Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 15

    The House of Mirth (Wordsworth Classics)

    by Edith Wharton

  • Votes: 13

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 11

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.
  • Votes: 9

    The Turn of the Screw (American Classics Edition)

    by Henry James

  • Votes: 7

    The God of Small Things

    by Arundhati Roy

    The year is 1969. In the state of Kerala, on the southernmost tip of India, a skyblue Plymouth with chrome tailfins is stranded on the highway amid a Marxist workers' demonstration. Inside the car sit two-egg twins Rahel and Esthappen, and so begins their tale.... Armed only with the invincible innocence of children, they fashion a childhood for themselves in the shade of the wreck that is their family - their lonely, lovely mother, Ammu (who loves by night the man her children love by day), their blind grandmother, Mammachi (who plays Handel on her violin), their beloved uncle Chacko (Rhodes scholar, pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher), their enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grandaunt), and the ghost of an imperial entomologist's moth (with unusually dense dorsal tufts). When their English cousin, Sophie Mol, and her mother, Margaret Kochamma, arrive on a Christmas visit, Esthappen and Rahel learn that Things Can Change in a Day. That lives can twist into new, ugly shapes, even cease forever, beside their river "graygreen. With fish in it. With the sky and trees in it. And at night, the broken yellow moon in it."
  • Votes: 6

    Klara and the Sun

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 6

    The Awakening

    by Nora Roberts

  • Votes: 6

    The Bluest Eye (Vintage International)

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 5

    Fleishman Is in Trouble

    by Taffy Brodesser-Akner

    LONGLISTED FOR THE WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2020 LONGLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE/JOHN LEONARD AWARD FOR BEST FIRST BOOK THE SUNDAY TIMES AND NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER 'This is the novel of the summer . . . There is no one that this book isn't for. I can't believe it's a first novel. Pure brilliance' INDIA KNIGHT, THE SUNDAY TIMES 'Could be one of the books of my entire lifetime. I've never felt so seen' GRACE DENT, GUARDIAN 'Sharp and wicked, insightful and funny, and then suddenly so touching' DAVID NICHOLLS 'This book is a work of utter perfection' ELIZABETH GILBERT Finally free from his nightmare marriage, Toby Fleishman is ready for a life of online dating and weekend-only parental duties. But as he optimistically looks to a future that is wildly different from the one he imagined, his life turns upside-down as his ex-wife, Rachel, suddenly disappears. While Toby tries to find out what happened - juggling work, kids and his new, app-assisted sexual popularity - his tidy narrative of a spurned husband is his sole consolation. But if he ever wants to really understand where Rachel went and what really happened to his marriage, he is going to have to consider that he might not have seen it all that clearly in the first place . . . A BLISTERING SATIRICAL NOVEL ABOUT MARRIAGE, DIVORCE AND MODERN RELATIONSHIPS, BY ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING NEW VOICES IN AMERICAN FICTION 'So sharp' GUARDIAN 'The most astonishingly brilliant Trojan horse of a novel' DOLLY ALDERTON 'Wonderful. Utterly blistering . . . A wildly entertaining, moving story' MARIAN KEYES 'Brimming with wisdom and utterly of this moment . . . Taffy Brodesser-Akner's debut is that rare and delicious treat: a page turner with heft' MARIA SEMPLE 'It is a Great Novel . . . It has depth, wit, nuance and life. Heartbreaking and funny' NIGELLA LAWSON
  • Votes: 5

    Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead

    by Olga Tokarczuk

  • Votes: 4

    The Remains of the Day

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity
  • Votes: 4

    The Nickel Boys

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 4

    The Godfather

    by Mario Puzo

    An inside fictional portrait journeys inside the world of the Cosa Nostra and its operations to chronicle the lives and fortunes of Mafia leader Vito Corleone, his family, and his underworld domain. Reissue.
  • Votes: 4

    The Trial

    by Franz Kafka

    From its gripping first sentence onward, this novel exemplifies the term "Kafkaesque." Its darkly humorous narrative recounts a bank clerk's entrapment in a bureaucratic maze, based on an undisclosed charge.
  • Votes: 4

    The End of the Road

    by Craig DiLouie

  • Votes: 4

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 4

    The Haunting of Hill House (Penguin Classics)

    by Shirley Jackson

  • Votes: 4

    The Magic Mountain

    by Thomas Mann

    A sanitorium in the Swiss Alps reflects the societal ills of pre-twentieth-century Europe, and a young marine engineer rises from his life of anonymity to become a pivotal character in a story about how a human's environment affects self-identity. 10,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 3

    Cloud Atlas

    by David Stephen Mitchell

  • Votes: 3

    Where’d You Go Bernadette

    Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect, and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette disappears. It began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica. But Bernadette's intensifying allergy to Seattle--and people in general--has made her so agoraphobic that a virtual assistant in India now runs her most basic errands. A trip to the end of the earth is problematic. To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, secret correspondence--creating a compulsively readable and touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter's role in an absurd world.
  • Votes: 3

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 3

    Us Conductors

    by Sean Michaels

  • Votes: 3

    Crossings

    by Katy S. Duffield

  • Votes: 3

    Everything I Never Told You

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 3

    The Forever War

    by Joe Haldeman

  • Votes: 3

    Train to Pakistan

    by Khushwant Singh

  • Votes: 3

    Wolf Hall

    by Hilary Mantel

  • Votes: 3

    Sula

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 3

    The Big Sleep (A Philip Marlowe Novel)

    by Raymond Chandler

  • Votes: 2

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

    In a novel set in an indefinite, futuristic, post-apocalyptic world, a father and his young son make their way through the ruins of a devastated American landscape, struggling to survive and preserve the last remnants of their own humanity.
  • Votes: 2

    Slade House

    by David Mitchell

  • Votes: 2

    Infinite Country

    by Patricia Engel

  • Votes: 2

    Excellent Women (Penguin Classics)

    by Barbara Pym

  • Votes: 2

    Voice of Our Shadow (Fantasy Masterworks)

    by Jonathan Carroll

  • Votes: 2

    The Light Between Oceans

    by M.L. Stedman

  • Votes: 2

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

  • Votes: 2

    The Savage Detectives

    by Roberto Bolano

  • Votes: 2

    The Things They Carried

    by Tim O'Brien

    A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds and lives since it burst onto the literary scene, The Things They Carried is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling. The Things They Carried depicts the men of Alpha Company: Jimmy Cross, Henry Dobbins, Rat Kiley, Mitchell Sanders, Norman Bowker, Kiowa, and the character Tim O’Brien, who has survived his tour in Vietnam to become a father and writer at the age of forty-three. Taught everywhere—from high school classrooms to graduate seminars in creative writing—it has become required reading for any American and continues to challenge readers in their perceptions of fact and fiction, war and peace, courage and fear and longing. The Things They Carried won France's prestigious Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize; it was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.
  • Votes: 2

    The People in the Trees

    by Hanya Yanagihara

  • Votes: 2

    Atonement

    by Ian McEwan

  • Votes: 2

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 2

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Votes: 2

    Orlando

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 2

    The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

    by John Boyne

    'Some things are just sitting there, minding their own business, waiting to be discovered. Like America. And other things are probably better off left alone' Nine-year-old Bruno has a lot of things on his mind. Who is the 'Fury'? Why did he make them leave their nice home in Berlin to go to 'Out-With' ? And who are all the sad people in striped pyjamas on the other side of the fence? The grown-ups won't explain so Bruno decides there is only one thing for it - he will have to explore this place alone. What he discovers is a new friend. A boy with the very same birthday. A boy in striped pyjamas. But why can't they ever play together? BACKSTORY: Read an interview with the author JOHN BOYNE and learn all about the Second World War in Germany.
  • Votes: 2

    All Quiet on the Orient Express

    by Magnus Mills

  • Votes: 2

    More Than Human

    by Theodore Sturgeon

  • Votes: 2

    The Mayor of Casterbridge

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 2

    Girl, Woman, Other

    by Bernardine Evaristo

    From one of Britain's most celebrated writers of color, a magnificent portrayal of the intersections of identity among an interconnected group of Black British women
  • Votes: 2

    The Last Time They Met

    by Anita Shreve

  • Votes: 2

    Silver Lining

    by Elizabeth Beisel

  • Votes: 2

    A Single Man

    by Christopher Isherwood

  • Votes: 2

    The Water Cure

    by Sophie Mackintosh

  • Votes: 2

    Ethan Frome

    by Edith Wharton

  • Votes: 1

    Homegoing

    by Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
  • Votes: 1

    Love in the Time of Cholera

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    Set on the Caribbean coast of South America, this love story brings together Fermina Daza, her distinguished husband, and a man who has secretly loved her for more than fifty years.