Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 123

    One Up On Wall Street

    by Peter Lynch

    The manager of a top investment fund discusses how individuals can make a killing in the market through research and investment techniques that confound conventional market wisdom.
  • Votes: 65

    A Random Walk Down Wall Street

    by Burton G. Malkiel

    An informative, timely, and irreverent guide to financial investment offers a close-up look at the current high-tech boom, explains how to maximize gains and minimize losses, and examines a broad spectrum of financial opportunities, from mutual funds to real estate to gold, especially in light of the dot-com crash.
  • Votes: 44

    The Psychology of Money

    by Morgan Housel

    Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.
  • Votes: 40

    You Can Be a Stock Market Genius

    by Joel Greenblatt

    A comprehensive and practical guide to the stock market from a successful fund manager—filled with case studies, important background information, and all the tools you’ll need to become a stock market genius. Fund manager Joel Greenblatt has been beating the Dow (with returns of 50 percent a year) for more than a decade. And now, in this highly accessible guide, he’s going to show you how to do it, too. You’re about to discover investment opportunities that portfolio managers, business-school professors, and top investment experts regularly miss—uncharted areas where the individual investor has a huge advantage over the Wall Street wizards. Here is your personal treasure map to special situations in which big profits are possible, including: · Spin-offs · Restructurings · Merger Securities · Rights Offerings · Recapitalizations · Bankruptcies · Risk Arbitrage
  • Votes: 34

    Margin of Safety

    by Seth A. Klarman

  • Votes: 27

    Value Investing

    by Bruce C. Greenwald

  • Votes: 25

    The Startup Owner's Manual

    by Steve Blank

  • Votes: 25

    Smarter Investing

    by Tim Hale

    ‘A book of investment wisdom' John C Bogle, Founder, Vanguard ‘Delightfully clear thinking', Charles D Ellis, Founder of Greenwich Associates ‘This book is a ‘must read' for anyone with personal, trust or pension assets to invest', Mark R Richardson, former CEO Chase Asset Management Simple and effective advice for anyone who wants their money to work harder than they do. Most investment books offer a bewildering array of complex strategies for how best to invest your money. But often the chances of success are remote and the rules are impossible to follow in practice. Smarter Investingintroduces you to a simple and powerful set of rules for successful investing, helping you to build an investment portfolio that suits your needs, stays the course when markets get rough and quietly gets on with the job of generating better results. In this updated and revised edition, Tim Hale gives you all the advice you'll need and demonstrates that the key to successful investing is to do a few straightforward things exceptionally well. Smarter Investingwill help you: Establish what you want your money to do for you Work out how much money you need to achieve your goals Avoid the mistakes that generations of investors have made Build a balanced portfolio that's right for you, using a simple set of understandable and accessible building blocks Select robust and transparent investment products easily and effectively Tim Halespent over 15 years in the active investment management world, working in London, New York, Hong Kong and Tokyo. Today he provides consulting and training to the investment and wealth management industry through his firm, Albion Strategic Consulting.
  • Votes: 24

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    by Daniel Kahneman

  • Votes: 22

    The Most Important Thing

    by Howard Marks

    This book explains the keys to successful investment and the pitfalls that can destroy capital or ruin a career. Utilizing passages from his memos to illustrate his ideas, Marks teaches by example, detailing the development of an investment philosophy that fully acknowledges the complexities of investing and the perils of the financial world. Brilliantly applying insight to today's volatile markets, Marks offers a volume that is part memoir, part creed, with a number of broad takeaways.
  • Votes: 22

    The Intelligent Investor

    by Benjamin Graham

  • Votes: 22

    The Little Book of Common Sense Investing

    by John C. Bogle

    The best-selling investing "bible" offers new information, new insights, and new perspectives The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is the classic guide to getting smart about the market. Legendary mutual fund pioneer John C. Bogle reveals his key to getting more out of investing: low-cost index funds. Bogle describes the simplest and most effective investment strategy for building wealth over the long term: buy and hold, at very low cost, a mutual fund that tracks a broad stock market Index such as the S&P 500. While the stock market has tumbled and then soared since the first edition of Little Book of Common Sense was published in April 2007, Bogle’s investment principles have endured and served investors well. This tenth anniversary edition includes updated data and new information but maintains the same long-term perspective as in its predecessor. Bogle has also added two new chapters designed to provide further guidance to investors: one on asset allocation, the other on retirement investing. A portfolio focused on index funds is the only investment that effectively guarantees your fair share of stock market returns. This strategy is favored by Warren Buffett, who said this about Bogle: “If a statue is ever erected to honor the person who has done the most for American investors, the hands-down choice should be Jack Bogle. For decades, Jack has urged investors to invest in ultra-low-cost index funds. . . . Today, however, he has the satisfaction of knowing that he helped millions of investors realize far better returns on their savings than they otherwise would have earned. He is a hero to them and to me.” Bogle shows you how to make index investing work for you and help you achieve your financial goals, and finds support from some of the world's best financial minds: not only Warren Buffett, but Benjamin Graham, Paul Samuelson, Burton Malkiel, Yale’s David Swensen, Cliff Asness of AQR, and many others. This new edition of The Little Book of Common Sense Investing offers you the same solid strategy as its predecessor for building your financial future. Build a broadly diversified, low-cost portfolio without the risks of individual stocks, manager selection, or sector rotation. Forget the fads and marketing hype, and focus on what works in the real world. Understand that stock returns are generated by three sources (dividend yield, earnings growth, and change in market valuation) in order to establish rational expectations for stock returns over the coming decade. Recognize that in the long run, business reality trumps market expectations. Learn how to harness the magic of compounding returns while avoiding the tyranny of compounding costs. While index investing allows you to sit back and let the market do the work for you, too many investors trade frantically, turning a winner’s game into a loser’s game. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing is a solid guidebook to your financial future.
  • Votes: 21

    Mastering the Market Cycle

    by Howard Marks

  • Votes: 20

    Expectations Investing

    by Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.
  • Votes: 15

    Beating the Street

    by Peter Lynch

  • Votes: 13

    Liar's Poker

    by Michael Lewis

    The author recounts his experiences on the lucrative Wall Street bond market of the 1980s, where young traders made millions in a very short time, in a humorous account of greed and epic folly.
  • Votes: 12

    Cable Cowboy

    by Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.
  • Votes: 12

    The Money Machine

    by Philip Coggan

    What happens in the City has never affected us more In this excellent guide, now fully revised and updated, leading financial journalist Philip Coggan cuts through the headlines, the scandals and the jargon to explain the nuts and bolts of the financial system. What causes the pound to rise or interest rates to fall? Which are the institutions that really matter? Why is it we need the Money Machine – and what happens when it crashes? Coggan provides clear and concise answers and shows why we should all be more familiar with a system we so intimately depend upon.
  • Votes: 12

    If You Can

    by William J Bernstein

  • Votes: 9

    Systemantics

    by John Gall

  • Votes: 7

    The Little Book That Still Beats the Market

    by Joel Greenblatt

    In 2005, Joel Greenblatt published a book that is already considered one of the classics of finance literature. In The Little Book that Beats the Market—a New York Times bestseller with 300,000 copies in print—Greenblatt explained how investors can outperform the popular market averages by simply and systematically applying a formula that seeks out good businesses when they are available at bargain prices. Now, with a new Introduction and Afterword for 2010, The Little Book that Still Beats the Market updates and expands upon the research findings from the original book. Included are data and analysis covering the recent financial crisis and model performance through the end of 2009. In a straightforward and accessible style, the book explores the basic principles of successful stock market investing and then reveals the author’s time-tested formula that makes buying above average companies at below average prices automatic. Though the formula has been extensively tested and is a breakthrough in the academic and professional world, Greenblatt explains it using 6th grade math, plain language and humor. He shows how to use his method to beat both the market and professional managers by a wide margin. You’ll also learn why success eludes almost all individual and professional investors, and why the formula will continue to work even after everyone “knows” it. While the formula may be simple, understanding why the formula works is the true key to success for investors. The book will take readers on a step-by-step journey so that they can learn the principles of value investing in a way that will provide them with a long term strategy that they can understand and stick with through both good and bad periods for the stock market. As the Wall Street Journal stated about the original edition, “Mr. Greenblatt...says his goal was to provide advice that, while sophisticated, could be understood and followed by his five children, ages 6 to 15. They are in luck. His ‘Little Book’ is one of the best, clearest guides to value investing out there.”
  • Votes: 6

    Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings

    by Philip A. Fisher

    Widely respected and admired, Philip Fisher is among the most influential investors of all time. His investment philosophies, introduced almost forty years ago, are not only studied and applied by today's financiers and investors, but are also regarded by many as gospel. This book is invaluable reading and has been since it was first published in 1958. The updated paperback retains the investment wisdom of the original edition and includes the perspectives of the author's son Ken Fisher, an investment guru in his own right in an expanded preface and introduction "I sought out Phil Fisher after reading his Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits...A thorough understanding of the business, obtained by using Phil's techniques...enables one to make intelligent investment commitments." —Warren Buffet
  • Votes: 6

    The Richest Man In Babylon - Original Edition

    by George S Clason

    The Richest Man in Babylon, based on "Babylonian parables", has been hailed as the greatest of all inspirational works on the subject of thrift, financial planning, and personal wealth. In simple language, these fascinating and informative stories set you on a sure path to prosperity and its accompanying joys. A celebrated bestseller, it offers an understanding and a solution to your personal financial problem. Revealed inside are the secrets to acquiring money, keeping money, and making money earn more money. Gold Edition includes bonus material: The Magic Story by Frederick Van Dey. The Magic Story: My task is done. I have written the recipe for "success." If followed, it cannot fail. Wherein I may not be entirely comprehended, the plus-entity of whosoever reads will supply the deficiency; and upon that Better Self of mine, I place the burden of imparting to generations that are to come, the secret of this all-pervading good, - the secret of being what you have it within you to be. It is claimed that many who read or hear this story almost immediately begin to have good fortune - so it is worth a few minutes of your time to find out if it works for you?
  • Votes: 5

    The Millionaire Next Door

    by Thomas J. Stanley

  • Votes: 5

    The Money Game

    by Adam Smith

    “The best book there is about the stock market”—timeless investing basics by the host of the Emmy Award–winning show Adam Smith’s Money World (The New York Times Book Review). This essential book takes readers to the Street to learn about the intricacies of money and how the stock market impacts every area of our lives. According to the author, the key to making wise, lucrative investments is knowing ourselves. In witty, easily accessible language, he shares pithy insights about the role of intuition and the psychology of guilt, arguing that there is no substitute for information. Smith’s Irregular Rules shatter common myths and misconceptions, revealing why nothing works all the time and illustrating how greed and fear fuel the market. Readers will learn about the safest types of investing, the key to following market trends, and how to capitalize growth, gleaning tips on stock movers, winners and losers, and much more. Peppered with entertaining and prescient anecdotes, The Money Game analyzes who makes the really big money and explores the meaning of our desire to become rich. From selling short and buying long to Wall Street’s crowd mentality, from what constitutes a random walk to why timing is everything, this is the definitive portrait of the Street, then and now.
  • Votes: 4

    The Decision-Making Process of Investor-State Arbitration Tribunals (International Arbitration Law Library Series Set)

    by Mary Mitsi

  • Votes: 4

    Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

    by Edwin Lefèvre

    First published in 1923, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator is the most widely read, highly recommended investment book ever. Generations of readers have found that it has more to teach them about markets and people than years of experience. Among the most compelling and enduring pieces ever written on trading, the new Illustrated Edition brings this story to life like never before. "Although Reminiscences...was first published some seventy years ago, its take on crowd psychology and market timing is as timely as last summer's frenzy on the foreign exchange markets."―Worth magazine "The most entertaining book written on investing is Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, by Edwin Lefèvre, first published in 1923."―The Seattle Times "After twenty years and many re-reads, Reminiscences is still one of my all-time favourites."―Kenneth L. Fisher, Forbes "A must-read classic for all investors, whether brand-new or experienced."―William O'Neil, founder and Chairman, Investor's Business Daily "Whilst stock market tomes have come and gone, this remains popular and in print eighty years on."―GQ magazine
  • Votes: 4

    Investing For Dummies, 9th Edition

    by Eric Tyson

  • Votes: 4

    The Dhandho Investor

    by Mohnish Pabrai

    A comprehensive value investing framework for the individual investor In a straightforward and accessible manner, The Dhandho Investor lays out the powerful framework of value investing. Written with the intelligent individual investor in mind, this comprehensive guide distills the Dhandho capital allocation framework of the business savvy Patels from India and presents how they can be applied successfully to the stock market. The Dhandho method expands on the groundbreaking principles of value investing expounded by Benjamin Graham, Warren Buffett, and Charlie Munger. Readers will be introduced to important value investing concepts such as "Heads, I win! Tails, I don't lose that much!," "Few Bets, Big Bets, Infrequent Bets," Abhimanyu's dilemma, and a detailed treatise on using the Kelly Formula to invest in undervalued stocks. Using a light, entertaining style, Pabrai lays out the Dhandho framework in an easy-to-use format. Any investor who adopts the framework is bound to improve on results and soundly beat the markets and most professionals.
  • Votes: 4

    Market Wizards, Updated

    by Jack D. Schwager

  • Votes: 4

    Learn to Earn

    by Peter Lynch

  • Votes: 3

    The Snowball

    by Alice Schroeder

    A portrait of the life and career of investment guru Warren Buffett sheds new light on the man, as well as on the work, ideas, business principles, strategies, and no-nonsense insights that have guided his phenomenally successful business endeavors.
  • Votes: 3

    Capital Returns

    by Edward Chancellor

  • Votes: 3

    The Investment Answer

    by Daniel C. Goldie

  • Votes: 3

    Financial Shenanigans, Fourth Edition

    by Howard Schilit

  • Votes: 3

    The Zulu Principle

    by Jim Slater

  • Votes: 3

    Manga Mark Mobius

    by Mark Mobius

  • Votes: 3

    Own It!

    by Iona Bain

    Are you young and feeling left behind financially? It doesn’t have to be this way. The UK’s leading millennial money expert, Iona Bain, is on a mission to help young people own their futures, once and for all. Low wages, high house prices, zero reward for saving and the catastrophic fallout from Covid-19... young people have had a rough ride. But we have a choice. We can sleepwalk into a poorer future – or we can transform our prospects by embracing the power of investing. Iona is here to demystify savings, pensions and investing for a new generation. Whether it's robo-advisers or auto-enrolment, green investing or forex on Instagram, Iona will break down what it all means so YOU can take charge of your long-term finances. In this fun, wise and incredibly helpful book, Iona explains why investing matters. She also shows you how to get your basic finances right, save for your first home and make your pension socially responsible. You'll find out all about the rewards and risks of online investing, from sexy stockpicking apps to digital wealth managers, and learn how to manage your long-term finances so you can avoid major mistakes and achieve your goals. Investing often gets a bad rep thanks to the Wolf of Wall Street, social media scams and high-rolling money men. In fact, investing has never been more accessible, more interesting – and more important. It’s the single biggest thing that we can do to change our lives, and society, for the better. So what are you waiting for? Let’s start owning it!
  • Votes: 3

    The Art of Short Selling

    by Kathryn F. Staley

  • Votes: 3

    The Finance Book

    by Stuart Warner

  • Votes: 3

    Behavioural Investing

    by James Montier

  • Votes: 3

    Extraordinary Popular Delusions and The Madness of Crowds

    by Charles Mackay

  • Votes: 2

    Inside the House of Money

    by Steven Drobny

  • Votes: 2

    The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing

    by Pat Dorsey

    The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing "By resisting both the popular tendency to use gimmicks that oversimplify securities analysis and the academic tendency to use jargon that obfuscates common sense, Pat Dorsey has written a substantial and useful book. His methodology is sound, his examples clear, and his approach timeless." --Christopher C. Davis Portfolio Manager and Chairman, Davis Advisors Over the years, people from around the world have turned to Morningstar for strong, independent, and reliable advice. The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing provides the kind of savvy financial guidance only a company like Morningstar could offer. Based on the philosophy that "investing should be fun, but not a game," this comprehensive guide will put even the most cautious investors back on the right track by helping them pick the right stocks, find great companies, and understand the driving forces behind different industries--without paying too much for their investments. Written by Morningstar's Director of Stock Analysis, Pat Dorsey, The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing includes unparalleled stock research and investment strategies covering a wide range of stock-related topics. Investors will profit from such tips as: * How to dig into a financial statement and find hidden gold . . . and deception * How to find great companies that will create shareholder wealth * How to analyze every corner of the market, from banks to health care Informative and highly accessible, The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing should be required reading for anyone looking for the right investment opportunities in today's ever-changing market.
  • Votes: 2

    Why Stocks Go Up and Down, 4E

    by William H. Pike CFA

  • Votes: 2

    The Madness of Crowds

    by Douglas Murray

  • Votes: 2

    Why Moats Matter

    by Heather Brilliant

  • Votes: 2

    The Big Short

    by Michael Lewis

    The #1 New York Times bestseller—Now a Major Motion Picture from Paramount Pictures From the author of The Blind Side and Moneyball, The Big Short tells the story of four outsiders in the world of high-finance who predict the credit and housing bubble collapse before anyone else. The film adaptation by Adam McKay (Anchorman I and II, The Other Guys) features Academy Award® winners Christian Bale, Brad Pitt, Melissa Leo and Marisa Tomei; Academy Award® nominees Steve Carell and Ryan Gosling. When the crash of the U.S. stock market became public knowledge in the fall of 2008, it was already old news. The real crash, the silent crash, had taken place over the previous year, in bizarre feeder markets where the sun doesn’t shine and the SEC doesn’t dare, or bother, to tread. Who understood the risk inherent in the assumption of ever-rising real estate prices, a risk compounded daily by the creation of those arcane, artificial securities loosely based on piles of doubtful mortgages? In this fitting sequel to Liar’s Poker, Michael Lewis answers that question in a narrative brimming with indignation and dark humor.
  • Votes: 2

    Barbarians at the Gate

    by Bryan Burrough

  • Votes: 2

    Warren Buffett and the Interpretation of Financial Statements

    by Mary Buffett

    Korean edition of WARREN BUFFETT AND THE INTERPRETATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS: The Search for the Company with a Durable Competitive Advantage by Mary Buffett and David Clark, authors of The Tao of Warren Buffett, introduces Buffett's fundamental methods and successful strategies on investments. Translated by Kim Sang U. In Korean. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc.
  • Votes: 2

    100 Baggers

    by Christopher W Mayer

    This book is about 100-baggers. These are stocks that return $100 for every $1 invested. That means a $10,000 investment turns into $1 million. Chris Mayer can help you find them. It sounds like an outrageous quest with a wildly improbable chance of success. But when Mayer studied 100-baggers of the past, definite patterns emerged ... The emphasis is always on the practical, so there are many stories and anecdotes to help illustrate important points. You should read this book if you want to get more out of your stocks. Even if you never get a 100-bagger, this book will help you turn up big winners and keep you away from losers and sleepy stocks that go nowhere. After reading 100-Baggers, you will never look at investing the same way again. It will energize and excite you about what s possible.
  • Votes: 2

    Where Are the Customers' Yachts?

    by Fred Schwed

    "Once I picked it up I did not put it down until I finished. . . . What Schwed has done is capture fully-in deceptively clean language-the lunacy at the heart of the investment business." -- From the Foreword by Michael Lewis, Bestselling author of Liar's Poker ". . . one of the funniest books ever written about Wall Street." -- Jane Bryant Quinn, The Washington Post "How great to have a reissue of a hilarious classic that proves the more things change the more they stay the same. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." -- Michael Bloomberg "It's amazing how well Schwed's book is holding up after fifty-five years. About the only thing that's changed on Wall Street is that computers have replaced pencils and graph paper. Otherwise, the basics are the same. The investor's need to believe somebody is matched by the financial advisor's need to make a nice living. If one of them has to be disappointed, it's bound to be the former." -- John Rothchild, Author, A Fool and His Money, Financial Columnist, Time magazine Humorous and entertaining, this book exposes the folly and hypocrisy of Wall Street. The title refers to a story about a visitor to New York who admired the yachts of the bankers and brokers. Naively, he asked where all the customers' yachts were? Of course, none of the customers could afford yachts, even though they dutifully followed the advice of their bankers and brokers. Full of wise contrarian advice and offering a true look at the world of investing, in which brokers get rich while their customers go broke, this book continues to open the eyes of investors to the reality of Wall Street.
  • Votes: 1

    The Naked Trader

    by Robbie Burns

  • Votes: 1

    Flash Boys

    by Michael Lewis

    Argues that post-crisis Wall Street continues to be controlled by large banks and explains how a small, diverse group of Wall Street men have banded together to reform the financial markets.
  • Votes: 1

    Green Eggs and Ham

    by Dr.Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    Dollars and Sense

    by Dr. Dan Ariely

    Blending humor and behavioral economics, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational delves into the truly illogical world of personal finance to help people better understand why they make bad financial decisions, and gives them the knowledge they need to make better ones. Why does paying for things often feel like it causes physical pain? Why does it cost you money to act as your own real estate agent? Why are we comfortable overpaying for something now just because we’ve overpaid for it before? In Dollars and Sense, world renowned economist Dan Ariely answers these intriguing questions and many more as he explains how our irrational behavior often interferes with our best intentions when it comes to managing our finances. Partnering with financial comedian and writer Jeff Kreisler, Ariely takes us deep inside our minds to expose the hidden motivations that are secretly driving our choices about money. Exploring a wide range of everyday topics—from credit card debt and household budgeting to holiday sales—Ariely and Kreisler demonstrate how our ideas about dollars and cents are often wrong and cost us more than we know. Mixing case studies and anecdotes with tangible advice and lessons, they cut through the unconscious fears and desires driving our worst financial instincts and teach us how to improve our money habits. Fascinating, engaging, funny, and essential, Dollars and Sense is a sound investment, providing us with the practical tools we need to understand and improve our financial choices, save and spend smarter, and ultimately live better.
  • Votes: 1

    Den of Thieves

    by James B. Stewart

    A #1 bestseller from coast to coast, Den of Thieves tells the full story of the insider-trading scandal that nearly destroyed Wall Street, the men who pulled it off, and the chase that finally brought them to justice. Pulitzer Prize–winner James B. Stewart shows for the first time how four of the eighties’ biggest names on Wall Street—Michael Milken, Ivan Boesky, Martin Siegel, and Dennis Levine —created the greatest insider-trading ring in financial history and almost walked away with billions, until a team of downtrodden detectives triumphed over some of America’s most expensive lawyers to bring this powerful quartet to justice. Based on secret grand jury transcripts, interviews, and actual trading records, and containing explosive new revelations about Michael Milken and Ivan Boesky written especially for this paperback edition, Den of Thieves weaves all the facts into an unforgettable narrative—a portrait of human nature, big business, and crime of unparalleled proportions.
  • Votes: 1

    Baruch My Own Story

    by Bernard Baruch

    Bernard M. Baruch - one of the most remarkable men of our time - was an office boy at nineteen, a Wall Street partner at twenty-five, and a millionaire before he was thirty-five. For some men this success would mark the climax of a career; for Baruch it was only the beginning of a still greater one. In the fifty years since he made his first fortune, Bernard Baruch has been a trusted counselor of Presidents, an adviser on social and economic reforms, a statesman who has worked with two political parties and won the respect of both. In this, the first volume of his memoirs, Mr. Baruch analyzes his personal philosophy and shows how it helped him solve the many problems that confronted him in his public life as chairman of the War Industries Board during World War I and as United States representative on the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission. Informal yet penetrating, intimate yet never losing sight of major events and issues, BARUCH: My Own Story is infused with the remarkable personality of a truly distinguished American.
  • Votes: 1

    The Wealthy Barber, Updated 3rd Edition

    by David Chilton

  • Votes: 1

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 1

    Smart Portfolios

    by Robert Carver

  • Votes: 1

    Secret Millionaires Club

    by Andy Heyward

    Priceless finance advice everyone can relate to from one of the world's most respected businessmen and the most successful investor of all time Of course you know who Warren Buffett is; he's the most successful investor in the world—maybe of all times. But what do you know about his approach to business and investing? It's an approach that, over the past four decades, has made him richest man in America and the third-richest man in the world, and that has earned vast fortunes for his business partners and investors. But as Buffett himself will tell you, at the heart of any wealth-building system there are certain core beliefs, not just about finance, but about business, work, morality, your responsibility to yourself, your family and society, and about living a decent life. Written in conjunction with the hit television series, "Secret Millionaire Club" and with Buffett's input and full support, this book makes Buffett's financial philosophy and homespun life lessons available to everyone outside his "Secret Club." Warren Buffet's goal in spearheading this book was to share lessons about personal finance he has learned and that he hopes will benefit you (and your kids) for a lifetime You'll learn the fundamentals of personal finance by reading Warren Buffett's war stories and personal reflections on money, life, business, ethics and more All of the finance principles covered in the book were personally approved by Warren Buffett as those which he himself follows Unforgettable Buffett quotes include: "Price is what you pay. Value is what you get"; "Risk comes from not knowing what you're doing"; and "Profit from folly rather than participate in it."
  • Votes: 1

    The Ascent of Money

    by Niall Ferguson

    Chronicles the evolution of finance from its origins in Mesopotamia to the modern world's most recent upheavals, covering such topics as the stock market bubble that prompted the French Revolution and the theories behind common investment vehicles.
  • Votes: 1

    The Warren Buffett Way

    by Robert G. Hagstrom

  • Votes: 1

    Rule #1

    by Phil Town

  • Votes: 1

    Getting the Best of It

    by David Sklansky

    Contains six sections discussing probability, poker, blackjack, other casino games, sports betting, and general gambling concepts. This book contains some of the most sophisticated gambling ideas that have ever been put into print. Included is perhaps the best discussion of the basic mathematics of gambling, yet it is written so that even the most non-mathematical of readers can understand it. Many of the ideas discussed are those that the author himself has successfully used during his career. Topics include expectation, combinations, Baye's Theorem, the eight mistakes in poker, checking in the dark, playing tight, The Key Card Concept, casinos and their mistakes, crapless craps, betting sports, hedging and middling, knowing what's important, the Law of Averages and Other Fallacies, and much more.
  • Votes: 1

    The Simple Path to Wealth

    by J. Collins

    The author shares his personal techniques, insights and experiences regarding saving money and investing, drawn from his blog posts as well as a series of letters to his teenage daughter, both dealing with money management.
  • Votes: 1

    The Long and the Short of It (International Edition)

    by Professor of Industrial Policy at the London Business School and Fellow John Kay

  • Votes: 1

    The Misbehavior of Markets

    by Benoit Mandelbrot

  • Votes: 1

    Stocks for the Long Run 5/E

    by Jeremy Siegel

  • Votes: 1

    Life in the Financial Markets

    by Daniel Lacalle

  • Votes: 1

    The Penguin Guide to Finance

    by Hugo Dixon

  • Votes: 1

    Modern Portfolio Theory and Investment Analysis

    by Edwin J. Elton

  • Votes: 1

    The Interpretation of Financial Statements

    by Benjamin Graham

    "All investors, from beginners to old hands, should gain from the use of this guide, as I have." From the Introduction by Michael F. Price, president, Franklin Mutual Advisors, Inc. Benjamin Graham has been called the most important investment thinker of the twentieth century. As a master investor, pioneering stock analyst, and mentor to investment superstars, he has no peer. The volume you hold in your hands is Graham's timeless guide to interpreting and understanding financial statements. It has long been out of print, but now joins Graham's other masterpieces, The Intelligent Investor and Security Analysis, as the three priceless keys to understanding Graham and value investing. The advice he offers in this book is as useful and prescient today as it was sixty years ago. As he writes in the preface, "if you have precise information as to a company's present financial position and its past earnings record, you are better equipped to gauge its future possibilities. And this is the essential function and value of security analysis." Written just three years after his landmark Security Analysis, The Interpretation of Financial Statements gets to the heart of the master's ideas on value investing in astonishingly few pages. Readers will learn to analyze a company's balance sheets and income statements and arrive at a true understanding of its financial position and earnings record. Graham provides simple tests any reader can apply to determine the financial health and well-being of any company. This volume is an exact text replica of the first edition of The Interpretation of Financial Statements, published by Harper & Brothers in 1937. Graham's original language has been restored, and readers can be assured that every idea and technique presented here appears exactly as Graham intended. Highly practical and accessible, it is an essential guide for all business people--and makes the perfect companion volume to Graham's investment masterpiece The Intelligent Investor.
  • Votes: 1

    Anatomy of the Bear

    by Russell Napier

  • Votes: 1

    A Man for All Markets

    by Edward O. Thorp

  • Votes: 1

    TrendWatching

    by Ron Insana

    Plummeting stock prices. Decimated 401(k) accounts. Shocking corporate scandals. Thus is the beginning of the twenty-first century. The boundless prosperity of the 1990s is now a remnant of history. With the turn of the millennium came a national reversal of fortune. In a period of under twelve months, the Nasdaq Composite index lost over 60 percent of its value, costing average Americans billions of dollars.If only we could've seen it coming. But perhaps it wasn't our lack of vision that blinded us to the approaching disaster. Perhaps all we needed to do was change our perspective. Too often we invest on whims and headlines, instincts and hot tips. We focus on the short-term possibilities and ignore the long-term picture. In this groundbreaking account, best-selling author and renowned CNBC anchor Ron Insana proves that we can profit from the best of times while preparing for the worst. Through an impressively illuminating investigation of financial market bubbles, manias, and trends, Insana shows how to predict confidently the seemingly erratic financial market booms and busts, getting in while the getting is good and getting out before we are gotten. We've all heard the adage: History repeats itself. In economic terms this truism could not be truer. Delving deep into the history of American investing, Insana’s enlightening study charts both well-known and widely overlooked events, proving definitively that the ups and downs of financial markets follow astonishingly similar patterns. Bubbles replicate those before them, trends imitate other trends, and the cycle repeats itself time and again. With keen insight, Insana, one of the world's top business journalists, will teach you how to recognize key signs and indicators so that you can determine when a bubble is forming, how long it will continue growing, and at what point it's going to burst. Too often, the public is the last in and the last out of the game. We lose money because we react to the decisions of others rather than anticipating fads on our own. Insana's eye-opening investigation will teach you how to stop following the herd and start finding your own way to investment success. Drawing on concrete evidence from the past to forecast the real-world changes of the future, this fascinating study paves the path for more secure, more dependable, and more profitable investing. It's your money.
  • Votes: 1

    100 to 1 in the Stock Market

    by Thomas William Phelps

  • Votes: 1

    The Motley Fool Investment Guide

    by Tom Gardner

  • Votes: 1

    Winning the Loser's Game, Seventh Edition

    by Charles Ellis

  • Votes: 1

    The Elements of Investing

    by Burton G. Malkiel

  • Votes: 1

    The Godfather

    by Mario Puzo

    An inside fictional portrait journeys inside the world of the Cosa Nostra and its operations to chronicle the lives and fortunes of Mafia leader Vito Corleone, his family, and his underworld domain. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    The Little Book That Builds Wealth

    by Pat Dorsey

  • Votes: 1

    Millionaire Teacher

    by Andrew Hallam

  • Votes: 1

    Broke Millennial Takes On Investing

    by Erin Lowry

  • Votes: 1

    Simple Wealth, Inevitable Wealth

    by Nick Murray