Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 86

    Technically Wrong

    by Sara Wachter-Boettcher

  • Votes: 86

    Weapons of Math Destruction

    by Cathy O'Neil

  • Votes: 86

    Bullshit Jobs

    by David Graeber

  • Votes: 86

    Shop Class as Soulcraft

    by Matthew B. Crawford

  • Votes: 86

    By Hand And Eye

    by George R. Walker and Jim Tolpin

  • Votes: 86

    The Innovator's Dilemma

    by Clayton M. Christensen

    The bestselling classic on disruptive innovation, by renowned author Clayton M. Christensen. His work is cited by the world’s best-known thought leaders, from Steve Jobs to Malcolm Gladwell. In this classic bestseller--one of the most influential business books of all time--innovation expert Clayton Christensen shows how even the most outstanding companies can do everything right--yet still lose market leadership. Christensen explains why most companies miss out on new waves of innovation. No matter the industry, he says, a successful company with established products will get pushed aside unless managers know how and when to abandon traditional business practices. Offering both successes and failures from leading companies as a guide, The Innovator’s Dilemma gives you a set of rules for capitalizing on the phenomenon of disruptive innovation. Sharp, cogent, and provocative--and consistently noted as one of the most valuable business ideas of all time--The Innovator’s Dilemma is the book no manager, leader, or entrepreneur should be without.
  • Votes: 86

    The Boy Kings

    by Katherine Losse

  • Votes: 86

    The Four

    by Scott Galloway

  • Votes: 86

    Systemantics

    by John Gall

  • Votes: 86

    Thinking in Systems

    by Donella H. Meadows

    In the years following her role as the lead author of the international bestseller, Limits to Growth—the first book to show the consequences of unchecked growth on a finite planet— Donella Meadows remained a pioneer of environmental and social analysis until her untimely death in 2001. Meadows' newly released manuscript, Thinking in Systems, is a concise and crucial book offering insight for problem solving on scales ranging from the personal to the global. Edited by the Sustainability Institute's Diana Wright, this essential primer brings systems thinking out of the realm of computers and equations and into the tangible world, showing readers how to develop the systems-thinking skills that thought leaders across the globe consider critical for 21st-century life. Some of the biggest problems facing the world—war, hunger, poverty, and environmental degradation—are essentially system failures. They cannot be solved by fixing one piece in isolation from the others, because even seemingly minor details have enormous power to undermine the best efforts of too-narrow thinking. While readers will learn the conceptual tools and methods of systems thinking, the heart of the book is grander than methodology. Donella Meadows was known as much for nurturing positive outcomes as she was for delving into the science behind global dilemmas. She reminds readers to pay attention to what is important, not just what is quantifiable, to stay humble, and to stay a learner. In a world growing ever more complicated, crowded, and interdependent, Thinking in Systems helps readers avoid confusion and helplessness, the first step toward finding proactive and effective solutions.
  • Votes: 86

    The Mythical Man-month

    by Frederick Phillips Brooks

    On software project management
  • Votes: 86

    Notes on the Synthesis of Form (Harvard Paperbacks)

    by Christopher Alexander

  • Votes: 16

    The Myths of Innovation

    by Scott Berkun

  • Votes: 16

    Eager

    by Ben Goldfarb

  • Votes: 16

    Strategy without Design

    by Robert C. H. Chia

  • Votes: 16

    Understanding Comics

    by Scott McCloud

  • Votes: 16

    Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition

    by Dr. Dan Ariely

  • Votes: 16

    Leading Geeks

    by Paul Glen

  • Votes: 16

    The Entrepreneurial State

    by Mariana Mazzucato

  • Votes: 16

    Machines of Loving Grace

    by John Markoff

    As robots are increasingly integrated into modern society—on the battlefield and the road, in business, education, and health—Pulitzer-Prize-winning New York Times science writer John Markoff searches for an answer to one of the most important questions of our age: will these machines help us, or will they replace us? In the past decade alone, Google introduced us to driverless cars, Apple debuted a personal assistant that we keep in our pockets, and an Internet of Things connected the smaller tasks of everyday life to the farthest reaches of the internet. There is little doubt that robots are now an integral part of society, and cheap sensors and powerful computers will ensure that, in the coming years, these robots will soon act on their own. This new era offers the promise of immense computing power, but it also reframes a question first raised more than half a century ago, at the birth of the intelligent machine: Will we control these systems, or will they control us? In Machines of Loving Grace, New York Times reporter John Markoff, the first reporter to cover the World Wide Web, offers a sweeping history of the complicated and evolving relationship between humans and computers. Over the recent years, the pace of technological change has accelerated dramatically, reintroducing this difficult ethical quandary with newer and far weightier consequences. As Markoff chronicles the history of automation, from the birth of the artificial intelligence and intelligence augmentation communities in the 1950s, to the modern day brain trusts at Google and Apple in Silicon Valley, and on to the expanding tech corridor between Boston and New York, he traces the different ways developers have addressed this fundamental problem and urges them to carefully consider the consequences of their work. We are on the verge of a technological revolution, Markoff argues, and robots will profoundly transform the way our lives are organized. Developers must now draw a bright line between what is human and what is machine, or risk upsetting the delicate balance between them.
  • Votes: 16

    Dreaming in Code

    by Scott Rosenberg