Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 73

    A Kind of Spark

    by Ellen McNicoll

    A Kind of Spark tells the story of 11-year-old Addie as she campaigns for a memorial in memory of the witch trials that took place in her Scottish hometown. Addie knows there's more to the story of these 'witches', just like there is more to hers. Can Addie challenge how the people in her town see her, and her autism, and make her voice heard? A story about friendship, courage and self-belief.
  • Votes: 46

    Boy In The Tower

    by Polly Ho-Yen

  • Votes: 46

    The Boy Who Made Everyone Laugh

    by Helen Rutter

    Billy is an eleven-year-old boy with a big dream. He wants to be a stand-up comedian when he grows up: delivering pinpoint punch-lines and having audiences hang on his every hilarious word. A tough career for anyone, but surely impossible for Billy, who has a stammer. How will he find his voice, if his voice won't let him speak?
  • Votes: 29

    Orphans of the Tide

    by Struan Murray

  • Votes: 25

    The Murderer's Ape

    by Jakob Wegelius

    A captivating mystery adventure story, with gorgeously detailed black-and-white illustrations throughout Sally Jones is an extraordinary ape and a loyal friend. In overalls or in a maharaja's turban, this unique gorilla moves among humans without speaking but understanding everything. She and the Chief are devoted comrades who operate a cargo boat. A job they are offered pays big bucks, but the deal ends badly, and the Chief is falsely convicted of murder. For Sally Jones this is the start of a quest for survival and to clear the Chief's name. Powerful forces are working against her, and they will do anything to protect their own secrets. Jakob Wegelius is a Swedish writer and illustrator. The Murderer's Ape was a bestseller in Sweden and Germany, won the August Prize for Best Children's Book, the Nordic Council Children and Young People's Literature Prize, and is an International Youth Library White Raven selection.
  • Votes: 22

    The Boy

    by Alan Sakell

    What would you do if the people who are meant to love and protect you the most, were monsters? How far would you go to escape the very worst kind of punishments imaginable? What would be your breaking point?
  • Votes: 17

    The Nowhere Emporium

    by Ross MacKenzie

    When the mysterious Nowhere Emporium arrives in Glasgow, orphan Daniel Holmes stumbles upon it quite by accident. Before long, the 'shop from nowhere' -- and its owner, Mr Silver -- draw Daniel into a breathtaking world of magic and enchantment. Recruited as Mr Silver's apprentice, Daniel learns the secrets of the Emporium's vast labyrinth of passageways and rooms -- rooms that contain wonders beyond anything Daniel has ever imagined. But when Mr Silver disappears, and a shadow from the past threatens everything, the Emporium and all its wonders begin to crumble. Can Daniel save his home, and his new friends, before the Nowhere Emporium is destroyed forever? Scottish Children's Book Award winner Ross MacKenzie unleashes a riot of imagination, colour and fantasy in this astonishing adventure, perfect for fans of Philip Pullman, Corneila Funke and Neil Gaiman.
  • Votes: 16

    The House With Chicken Legs

    by Sophie Anderson

  • Votes: 14

    Amari and the Night Brothers (Supernatural Investigations, 1)

    by B. B. Alston

  • Votes: 14

    Wonder

    by R. J. Palacio

    " ... a collection of explanations for everyday mysteries sure to appeal to a child's natural curiosity and expand knowledge. Colorful and sometimes humorous illustrations help demonstrate answers. Perfect as a springboard to further reading"--P. [4] of cover.
  • Votes: 12

    Kensuke's Kingdom

    by Michael Morpurgo

    When Michael is swept off his family's yacht, he washes up on a desert island, where he struggles to survive--until he finds he is not alone.
  • Votes: 11

    The Tzar's Curious Runaways

    by Robin Scott-Elliot

  • Votes: 11

    Skellig

    by David Almond

    The beautiful and haunting novel that launched David Almond as one of the best children's writers of today When a move to a new house coincides with his baby sister's illness, Michael's world seems suddenly lonely and uncertain. Then, one Sunday afternoon, he stumbles into the old, ramshackle garage of his new home, and finds something magical. A strange creature - part owl, part angel, a being who needs Michael's help if he is to survive. With his new friend Mina, Michael nourishes Skellig back to health, while his baby sister languishes in the hospital. But Skellig is far more than he at first appears, and as he helps Michael breathe life into his tiny sister, Michael's world changes for ever . . . Skellig won the Carnegie Medal and the Whitbread Children's Book Award and is now a major Sky1 feature film, starring Tim Roth and John Simm. David Almond is also winner of the 2010 Hans Christian Andersen award. Powerful and moving - The Guardian This newly jacketed edition celebrates 15 years of this multi-award-winning novel.
  • Votes: 11

    Clockwork

    by Philip Pullman

    Great elementary grades reading.
  • Votes: 10

    The Midnight Guardians

    by Ross Montgomery

  • Votes: 9

    The Beast of Harwood Forest

  • Votes: 9

    Pax

    by Sara Pennypacker

    A moving story of the extraordinary friendship between a boy and his fox, and their epic journey to be reunited. Beautifully illustrated by multi-award winner, Jon Klassen.
  • Votes: 7

    Crater Lake

  • Votes: 7

    Can You See Me?

    by Libby Scott

  • Votes: 6

    Eleven

    by Tom Rogers

    "Alex Douglas always wanted to be a hero. But nothing heroic ever happened to Alex. Nothing, that is, until his eleventh birthday [which fell on September 11, 2001]. Then everything changed"--P. [4] of cover.
  • Votes: 6

    Malamander

    by Thomas Taylor

    A quirky, creepy fantasy set in Eerie-on-Sea finds a colorful cast of characters in hot pursuit of a sea monster thought to convey a surprising gift. It’s winter in the town of Eerie-on-Sea, where the mist is thick and the salt spray is rattling the windows of the Grand Nautilus Hotel. Inside, young Herbert Lemon, Lost and Founder for the hotel, has an unexpected visitor. It seems that Violet Parma, a fearless girl around his age, lost her parents at the hotel when she was a baby, and she’s sure that the nervous Herbert is the only person who can help her find them. The trouble is, Violet is being pursued at that moment by a strange hook-handed man. And the town legend of the Malamander — a part-fish, part-human monster whose egg is said to make dreams come true — is rearing its scaly head. As various townspeople, some good-hearted, some nefarious, reveal themselves to be monster hunters on the sly, can Herbert and Violet elude them and discover what happened to Violet’s kin? This lighthearted, fantastical mystery, featuring black-and-white spot illustrations, kicks off a trilogy of fantasies set in the seaside town.
  • Votes: 6

    A Monster Calls

    by Patrick Ness

  • Votes: 5

    A Place Called Perfect

    by helena Duggan

    Violet never wanted to move to Perfect. Who wants to live in a town where everyone has to wear glasses to stop them going blind? And who wants to be neat and tidy and perfectly behaved all the time? But Violet quickly discovers there’s something weird going on – she keeps hearing noises in the night, her mum is acting strange and her dad has disappeared. When she meets Boy she realizes that her dad is not the only person to have been stolen away... and that the mysterious Watchers are guarding a perfectly creepy secret!
  • Votes: 5

    Guardians of the Wild Unicorns (Kelpies)

    by Lindsay Littleson

    'Across the moor galloped a huge dark beast; a heavily muscled horse with a gleaming, rippling black mane. The animal reared up, its hooves cutting the sky, its silken tail streaming like a banner. Its spiralled horn glinted in the sun.' Lewis is cold, wet and miserable on his school residential trip in the highlands of Scotland. The last thing he expects to see is a mythical creature galloping across the bleak moorland. Unicorns aren't real... are they? Lewis and his best friend Rhona find themselves caught up in a dangerous adventure to save the world's last herd of wild unicorns. Fighting against dark forces, battling the wild landscape, and harnessing ancient magic, can they rescue the legendary creatures in time?
  • Votes: 5

    The Storm Keeper’s Island (The Storm Keeper’s Island Series, 1)

    by Catherine Doyle

    WINNER OF THE BAMB YOUNG READERS – MIDDLE GRADE AWARD 2018 NOMINATED FOR THE CILIP CARNEGIE MEDAL 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE IRISH BOOK AWARDS CHILDRENS BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 'Magical in every way' EOIN COLFER 'Funny, dark and blazingly beautiful' KIRAN MILLWOOD HARGRAVE 'So magical and wild that it's like being swept away by the sea' KATHERINE RUNDELL When Fionn Boyle sets foot on Arranmore Island, it begins to stir beneath his feet ... Once in a generation, Arranmore Island chooses a new Storm Keeper to wield its power and keep its magic safe from enemies. The time has come for Fionn's grandfather, a secretive and eccentric old man, to step down. Soon, a new Keeper will rise. But, deep underground, someone has been waiting for Fionn. As the battle to become the island's next champion rages, a more sinister magic is waking up, intent on rekindling an ancient war.
  • Votes: 5

    Savages

    by Don Winslow

    Part-time environmentalist and philanthropist Ben and his ex-mercenary buddy Chon run a Laguna Beach-based marijuana operation, reaping significant profits from their loyal clientele. In the past when their turf was challenged, Chon took care of eliminating the threat. But now they may have come up against something that they can't handle-the Mexican Baja Cartel wants in, sending them the message that a "no" is unacceptable. When they refuse to back down, the cartel escalates its threat, kidnapping Ophelia, the boys' playmate and confidante. O's abduction sets off a dizzying array of ingenious negotiations and gripping plot twists that will captivate readers eager to learn the costs of freedom. Savages is an adrenaline-fuelled novel by a master thriller writer at the very top of his game.
  • Votes: 4

    The Maze Runner (Book 1)

    by James Dashner

  • Votes: 4

    Boy 87 [Paperback] Ele Fountain

    by Ele Fountain

    The story of a refugee: one child's journey stands for the journeys of many and the hopes of even more Shif is just an ordinary boy who likes chess, maths and racing his best friend home from school. But one day, soldiers with guns come to his door - and he knows that he is no longer safe. Shif is forced to leave his mother and little sister, and embark on a dangerous journey; a journey through imprisonment and escape, new lands and strange voices, and a perilous crossing by land and sea. He will encounter cruelty and kindness; he will become separated from the people he loves. Boy 87 is a gripping, uplifting tale of one boy's struggle for survival; it echoes the story of young people all over the world today. Ele Fountain worked as an Editor in children's publishing, where she was responsible for launching and nurturing the careers of many prize-winning and best-selling authors including Angie Sage, Philip Reeve and Sarah Crossan. She lived in Addis Ababa for several years, where she was inspired to write Boy 87, her debut novel. Ele now lives in what she describes as a 'not quite falling down house' in Hampshire with her husband and two young daughters.
  • Votes: 4

    No Ballet Shoes in Syria

    by Bruton Catherine

    Aya is eleven years old and has just arrived in Britain with her mum and baby brother, seeking asylum from war in Syria. When Aya stumbles across a local ballet class, the formidable dance teacher spots her exceptional talent and believes that Aya has the potential to earn a prestigious ballet scholarship. But at the same time, Aya and her family must fight to be allowed to remain in the country, to make a home for themselves, and to find Aya's father - separated from the rest of the family during the journey from Syria. With beautiful, captivating writing, wonderfully authentic ballet detail, and an important message championing the rights of refugees, this is classic storytelling - filled with warmth, hope and humanity.
  • Votes: 4

    Who Let the Gods Out?

    by Maz Evans

    A shooting star crashes to earth and changes Elliot's life forever. The star is Virgo - a young Zodiac goddess on a mission. When the pair accidentally unleash the wicked death daemon Thanatos, they turn to the old Olympian gods for help. But after centuries of cushy retirement on earth, are Zeus and his crew up to the task?
  • Votes: 4

    The Monsters of Rookhaven

    by Pádraig Kenny

    Sometimes the monsters take us. Sometimes we become the monsters. Mirabelle has always known she is a monster. When the glamour protecting her unusual family from the human world is torn and an orphaned brother and sister stumble upon Rookhaven, Mirabelle soon discovers that friendship can be found in the outside world. But as something far more sinister comes to threaten them all, it quickly becomes clear that the true monsters aren't necessarily the ones you can see. A thought-provoking, chilling and beautifully written novel, Pádraig Kenny's The Monsters of Rookhhaven, stunningly illustrated by Edward Bettison, explores difference and empathy through the eyes of characters you won't want to let go. 'A stunning book . . . a brand new take on the monster story' Eoin Colfer, author of Artemis Fowl 'A magnificent, shadowy, gothic adventure full of heart' Emma Carroll 'A wildly imaginative story . . . a triumph' Irish Examiner
  • Votes: 4

    The Man Who Walked Between the Towers

    by National Geographic Learning

    In 1974, French aerialist Philippe Petit threw a tightrope between the two towers of the World Trade Center and spent an hour walking, dancing, and performing high-wire tricks a quarter mile in the sky. This picture book captures the poetry and magic of the event with a poetry of its own: lyrical words and lovely paintings that present the detail, daring, and--in two dramatic foldout spreads-- the vertiginous drama of Petit's feat. The Man Who Walked Between the Towers is the winner of the 2004 Caldecott Medal, the winner of the 2004 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award for Picture Books, and the winner of the 2006 Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children's Video.
  • Votes: 4

    Legend of Podkin One-Ear, The

    by Kieran Larwood

    Winner of the Best Story Blue Peter Book Award 2017 A thick white blanket covers the wide slopes of the band of hills some call the Razorback Downs... Podkin One-Ear is a legend: a fearsome warrior rabbit whose reputation for cunning and triumph in battle has travelled the ages. But how did he become such a mighty fighter? The answer may surprise you... When a travelling bard arrives at Thornwood Warren on Midwinter night, he is warmly welcomed. In return for food and lodging, he settles down to tell the tale of Podkin One-Ear - and soon the rabbits are enthralled to hear the story of how one lost little rabbit overcame the cruellest enemy imaginable, and became the greatest warrior their land has ever known.
  • Votes: 4

    The Giver

    by Lois Lowry

    Celebrate Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world in this 25th Anniversary Edition of The Giver. Includes a new afterword from Lois Lowry, as well as her Newbery acceptance speech. The Giver, Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning novel, has become one of the most influential books of our time. Placed on countless reading lists and curricula, translated into more than forty languages, and made into a feature film, The Giver is a modern classic. Celebrate this beloved contribution to children's literature with the 25th Anniversary Edition. The haunting story of twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity, is as resonant today as when it was first published. Lois Lowry will include a new afterword as well as her Newbery acceptance speech in this beautifully rejacketed edition.
  • Votes: 4

    The Viewer

    by Gary Crew

    THE VIEWER tells the peculiar story of a boy whose obsession with curious artefacts leads him to discover an strange box at a dump site. It proves to be an ancient chest full of optical devices, one of which captures his interest; an intricately mechanical object which carries disks of images; scenes of destruction, violence and the collapse of civilisations throughout time. The boy is afraid, but also cannot help but look into the machine time and time again as the images shift and change ...
  • Votes: 4

    A Little Piece of Ground

    by Elizabeth Laird

    A Little Piece Of Ground will help young readers understand more about one of the worst conflicts afflicting our world today. Written by Elizabeth Laird, one of Great Britain’s best-known young adult authors, A Little Piece Of Ground explores the human cost of the occupation of Palestinian lands through the eyes of a young boy. Twelve-year-old Karim Aboudi and his family are trapped in their Ramallah home by a strict curfew. In response to a Palestinian suicide bombing, the Israeli military subjects the West Bank town to a virtual siege. Meanwhile, Karim, trapped at home with his teenage brother and fearful parents, longs to play football with his friends. When the curfew ends, he and his friend discover an unused patch of ground that’s the perfect site for a football pitch. Nearby, an old car hidden intact under bulldozed building makes a brilliant den. But in this city there’s constant danger, even for schoolboys. And when Israeli soldiers find Karim outside during the next curfew, it seems impossible that he will survive. This powerful book fills a substantial gap in existing young adult literature on the Middle East. With 23,000 copies already sold in the United Kingdom and Canada, this book is sure to find a wide audience among young adult readers in the United States.
  • Votes: 4

    The Haunting of Aveline Jones

    by Phil Hickes

    Turn on your torches and join Aveline Jones! Aveline loves reading ghost stories, so a dreary half-term becomes much more exciting when she discovers a spooky old book. Not only are the stories spinetingling, but it belonged to a girl called Primrose Penberthy, who vanished mysteriously, never to be seen again. Intrigued, Aveline decides to investigate Primrose's disappearance, with some help from her new friend, Harold. Now someone...or something, is stirring. And it is looking for Aveline.
  • Votes: 4

    The Boy at the Back of the Class

    by Onjali Q. Raúf

    A World Book Day 2020 Author WINNER OF THE BLUE PETER BOOK AWARD 2019 WINNER OF THE WATERSTONES CHILDREN'S BOOK PRIZE 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE JHALAK PRIZE 2019 Told with heart and humour, The Boy at the Back of the Class is a child's perspective on the refugee crisis, highlighting the importance of friendship and kindness in a world that doesn't always make sense. There used to be an empty chair at the back of my class, but now a new boy called Ahmet is sitting in it. He's nine years old (just like me), but he's very strange. He never talks and never smiles and doesn't like sweets - not even lemon sherbets, which are my favourite! But then I learned the truth: Ahmet really isn't very strange at all. He's a refugee who's run away from a War. A real one. With bombs and fires and bullies that hurt people. And the more I find out about him, the more I want to help. That's where my best friends Josie, Michael and Tom come in. Because you see, together we've come up with a plan. . . With beautiful illustrations by Pippa Curnick
  • Votes: 3

    The Whizz Pop Chocolate Shop

    by Kate Saunders

    Oz and Lily's family have inherited an ancient chocolate shop and they're moving in upstairs. It's the perfect home ... apart from the small fact that it's haunted. And then they discover some solid gold chocolate moulds - with magic powers! Soon the ghosts are joined by some evil villains determined to get their hands on the priceless secrets of the magical chocolate.
  • Votes: 3

    The Hunger Games (Book 1)

    by Suzanne Collins

  • Votes: 3

    The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler

    by Gene Kemp

    Tyke Tiler is very fond of jokes, that's why there are so many in this story. Tyke is also fond of Danny Price, who is not too bright and depends a lot on his friend. Together Tyke and Danny are double trouble.
  • Votes: 3

    Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library

    by Chris Grabenstein

    Join Kyle as he uses all his gamer skills to solve the puzzle that is Mr Lemoncello's extraordinary library. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory meets A Night in the Museum in this the action-packedNew York Times bestseller from Chris Grabenstein, coauthor of I Funny and other bestselling series with James Patterson! Kyle Keeley is the class clown and a huge fan of all games - board games, word games, and particularly video games. His hero, Luigi Lemoncello, the most famous and creative gamemaker in the world, just so happens to be the genius behind the town's brand-new super library that is as much a home for tech and trickery as it is for stories. Kyle is lucky enough to win a coveted spot as one of twelve kids invited for a puzzle-packed lock-in on the library's opening night, hosted by Mr. Lemoncello. But when morning comes, the doors stay locked. Kyle and the other kids must solve every clue and figure out every secret riddle to find the hidden escape route . . . !
  • Votes: 3

    The Mysterious Benedict Society

    by Trenton Lee Stewart

    When an advert appears in the newspaper for children to take part in a secret mission, children everywhere sit a series of odd tests. In the end, just Reynie, Kate, Sticky and Constance succeed. They have three things in common: they are honest, talented and orphans. They must go undercover and work as a team to save themselves, but also the world.
  • Votes: 3

    The Age of Miracles

    by Karen Thompson Walker

  • Votes: 3

    The Old Curiosity Shop

    by Charles Dickens

    In this tale, first published serially in 1841 and 1842, Dickens follows Nell Trent, an angelic and unfailingly virtuous girl of "nearly fourteen" and her grandfather as they navigate a world populated by villains, criminals and ne'er-do-wells. The public response at the time equalled modern reactions to the Harry Potter books, the audience rapt to learn of Nell's fate. Does she live a life of comfort, of which her grandfather dreams? Or does fate have something less noble in store for poor Nell? This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.
  • Votes: 3

    Journey to the River Sea

    by Eva Ibbotson

    Sent with her governess to live with the dreadful Carter family in exotic Brazil in 1910, Maia endures many hardships before fulfilling her dream of exploring the Amazon River.
  • Votes: 2

    Summer's Shadow

    by Deb Landry

    Summer learned how to mix and match her clothes into stunning outfits because when she was seven, her Mom bought all her clothes at a Nellie's Thrift Shoppe, where her Mom got donations. Mom didn't have money to buy expensive clothes for Summer, and the thrift shop had lots to choose from. Summer's Mom made it fun so she would not feel bad about having to wear hand-me-downs or used clothing. They would mix and match and play dress-up when they were shopping. Miss Nellie was so impressed with Mom and Summer's creativity with all her merchandise, she asked Mom if she would like a job in her store. Summer loved shopping and going to Nellie's Thrift Shoppe and wanted to be a fashion designer when she grew up. It wasn't until she met Max at school that Summer discovered some people could be mean, rude, and hurtful, making fun of the clothes she wore and designs she created. Summer's Shadow teaches the important story of being yourself, trusting adults like Mom, and overcoming obstacles of being excluded, teased, and humiliated just for being who you are.
  • Votes: 2

    Broken Glass

    by Alex Beam

    The true story of the intimate relationship that gave birth to the Farnsworth House, a masterpiece of twentieth-century architecture--and disintegrated into a bitter feud over love, money, gender, and the very nature of art. "An amazing story, brilliantly told."--Sebastian Smee, Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic and author of The Art of Rivalry In 1945, Edith Farnsworth asked the German architect Mies van der Rohe, already renowned for his avant-garde buildings, to design a weekend home for her outside of Chicago. Edith was a woman ahead of her time--unmarried, she was a distinguished medical researcher, as well as an accomplished violinist, translator, and poet. The two quickly began spending weekends together, talking philosophy, Catholic mysticism, and, of course, architecture over wine-soaked picnic lunches. Their personal and professional collaboration would produce the Farnsworth House, one of the most important works of architecture of all time, a blindingly original structure made up almost entirely of glass and steel. But the minimalist marvel, built in 1951, was plagued by cost overruns and a sudden chilling of the two friends' mutual affection. Though the building became world famous, Edith found it impossible to live in, because of its constant leaks, flooding, and complete lack of privacy. Alienated and aggrieved, she lent her name to a public campaign against Mies, cheered on by Frank Lloyd Wright. Mies, in turn, sued her for unpaid monies. The ensuing lengthy trial heard evidence of purported incompetence by an acclaimed architect, and allegations of psychological cruelty and emotional trauma. A commercial dispute litigated in a rural Illinois courthouse became a trial of modernist art and architecture itself. Interweaving personal drama and cultural history, Alex Beam presents a stylish, enthralling narrative tapestry, illuminating the fascinating history behind one of the twentieth-century's most beautiful and significant architectural projects.
  • Votes: 2

    Out of the Smoke

    by Matthew Wainwright

    The final book of the Bible, Revelation prophesies the ultimate judgement of mankind in a series of allegorical visions, grisly images and numerological predictions. According to these, empires will fall, the "Beast" will be destroyed and Christ will rule a new Jerusalem. With an introduction by Will Self.
  • Votes: 2

    The Middler

    by Kirsty Applebaum

    A gripping middle-grade story of a community in which birth order determines social status—until one middle child starts to question the founding truths of her society.
  • Votes: 2

    Hollywood Eden

    by Joel Selvin

    From the Beach Boys and Jan & Dean to the Byrds and the Mamas & the Papas, acclaimed music journalist Joel Selvin tells the story of a group of young artists and musicians who came together at the dawn of the 1960s to create the lasting myth of the California dream. From surf music to hot-rod records to the sunny pop of the Beach Boys and the Mamas & the Papas, Hollywood Eden captures the fresh blossom of a young generation who came together in the epic spring of the 1960s to invent the myth of the California Paradise. Central to the story is a group of sun-kissed teens from the University High School class of 1959 -- a class that included Jan & Dean, Nancy Sinatra, and future members of the Beach Boys -- who came of age in Los Angeles at the dawn of a new golden era when anything seemed possible. These were the people who created the idea of modern California for the rest of the world. From the Beach Boys' "California Girls" to the Mamas & the Papas' "California Dreamin'," they crafted an image of the West Coast as the promised land -- a sun-dappled vision of an idyllic life in the sand and surf. But their own private struggles belied the paradise portrayed in their music. What began as a light-hearted frolic under sunny skies ended up crashing down to earth just a few short but action-packed years later, as, one by one, each met their destinies head-on. Compelling, evocative, and ultimately tragic, Hollywood Eden travels far beyond the music into the desires of the human heart and the price of living out a dream. A rock 'n' roll opera loaded with violence, deceit, intrigue, low comedy, and high drama, it tells the story of a group of young artists and musicians who bumped heads, crashed cars, and ultimately flew too close to the sun.
  • Votes: 2

    Fox Girl

    by Nora Okja Keller

    Nora Okja Keller, the acclaimed author of Comfort Woman, tells the shocking story of a group of young people abandoned after the Korean War. At the center of the tale are two teenage girls—Hyun Jin and Sookie, a teenage prostitute kept by an American soldier—who form a makeshift family with Lobetto, a lost boy who scrapes together a living running errands and pimping for neighborhood girls. Both horrifying and moving, Fox Girl at once reveals another layer of war's human detritus and the fierce love between a mother and daughter.
  • Votes: 2

    The Strangeworlds Travel Agency

    by L. D. Lapinski

    'Assured, witty and inventive. This debut has "future classic" written all over it.' - The Guardian Pack your suitcase for a magical adventure! Perfect for fans of The Train to Impossible Places and Pages & Co. At the Strangeworlds Travel Agency, each suitcase transports you to a different world. All you have to do is step inside . . . When 12-year-old Flick Hudson accidentally ends up in the Strangeworlds Travel Agency, she uncovers a fantastic secret: there are hundreds of other worlds just steps away from ours. All you have to do to visit them is jump into the right suitcase. Then Flick gets the invitation of a lifetime: join Strangeworlds' magical travel society and explore other worlds. But, unknown to Flick, the world at the very centre of it all, a city called Five Lights, is in danger. Buildings and even streets are mysteriously disappearing. Once Flick realizes what's happening she must race against time, travelling through unchartered worlds, seeking a way to fix Five Lights before it collapses into nothingness - and takes our world with it. A magical adventure for 9+ readers that will take you to whole new worlds.
  • Votes: 2

    The Explorer

    by Katherine Rundell

  • Votes: 2

    The Light Jar

    by Lisa Thompson

    Nate and his mother are running away, hiding out in a dilapidated cottage in the middle of a dark forest. When Mum heads off for provisions, and then doesn't return, Nate is left alone and afraid. But comfort can come from the most unexpected of places - a mysterious girl trying to solve a treasure hunt and the reappearance of an old friend.
  • Votes: 2

    The Chicken Nugget Ambush (A Roman Garstang Disaster)

    by Mark Lowery

    An outdoor adventure trip is one thing, but can Roman Garstang survive a chicken nugget-only diet? Roman Garstang is all set for his class trip to Farm View outdoor survival centre. There are only three issues: 1. With Darren Gamble as his new 'BFF' how can Roman make friends with funny, cool girl Vanya? 2. Roman will be sharing a tent with Kevin (AKA 'The Pukelear Missile') for THREE DAYS 3. Mum has prescribed a strict chicken nugget-only diet (Seriously?!) It's time to put his new survival skills to the test . . .
  • Votes: 2

    The Wild Folk

    by Sylvia V. Linsteadt

    When Tin, an orphan City boy with a passion for invention, and curious Country girl Comfrey are visited by two young hares, it is the start of a magical quest. To stop the City from ravaging the Country, they must complete seemingly impossible challenges set by the mystical Wild Folk to find the one who holds the secret to saving their world. A timeless adventure filled with wonder and a crucial environmental message, this is the first book in the magical Stargold Chronicles. Nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal 2019
  • Votes: 1

    Graveyard Book

    by Neil Gaiman

    The first paperback edition of the glorious two-volume, full-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal–winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this stunning adaptation, now in paperback. Artists Kevin Nowlan, P. Craig Russell, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson, and Stephen B. Scott lend their own signature styles to create an imaginatively diverse and yet cohesive interpretation of Neil Gaiman's luminous novel. Volume One contains Chapter One through the Interlude, while Volume Two includes Chapter Six to the end.
  • Votes: 1

    The Tin Snail

    by Cameron Mcallister

    It’s 1938. In order to save his dad’s job, Angelo needs to invent a brand-new car that can carry: a farmer his wife two chickens a flagon of wine and a dozen eggs across a bumpy field without breaking a single egg . . . and without the enemy discovering his top-secret design! Here's the extraordinary story – inspired by real events – of how one little car changed history.