Mind in Mind, Jeff Johnson, author of the best selling GUI Bloopers, provides designers with just enough background in perceptual and cognitive psychology that UI design guidelines make intuitive sense rather than being just a list of rules to follow. * The first practical, all-in-one source for practitioners on user interface design rules and why, when and how to apply them. * Provides just enough background into the reasoning behind interface design rules that practitioners can make informed decisions in every project. * Gives practitioners the insight they need to make educated design decisions when confronted with tradeoffs, including competing design rules, time constrictions, or limited resources.