Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 18

    The Art of Doing Science and Engineering

    by Richard W. Hamming

  • Votes: 17

    Masters of Doom

    by David Kushner

    Presents a dual biography of John Carmack and John Romero, the creators of the video games Doom and Quake, assessing the impact of their creation on American pop culture and revealing how their success eventually destroyed their relationship.
  • Votes: 15

    Finite and Infinite Games

    by James Carse

    “There are at least two kinds of games,” states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. “One could be called finite; the other infinite.” Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change—as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end. What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we play—finitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives? Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely. He surveys our world—from the finite games of the playing field and playing board to the infinite games found in culture and religion—leaving all we think we know illuminated and transformed. Along the way, Carse finds new ways of understanding everything, from how an actress portrays a role to how we engage in sex, from the nature of evil to the nature of science. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander. Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. Reading it is the first step in learning to play the infinite game.
  • Votes: 10

    The War of Art

    by Steven Pressfield

    "In this powerful, straight-from-the-hip examination of the internal obstacles to success, bestselling author Steven Pressfield shows readers how to identify, defeat, and unlock the inner barriers to creativity. The War of Art is an inspirational, funny, well-aimed kick in the pants guaranteed to galvanize every would-be artist, visionary, or entrepreneur." --from back cover.
  • Votes: 9

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

  • Votes: 7

    Mother of Learning

  • Votes: 7

    Diaspora

    by Greg Egan

  • Votes: 6

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 4

    Shrimad Bhagwat Geeta

    by Rajkot Gurukul

  • Votes: 4

    The Rise and Decline of Nations

    by Mancur Olson

  • Votes: 3

    The Making of Prince of Persia

    by Jordan Mechner

  • Votes: 2

    Can't Hurt Me

    by David Goggins

    For David Goggins, childhood was a nightmare - poverty, prejudice, and physical abuse colored his days and haunted his nights. But through self-discipline, mental toughness, and hard work, Goggins transformed himself from a depressed, overweight young man with no future into a U.S. Armed Forces icon and one of the world's top endurance athletes. The only man in history to complete elite training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller, he went on to set records in numerous endurance events, inspiring Outside magazine to name him The Fittest (Real) Man in America. In this curse-word-free edition of Can't Hurt Me, he shares his astonishing life story and reveals that most of us tap into only 40% of our capabilities. Goggins calls this The 40% Rule, and his story illuminates a path that anyone can follow to push past pain, demolish fear, and reach their full potential.
  • Votes: 2

    Aunts Aren't Gentlemen

    by P.G. Wodehouse

  • Votes: 2

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Votes: 2

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

    by Stephen R. Covey

    A leading management consultant outlines seven organizational rules for improving effectiveness and increasing productivity at work and at home.
  • Votes: 2

    A Calendar of Wisdom

    by Leo Tolstoy

    This is the first-ever English-language edition of the book Leo Tolstoy considered to be his most important contribution to humanity, the work of his life's last years. Widely read in prerevolutionary Russia, banned and forgotten under Communism; and recently rediscovered to great excitement, A Calendar of Wisdom is a day-by-day guide that illuminates the path of a life worth living with a brightness undimmed by time. Unjustly censored for nearly a century, it deserves to be placed with the few books in our history that will never cease teaching us the essence of what is important in this world.
  • Votes: 2

    Deep Work

    by Cal Newport

  • Votes: 1

    Zero to One

    by Blake Masters

    WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. If you are copying these guys, you aren’t learning from them. It’s easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. Every new creation goes from 0 to 1. This book is about how to get there. ‘Peter Thiel has built multiple breakthrough companies, and Zero to One shows how.’ ELON MUSK, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla ‘This book delivers completely new and refreshing ideas on how to create value in the world.’ MARK ZUCKERBERG, CEO of Facebook ‘When a risk taker writes a book, read it. In the case of Peter Thiel, read it twice. Or, to be safe, three times. This is a classic.’ NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB, author of The Black Swan
  • Votes: 1

    The Seventh Sense

    by Joshua Cooper Ramo

  • Votes: 1

    TOOLS OF TITANS

    by T. Ferriss