Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 14

    The Beginning of Infinity

    by David Deutsch

    A bold and all-embracing exploration of the nature and progress of knowledge from one of today's great thinkers. Throughout history, mankind has struggled to understand life's mysteries, from the mundane to the seemingly miraculous. In this important new book, David Deutsch, an award-winning pioneer in the field of quantum computation, argues that explanations have a fundamental place in the universe. They have unlimited scope and power to cause change, and the quest to improve them is the basic regulating principle not only of science but of all successful human endeavor. This stream of ever improving explanations has infinite reach, according to Deutsch: we are subject only to the laws of physics, and they impose no upper boundary to what we can eventually understand, control, and achieve. In his previous book, The Fabric of Reality, Deutsch describe the four deepest strands of existing knowledge-the theories of evolution, quantum physics, knowledge, and computation-arguing jointly they reveal a unified fabric of reality. In this new book, he applies that worldview to a wide range of issues and unsolved problems, from creativity and free will to the origin and future of the human species. Filled with startling new conclusions about human choice, optimism, scientific explanation, and the evolution of culture, The Beginning of Infinity is a groundbreaking book that will become a classic of its kind.
  • Votes: 12

    Knowledge And Decisions

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 12

    Impro

    by Keith Johnstone

  • Votes: 12

    How to Read a Book

    by Mortimer Jerome Adler

    Analyzes the art of reading and suggests ways to approach literary works
  • Votes: 12

    The Blind Watchmaker

    by Richard Dawkins

  • Votes: 12

    The Ascent of Man

    by Jacob Bronowski

  • Votes: 12

    The Theory of Moral Sentiments (Penguin Classics)

    by Adam Smith

  • Votes: 12

    The Strategy of Conflict

    by Thomas C. Schelling

    Analyzes the nature of international disagreements and conflict resolution in terms of game theory and non-zero-sum games.
  • Votes: 12

    How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read

    by Pierre Bayard

  • Votes: 10

    The Making of the Atomic Bomb

    by Richard Rhodes

  • Votes: 10

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 7

    East of Eden (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 6

    Viktor E Frankl Collection 2 Books Set (Man's Search For Meaning, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning)

    by Viktor E Frankl

  • Votes: 6

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Professor Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical—and sometimes devastating—breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, and incorporating full-color illustrations throughout the text, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behavior from the legacy of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging, and provocative, Sapiens integrates history and science to challenge everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our heritage...and our future.
  • Votes: 5

    The Psychology of Money

    by Morgan Housel

    Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.
  • Votes: 5

    1984

    by George Orwell

    Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities
  • Votes: 5

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides suggestions for successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations
  • Votes: 5

    The lessons of history

    by Will Durant

    2 distinguished historians express their evaluation of the nature of the human experience and what may be learned from it
  • Votes: 5

    Influence

    by Robert B. Cialdini

  • Votes: 5

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M. Pirsig

    Acclaimed as one of the most exciting books in the history of American letters, this modern epic became an instant bestseller upon publication in 1974, transforming a generation and continuing to inspire millions. This 25th Anniversary Quill Edition features a new introduction by the author; important typographical changes; and a Reader's Guide that includes discussion topics, an interview with the author, and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, the book becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions of how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is a touching and transcendent book of life.
  • Votes: 5

    On the Shortness of Life

    by Seneca

  • Votes: 5

    Left of Bang

    by Patrick Van Horne

  • Votes: 5

    Verbal Judo

    by George J. Thompson

  • Votes: 5

    Meditations

    by Marcus Aurelius

    The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 5

    Awareness

    by Anthony De Mello

    An inspirational course on the spiritual life focuses on the theme of awareness, discussing the issues of change, suffering, and loss, and explaining how to cope with one's emotions
  • Votes: 5

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    You can go after the job you want—and get it! You can take the job you have—and improve it! You can take any situation—and make it work for you! Dale Carnegie’s rock-solid, time-tested advice has carried countless people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. One of the most groundbreaking and timeless bestsellers of all time, How to Win Friends & Influence People will teach you: -Six ways to make people like you -Twelve ways to win people to your way of thinking -Nine ways to change people without arousing resentment And much more! Achieve your maximum potential—a must-read for the twenty-first century with more than 15 million copies sold!
  • Votes: 5

    Total Freedom

    by Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • Votes: 5

    Spiritual Enlightenment

    by Jed McKenna

    From a Spiritual Master Unlike Any, A Spiritual Masterpiece Like No Other AUTHOR, TEACHER AND SPIRITUAL MASTER Jed McKenna tells it like it's never been told before. A true American original, Jed succeeds where countless others have failed by reducing this highest of attainments - Spiritual Enlightenment - to the simplest of terms. Effectively demystifying the mystical, Jed astonishes the reader not by adding to the world's collected spiritual wisdom, but by taking the spirituality out of spiritual enlightenment. Never before has this elusive topic been treated in so engaging and accessible a manner. A masterpiece of illuminative writing, Spiritual Enlightenment is mandatory reading for anyone following a spiritual path. Part exposé and part how-to manual, this is the first book to explain why failure seems to be the rule in the search for enlightenment - and how the rule can be broken. Says Jed: The truth is that enlightenment is neither remote nor unattainable. It is closer than your skin and more immediate than your next breath. If we wonder why so few seem able to find that which can never be lost, we might recall the child who was looking in the light for a coin he dropped in the dark because "the light is better over here." Mankind has spent ages looking in the light for a coin that awaits us not in light and not in dark, but beyond all opposites. That is the message of this book: Spiritual enlightenment, pure and simple.
  • Votes: 5

    The Autobiography of Malcolm X

    by Malcolm X

    REA's MAXnotes for Alex Haley's *The Autobiography of Malcolm X* MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions. MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work's historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each chapter is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers. Amazon.com Review Malcolm X's searing memoir belongs on the small shelf of great autobiographies. The reasons are many: the blistering honesty with which he recounts his transformation from a bitter, self-destructive petty criminal into an articulate political activist, the continued relevance of his militant analysis of white racism, and his emphasis on self-respect and self-help for African Americans. And there's the vividness with which he depicts black popular culture--try as he might to criticize those lindy hops at Boston's Roseland dance hall from the perspective of his Muslim faith, he can't help but make them sound pretty wonderful. These are but a few examples. The Autobiography of Malcolm X limns an archetypal journey from ignorance and despair to knowledge and spiritual awakening. When Malcolm tells coauthor Alex Haley, "People don't realize how a man's whole life can be changed by one book," he voices the central belief underpinning every attempt to set down a personal story as an example for others. Although many believe his ethic was directly opposed to Martin Luther King Jr.'s during the civil rights struggle of the '60s, the two were not so different. Malcolm may have displayed a most un-Christian distaste for loving his enemies, but he understood with King that love of God and love of self are the necessary first steps on the road to freedom. --Wendy Smith Review Biography, published in 1965, of the American black militant religious leader and activist who was born Malcolm Little. Written by Alex Haley, who had conducted extensive audiotaped interviews with Malcolm X just before his assassination in 1965, the book gained renown as a classic work on black American experience. The Autobiography recounts the life of Malcolm X from his traumatic childhood plagued by racism to his years as a drug dealer and pimp, his conversion to the Black Muslim sect (Nation of Islam) while in prison for burglary, his subsequent years of militant activism, and the turn late in his life to more orthodox Islam. --The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature
  • Votes: 5

    The Lord of the Rings Illustrated Edition

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 4

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

    by William James

  • Votes: 4

    The Social Contract

    by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  • Votes: 4

    Gardens of the Moon (Malazan Book of the Fallen, 1)

    by Steven Erikson

  • Votes: 4

    The Wealth of Nations

    by Adam Smith

    The classic eighteenth-century treatise on the principles of political economics is presented in a definitive text with an introduction, chronology, and index.
  • Votes: 4

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

    by Stephen R. Covey

  • Votes: 4

    12 Rules for Life

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 3

    Life 3.0

    by Max Tegmark

    Beschrijving van de mogelijke gevolgen van kunstmatige intelligentie.
  • Votes: 3

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

    Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this multi-million-copy New York Times bestseller is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control – from the author of The Laws of Human Nature. In the book that People magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum. Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.
  • Votes: 3

    Count of Monte Christo (World's Greatest Literature, 4)

    by Alexander Dumas

  • Votes: 3

    A History of Western Philosophy

    by Bertrand Russell

  • Votes: 3

    Big History

    by DK

    Featuring a foreword by the father of Big History, David Christian, and produced in association with the Big History Institute, Big History provides a comprehensive understanding of the major events that have changed the nature and course of life on the planet we call home. This first fully integrated visual reference on Big History for general readers places humans in the context of our universe, from the Big Bang to virtual reality. Why does the universe work the way it does? Why are stars so big? Why are humans so small? What does it mean to be human? Big History blends geology, biology, physics, anthropology, sociology, and so much more to tell one coherent story, taking us right back to our origins and exploring how a unique series of events led to and then impacted human existence: how everything came to be, where we fit in, and even where we are going. Graphics, artworks, timelines, and at-a-glance overviews make the causes and effects of pivotal events and major thresholds in Big History instantly accessible, and evidence features explain how we know what we know. An additional 64-page reference section provides a more conventional account of events in human history. Placing humans in the context of our universe and revealing how and why we got to where we are today, Big History covers 13.8 billion years of history, from the formation of the universe and the dawn of time to the present day.
  • Votes: 3

    The Road to Reality

    by Roger Penrose

    Presents an overview of the physical laws of the universe, with an explanation of the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics, cosmology, the Big Bang, black holes, and string and M theory.
  • Votes: 3

    Shadow Country (Modern Library Paperbacks)

    by Peter Matthiessen

  • Votes: 3

    The Bitcoin Standard

    by Saifedean Ammous

    When a pseudonymous programmer introduced “a new electronic cash system that’s fully peer-to-peer, with no trusted third party” to a small online mailing list in 2008, very few paid attention. Ten years later, and against all odds, this upstart autonomous decentralized software offers an unstoppable and globally-accessible hard money alternative to modern central banks. The Bitcoin Standard analyzes the historical context to the rise of Bitcoin, the economic properties that have allowed it to grow quickly, and its likely economic, political, and social implications. While Bitcoin is a new invention of the digital age, the problem it purports to solve is as old as human society itself: transferring value across time and space. Ammous takes the reader on an engaging journey through the history of technologies performing the functions of money, from primitive systems of trading limestones and seashells, to metals, coins, the gold standard, and modern government debt. Exploring what gave these technologies their monetary role, and how most lost it, provides the reader with a good idea of what makes for sound money, and sets the stage for an economic discussion of its consequences for individual and societal future-orientation, capital accumulation, trade, peace, culture, and art. Compellingly, Ammous shows that it is no coincidence that the loftiest achievements of humanity have come in societies enjoying the benefits of sound monetary regimes, nor is it coincidental that monetary collapse has usually accompanied civilizational collapse. With this background in place, the book moves on to explain the operation of Bitcoin in a functional and intuitive way. Bitcoin is a decentralized, distributed piece of software that converts electricity and processing power into indisputably accurate records, thus allowing its users to utilize the Internet to perform the traditional functions of money without having to rely on, or trust, any authorities or infrastructure in the physical world. Bitcoin is thus best understood as the first successfully implemented form of digital cash and digital hard money. With an automated and perfectly predictable monetary policy, and the ability to perform final settlement of large sums across the world in a matter of minutes, Bitcoin’s real competitive edge might just be as a store of value and network for final settlement of large payments—a digital form of gold with a built-in settlement infrastructure. Ammous’ firm grasp of the technological possibilities as well as the historical realities of monetary evolution provides for a fascinating exploration of the ramifications of voluntary free market money. As it challenges the most sacred of government monopolies, Bitcoin shifts the pendulum of sovereignty away from governments in favor of individuals, offering us the tantalizing possibility of a world where money is fully extricated from politics and unrestrained by borders. The final chapter of the book explores some of the most common questions surrounding Bitcoin: Is Bitcoin mining a waste of energy? Is Bitcoin for criminals? Who controls Bitcoin, and can they change it if they please? How can Bitcoin be killed? And what to make of all the thousands of Bitcoin knock-offs, and the many supposed applications of Bitcoin’s ‘blockchain technology’? The Bitcoin Standard is the essential resource for a clear understanding of the rise of the Internet’s decentralized, apolitical, free-market alternative to national central banks.
  • Votes: 3

    Amusing Ourselves to Death

    by Neil Postman

    Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos)

    by Dan Simmons

  • Votes: 3

    Computational Thinking and Coding for Every Student

    by Jane Krauss

  • Votes: 3

    The Obstacle Is the Way

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 3

    Antifragile

    by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    Shares insights into how adversity can bring out the best in individuals and communities, drawing on multiple disciplines to consider such topics as the superiority of city states over nation states and the drawbacks of debt.
  • Votes: 3

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 2

    The Sirens of Titan

    by Kurt Vonnegut

    When Winston Niles Rumfoord flies his spaceship into a chrono-synclastic infundibulum he is converted into pure energy and only materializes when his waveforms intercept Earth or some other planet. As a result, he only gets home to Newport, Rhode Island, once every fifty-nine days and then only for an hour. But at least, as a consolation, he now knows everything that has ever happened and everything that ever will be. He knows, for instance, that his wife is going to Mars to mate with Malachi Constant, the richest man in the world. He also knows that on Titan - one of Saturn's moons - is an alien from the planet Tralfamadore, who has been waiting 200,000 years for a spare part for his grounded spacecraft ...
  • Votes: 2

    The Theory That Would Not Die

    by Sharon Bertsch Mcgrayne

  • Votes: 2

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 2

    The Kybalion

    by Three Initiates

  • Votes: 2

    My System & Chess Praxis

    by Aron Nimzowitsch

  • Votes: 2

    Confidence Game

    by Christine S. Richard

  • Votes: 2

    Guns, Germs, and Steel

    by Jared Diamond Ph.D.

    "Fascinating.... Lays a foundation for understanding human history."—Bill Gates In this "artful, informative, and delightful" (William H. McNeill, New York Review of Books) book, Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed religion --as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war --and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, the Rhone-Poulenc Prize, and the Commonwealth club of California's Gold Medal.
  • Votes: 2

    Jayber Crow

    by Wendell Berry

  • Votes: 2

    Long Way Down

    by Jason Reynolds

  • Votes: 2

    Ask the Dust by John Fante (1980-03-08)

    by John Fante

  • Votes: 2

    The Intellectual Life

    by OP A. G. Sertillanges

  • Votes: 2

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 2

    The Molecule of More

    by Daniel Z. Lieberman

  • Votes: 2

    A Brief History of Time

    by Stephen Hawking

    An anniversary edition of a now-classic survey of the origin and nature of the universe features a new introduction by the author and a new chapter on the possibility of time travel and "wormholes" in space
  • Votes: 2

    Das Kapital

    by Karl Marx

  • Votes: 2

    One Second After (A John Matherson Novel, 1)

    by William R. Forstchen

  • Votes: 2

    The Body

    by Bill Bryson

  • Votes: 2

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    by Bill Bryson

  • Votes: 2

    The Goal

    by Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    "Includes case study interviews"--Cover.
  • Votes: 2

    Obstacle Is The Way

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 2

    Everybody Poops!

    by Justine Avery

    Taking the taboo out of POO! Everybody poops-it's true! It's time to blow the door right off the bathroom, and shine a light on what happens on the loo. For the little ones just discovering the contents of their diapers and nappies, the bigger ones needing reassurance that their most mysterious bodily function is as natural as can be, and the biggest ones who still hold a fondness for toilet humor, Everybody Poops! is piled high with bold and audacious illustrations and the truth about who's doing the pooing: every body is doing it! Sure to insight giggling fits and all-ages laughter, Everybody Poops! exposes the least talked about fact we all have in common the world over and among all walks of life, benefiting the youngest of us by opening the discussion, promoting comfort with their bodies, and helping them feel included. Poo pride!
  • Votes: 2

    Candide

    by Voltaire

  • Votes: 1

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    Edmund Dantes, unjustly convicted of aiding the exiled Napoleon, escapes after fourteen years of imprisonment and seeks his revenge in Paris.
  • Votes: 1

    A Short History of Decay

    by E. M. Cioran

  • Votes: 1

    Letters from a Stoic (Penguin Classics)

    by Lucius Annaeus Seneca

    A philosophy that saw self-possession as the key to an existence lived 'in accordance with nature', Stoicism called for the restraint of animal instincts and the severing of emotional ties. These beliefs were formulated by the Athenian followers of Zeno in the fourth century BC, but it was in Seneca (c. 4 BC- AD 65) that the Stoics found their most eloquent advocate. Stoicism, as expressed in the Letters, helped ease pagan Rome's transition to Christianity, for it upholds upright ethical ideals and extols virtuous living, as well as expressing disgust for the harsh treatment of slaves and the inhumane slaughters witnessed in the Roman arenas. Seneca's major contribution to a seemingly unsympathetic creed was to transform it into a powerfully moving and inspiring declaration of the dignity of the individual mind.
  • Votes: 1

    The Confessions Of St. Augustine - The Classic Autobiography

    by Saint Augustine

  • Votes: 1

    The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius

    by Boethius

  • Votes: 1

    The Utopia of Rules

    by David Graeber

  • Votes: 1

    Be As You Are

    by Sri Ramana Maharshi

  • Votes: 1

    Basic Economics

    by Thomas Sowell

    An accessible, jargon-free resource outlines the principles behind each major type of economy including capitalist, socialist, and feudal, in terms of the incentives each creates.
  • Votes: 1

    The Selfish Gene

    by Richard Dawkins

    With a new epilogue to the 40th anniversary edition.
  • Votes: 1

    The Essential Rumi, New Expanded Edition

    by Jalal al-Din Rumi

  • Votes: 1

    The Origin of Species

    by Charles Darwin

    States the evidence for a theory of evolution, explains how evolution takes place, and discusses instinct, hybridism, fossils, distribution and classification.
  • Votes: 1

    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    by Leo Tolstoy

  • Votes: 1

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    The Rational Optimist

    by Matt Ridley

  • Votes: 1

    How I Misunderstood Love

    by Hitesh Sharma

  • Votes: 1

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.