Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 49

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 22

    Mindset

    by Carol S. Dweck

    Reveals how established attitudes affect all aspects of one's life, explains the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, and stresses the need to be open to change in order to achieve fulfillment and success.
  • Votes: 15

    The Obstacle Is the Way

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 13

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides suggestions for successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations
  • Votes: 12

    The Almanack of Naval Ravikant

    by Eric Jorgenson

    Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.
  • Votes: 12

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

    by Stephen R. Covey

    A leading management consultant outlines seven organizational rules for improving effectiveness and increasing productivity at work and at home.
  • Votes: 11

    Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely (2010-02-18)

  • Votes: 11

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 10

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

    by Mark Manson

  • Votes: 9

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 7

    How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big

    by Scott Adams

    "Dilbert creator Scott Adams offers his most personal book ever--a ... memoir of his many failures and what they eventually taught him about success. How do you go from hapless office worker to world-famous cartoonist and bestselling author in just a few years? No career guide can answer that, and not even Scott Adams (who actually did it) can give you a road map that works for everyone. But there's a lot to learn from his personal story, and a lot of humor along the way"--
  • Votes: 7

    The Undoing Project

    by Michael Lewis

    Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis's own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms. The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield--both had important careers in the Israeli military--and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn't remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter. This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind's view of its own mind.
  • Votes: 7

    The Psychology of Money

    by Morgan Housel

    Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.
  • Votes: 7

    The Intelligent Investor

    by Benjamin Graham

  • Votes: 6

    The Lord of the Rings Boxed Set

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

    Large print hardback edition of the first volume of J.R.R. Tolkien's epic adventure, The Lord of the Rings, complete with fold-out map. Sauron, the Dark Lord, has gathered to him all the Rings of Power -- the means by which he intends to rule Middle-earth. All he lacks in his plans for dominion is the One Ring -- the ring that rules them all -- which has fallen into the hands of the hobbit, Bilbo Baggins. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose. Now available in large print and impossible to describe in a few words, JRR Tolkien's great work of imaginative fiction has been labelled both a heroic romance and a classic fantasy fiction. By turns comic and homely, epic and diabolic, the narrative moves through countless changes of scene and character in an imaginary world which is totally convincing in its detail.
  • Votes: 6

    A Guide to the Good Life

    by William B. Irvine

    One of the great fears many of us face is that despite all our effort and striving, we will discover at the end that we have wasted our life. In A Guide to the Good Life, William B. Irvine plumbs the wisdom of Stoic philosophy, one of the most popular and successful schools of thought in ancient Rome, and shows how its insight and advice are still remarkably applicable to modern lives. In A Guide to the Good Life, Irvine offers a refreshing presentation of Stoicism, showing how this ancient philosophy can still direct us toward a better life. Using the psychological insights and the practical techniques of the Stoics, Irvine offers a roadmap for anyone seeking to avoid the feelings of chronic dissatisfaction that plague so many of us. Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life. As he does so, he describes his own experiences practicing Stoicism and offers valuable first-hand advice for anyone wishing to live better by following in the footsteps of these ancient philosophers. Readers learn how to minimize worry, how to let go of the past and focus our efforts on the things we can control, and how to deal with insults, grief, old age, and the distracting temptations of fame and fortune. We learn from Marcus Aurelius the importance of prizing only things of true value, and from Epictetus we learn how to be more content with what we have. Finally, A Guide to the Good Life shows readers how to become thoughtful observers of their own lives. If we watch ourselves as we go about our daily business and later reflect on what we saw, we can better identify the sources of distress and eventually avoid that pain in our life. By doing this, the Stoics thought, we can hope to attain a truly joyful life.
  • Votes: 6

    The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition

    by William Strunk Jr.

    Offers advice on improving writing skills and promoting a style marked by simplicity, orderliness, and sincerity.
  • Votes: 6

    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

  • Votes: 5

    The Magic (Secret (Rhonda Byrne))

    by Rhonda Byrne

    A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.
  • Votes: 5

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Professor Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical—and sometimes devastating—breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, and incorporating full-color illustrations throughout the text, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behavior from the legacy of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging, and provocative, Sapiens integrates history and science to challenge everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our heritage...and our future.
  • Votes: 4

    The Story of Philosophy

    by Will Durant

  • Votes: 4

    SURELY YOU ARE JOKING, MR. FEYNMAN!

    by Richard P. Feynman

  • Votes: 4

    Love in the Time of Cholera

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    Set on the Caribbean coast of South America, this love story brings together Fermina Daza, her distinguished husband, and a man who has secretly loved her for more than fifty years.
  • Votes: 4

    The Laws of Human Nature

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 3

    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Harper Perennial Deluxe Editions)

    by Betty Smith

  • Votes: 3

    Loonshots

    by Safi Bahcall

  • Votes: 3

    Daring Greatly

    by Brené Brown

    **Now on Netflix as The Call to Courage** Every time we are introduced to someone new, try to be creative, or start a difficult conversation, we take a risk. We feel uncertain and exposed. We feel vulnerable. Most of us try to fight those feelings - we strive to appear perfect. In a powerful new vision Dr Brené Brown challenges everything we think we know about vulnerability, and dispels the widely accepted myth that it's a weakness. She argues that, in truth, vulnerability is strength and when we shut ourselves off from vulnerability - from revealing our true selves - we distance ourselves from the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives. Daring Greatly is the culmination of 12 years of groundbreaking social research, across every area of our lives including home, relationships, work, and parenting. It is an invitation to be courageous; to show up and let ourselves be seen, even when there are no guarantees. This is vulnerability. This is daring greatly.
  • Votes: 3

    Radical Candor

    by Kim Scott

  • Votes: 3

    The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

    by Robin Sharma

    An internationally bestselling fable about a spiritual journey, littered with powerful life lessons that teach us how to abandon consumerism in order to embrace destiny, live life to the full and discover joy.
  • Votes: 3

    Make Time

    by Jake Knapp

    'If you want to achieve more (without going nuts), read this book.' Charles Duhigg 'Essential reading for anyone who wants to create a happier, more successful life.' Gretchen Rubin Nobody ever looked at an empty calendar and said, 'The best way to spend this time is by cramming it full of meetings!' Or got to work in the morning and thought, 'Today I'll spend hours on Facebook!' Yet, that's exactly what we do. Why? In a world where information refreshes endlessly and the workday feels like a race to react to other people's priorities faster, frazzled and distracted has become our default position. But what if the exhaustion of constant busyness wasn't mandatory? What if you could step off the hamster wheel and start taking control of your time and attention? That's what this book is about. As creators of Google Ventures' renowned 'design sprint', Jake and John have helped hundreds of teams solve important problems by changing how they work. Building on the success of these sprints and their experience designing ubiquitous tech products like Gmail and YouTube, they spent years experimenting with their own personal habits and routines, looking for ways to help individuals optimize their energy, focus, and time. Now they've packaged the most effective tactics into a four-step daily framework that anyone can use to systematically design their days. Make Time is not a one-size-fits-all formula. Instead, it offers a customizable menu of bite-sized tips and strategies that can be tailored to individual habits and lifestyles. It isn't about productivity, or checking off more to-dos. Nor does it propose unrealistic solutions like throwing out your smartphone or swearing off social media. Making time isn't about radically overhauling your lifestyle; it's about making small shifts in your environment to liberate yourself from constant busyness and distraction. A must-read for anyone who has ever thought 'If only there were more hours in the day...' Make Time will help you to stop passively reacting to the demands of the modern world and start intentionally making time for the things that matter.
  • Votes: 3

    The Power of Now

    by Eckhart Tolle

    The author shares the secret of his own self-realization and the philosophy for living in the present he has developed.
  • Votes: 3

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 3

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 3

    Deep Work

    by Cal Newport

  • Votes: 3

    The Magic of Thinking Big

    by David J. Schwartz

  • Votes: 2

    Mastery

    by Robert Greene

    Evaluates the tactics employed by great historical figures to offer insight into how to gain control over one's own life and destiny, challenging cultural myths to demonstrate how anyone can tap the power of a love for doing something well to achieve high levels of success.
  • Votes: 2

    Inner Engineering

    by Sadhguru

    "The founder of the Isha Foundation, an all-volunteer organization involved in large-scale humanitarian, educational, and environmental projects, Sadhguru is a thought leader on a epic scale. His mission is to improve the quality and experience of life, from the individual to the global. He has distilled a system of practices from the ancient yogic sciences that will deepen your perception and bring about a shift in the very way you experience your life, work, relationships, and the world you inhabit. It is a profound system of self-exploration and transformation, based on the radical premise that it is possible for a human being to evolve consciously. Unlike biological evolution, which happens without your conscious participation, spiritual evolution can happen consciously. All it takes is willingness."
  • Votes: 2

    Think and Grow Rich

    by Napoleon Hill

    An updated edition of the best-selling guide features anecdotes about such modern figures as Bill Gates, Dave Thomas, and Sir John Templeton, explaining how their examples can enable modern readers to pursue wealth and overcome personal stumbling blocks. Original. 30,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 2

    Illusions

    by Richard Bach

    In the cloud-washed airspace between the cornfields of Illinois and blue infinity, a man puts his faith in the propeller of his biplane. For disillusioned writer and itinerant barnstormer Richard Bach, belief is as real as a full tank of gas and sparks firing in the cylinders ... until he meets Donald Shimoda - former mechanic and self-described messiah who can make wrenches fly and Richard's imagination soar... In Illusions,the unforgettable follow-up to his phenomenal New York Times bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull,Richard Bach takes to the air to discover the ageless truths that give our souls wings- that people don't need airplanes to soar ... that even the darkest clouds have meaning once we lift ourselves above them ... and that messiahs can be found in the unlikeliest places - like hay fields, one-traffic-light midwestern towns, and most of all, deep within ourselves.
  • Votes: 2

    Testament of Youth (Penguin Classics)

    by Vera Brittain

    Much of what we know and feel about the First World War we owe to Vera Brittain's elegiac yet unsparing book, which set a standard for memoirists from Martha Gellhorn to Lillian Hellman. Abandoning her studies at Oxford in 1915 to enlist as a nurse in the armed services, Brittain served in London, in Malta, and on the Western Front. By war's end she had lost virtually everyone she loved. "Testament of Youth" is both a record of what she lived through and an elegy for a vanished generation. Hailed by the "Times Literary Supplement" as a book that helped "both form and define the mood of its time," it speaks to any generation that has been irrevocably changed by war.
  • Votes: 2

    Never Split the Difference

    by VOSS/RAZ

    'A master of persuasion.' Forbes'This book blew my mind.' Adam Grant, bestselling author of OriginalsA former FBI hostage negotiator offers a new, field-tested approach to negotiating - effective in any situation. After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a kidnapping negotiator brought him face-to-face with bank robbers, gang leaders and terrorists. Never Split the Differencetakes you inside his world of high-stakes negotiations, revealing the nine key principles that helped Voss and his colleagues succeed when it mattered the most - when people?s lives were at stake. Rooted in the real-life experiences of an intelligence professional at the top of his game, Never Split the Differencewill give you the competitive edge in any discussion.'Filled with insights that apply to everyday negotiations.' Business Insider'A stupendous book.' The Week'It's rare that a book is so gripping and entertaining while still being actionable and applicable.' Inc.
  • Votes: 2

    The Richest Man In Babylon - Original Edition

    by George S Clason

    The Richest Man in Babylon, based on "Babylonian parables", has been hailed as the greatest of all inspirational works on the subject of thrift, financial planning, and personal wealth. In simple language, these fascinating and informative stories set you on a sure path to prosperity and its accompanying joys. A celebrated bestseller, it offers an understanding and a solution to your personal financial problem. Revealed inside are the secrets to acquiring money, keeping money, and making money earn more money. Gold Edition includes bonus material: The Magic Story by Frederick Van Dey. The Magic Story: My task is done. I have written the recipe for "success." If followed, it cannot fail. Wherein I may not be entirely comprehended, the plus-entity of whosoever reads will supply the deficiency; and upon that Better Self of mine, I place the burden of imparting to generations that are to come, the secret of this all-pervading good, - the secret of being what you have it within you to be. It is claimed that many who read or hear this story almost immediately begin to have good fortune - so it is worth a few minutes of your time to find out if it works for you?
  • Votes: 2

    The Road to Serfdom

    by Hayek

  • Votes: 2

    Expect a Miracle -You Won't Be Disappointed!

    by Tel Franklin

  • Votes: 2

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

  • Votes: 2

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    by Daniel Kahneman

  • Votes: 2

    Know Thyself

    by Stephen M Fleming

    The surprising science of the human mind's greatest power: introspection It happens to everyone: You are asked a question -- even something you know well, such as the name of a longtime colleague -- and can't answer. The information is stuck on the tip of your tongue. It's an experience so frustrating that it seems like it must be a brain malfunction. In fact, it's actually a hallmark of our greatest power: self-awareness. As cognitive neuroscientist Stephen M. Fleming shows in Know Thyself, self-awareness shapes our intelligence, memory, and conscious experience. It's integral to how we teach and learn. We use it every time we weigh difficult questions, such as assessing how we'd respond in a crisis. Drawing on psychology and neuroscience, Fleming provides deep insight into how self-awareness works, and how we can enhance our ability to know our strengths and weaknesses. In the end, this book isn't just about psychology: it's about the science of human excellence.
  • Votes: 2

    Linchpin

    by Seth Godin

  • Votes: 2

    Reason

    WHAT DOES GOD LOOK LIKE? Welcome to southeast Michigan and the small town of Carlson where faith, hope, and struggle are defined by the different faces of those who live there. An addict that sits at a bar to forget. A mother whose five-year-old boy has leukemia. Two doctors. An atheist haunted by his past and a brilliant young oncologist that places all her hope in the power of modern medicine. A blind pastor whose son hasn’t spoken a single word in thirty-eight years. But the minister sees by faith. He knows there are answers and believes that someone who cares is watching—someone with a greater purpose. Yet there is something he doesn’t know... that none of them know. In the midst of the ordinary and the devastat- ing, there is a reason these lives will be changed forever. Lightning is about to strike. The Reason opens with a thunderbolt and never lets up as it introduces us to everyday characters who are wrestling with questions: Where is God when bad things happen? Does God ignore the prayers of the faithful? The answer each character receives will astound readers while offering an unforgettable call to hope, to change, and to believe.
  • Votes: 2

    How to Do the Work

    by Dr. Nicole LePera

  • Votes: 1

    Understanding Comics

    by Scott McCloud

  • Votes: 1

    365 Ways to Be Your Own Life Coach

    by David Lawrence Preston

    Life coaches aim to support and encourage their clients in their personal and professional growth by helping them to identify and achieve their goals. Good coaches don't give advice, but help the client to find the answer for themselves. But they are expensive. With this book, you can transform your life with no financial outlay other than the cover price. Using the author's eight steps to success you'll learn how to: - Choose your goals - Use the power of your mind - Build desirable personal qualities into yourself - Evaluate your current situation - Consider your options - Take action in order to succeed - Monitor your progress - Plug into the power of Persistence
  • Votes: 1

    Have a Look, Says Book.

    by Richard Jackson

    Illustrations and simple, rhyming text introduce objects and creatures, both real and imaginary, that invite the reader to touch and discover how furry, fleecy, mossy, or squishy each is.
  • Votes: 1

    FREEDOM - A Beautiful Choice

    by Mrs. Nancy A. Tanton

    "The ancient Greeks argued that the best life was filled with beauty, truth, justice, play and love. The mathematician Francis Su knows just where to find them."--Kevin Hartnett, Quanta Magazine" This is perhaps the most important mathematics book of our time. Francis Su shows mathematics is an experience of the mind and, most important, of the heart."--James Tanton, Global Math Project For mathematician Francis Su, a society without mathematical affection is like a city without concerts, parks, or museums. To miss out on mathematics is to live without experiencing some of humanity's most beautiful ideas. In this profound book, written for a wide audience but especially for those disenchanted by their past experiences, an award-winning mathematician and educator weaves parables, puzzles, and personal reflections to show how mathematics meets basic human desires--such as for play, beauty, freedom, justice, and love--and cultivates virtues essential for human flourishing. These desires and virtues, and the stories told here, reveal how mathematics is intimately tied to being human. Some lessons emerge from those who have struggled, including philosopher Simone Weil, whose own mathematical contributions were overshadowed by her brother's, and Christopher Jackson, who discovered mathematics as an inmate in a federal prison. Christopher's letters to the author appear throughout the book and show how this intellectual pursuit can--and must--be open to all.
  • Votes: 1

    Principles

    by Ray Dalio

  • Votes: 1

    A More Beautiful Question

    by Warren Berger

  • Votes: 1

    Think & Trade Like a Champion

    by Mark Minervini

  • Votes: 1

    Invisible Women

    by Caroline Criado Perez

  • Votes: 1

    Feeling the Shoulder of the Lion

    by Jalaluddin Rumi

    These selections from Rumi's Mathnawi—a classic of Sufi spiritual literature—express the "lion's roar" of courage, discipline, clarity, and integrity. The lion represents the fierce intensity that recognizes no authority except the highest truth. At the same time, Rumi's lion is full of heart and devotion. Through these poems the reader will explore the qualities that are vital to the spiritual aspirant who seeks to overcome the imprisonment of ego.
  • Votes: 1

    Born a Crime

    by Trevor Noah

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man's coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Michiko Kakutani, New York Times * USA Today * San Francisco Chronicle * NPR * Esquire * Newsday * Booklist Trevor Noah's unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents' indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa's tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man's relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother--his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother's unconventional, unconditional love. Praise for Born a Crime "[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah's] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah's family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author's remarkable mother."--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "[An] unforgettable memoir."--Parade "What makes Born a Crime such a soul-nourishing pleasure, even with all its darker edges and perilous turns, is reading Noah recount in brisk, warmly conversational prose how he learned to negotiate his way through the bullying and ostracism. . . . What also helped was having a mother like Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. . . . Consider Born a Crime another such gift to her--and an enormous gift to the rest of us."--USA Today "[Noah] thrives with the help of his astonishingly fearless mother. . . . Their fierce bond makes this story soar."--People
  • Votes: 1

    The Goal

    by Eliyahu M. Goldratt

    "Includes case study interviews"--Cover.
  • Votes: 1

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 1

    How to Be a Woman

    by Caitlin Moran

    It's a good time to be a woman: we have the vote and the Pill, and we haven't been burnt as witches since 1727. But a few nagging questions remain... Why are we supposed to get Brazilians? Should we use Botox? Do men secretly hate us? And why does everyone ask you when you're going to have a baby? Part memoir, part protest, Caitlin answers the questions that every modern woman is asking.