Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 36

    A Primate's Memoir

    by Robert M. Sapolsky

    In the tradition of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Robert Sapolsky, a foremost science writer and recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant, tells the mesmerizing story of his twenty-one years in remote Kenya with a troop of Savannah baboons. “I had never planned to become a savanna baboon when I grew up; instead, I had always assumed I would become a mountain gorilla,” writes Robert Sapolsky in this witty and riveting chronicle of a scientist’s coming-of-age in remote Africa. An exhilarating account of Sapolsky’s twenty-one-year study of a troop of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate’s Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti—for man and beast alike. Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa. As he conducts unprecedented physiological research on wild primates, he becomes evermore enamored of his subjects—unique and compelling characters in their own right—and he returns to them summer after summer, until tragedy finally prevents him. By turns hilarious and poignant, A Primate’s Memoir is a magnum opus from one of our foremost science writers.
  • Votes: 11

    Catch-22

    by J. Heller

  • Votes: 9

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 6

    A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole (2000-02-01)

    by John Kennedy Toole

  • Votes: 4

    What a Carve Up! (Penguin Street Art)

    by Jonathan Coe

  • Votes: 4

    The Picnic and Suchlike Pandemonium

  • Votes: 3

    At Swim-Two-Birds (Irish Literature)

    by Flann O'Brien

  • Votes: 3

    Last Chance to See

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 3

    The Screwtape Letters

    by C. S. Lewis

    The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis is a classic masterpiece of religious satire that entertains readers with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to "Our Father Below." At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis's The Screwtape Letters is the most engaging account of temptation—and triumph over it—ever written.
  • Votes: 3

    The Princess Bride

    by William Goldman

  • Votes: 3

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Hyperbole and a Half

    by Allie Brosh

  • Votes: 2

    Lamb

    by Christopher Moore

  • Votes: 2

    Portnoy's Complaint

    by Philip Roth

  • Votes: 2

    The World According to Garp

    by John Irving

  • Votes: 2

    Stark by Ben Elton (1989-03-02)

    by Ben Elton

  • Votes: 2

    The Chairs

    by Eugene Ionesco

  • Votes: 2

    The Big Bing

    by Stanley Bing

    A corporate mole's-eye view of the society in which we all live and toil, creating one of the most entertaining, thought provoking, and just plain funny bodies of work in contemporary letters. Stanley Bing knows whereof he speaks. He has lived the last two decades working inside a gigantic multinational corporation, kicking and screaming all the way up the ladder. He has seen it all -- mergers, acquisitions, layoffs, the death of the three-martini lunch -- and has himself been painfully re-engineered a number of times. He has eaten and drunk way too much, stayed in hotels far too good for him, waited for limousines in the pouring rain, and enjoyed it all. Sort of. Most importantly, Bing has seen management at its best and worst, and has practiced both as he made the transition from an inexperienced player who hated pompous senior management to a polished strategist who kind of sees its point of view now and then. In one essential volume, here is all you need to know to master your career, your life, and when necessary, other weaker life forms.
  • Votes: 2

    One More Thing

  • Votes: 2

    Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 2

    Come, Thou Tortoise by Jessica Grant (2009-03-10)

  • Votes: 1

    Gin Tama, Volume 1

    by Hideaki Sorachi

  • Votes: 1

    Hard Life

    by Flann O'Brien

  • Votes: 1

    Ham on Rye

    by Charles Bukowski

    In what is widely hailed as the best of his many novels, Charles Bukowski details the long, lonely years of his own hardscrabble youth in the raw voice of alter ego Henry Chinaski. From a harrowingly cheerless childhood in Germany through acne-riddled high school years and his adolescent discoveries of alcohol, women, and the Los Angeles Public Library's collection of D. H. Lawrence, Ham on Rye offers a crude, brutal, and savagely funny portrait of an outcast's coming-of-age during the desperate days of the Great Depression.
  • Votes: 1

    The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

    by Jonas Jonasson

    THE GLOBAL BESTSELLER Sitting quietly in his room in an old people's home, Allan Karlsson is waiting for a party he doesn't want to begin. His one-hundredth birthday party to be precise. The Mayor will be there. The press will be there. But, as it turns out, Allan will not . . . Escaping (in his slippers) through his bedroom window, into the flowerbed, Allan makes his getaway. And so begins his picaresque and unlikely journey involving criminals, several murders, a suitcase full of cash, and incompetent police. As his escapades unfold, Allan's earlier life is revealed. A life in which - remarkably - he played a key role behind the scenes in some of the momentous events of the twentieth century. Translated by Roy Bradbury.
  • Votes: 1

    Wonder Boys

    by Michael Chabon

  • Votes: 1

    As I Lay Dying

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 1

    The Futurological Congress by Stanislaw Lem (1976-05-01)

  • Votes: 1

    American Psycho

    by Bret Easton Ellis

  • Votes: 1

    Glamorama

    by Bret Easton Ellis