Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 90

    Terry pratchett discworld novel series 1

  • Votes: 76

    The world of Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Quartet

    by Maurizio Francesco Pagano Russo

  • Votes: 66

    City of Bohane

    by Kevin Barry

  • Votes: 65

    Strumpet City

    by James Plunkett

  • Votes: 36

    One Hundred Years of Solitude

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    Gabriel García Márquez's first novel One Hundred Years of Solitude was a sensation when first published in 1967. Translated into thirty-seven languages and selling over thirty million copies, it has become one of the key novels of the twentieth century - to be read, studied, emulated, enjoyed and loved over and over again. One Hundred Years of Solitude helped its author to the Nobel Prize for Literature and put Latin American literature firmly on the map. It also saw the world fall in love with an author whose every subsequent book was greeted by legions of devoted fans. Telling the story of the rise and fall of the town of Macondo and the generations of the Buendia family who found and then become trapped in it, One Hundred Years of Solitude is both tragic and comic, intimate and epic. 'A masterpiece and one of the undeniable classics of the century.' TES 'Enormously kaleidoscopically, mysteriously alive . . . reality and fantasy are indistinguishable.' Guardian
  • Votes: 28

    The Spinning Heart

    by Donal Ryan

  • Votes: 27

    Middlemarch (Penguin Classics)

    by George Eliot

  • Votes: 20

    Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

    by John Berendt

  • Votes: 18

    Buddenbrooks

    by Thomas Mann

  • Votes: 17

    Olive Kitteridge

    by Elizabeth Strout

    The world of Olive Kitteridge, a retired school teacher in a small coastal town in Maine, is revealed in stories that explore her diverse roles in many lives, including a lounge singer haunted by a past love, her stoic husband, and her own resentful son.
  • Votes: 16

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 14

    Shuggie Bain

    by Douglas Stuart

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020 Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020 The Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year 2020 'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' – Observer It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest. Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place. Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell. 'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' – The judges of the Booker Prize
  • Votes: 13

    The Corner

    by David Simon

  • Votes: 12

    The City & the City

    by China Miéville

    Inspector Tyador Borlâu must travel to Ul Qoma to search for answers in the murder of a woman found in the city of Besâzel.
  • Votes: 9

    Milkman

    by Anna Burns

  • Votes: 9

    The Dirty Dust

    by Mairtin O Cadhain

  • Votes: 9

    The Gormenghast Trilogy

    by Mervyn Peake

  • Votes: 9

    Sometimes a Great Notion

    by Ken Kesey

  • Votes: 9

    Cloudstreet

    by Tim Winton

  • Votes: 9

    Cannery Row

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 9

    The Pillars of the Earth

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 8

    Berlin Alexanderplatz (New York Review Books Classics)

    by Alfred Doblin

  • Votes: 7

    The Scapegoat

    by Sara Davis

  • Votes: 6

    The Master of Petersburg

    by J. M. Coetzee

  • Votes: 6

    Little Fires Everywhere

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 6

    Ulysses

    by James Joyce

  • Votes: 5

    Gorky Park (1) (The Arkady Renko Novels)

    by Martin Cruz Smith

  • Votes: 5

    The Snapper

    by Roddy Doyle

  • Votes: 5

    The Commitments

    by Roddy Doyle

  • Votes: 5

    Eureka Street by Robert McLiam Wilson (1997-06-16)

    by Robert McLiam Wilson

  • Votes: 5

    Piranesi

    by Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.
  • Votes: 5

    The Bridge on the Drina (Phoenix Fiction)

    by Ivo Andric

  • Votes: 5

    Perdido Street Station (Bas-Lag)

    by China Miéville

  • Votes: 4

    Knockemstiff by Donald Ray Pollock (2009-07-02)

    by Donald Ray Pollock

  • Votes: 4

    Sarum

    by Edward Rutherfurd

  • Votes: 4

    During the Reign of the Queen of Persia (New York Review Books (Paperback))

    by Joan Chase

  • Votes: 4

    Tales from Firozsha Baag by Rohinton Mistry (19-Oct-2006) Paperback

  • Votes: 4

    The News Where You Are by Catherine O'Flynn (2010-12-26)

    by Catherine O'Flynn

  • Votes: 4

    The Hobbit

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

    This lavish gift edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic features cover art, illustrations, and watercolor paintings by the artist Alan Lee. Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum. Written for J.R.R. Tolkien's own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.
  • Votes: 4

    Justine

    by Forsyth Harmon

  • Votes: 4

    Chocolat

    by Joanne Harris

  • Votes: 4

    Independent People

    by Halldor Laxness

  • Votes: 4

    Gilead

    by Marilynne Robinson

    As the Reverend John Ames approaches the hour of his own death, he writes a letter to his son chronicling three previous generations of his family, a story that stretches back to the Civil War and reveals uncomfortable secrets about the family of preachers. Reader's Guide available. Reprint.
  • Votes: 4

    Empire Falls

    by Richard Russo

  • Votes: 3

    The Balthazar Cookbook

    by Keith McNally

  • Votes: 3

    A Suitable Boy

    by Vikram Seth

  • Votes: 3

    Hillbilly Elegy by Vance, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens 2 Books Collection Set

    by Vance

  • Votes: 3

    The End of Vandalism

    by Tom Drury

  • Votes: 3

    Stephen King

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 3

    Winesburg, Ohio Sherwood Anderson

    by Sherwood Anderson

  • Votes: 3

    10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 3

    The Philosopher's Pupil

    by Iris Murdoch

  • Votes: 3

    My Name Is Red

    by Orhan Pamuk

    The Sultan secretly commissions a great book: a celebration of his life and the Ottoman Empire, to be illuminated by the best artists of the day - in the European manner. In Istanbul at a time of violent fundamentalism, however, this is a dangerous proposition. Even the illustrious circle of artists are not allowed to know for whom they are working. But when one of the miniaturists is murdered, their Master has to seek outside help. Did the dead painter fall victim to professional rivalry, romantic jealousy or religious terror? With the Sultan demanding an answer within three days, perhaps the clue lies somewhere in the half-finished pictures . . . From Turkey's winner of the Nobel Prize and author of Istanbul and The Museum of Innocence, this novel is a thrilling murder mystery set amid the splendour of Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire. Part fantasy and part philosophical puzzle, My Name is Red is also a stunning meditation on love, artistic devotion and the tensions between East and West.
  • Votes: 3

    Olive, Again

    by Elizabeth Strout

  • Votes: 3

    Infinite Country

    by Patricia Engel

  • Votes: 3

    The Cairo Trilogy

    by Naguib Mahfouz

  • Votes: 3

    Ohio

    by Stephen Markley

  • Votes: 3

    100 years of solitude

    by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

  • Votes: 2

    Make Me A City

    by Jonathan Carr

  • Votes: 2

    The Cultural Revolution

    by Frank Dikötter

    The concluding volume--following Mao's Great Famine and The Tragedy of Liberation--in Frank Dikötter's award-winning trilogy chronicling the Communist revolution in China. After the economic disaster of the Great Leap Forward that claimed tens of millions of lives from 1958–1962, an aging Mao Zedong launched an ambitious scheme to shore up his reputation and eliminate those he viewed as a threat to his legacy. The Cultural Revolution's goal was to purge the country of bourgeois, capitalistic elements he claimed were threatening genuine communist ideology. Young students formed the Red Guards, vowing to defend the Chairman to the death, but soon rival factions started fighting each other in the streets with semiautomatic weapons in the name of revolutionary purity. As the country descended into chaos, the military intervened, turning China into a garrison state marked by bloody purges that crushed as many as one in fifty people. The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962–1976 draws for the first time on hundreds of previously classified party documents, from secret police reports to unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches. After the army itself fell victim to the Cultural Revolution, ordinary people used the political chaos to resurrect the market and hollow out the party's ideology. By showing how economic reform from below was an unintended consequence of a decade of violent purges and entrenched fear, The Cultural Revolution casts China's most tumultuous era in a wholly new light.
  • Votes: 2

    Forever by Pete Hamill (2004-06-17)

  • Votes: 2

    The Garden of the Finzi-Continis

    by Giorgio Bassani

  • Votes: 2

    The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe (2002-01-11)

    by Patrick McCabe

  • Votes: 2

    A Long Long Way by Sebastian Barry (2006-04-06)

  • Votes: 2

    Viriconium

  • Votes: 2

    The Descent of the Drowned

    by Ana Lal Din

  • Votes: 2

    Disappearing Earth

    by Julia Phillips

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST One August afternoon, two sisters--Sophia, eight, and Alyona, eleven--go missing from a beach on the far-flung Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia. Taking us through the year that follows, Disappearing Earth enters the lives of women and girls in this tightly knit community who are connected by the crime: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. We are transported to vistas of rugged beauty--open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, dense forests, the glassy seas that border Japan and Alaska--and into a region as complex as it is alluring, where social and ethnic tensions have long simmered, and where outsiders are often the first to be accused. In a story as propulsive as it is emotionally engaging, Julia Phillips's powerful novel brings us to a new understanding of the intricate bonds of family and community, in a Russia unlike any we have seen before.
  • Votes: 2

    The Word for World is Forest

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 2

    Light a Penny Candle (Famous Firsts)

    by Maeve Binchy

  • Votes: 2

    1983

    by Taylor Downing

  • Votes: 2

    Open City

    by Teju Cole

  • Votes: 2

    44 Scotland Street (44 Scotland Street Series, Book 1)

    by Alexander McCall Smith

  • Votes: 2

    Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin (1996-04-05)

    by Armistead Maupin

  • Votes: 2

    Colleen McCullough.

    by Colleen McCullough

  • Votes: 2

    A Gentleman in Moscow

    by Amor Towles

    The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series "The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate." --The Wall Street Journal He can't leave his hotel. You won't want to. From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility--a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count's endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.
  • Votes: 2

    Memoirs of a Geisha

    by Arthur Golden

  • Votes: 2

    Shantaram

    by Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    The Deans Watch by Elizabeth Goudge (1991-03-02)

  • Votes: 1

    The Master and Margarita

    by Mikhail Bulgakov

    Presents a satirical drama about Satan's visit to Moscow, where he learns that the citizens no longer believe in God. He decides to teach them a lesson by perpetrating a series of horrific tricks. Combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem.
  • Votes: 1

    Lanny

    by Max Porter

  • Votes: 1

    Foods of the Azores Islands

    by Deolinda Maria Avila

  • Votes: 1

    The Savage Detectives

    by Roberto Bolano

  • Votes: 1

    Magical Realism

    by Lois Parkinson Zamora

  • Votes: 1

    A Man in Full

    by Tom Wolfe

  • Votes: 1

    The Mayor of Casterbridge

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 1

    The Night Watchman

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 1

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 1

    Oliver Twist (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

    Tells the story of a poor orphan's adventures in the criminal underworld of mid-nineteenth-century London.
  • Votes: 1

    The Last Convertible

    by Anton Myrer

  • Votes: 1

    White Teeth

    by Zadie Smith

  • Votes: 1

    The Dutch House

    by Ann Patchett

  • Votes: 1

    Anne of Green Gables, Complete 8-Book Box Set

    by L. M. Montgomery

  • Votes: 1

    My Struggle:

    by Karl Ove Knausgaard

    An autobiographical novel focuses on a young man trying to make sense of his place in the disjointed world that surrounds him.
  • Votes: 1

    A Little Life

    by Hanya Yanagihara

    "A little life, follows four college classmates --broke, adrift, and bouyed only by their friendship and ambition--as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves." --Back cover
  • Votes: 1

    A Star Called Henry

    by Roddy Doyle

  • Votes: 1

    The Sellout

    by Paul Beatty

  • Votes: 1

    Trinity

    by Leon Uris

    Recounts the interrelationships, clashes, and common concerns of the Catholic, hill-farming Larkins of Donegal, the aristocratic and British Hubbles, and the Scottish-Presbyterian MacLeods of Belfast during the years from the 1840's famine to the 1916 Easter Rising.
  • Votes: 1

    Less Than Zero

    by Bret Easton Ellis

    Set in Los Angeles in the early 1980s, a best-selling novel follows a cast of upper-class, good-looking, oversexed, drug-addled, thrill-seeking, college-age characters on the road to perdition. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Bleak House

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    Apeirogon

    by Colum McCann

  • Votes: 1

    The Chisellers (Agnes Browne Series)

    by Brendan O'Carroll

  • Votes: 1

    Elantris

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 1

    In Cold Blood

    by Truman Capote

  • Votes: 1

    Marcovaldo

    by Italo Calvino

  • Votes: 1

    The Beautiful Mrs. Seidenman by Andrzej Szczypiorski (1990-02-03)

  • Votes: 1

    Spoon River Anthology

    by Edgar Lee Masters

  • Votes: 1

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    A Scots Quair by Lewis Grassic Gibbon (2008-08-07)

  • Votes: 1

    The Dry

    by Jane Harper

  • Votes: 1

    Suttree

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    The Woman of Porto Pim

    by Antonio Tabucchi

  • Votes: 1

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 1

    Cutting for Stone

    by Abraham Verghese

    Marion and Shiva Stone are twin brothers born of a secret union between a beautiful Indian nun and a brash British surgeon. Orphaned by their mother’s death and their father’s disappearance and bound together by a preternatural connection and a shared fascination with medicine, the twins come of age as Ethiopia hovers on the brink of revolution. Moving from Addis Ababa to New York City and back again, Cutting for Stone is an unforgettable story of love and betrayal, medicine and ordinary miracles—and two brothers whose fates are forever intertwined.
  • Votes: 1

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 1

    Angela's Ashes

    by Frank McCourt

  • Votes: 1

    Galore by Michael Crummey (2011-03-29)

    by Michael Crummey;

  • Votes: 1

    A Strangeness in My Mind

    by Orhan Pamuk

  • Votes: 1

    War and Peace (Vintage Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

    Presents a new translation of the classic reflecting the life and times of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars, in a book accompanied by an index of historical figures, textual annotation, a chapter summary, and an introduction.
  • Votes: 1

    Ragged

    by Gretchen Ronnevik

  • Votes: 1

    Down And Out In Paris And London

    by George Orwell

  • Votes: 1

    The Third Policeman

    by Flann O'Brien

  • Votes: 1

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    by Milan Kundera

    A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals—while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel “the unbearable lightness of being.” A major achievement from one of the world’s truly great writers, Milan Kundera’s magnificent novel of passion and politics, infidelity and ideas, encompasses the extremes of comedy and tragedy, illuminating all aspects of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    Main Street

    by Sinclair Lewis

  • Votes: 1

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 1

    The Angel's Game

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

  • Votes: 1

    Cold Granite

    by Stuart MacBride

  • Votes: 1

    And the Land Lay Still by James Robertson (2011-06-02)

    by James Robertson

  • Votes: 1

    Family Matters by Rohinton Mistry (2002-04-08)

    by Rohinton Mistry

  • Votes: 1

    1940 Carson McCullers THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER HB/DJ 1st Ed.; 2nd Prtg Rare

    by Carson McCullers

  • Votes: 1

    Once Upon a River

    by Diane Setterfield

  • Votes: 1

    The City We Became

    by N. K. Jemisin

    'A glorious fantasy, set in that most imaginary of cities, New York' Neil Gaiman on THE CITY WE BECAME 'The most celebrated science fiction and fantasy writer of her generation... Jemisin seems able to do just about everything' NEW YORK TIMES 'Jemisin is now a pillar of speculative fiction, breathtakingly imaginative and narratively bold' ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY Five New Yorkers must band together to defend their city in the first book of a stunning new series by Hugo award-winning and New York Times bestselling author N. K. Jemisin. Every city has a soul. Some are as ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York City? She's got five. But every city also has a dark side. A roiling, ancient evil stirs beneath the earth, threatening to destroy the city and her five protectors unless they can come together and stop it once and for all. 'The most critically acclaimed author in contemporary science fiction and fantasy' GQ 'N. K. Jemisin is a powerhouse of speculative fiction' BUSTLE
  • Votes: 1

    The Given Day

    by Dennis Lehane

  • Votes: 1

    Shadow Country by Peter Matthiessen (2011-03-03)

    by Peter Matthiessen

  • Votes: 1

    A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    Queenie

    THE NUMBER TWO SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'Hilarious, compelling, painful, enlightening, honest. I loved it.' - Dolly Alderton 'Brilliant, timely, funny, heartbreaking' - Jojo Moyes 'A vital, often very funny novel' - The Sunday Times 'Inspirational, funny and wise' - Kit de Waal 'Perfect for anyone who loves Fleabag' - Mail on Sunday Queenie Jenkins can't cut a break. Well, apart from the one from her long term boyfriend, Tom. That's definitely just a break though. Definitely not a break up. Then there's her boss who doesn't seem to see her and her Caribbean family who don't seem to listen (if it's not Jesus or water rates, they're not interested). She's trying to fit in two worlds that don't really understand her. It's no wonder she's struggling. She was named to be queen of everything. So why is she finding it so hard to rule her own life? A darkly comic and bitingly subversive take on life, love, race and family, QUEENIE will have you nodding in recognition, crying in solidarity, and rooting for this unforgettable character every step of the way. Perfect for fans of Dolly Alderton, Elizabeth Day, Sally Rooney and Diana Evans, and anyone who loved Fleabag. ******** Praise for QUEENIE: 'I was engrossed and loved Queenie - her humour, her pain, her politics, her friends, her family.' - Diana Evans 'Candice gives so generously with her joy, pain and humour, that we cannot help but become fully immersed in the life of Queenie - a beautiful and compelling book.' - Afua Hirsch *This book has been printed with three different colour cover designs. We are unable to accept requests for a specific cover. The different covers will be assigned to orders at random*
  • Votes: 1

    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 1

    Shogun

    by James Clavell

  • Votes: 1

    Jitterbug Perfume

    by Tom Robbins