Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 1744

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Votes: 924

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

  • Votes: 830

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    Drifters in search of work, George and his childlike friend Lennie, have nothing in the world except the clothes on their back - and a dream that one day they will have some land of their own. Eventually they find work on a ranch in California's Salinas Valley, but their hopes are dashed as Lennie - struggling against extreme cruelty, misunderstanding and feelings of jealousy - becomes a victim of his own strength. Tackling universal themes of friendship and shared vision, and giving a voice to America's lonely and dispossessed, Of Mice and Men remains Steinbeck's most popular work, achieving success as a novel, Broadway play and three acclaimed films.
  • Votes: 755

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 678

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

  • Votes: 643

    The Crucible

    by Arthur Miller

    The Crucible is a study in the mass hysteria which led to the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials, concentrating on the fate of some of the key figures caught up in the persecution. It powerfully depicts people and principles under pressure and the issues and motivations involved. At the same time, it is also a parable for the events of the McCarthy era in the USA of the 1950s when anyone suspected of left-wing views was arraigned for 'Un-American Activities'.
  • Votes: 562

    The Odyssey

    by Homer

  • Votes: 429

    1984

    by George Orwell

    Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities
  • Votes: 409

    Romeo and Juliet (Folger Shakespeare Library)

    by William Shakespeare

    Offers explanatory notes on pages facing the text of the play, as well as an introduction to Shakespeare's language, life, and theater.
  • Votes: 408

    Scarlet

    by A. C. Gaughen

    Posing as one of Robin Hood's thieves to avoid the evil Lord Gisbourne, Scarlet has kept her identity secret from all of Nottinghamshire. Only her fellow outlaws, John Little, Much and Robin Hood know the truth - this agile thief is no boy but in fact a fearless young woman with a secret past. But Scarlet is torn between her desire to get as far from Lord Gisbourne as possible and a strong sense of responsibility to those who took her in when she was first on the run. As Gisbourne draws closer to Scarlet and puts innocent lives at risk, she must decide how much the people of Nottinghamshire mean to her, especially John Little and Robin, whose quick smiles and temper have the rare power to unsettle Scarlet. Full of exciting action, secrets and romance, this imaginative retelling of the classic tale will have readers following every move of Robin Hood and his band of thieves.
  • Votes: 399

    Mockingbird

    by Kathryn Erskine

    Caitlin misses her brother every day. Since his death in a school shooting, she has no one to explain the world to her. And for Caitlin, the world is a confusing place. She hates it when colours get mixed up, prefers everything to be black-and-white, and needs to check her Facial Expressions Chart to understand emotions. So when Caitlin reads the definition of “closure”, she decides that’s what she needs. And as she struggles to find it, a world of colour begins to enter her black-and-white life...
  • Votes: 351

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 344

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 332

    The Scarlet Letter

    by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The Scarlet Letter: A Romance is a work of historical fiction by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850.Set in Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony during the years 1642 to 1649, the novel tells the story of Hester Prynne who conceives a daughter through an affair and then struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Containing a number of religious and historic allusions, the book explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.The Scarlet Letter was one of the first mass-produced books in America.It was popular when first published and is considered a classic work today.It inspired numerous film, television, and stage adaptations. Critics have described it as a masterwork and novelist D. H. Lawrence called it a "perfect work of the American imagination".
  • Votes: 330

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 327

    Heart of Darkness

    by Joseph Conrad

  • Votes: 324

    Great Expectations (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 321

    Frankenstein (Signet Classics)

    by Mary Shelley

  • Votes: 302

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 273

    Things Fall Apart

    by Chinua Achebe

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele
  • Votes: 265

    Death of a Salesman (Penguin Plays)

    by Arthur Miller

    Arthur Miller's extraordinary masterpiece, Death of a Salesman changed the course of modern theatre, and has lost none of its power as an examination of American life and consumerism, published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'A man is not an orange. You can't eat the fruit and throw the peel away' Willy Loman is on his last legs. Failing at his job, dismayed at his the failure of his sons, Biff and Happy, to live up to his expectations, and tortured by his jealousy at the success and happiness of his neighbour Charley and his son Bernard, Willy spirals into a well of regret, reminiscence, and A scathing indictment of the ultimate failure of the American dream, and the empty pursuit of wealth and success, is a harrowing journey. In creating Willy Loman, his destructively insecure anti-hero, Miller defined his aim as being 'to set forth what happens when a man does not have a grip on the forces of life'. Arthur Miller (1915-2005), American dramatist, was born in New York City. In 1938 Miller won awards for his comedy The Grass Still Grows. His major achievement was Death of a Salesman, which won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 1949 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award. The Crucible was aimed at the widespread congressional investigation of subversive activities in the US; the drama won the 1953 Tony Award. Miller's autobiography, Timebends: A Life was published in 1987. If you enjoyed Death of a Salesman, you might like Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.
  • Votes: 241

    Night (Night)

    by Elie Wiesel

  • Votes: 228

    Metamorphosis

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 226

    One Hundred Years of Solitude

    by Gabriel García Márquez

  • Votes: 216

    The Canterbury Tales

    by Geoffrey Chaucer

    'Nevill Coghill's easy, seductive translation ensures that this, the most popular work in English Literature - now 600 years old - will run through yet more centuries' Melvyn Bragg In The Canterbury Tales Chaucer created one of the great touchstones of English literature. A storytelling competition within a group of pilgrims from all walks of life is the occasion for a series of tales that range from the Knight's account of courtly love and the ebullient Wife of Bath's Arthurian legend to the ribald anecdotes of the Miller and the Cook. This masterly and vivid modern English verse translation retains all the vigour and poetry of Chaucer's fourteenth-century Middle English. Translated by NEVILL COGHILL
  • Votes: 197

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

    A Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of a counterculture classic, and the inspiration for the new Netflix original series Ratched, with a foreword by Chuck Palahniuk Boisterous, ribald, and ultimately shattering, Ken Kesey’s 1962 novel has left an indelible mark on the literature of our time. Now in a new deluxe edition with a foreword by Chuck Palahniuk and cover by Joe Sacco, here is the unforgettable story of a mental ward and its inhabitants, especially the tyrannical Big Nurse Ratched and Randle Patrick McMurphy, the brawling, fun-loving new inmate who resolves to oppose her. We see the struggle through the eyes of Chief Bromden, the seemingly mute half-Indian patient who witnesses and understands McMurphy’s heroic attempt to do battle with the powers that keep them all imprisoned. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 182

    In Cold Blood

    by Truman Capote

  • Votes: 182

    Pride and Prejudice

    by Jane Austen

  • Votes: 161

    The Old Man and The Sea, Book Cover May Vary

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 160

    Beowulf

    by Seamus Heaney

    Composed towards the end of the first millennium, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf is one of the great Northern epics and a classic of European literature. In his new translation, Seamus Heaney has produced a work which is both true, line by line, to the original poem, and an expression, in its language and music, of something fundamental to his own creative gift. The poem is about encountering the monstrous, defeating it, and then having to live on, physically and psychically exposed, in that exhausted aftermath. It is not hard to draw parallels between this story and the history of the twentieth century, nor can Heaney's Beowulf fail to be read partly in the light of his Northern Irish upbringing. But it also transcends such considerations, telling us psychological and spiritual truths that are permanent and liberating.
  • Votes: 143

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.
  • Votes: 138

    A Separate Peace

    by John Knowles

    AS HEARD ON BBC RADIO 4 'A GOOD READ' 'A novel that made such a deep impression on me at sixteen that I can still conjure the atmosphere in my fifties: of yearning, infatuation mingled indistinguishably with envy, and remorse' Lionel Shriver An American coming-of-age tale during a period when the entire country was losing its innocence to the second world war. Set at a boys' boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.
  • Votes: 138

    Othello

    by William Shakespeare

  • Votes: 121

    The Outsiders

    by S. E. Hinton

  • Votes: 111

    A Midsummer Night's Dream (Folger Shakespeare Library)

    by William Shakespeare

    Presents Shakespeare's popular comedy of love and mistaken identity.
  • Votes: 98

    Flowers for Algernon

    by Daniel Keyes

  • Votes: 98

    The Good Earth

    by Pearl S. Buck

  • Votes: 96

    Invisible Man

    by Ralph Ellison

  • Votes: 96

    Adventures of Huckleberry Fin

    by Mark Twain

    In Mark Twain's classic tale of friendship and adventure, Huckleberry Finn escapes his evil, drunken father, befriends a runaway slave named Jim, and sails the Mississippi River! As Huck and Jim sail to freedom, they encounter con men and thieves and get in plenty of trouble along the way. Follow Huck's coming-of-age journey in the Calico Illustrated Classics adaptation of Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Calico Chapter Books is an imprint of Magic Wagon, a division of ABDO Group. Grades 3-8.
  • Votes: 94

    Beloved

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 88

    The Pearl

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 80

    A Raisin in the Sun

    by Lorraine Hansberry

  • Votes: 79

    The Red Badge of Courage (Dover Thrift Editions)

    by Stephen Crane

    The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane from Coterie Classics All Coterie Classics have been formatted for ereaders and devices and include a bonus link to the free audio book. “It was not well to drive men into final corners; at those moments they could all develop teeth and claws.” ― Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage The Red Badge of Courage tells the story of a young man sent to fight in the Civil War that discovers glory is a myth and war is truly hell.
  • Votes: 70

    Where the Red Fern Grows

    by Wilson Rawls

    A beloved classic that captures the powerful bond between man and man’s best friend. Billy has long dreamt of owning not one, but two, dogs. So when he’s finally able to save up enough money for two pups to call his own—Old Dan and Little Ann—he’s ecstatic. It doesn’t matter that times are tough; together they’ll roam the hills of the Ozarks. Soon Billy and his hounds become the finest hunting team in the valley. Stories of their great achievements spread throughout the region, and the combination of Old Dan’s brawn, Little Ann’s brains, and Billy’s sheer will seems unbeatable. But tragedy awaits these determined hunters—now friends—and Billy learns that hope can grow out of despair, and that the seeds of the future can come from the scars of the past. Praise for Where the Red Fern Grows A Top 100 Children’s Novel, School Library Journal's A Fuse #8 Production A Must-Read for Kids 9 to 14, NPR Winner of Multiple State Awards Over 7 million copies in print! “Very touching.” —The New York Times Book Review “One of the great classics of children’s literature . . . Any child who doesn’t get to read this beloved and powerfully emotional book has missed out on an important piece of childhood for the last 40-plus years.” —Common Sense Media “An exciting tale of love and adventure you’ll never forget.” —School Library Journal “A book of unadorned naturalness.” —Kirkus Reviews “Written with so much feeling and sentiment that adults as well as children are drawn [in] with a passion.” —Arizona Daily Star “It’s a story about a young boy and his two hunting dogs and . . . I can’t even go on without getting a little misty.” —The Huffington Post “We tear up just thinking about it.” —Time on the film adaptation
  • Votes: 70

    The Glass Menagerie

    by Tennessee Williams

  • Votes: 69

    Ethan Frome

    by Edith Wharton

  • Votes: 69

    Antigone

    by Sophocles

    To make this quintessential Greek drama more accessible to the modern reader, this Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Edition? includes a glossary of difficult terms, a list of vocabulary words, and convenient sidebar notes. By providing these, it is our intention that readers will more fully enjoy the beauty, wisdom, and intent of the play.The curse placed on Oedipus lingers and haunts a younger generation in this new and brilliant translation of Sophocles? classic drama. The daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, Antigone is an unconventional heroine who pits her beliefs against the King of Thebes in a bloody test of wills that leaves few unharmed. Emotions fly as she challenges the king for the right to bury her own brother. Determined but doomed, Antigone shows her inner strength throughout the play. Antigone raises issues of law and morality that are just as relevant today as they were more than two thousand years ago. Whether this is your first reading or your twentieth, Antigone will move you as few pieces of literature can.
  • Votes: 68

    The Things We Cannot Say

    by Kelly Rimmer

    If you were moved by The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris or The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe, this book is for you. A searing page-turner of hope, family secrets and a love to defy all odds from bestselling Kelly Rimmer, inspired by the author's family history. 'Fans of The Nightingale and Lilac Girls will adore The Things We Cannot Say' Pam Jenoff 'Simply amazing book, so moving I couldn't put it down. A book that will remain in my heart for many years to come *****' A reader 'Captivating. I am in awe of this story *****' A reader 'I have never ever been so deeply moved by a book...the most amazing love story of hope and survival during the Nazi occupation of Poland... i just didn't want it to end *****' A reader It begins with the discovery of a tattered photo, a letter and a tiny leather shoe... World War Two, Poland. Alina and Tomasz are childhood sweethearts. The night before he leaves for college, Tomasz proposes marriage. But when their village falls to the Nazis, Alina doesn't know if Tomasz is alive or dead. 2019. Life changed beyond recognition for Alice when her son, Eddie, was born with autism spectrum disorder. She must do everything to support him, but at what cost to her family? When her cherished grandmother is hospitalised, a hidden box of mementoes reveals a tattered photo of a young man, a tiny leather shoe and a letter. Her grandmother begs Alice to return to Poland to see what became of those she held dearest. In Poland, separated from her family, Alice begins to uncover the story her grandmother is so desperate to tell, and discovers a love that bloomed in the winter of 1942. As a painful family history comes to light, will the struggles of the past and present finally reach a heartbreaking resolution? 'Alina and Tomasz's story is one of bravery, resilience, and the lengths we will go to for the ones we love' Sally Hepworth More praise for the heart-tugging novels of Kelly Rimmer 'Kelly Rimmer serves up a heart-pounding dilemma for fans of Jodi Picoult' Marie Claire 'A heartbreaking story... Her characters are captivating' Daily Telegraph 'Kelly Rimmer tears at the heartstrings' Herald Sun
  • Votes: 65

    Oedipus the King

    by Sophocles

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • Votes: 62

    All Quiet on the Western Front

    by Erich Maria Remarque

  • Votes: 61

    A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

    by Charles Dickens

    Great Stories in Easy English
  • Votes: 61

    The Merchant of Venice (Folger Shakespeare Library)

    by William Shakespeare

    In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare creates a violent world, in which two young people fall in love. It is not simply that their families disapprove; the Montagues and the Capulets are engaged in a blood feud. In this death-filled setting, the movement from love at first sight to the lovers' final union in death seems almost inevitable. And yet, this play set in an extraordinary world has become the quintessential story of young love. In part because of its exquisite language, it is easy to respond as if it were about all young lovers. The authoritative edition of Romeo and Juliet from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, is now available as an eBook. Features include: · The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference · Hundreds of hypertext links for instant navigation · Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play · Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play · Scene-by-scene plot summaries · A key to famous lines and phrases · An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language · Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books · An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play
  • Votes: 61

    A Farewell to Arms

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 55

    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

    by Maya Angelou

  • Votes: 54

    The Hobbit

    by J. R. R. Tolkien

    The first volume in J.R.R. Tolkien's epic adventure THE LORD OF THE RINGS One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins, as told in The Hobbit. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose. “A unique, wholly realized other world, evoked from deep in the well of Time, massively detailed, absorbingly entertaining, profound in meaning.” – New York Times
  • Votes: 53

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 52

    The Stranger

    by Albert Camus

    An ordinary man is unwittingly caught up in a senseless murder in Algeria
  • Votes: 52

    Anne Frank

    by Anne Frank

  • Votes: 51

    The Awakening

    by Nora Roberts

  • Votes: 49

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 49

    The Taming of the Shrew (Folger Shakespeare Library)

    by William Shakespeare

    Previously published: New York: Washington Square Press, 1992.
  • Votes: 48

    As I Lay Dying

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 45

    A Streetcar Named Desire

    by Tennessee Williams

    A Streetcar Named Desire shows a turbulent confrontation between traditional values in the American South - an old-world graciousness and beauty running decoratively to seed - set against the rough-edged, aggressive materialism of the new world. Through the vividly characterised figures of Southern belle Blanche Dubois, seeking refuge from physical ugliness in decayed gentility, and her brutal brother-in-law Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams dramatises his sense of the South's past as still active and often destructive in modern America. This revised edition features a new production history of the play that considers both stage and screen presentations, an updated bibliography and extensive notes on the language of the play. Commentary and notes by Patricia Hern and Michael Hooper.
  • Votes: 41

    The House on Mango Street

    by Sandra Cisneros

    The bestselling coming-of-age classic, acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught in schools and universities alike, and translated around the world from the winner of the 2019 PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Told in a series of vignettes-sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous-Sandra Cisneros' masterpiece is a classic story of childhood and self-discovery. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.
  • Votes: 39

    The Joy Luck Club

    by Amy Tan

    ‘The Joy Luck Club is an ambitious saga that’s impossible to read without wanting to call your Mum’ Stylist Discover Amy Tan’s moving and poignant tale of immigrant Chinese mothers and their American-born daughters. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, meet weekly to play mahjong and tell stories of what they left behind in China. United in loss and new hope for their daughters' futures, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Their daughters, who have never heard these stories, think their mothers' advice is irrelevant to their modern American lives - until their own inner crises reveal how much they've unknowingly inherited of their mothers' pasts.
  • Votes: 38

    Siddhartha

    by Hermann Hesse

  • Votes: 36

    The Jungle

    by Upton Sinclair

    The author's famous tale of a Lithuanian family who emigrates to America and is destroyed by exploitation, crushing poverty, and economic despair.
  • Votes: 36

    The Giver

    by Lois Lowry

    Celebrate Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world in this 25th Anniversary Edition of The Giver. Includes a new afterword from Lois Lowry, as well as her Newbery acceptance speech. The Giver, Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning novel, has become one of the most influential books of our time. Placed on countless reading lists and curricula, translated into more than forty languages, and made into a feature film, The Giver is a modern classic. Celebrate this beloved contribution to children's literature with the 25th Anniversary Edition. The haunting story of twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity, is as resonant today as when it was first published. Lois Lowry will include a new afterword as well as her Newbery acceptance speech in this beautifully rejacketed edition.
  • Votes: 36

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

    by Mark Twain

    Here is the story of Tom, Huck, Becky, and Aunt Polly; a tale of adventures, pranks, playing hookey, and summertime fun. Written by the author sometimes called "the Lincoln of literature," The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was surprisingly neither a critical nor a financial success when it was first published in 1876. It was Mark Twain's first novel. However, since then Tom Sawyer has become his most popular work, enjoying dramatic, film, and even Broadway musical interpretations.
  • Votes: 34

    Life of Pi

    by Yann Martel

  • Votes: 34

    The Importance of Being Earnest

    by Oscar Wilde

  • Votes: 33

    Watership Down

    by Richard Adams

    WINNER of the Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Class Animated Program Now a Netflix animated miniseries starring James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, and Oscar and Grammy award-winner Sir Ben Kingsley. A worldwide bestseller for more than forty years, Watership Down is the compelling tale of a band of wild rabbits struggling to hold onto their place in the world—“a classic yarn of discovery and struggle” (The New York Times). Richard Adams’s Watership Down is a timeless classic and one of the most beloved novels of all time. Set in the Hampshire Downs in Southern England, an idyllic rural landscape, this stirring tale of “suspense, hot pursuit, and derring-do” (Chicago Tribune) follows a band of rabbits in flight from the incursion of man and the destruction of their home. Led by a stouthearted pair of brothers, they travel forth from their native Sandleford warren through harrowing trials to a mysterious promised land and a more perfect society. “A marvelous story of rebellion, exile, and survival” (Sunday Telegraph) this is an unforgettable literary classic for all ages.
  • Votes: 32

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin Classics)

    by James Joyce

    "I will not serve that in which I no longer believe, whether it call itself my home, my fatherland or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defence the only arms I allow myself to use -- silence, exile, and cunning." James Joyce's supremely innovative fictional autobiography is also, in the apt phrase of the biographer Richard Ellmann, nothing less than "the gestation of a soul." For as he describes the shabby, cloying, and sometimes terrifying Dublin upbringing of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, Joyce immerses the reader in his emerging consciousness, employing language that ranges from baby talk to hellfire sermon to a triumphant artist's manifesto. The result is a novel of immense boldness, eloquence, and energy, a work that inaugurated a literary revolution and has become a model for the portrayal of the self in our time. The text of this edition has been newly edited by Hans Walter Gabler and Walter Hettche and is followed by a new afterword, chronology, and bibliography by Richard Brown.
  • Votes: 32

    The Handmaid's Tale

    by Margaret Atwood

  • Votes: 31

    The Metamorphosis

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 31

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 31

    The Iliad

    by Homer

  • Votes: 31

    Anthem

    by Ayn Rand

    In a future world, only one man dares to think, strive, and love as an individual in the midst of a paralyzing collective humanity.
  • Votes: 29

    The Scarlett Letters

    by Jenny Nordbak

    Jenny Nordbak takes us to a place that few have seen, but millions have fantasized about, revealing how she transformed herself from a USC grad lacking in confidence into an elite professional dominatrix who finds her own voice, power and compassion for others. On an unorthodox quest to understand her hidden fantasies, Jenny led a double life for two years. By day she was a construction manager, but at night she became Mistress Scarlett. Working at LA’s longest-running dungeon, she catered to the secret fetishes of clients ranging from accountants to movie stars. She simultaneously developed a career in the complex and male-dominated world of healthcare construction, while spending her nights as a sex worker, dominating men. Far from the standard-issue powerful men who pay to be helpless, Mistress Scarlett’s clientele included men whose fantasies revealed more complex needs, from “Tickle Ed” to “Doggie Dan,” from the “Treasure Trolls” to “Ta-Da Ted.” The Scarlett Letters explores the spectacularly diverse array of human sexuality and the fascinating cast of characters that the author encountered along the way.
  • Votes: 28

    The Plague

    by Albert Camus

    The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.
  • Votes: 28

    Billy Budd

    by Herman Melville

    Herman Melville's final masterpiece, found unpublished on his desk at his death. "Billy Budd, Sailor" would emerge, after its publication in 1924, as one of Melville's best-loved books--and one of his most open, with its discussion of homosexualty. In it, Melville returns to the sea to tell the story of Billy, a cheerful, hard working, and handsome young sailor, conscripted to work against his will on another ship, where he soon finds himself persecuted by Claggart, the paranoid master-at-arms. As things escalate beyond the naive Billy's control, tragedy looms on the horizon like Melville's great white whale, and the story become Melville's final, sublime plunge into the classic tussle between civilization and chaos, between oppression and freedom, as well as the book in which he discusses homosexuality most openly. One of the major works of American literature.
  • Votes: 28

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    by Alan Paton

    Cry the Beloved Countryis the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its contemporaneity, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry the Beloved Countryis a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.
  • Votes: 28

    Mythology

    by Edith Hamilton

  • Votes: 28

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    by Mark Twain

  • Votes: 27

    Hiroshima

    by John Hersey

  • Votes: 26

    The Tragedy of Julius Ceasar

    by William Shakespeare

  • Votes: 26

    Candide

    by Voltaire

  • Votes: 25

    Bless Me, Ultima

    by Rudolfo Anaya

    Antonio Marez is six years old when Ultima comes to stay with his family in New Mexico.
  • Votes: 25

    Much Ado About Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library)

    by William Shakespeare

    Much Ado About Nothing includes two quite different stories of romantic love. Hero and Claudio fall in love almost at first sight, but an outsider, Don John, strikes out at their happiness. Beatrice and Benedick are kept apart by pride and mutual antagonism until others decide to play Cupid. The authoritative edition of Much Ado About Nothing from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, includes: -The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference -Hundreds of hypertext links for instant navigation -Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play -Full explanatory notes conveniently linked to the text of the play -Scene-by-scene plot summaries -A key to the play’s famous lines and phrases -An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language -An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play -Fresh images from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books -An annotated guide to further reading Essay by Gail Kern Paster The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, is home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare’s printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit Folger.edu.
  • Votes: 25

    Dante's Inferno

    by Dante Alighieri

    Belonging in the immortal company of the works of Homer, Virgil, Milton, and Shakespeare, Dante Alighieri’s poetic masterpiece is a visionary journey that takes readers through the torment of Hell. The first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy is many things: a moving human drama, a supreme expression of the Middle Ages, a glorification of the ways of God, and a magnificent protest against the ways in which men have thwarted the divine plan. One of the few literary works that has enjoyed a fame both immediate and enduring, The Inferno remains powerful after seven centuries. It confronts the most universal values—good and evil, free will and predestination—while remaining intensely personal and ferociously political, for it was born out of the anguish of a man who saw human life blighted by the injustice and corruption of his times. Translated by John Ciardi With an Introduction by Archibald T. MacAllister and an Afterword by Edward M. Cifelli
  • Votes: 24

    Euripides

    by Euripides

    Agememnon is the first part of the Aeschylus's Orestian trilogy in which the leader of the Greek army returns from the Trojan war to be murdered by his treacherous wife Clytemnestra. In Sophocles' Oedipus Rex the king sets out to uncover the cause of the plague that has struck his city, only to disover the devastating truth about his relationship with his mother and his father. Medea is the terrible story of a woman's bloody revenge on her adulterous husband through the murder of her own children.
  • Votes: 24

    If Beale Street Could Talk

    by James Baldwin

    When a pregnant Tish's boyfriend Fonny, a sculptor, is wrongfully jailed for the rape of a Puerto Rican woman, their families unite to prove the charge false. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 24

    A Clockwork Orange

    by Anthony Burgess

  • Votes: 24

    Speak

    by Laurie Halse Anderson

    A fiercely authentic, critically acclaimed and award-winning modern classic. 'Speak up for yourself - we want to know what you have to say.' From my first day at Merryweather High, I know this is a lie. Nobody will even talk to me, let alone listen - all because I called the cops on an end-of-summer party. But if I could only tell everyone why I called the police that night... If I could explain what happened to me... If I could speak... Then everything might change. 'With the rise of women finding their voices and speaking out about sexual assault in the media, this should be on everyone's radar... Powerful, necessary, and essential.' - Kirkus
  • Votes: 23

    Johnny Got His Gun

    by Dalton Trumbo

    The Searing Portrayal Of War That Has Stunned And Galvanized Generations Of Readers An immediate bestseller upon its original publication in 1939, Dalton Trumbo’s stark, profoundly troubling masterpiece about the horrors of World War I brilliantly crystallized the uncompromising brutality of war and became the most influential protest novel of the Vietnam era. Johnny Got His Gun is an undisputed classic of antiwar literature that’s as timely as ever. “A terrifying book, of an extraordinary emotional intensity.”--The Washington Post "Powerful. . . an eye-opener." --Michael Moore "Mr. Trumbo sets this story down almost without pause or punctuation and with a fury amounting to eloquence."--The New York Times "A book that can never be forgotten by anyone who reads it."--Saturday Review
  • Votes: 23

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 23

    Call of the Wild

    by Kimberly Ann Johnson

    From trauma educator and somatic guide Kimberly Ann Johnson comes a cutting-edge guide for tapping into the wisdom and resilience of the body to rewire the nervous system, heal from trauma, and live fully. In an increasingly polarized world where trauma is often publicly renegotiated, our nervous systems are on high alert. From skyrocketing rates of depression and anxiety to physical illnesses such as autoimmune diseases and digestive disorders, many women today find themselves living out of alignment with their bodies. Kimberly Johnson is a somatic practitioner, birth doula, and postpartum educator who specializes in helping women recover from all forms of trauma. In her work, she’s seen the same themes play out time and again. In a culture that prioritizes executive function and “mind over matter,” many women are suffering from deeply unresolved pain that causes mental and physical stagnation and illness. In Call of the Wild, Johnson offers an eye-opening look at this epidemic as well as an informative view of the human nervous system and how it responds to difficult events. From the “small t” traumas of getting ghosted, experiencing a fall-out with a close friend, or swerving to avoid a car accident to the “capital T” traumas of sexual assault, an upending natural disaster, or a life-threatening illness—Johnson explains how the nervous system both protects us from immediate harm and creates reverberations that ripple through a lifetime. In this practical, empowering guide, Johnson shows readers how to metabolize these nervous system responses, allowing everyone to come home to their deepest, most intuitive and whole selves. Following her supportive advice, readers will learn how to move from wholeness, tapping into the innate wisdom of their senses, soothing frayed nerves and reconnecting with their “animal selves.” While we cannot cure the painful cultural rifts inflicting our society, there is a path forward—through our bodies.
  • Votes: 23

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 22

    Sefer Raziel haMalach (Hebrew Edition)

    by Unknown Contributor

    Sepher Rezial Hemelach is the longawaited first English translation of this famous magical text a translation from the ancient Hebrew in the rare and complete 1701 Amsterdam edition. According to Hebrew legend, the Sepher Rezial was presented to Adam in the Garden of Eden, given by the hand of God, and delivered by the angel Rezial. The myth thus suggests that this is the first book ever written, and of direct divine provenance. A diverse compendium of ancient Hebrew magical lore, this book was quite possibly the original source for later, traditional literature on angelic hierarchy, astrology, Qabalah, and Gematria. Moses Gaster mentions this in his introduction to The Sword of Moses (1896) suggesting that the Sepher Rezial could be a primary source for many magic and qabalistic books of the Middle Ages. Sepher Rezial Hemelach is a compilation of five books: "The Book of the Vestment," "The Book of the Great Rezial," "The Holy Names," "The Book of the Mysteries," and "The Book of the Signs of the Zodiac." It includes extensive explanatory text on the holy names of God, the divisions of Heaven and Hell, the names and hierarchy of the angels and spirits, as well as symbolic interpretations of both the Book of Genesis and Sepher Yetzirah. It also includes material on astronomy, astrology, gematria, and various magical talismans, most notably those used for protection during childbirth. In his introduction, Steve Savedow details the history, bibliographical citations, and lineage of this famous work. He lists the old and rare manuscripts still in existence, and provides a bibliography of other reference works for study of the Western esoteric tradition.
  • Votes: 22

    April Morning

    by Howard Fast

    Howard Fast’s bestselling coming-of-age novel about one boy’s introduction to the horrors of war amid the brutal first battle of the American Revolution On April 19, 1775, musket shots ring out over Lexington, Massachusetts. As the sun rises over the battlefield, fifteen-year-old Adam Cooper stands among the outmatched patriots, facing a line of British troops. Determined to defend his home and prove his worth to his disapproving father, Cooper is about to embark on the most significant day of his life. The Battle of Lexington and Concord will be the starting point of the American Revolution—and when Cooper becomes a man. Sweeping in scope and masterful in execution, April Morning is a classic of American literature and an unforgettable story of one community’s fateful struggle for freedom. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Howard Fast including rare photos from the author’s estate.
  • Votes: 22

    The Martian Chronicles

    by Ray Bradbury

    The tranquility of Mars is disrupted by humans who want to conquer space, colonize the planet, and escape a doomed Earth.
  • Votes: 22

    Walden

    by Henry David Thoreau

  • Votes: 22

    Dracula

    by Bram Stoker

  • Votes: 22

    Grendel

    by John Gardner

  • Votes: 22

    Ender's Game (The Ender Quintet)

    by Orson Scott Card

  • Votes: 22

    The Sound and the Fury

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 21

    The Book of Abramelin

    by Abraham von Worms

    This is a new and expanded second edition of The Book of Abramelin, a modern classic of Magic since it was first published in English by Ibis Press in 2006. The new material includes copious footnotes and an extensive index. It is the first modern translation of this critical magical work since S.L. Macgregor Mathers’s original translation over 100 years ago. Not only is the language updated, but Georg Dehn, the compiler and editor, has sourced his work from all extant manuscripts, whereas Mathers used just one. The result is a stunning new translation, which has already set the occult world abuzz.
  • Votes: 21

    The Magical Treatise of Solomon or Hygromanteia

    by Ioannis Marathakis

    The Magical Treatise of Solomon, or Hygromanteia is the ultimate grimoire — the absolute foundation of ceremonial magic. The true source of the Key of Solomon, it is arguably the most significant magical text in the world. For the first time ever, this extraordinary work has been translated from the original Greek into English, allowing magic scholars worldwide to finally access its treasures. The translator, Ioannis Marathakis, is a native born Greek academic with an extensive knowledge of ceremonial magic. Unlike the abridged Latin translation, this groundbreaking work is the complete text, now arranged in its proper order.
  • Votes: 21

    Pseudomonarchia Daemonum

    by Johann Weyer

    Johan Weyer's Pseudomonarchia D�monum first appeared as an appendix to his 1563 work, De Praestigiis D�monum. This infamous catalogue of Demons and Devils is a classic of Demonology whose influence on the literature of grimoires and black magic cannot be understated. Presented here in this quaint edition is Reginald Scot's 1583 English translation.
  • Votes: 21

    Manual del Brujo Sefer Harazim

    by Fabio Rozenek

    Obra dividida em duas partes, a primeira é a tradução para a língua portuguesa do Sepher Ha-Razim e a segunda parte de práticas de magia com os anjos citados na obra, constando sugestões de círculo mágico, tábua da arte, selos e evocações dentro das virtudes para cada grupamento angelical específico.
  • Votes: 21

    Le Livre des Esprits

    by Allan Kardec

    Où peut-on trouver la preuve de l'existence de Dieu ? - Quelle définition peut-on donner des Esprits ? - La séparation de l'âme et du corps est-elle douloureuse ? - Que penser de la signification attribuée aux rêves ? - Peut-on s'affranchir de l'influence des Esprits? - Comment peut-on distinguer le bien et le mal ? - Peut-on prier les Esprits ? - Quel est le premier de tous les droits naturels de l'homme ? - Quel est le moyen le plus efficace de s'améliorer ? - Le règne du bien pourra-t-il jamais avoir lieu sur la Terre ? Le livre des Esprits contient plus de 1000 réponses et communications destinées à celles et ceux qui cherchent à comprendre qui ils sont, d'où ils viennent et où ils vont.
  • Votes: 21

    The Lesser Key of Solomon

    by Aleister Crowley

    Trade paperback edition of Aleister Crowley's and S.L. MacGregor Mather's The Lesser Key of Solomon. This edition is fully illustrated and contains over 100 of the original, or exact replicas of the 1904 edition illustrations.The Lesser Key of Solomon, or the Clavicula Salomonis Regis, or Lemegeton, is a compilation of materials and writings from ancient sources making up a text book of magic or ?grimoire.' Portions of this book can be traced back to the mid-16th to 17th centuries, when occult researchers such as Cornelius Agrippa and Johannes Trithemisus assembled what they discovered during their investigations into their own great works.As a modern grimoire, the Lesser Key of Solomon has seen several editions with various authors and editors taking liberty to edit and translate the ancient writings and source material. In 1898, Arthur Edward Waite published his The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, which contained large portions of the Lemegeton. He was followed by Mathers and Crowley in 1904 who published The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon. Many others have assembled their own version of this ancient material since, and it is important to realize that it is the contents rather than the book itself that make up the Lesser Key. Traditionally, the source material is divided into five books: Ars Goetia, Ars Theurgia Goetia, Ars Paulina, Ars Almadel, and Ars Notoria. Mathers and Crowley indicate their edition is a translation of the first.In the preface to this edition, it is explained that a ?Secret Chief? of the Rosicrucian Order directed the completion of the book. The original editor was a G. H. Fra. D.D.C.F. who translated ancient texts from French, Hebrew, and Latin, but was unable to complete his labors because of the martial assaults of the Four Great Princes. Crowley was then asked to step in and finish what the previous author had begun. Traditionally, S. L. MacGregor Mathers is credited as the translator of this edition, and Crowley is given the title of editor.
  • Votes: 21

    The Secret Life of Bees

    by Sue Monk Kidd

    After her "stand-in mother," a bold black woman named Rosaleen, insults the three biggest racists in town, Lily Owens joins Rosaleen on a journey to Tiburon, South Carolina, where they are taken in by three black, bee-keeping sisters.
  • Votes: 21

    The Color Purple

    by Alice Walker

  • Votes: 21

    The Bean Trees

    by Barbara Kingsolver

    Clear-eyed and spirited, Taylor Greer grew up poor in rural Kentucky with the goals of avoiding pregnancy and getting away. But when she heads west with high hopes and a barely functional car, she meets the human condition head-on. By the time Taylor arrives in Tucson, Arizona, she has acquired a completely unexpected child, a three-year-old American Indian girl named Turtle, and must somehow come to terms with both motherhood and the necessity for putting down roots. Hers is a story about love and friendship, abandonment and belonging, and the discovery of surprising resources in apparently empty places.
  • Votes: 20

    Tess of the D'Urbervilles (Penguin Classics)

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 20

    Rebecca

    by Daphne Du Maurier

  • Votes: 20

    Silas Marner (Signet Classics)

    by George Eliot

    Disappointed in friendship and love, and embittered by a false accusation, weaver Silas Marner retreats from the world with his loom, but soon finds his monastic existence forever changed by the arrival of an orphaned girl, whom he takes in and raises as his own daughter. Reissue.
  • Votes: 20

    A Doll's House (Dover Thrift Editions)

    by Henrik Ibsen

    One of the best-known, most frequently performed of modern plays, A Doll's House richly displays the genius with which Henrik Ibsen pioneered modern, realistic prose drama. In the central character of Nora, Ibsen epitomized the human struggle against the humiliating constraints of social conformity. Nora's ultimate rejection of a smothering marriage and life in "a doll's house" shocked theatergoers of the late 1800s and opened new horizons for playwrights and their audiences. But daring social themes are only one aspect of Ibsen's power as a dramatist. A Doll's House shows as well his gifts for creating realistic dialogue, a suspenseful flow of events and, above all, psychologically penetrating characterizations that make the struggles of his dramatic personages utterly convincing. Here is a deeply absorbing play as readable as it is eminently playable, reprinted from an authoritative translation. A selection of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.
  • Votes: 19

    Les Miserables

    by Victor Hugo

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • Votes: 19

    The Nones

    by Ryan P. Burge

    In The Nones: Where They Came From, Who They Are, and Where They Are Going, Ryan P. Burge details a comprehensive picture of an increasingly significant group--Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. The growth of the nones in American society has been dramatic. In 1972, just 5 percent of Americans claimed "no religion" on the General Social Survey. In 2018, that number rose to 23.7 percent, making the nones as numerous as both evangelical Protestants and Roman Catholics. Every indication is that the nones will be the largest religious group in the United States in the next decade. Burge illustrates his precise but accessible descriptions with charts and graphs drawn from over a dozen carefully curated datasets, some tracking changes in American religion over a long period of time, others large enough to allow a statistical deep dive on subgroups such as atheists and agnostics. Burge also draws on data that tracks how individuals move in and out of religion over time, helping readers understand what type of people become nones and what factors lead an individual to return to religion. The Nones gives readers a nuanced, accurate, and meaningful picture of the growing number of Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. Burge explains how this rise happened, who the nones are, and what they mean for the future of American religion.
  • Votes: 18

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 18

    The Illustrated Man

    by Ray Bradbury

    Eighteen science fiction stories deal with love, madness, and death on Mars, Venus, and in space.
  • Votes: 18

    The Prince

    by Niccolò Machiavelli

    The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli, is a 16th-century political treatise. The Prince is sometimes claimed to be one of the first works of modern philosophy, especially modern political philosophy, in which the effective truth is taken to be more important than any abstract ideal. It was also in direct conflict with the dominant Catholic and scholastic doctrines of the time concerning politics and ethics.The Prince has the general theme of accepting that the aims of princes-such as glory and survival-can justify the use of immoral means to achieve those ends.Although it is relatively short, the treatise is the most remembered of Machiavelli's works and the one most responsible for bringing the word "Machiavellian" into usage as a pejorative. It even contributed to the modern negative connotations of the words "politics" and "politician" in western countries. In terms of subject matter it overlaps with the much longer Discourses on Livy, which was written a few years later.Machiavelli emphasized the need for realism, as opposed to idealism. Along with this, he stresses the difference between human-beings and animals since "there are two ways of contending, one in accordance with the laws, the other by force; the first of which is proper to men, the second to beast". In The Prince he does not explain what he thinks the best ethical or political goals are, except the control of one's own fortune, as opposed to waiting to see what chance brings. Machiavelli took it for granted that would-be leaders naturally aim at glory or honor. He associated these goals with a need for "virtue" and "prudence" in a leader, and saw such virtues as essential to good politics and indeed the common good. That great men should develop and use their virtue and prudence was a traditional theme of advice to Christian princes. And that more virtue meant less reliance on chance was a classically influenced "humanist commonplace" in Machiavelli's time, as Fischer says, even if it was somewhat controversial. However, Machiavelli went far beyond other authors in his time, who in his opinion left things to fortune, and therefore to bad rulers, because of their Christian beliefs. He used the words "virtue" and "prudence" to refer to glory-seeking and spirited excellence of character, in strong contrast to the traditional Christian uses of those terms, but more keeping with the original pre-Christian Greek and Roman concepts from which they derived. He encouraged ambition and risk taking. So in another break with tradition, he treated not only stability, but also radical innovation, as possible aims of a prince in a political community. Managing major reforms can show off a Prince's virtue and give him glory. He clearly felt Italy needed major reform in his time, and this opinion of his time is widely shared.Machiavelli's descriptions in The Prince encourage leaders to attempt to control their fortune gloriously, to the extreme extent that some situations may call for a fresh "founding" (or re-founding) of the "modes and orders" that define a community, despite the danger and necessary evil and lawlessness of such a project. Founding a wholly new state, or even a new religion, using injustice and immorality has even been called the chief theme of The Prince. Machiavelli justifies this position by explaining how if "a prince did not win love he may escape hate" by personifying injustice and immorality; therefore, he will never loosen his grip since "fear is held by the apprehension of punishment" and never diminishes as time goes by. For a political theorist to do this in public was one of Machiavelli's clearest breaks not just with medieval scholasticism, but with the classical tradition of political philosophy, especially the favorite philosopher of Catholicism at the time, Aristotle. This is one of Machiavelli's most lasting influences upon modernity.
  • Votes: 18

    Chronicle of a Death Foretold

    by Gabriel García Márquez

  • Votes: 18

    The Glass Castle

    by Jeannette Walls

    Now a major motion picture starring Brie Larson, Naomi Watts and Woody Harrelson. This is a startling memoir of a successful journalist's journey from the deserted and dusty mining towns of the American Southwest, to an antique filled apartment on Park Avenue. Jeanette Walls narrates her nomadic and adventurous childhood with her dreaming, 'brilliant' but alcoholic parents. At the age of seventeen she escapes on a Greyhound bus to New York with her older sister; her younger siblings follow later. After pursuing the education and civilisation her parents sought to escape, Jeanette eventually succeeds in her quest for the 'mundane, middle class existence' she had always craved. In her apartment, overlooked by 'a portrait of someone else's ancestor' she recounts poignant remembered images of star watching with her father, juxtaposed with recollections of irregular meals, accidents and police-car chases and reveals her complex feelings of shame, guilt, pity and pride toward her parents.
  • Votes: 18

    The Pigman

    by Paul Zindel

    One of the best-selling young adult books of all time, written by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Zindel. John Conlan is nicknamed “The Bathroom Bomber” after setting off firecrackers in the boys’ bathroom 23 times without ever getting caught. John and his best friend, Lorraine, can never please their parents, and school is a chore. To pass the time, they play pranks on unsuspecting people and it's during one of these pranks that they meet the “Pigman.” In spite of themselves, John and Lorraine soon get caught up in Mr. Pignati’s zest for life. In fact, they become so involved that they begin to destroy the only corner of the world that has ever mattered to them. Can they stop before it’s too late?'
  • Votes: 18

    Les Mis‚rables (ABR)

    by Victor Hugo

  • Votes: 17

    The Diary of a Young Girl

    by Anne Frank

  • Votes: 17

    Scarlett

    by Alexandra Ripley

    The sequel to the classic novel is set in the Reconstruction South and Ireland and tells what happened next in the lives of Rhett and Scarlett
  • Votes: 16

    The Freshman

    by Monica Murphy

    An all new angsty, dark, stand-alone Contemporary Romance in the Moments in Boston Series ... You never forget your first love … even when he becomes a memory. There was before. When we were together, when we were happy. When we had nothing but dreams. When not a single bad thing could ever happen because we were young and in love. And there was after. When the unthinkable occurs, how do you count time, knowing how precious it is? When dreams turn to nightmares, how do you wake up every day and choose to go on? When you have a chance to save another, how can you not? Even if it changes everything. Even if it destroys you. A harrowing, heartbreaking dark contemporary romance from USA Today best-selling author Marni Mann, the third installment in the Moments in Boston series of stand-alones that explores the darkest nights and brightest dawns of the heart. A book that will leave you aching … and looking over your shoulder.
  • Votes: 16

    Into the Wild

    by Jon Krakauer

  • Votes: 16

    Our Town

    by Thornton Wilder

    A work of startling originality when it debuted in 1938, Thornton Wilder's Our Town evolved to be seen by some as a vintage slice of early 20th Century Americana, rather than being fully appreciated for its complex and eternal themes and its deceptively simple form. This unique and timely book shines a light on the play's continued impact in the 21st century and makes a case for the healing powers of Wilder's text to a world confronting multiple crises. Through extensive interviews with more than 100 artists about their own experience of the play and its impact on them professionally and personally – and including background on the play's early years and its pervasiveness in American culture – Another Day's Begun shows why this particular work remains so important, essential, and beloved. Every production of Our Town has a story to tell beyond Wilder's own. One year after the tragedy of 9/11, Paul Newman, in his final stage appearance, played the Stage Manager in Our Town on Broadway. Director David Cromer's 2008 Chicago interpretation would play in five more cities, ultimately becoming New York's longest-running Our Town ever. In 2013, incarcerated men at Sing Sing Correctional Facility brought Grover's Corners inside a maximum security prison. After the 2017 arena bombing in Manchester UK, the Royal Exchange Theatre chose Our Town as its offering to the stricken community. 80 years after it was written, more than 110 years after its actions take place, Our Town continues to assert itself as an essential play about how we must embrace and appreciate the value of life itself. Another Day's Begun explains how this American classic has the power to inspire, heal and endure in the modern day, onstage and beyond.
  • Votes: 16

    Hatchet

    by Gary Paulsen

    Celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the Newbery Honor–winning survival novel Hatchet with a pocket-sized edition perfect for travelers to take along on their own adventures. This special anniversary edition includes a new introduction and commentary by author Gary Paulsen, pen-and-ink illustrations by Drew Willis, and a water resistant cover. Hatchet has also been nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson, haunted by his secret knowledge of his mother’s infidelity, is traveling by single-engine plane to visit his father for the first time since the divorce. When the plane crashes, killing the pilot, the sole survivor is Brian. He is alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but his clothing, a tattered windbreaker, and the hatchet his mother had given him as a present. At first consumed by despair and self-pity, Brian slowly learns survival skills—how to make a shelter for himself, how to hunt and fish and forage for food, how to make a fire—and even finds the courage to start over from scratch when a tornado ravages his campsite. When Brian is finally rescued after fifty-four days in the wild, he emerges from his ordeal with new patience and maturity, and a greater understanding of himself and his parents.
  • Votes: 16

    Gulliver's Travels (Dover Thrift Editions)

    by Jonathan Swift

    DIVGreat classic by preeminent prose satirist of the English language, written with disarming simplicity and careful attention to detail. An enchanting fantasy for children; for adults, a witty parody of political life in Swift's time. /div
  • Votes: 15

    Sophomores

    by Sean Desmond

    "What a vibrant, propulsive, wildly intelligent and big-hearted slice of life Sophomores is, an intricate portrait of a family in crisis rendered with a great deal of humor and compassion. I loved this family, this corner of the world, this novel." -Claire Lombardo, author of The Most Fun We Ever Had The late 1980s come alive in this moving and keenly observed story of one boy's unforgettable sophomore year, and his parents' surprising journey alongside him. It's fall 1987 and life as normal is ending for the Malone family. With their sterile Dallas community a far cry from the Irish-American Bronx of their youth, Pat and Anne Malone have reached a breaking point. Pat, faced with a debilitating MS diagnosis, has fallen into his drinking. Anne, his devoutly Catholic wife, is selected as a juror for a highly publicized attempted murder trial, one that raises questions--about God, and about men in power--she has buried her entire life. Together, they try to raise their only son, Daniel, a bright but unmotivated student who is shocked into actual learning by an enigmatic English teacher. For once, Dan is unable to fly under the radar, and is finally asked to consider what he might want to make of his life. With humor and tenderness, Sophomores brilliantly captures the enduring poignancy of coming of age, teenage epiphanies and heartbreak, and family redemption.
  • Votes: 15

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

    by Oscar Wilde

    A handsome, dissolute man who sells his soul for eternal youth is horrified to see the reflection of his degeneration in the distorted features of his portrait.
  • Votes: 15

    Waiting for Godot

    by Samuel Beckett

    From an inauspicious beginning at the tiny Left Bank Theatre de Babylone in 1953, followed by bewilderment among American and British audiences, "Waiting for Godot" has become one of the most important and enigmatic plays of the past fifty years and a cornerstone of twentieth-century drama. As Clive Barnes wrote, "Time catches up with genius. . . . "Waiting for Godot" is one of the masterpieces of the century." The story revolves around two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone--or something--named Godot. Vladimir and Estragon wait near a tree, inhabiting a drama spun of their own consciousness. The result is a comical wordplay of poetry, dreamscapes, and nonsense, which has been interpreted as mankind's inexhaustible search for meaning. Beckett's language pioneered an expressionistic minimalism that captured the existential post- World War II Europe. His play remains one of the most magical and beautiful allegories of our time.
  • Votes: 15

    Gilgamesh

    by Stephen Mitchell

    Vivid, enjoyable and comprehensible, the poet and pre-eminent translator Stephen Mitchell makes the oldest epic poem in the world accessible for the first time. Gilgamesh is a born leader, but in an attempt to control his growing arrogance, the Gods create Enkidu, a wild man, his equal in strength and courage. Enkidu is trapped by a temple prostitute, civilised through sexual experience and brought to Gilgamesh. They become best friends and battle evil together. After Enkidu's death the distraught Gilgamesh sets out on a journey to find Utnapishtim, the survivor of the Great Flood, made immortal by the Gods to ask him the secret of life and death. Gilgamesh is the first and remains one of the most important works of world literature. Written in ancient Mesopotamia in the second millennium B.C., it predates the Iliad by roughly 1,000 years. Gilgamesh is extraordinarily modern in its emotional power but also provides an insight into the values of an ancient culture and civilisation.
  • Votes: 14

    The Stone Angel (Phoenix Fiction)

    by Margaret Laurence

  • Votes: 14

    Death be Not Proud

    by John Donne

    Holy Sonnets by John Donne are a series of nineteen poems originally written in 1609-1610 and have been tied to Donne's conversion to Anglicanism. These poems of John Donne have become some of his most highly regarded and most popular works. Included are Holy Sonnet 10 ("Death be not Proud") and Holy Sonnet 14 ("Batter my heart, three-person'd God; for you").
  • Votes: 14

    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics)

    by Frederick Douglass

    This new edition of Douglass's classic autobiography examines the man and the myth, his complex relationship with women, and the enduring power of his book. Included are extracts from Douglass's primary sources and examples of his writing on women's rights.
  • Votes: 14

    The Cask of Amontillado

    by Edgar Allan Poe

    After enduring many injuries of the noble Fortunato, Montressor executes the perfect revenge.
  • Votes: 14

    Paradise Lost

    by John Milton

  • Votes: 14

    Persepolis

    by Marjane Satrapi

    The great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists describes growing up in Tehran in a country plagued by political upheaval and vast contradictions between public and private life. Reprint. 75,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 14

    The Mayor of Casterbridge

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 14

    Alexander Hamilton

    by Ron Chernow

  • Votes: 14

    Off the Top of My Head

    by Benjamin D. Hutchins

  • Votes: 13

    The Bell Jar

    by Sylvia Plath

    Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.
  • Votes: 13

    The Autobiography of Malcolm X

    by Malcolm X

  • Votes: 13

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

    by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    One of the most chilling novels ever written about the oppression of totalitarian regimes--and the first to open Western eyes to the terrors of Stalin's prison camps, this book allowed Solzhenitsyn, who later became Russia's conscience in exile, to challenge the brutal might of the Soviet Union.
  • Votes: 13

    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Harper Perennial Deluxe Editions)

    by Betty Smith

  • Votes: 12

    The Killer Angels

    by Michael Shaara

    It is the third summer of the war, June 1863, and Robert Lee's Confederate Army slips across the Potomac to draw out the Union Army. Lee's army is 70,000 strong and has won nearly every battle it has fought. The Union Army is 80,000 strong and accustomed to defeat and retreat. Thus begins the Battle of Gettysburg, the four most bloody and courageous days of America's history. Two armies fight for two goals - one for freedom, the other for a way of life. This is a classic, Pulitzer Prize-Winning, historical novel set during the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Votes: 12

    Cold Sassy Tree

    by Olive Ann Burns

    Young Will Tweedy becomes chaperon, conspirator, and confidant to his renegade grandpa, E. Rucker Blakeslee, and the old man's young new wife, Miss Love Simpson, in a new edition of the classic novel set against the backdrop of Cold Sassy, Georgia, at the beginning of the twentieth century. Reprint.
  • Votes: 12

    Island of the Blue Dolphins

    by Scott O'Dell

  • Votes: 12

    Dubliners

    by James Joyce

    Dubliners is a book of an Irish writer James Augustine Aloysius Joyce. This is a collection of stories, written in a slightly impressionistic way, in which a life of citizens of the Ireland’s capital city, so-called “middle-level gentlemen”, is described. It is the top of an Irish realistic literature of the beginning of the twentieth century. Joyce made it his aim to “write a chapter of a spiritual history of his nation.”
  • Votes: 12

    Dandelion Wine

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 12

    Madame Bovary

    by Gustave Flaubert

    A powerful nineteenth-century French classic depicting the moral degeneration of a weak-willed woman
  • Votes: 12

    A Christmas Carol

    by Charles Dickens

    A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future
  • Votes: 12

    The Last of the Mohicans (Bantam Classics)

    by James Fenimore Cooper

  • Votes: 11

    Don Quixote (Penguin Classics)

    by Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra

  • Votes: 11

    Pygmalion

  • Votes: 11

    The Little Prince

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

  • Votes: 11

    Beowolf's Companion

    by JoEllen Conger

    Attacked by banditos, Tonya Baldwin and her personal maid, Mindy face the perils of wild Mexico. The bandits shoot and kill her driver as well as her body guard. Tanya realizes she must escape before the bandits discover the wooden chest they have stolen from her does not contain gold. The ladies are rescued and hosted by a rich landowner, Senor Carlos Molinaro.Beowolf, an aging Russian wolfhound, grieves for his lost mistress. The hacenado pleads for Tanya to stay "while this old dog still lives." Her professional journey temporarily brought to a standstill, she stays at the desert rancho to companion the dying dog. But once he is gone...what will become of her then? Will the swarthy-eyed owner, Carlos, beg her not to leave?
  • Votes: 11

    Frederick Douglass

    by David W. Blight

    **Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History** “Extraordinary…a great American biography” (The New Yorker) of the most important African-American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era. As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery. Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, using his own story to condemn slavery. By the Civil War, Douglass had become the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. After the war he sometimes argued politically with younger African Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights. In this “cinematic and deeply engaging” (The New York Times Book Review) biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. “Absorbing and even moving…a brilliant book that speaks to our own time as well as Douglass’s” (The Wall Street Journal), Blight’s biography tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. “David Blight has written the definitive biography of Frederick Douglass…a powerful portrait of one of the most important American voices of the nineteenth century” (The Boston Globe). In addition to the Pulitzer Prize, Frederick Douglass won the Bancroft, Parkman, Los Angeles Times (biography), Lincoln, Plutarch, and Christopher awards and was named one of the Best Books of 2018 by The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, The San Francisco Chronicle, and Time.
  • Votes: 11

    The Most Dangerous Game - Richard Connell's Original Masterpiece

    by Richard Connell

    "The Most Dangerous Game" is Richard Connell's best known story and has spawned many imitations and a number of film adaptations.
  • Votes: 10

    The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

    by Sherman Alexie

    Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live. With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.
  • Votes: 10

    Giants in the Earth

    by Ole Edvart Rolvaag

    The classic story of a Norwegian pioneer family's struggles with the land and the elements of the Dakota Territory as they try to make a new life in America.
  • Votes: 10

    The Chocolate War

    by Robert Cormier

    A high-school freshman who refuses to participate in the annual fund-raising chocolate sale is forced to defend his convictions.
  • Votes: 10

    Cannery Row

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 10

    Song of Solomon

    by Toni Morrison

    Macon Dead, Jr., called "Milkman," the son of the wealthiest African American in town, moves from childhood into early manhood, searching, among the disparate, mysterious members of his family, for his life and reality. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. Reader's Guide available. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 10

    Farewell to Manzanar

    by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

    During World War II a community called Manzanar was hastily created in the high mountain desert country of California, east of the Sierras. Its purpose was to house thousands of Japanese American internees. One of the first families to arrive was the Wakatsukis, who were ordered to leave their fishing business in Long Beach and take with them only the belongings they could carry. For Jeanne Wakatsuki, a seven-year-old child, Manzanar became a way of life in which she struggled and adapted, observed and grew. For her father it was essentially the end of his life. At age thirty-seven, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston recalls life at Manzanar through the eyes of the child she was. She tells of her fear, confusion, and bewilderment as well as the dignity and great resourcefulness of people in oppressive and demeaning circumstances. Written with her husband, Jeanne delivers a powerful first-person account that reveals her search for the meaning of Manzanar. Farewell to Manzanar has become a staple of curriculum in schools and on campuses across the country. Last year the San Francisco Chronicle named it one of the twentieth century’s 100 best nonfiction books from west of the Rockies. First published in 1973, this new edition of the classic memoir of a devastating Japanese American experience includes an inspiring afterword by the authors.
  • Votes: 10

    Medea

    by Euripides

    Euripides: Medea Aufführung 431 v. Chr. in Athen. Hier nach der Übers. von J.A. Hartung in: Griechische Tragiker, hg. v. Wolf Hartmut Friedrich, München (Winkler) 1958. Vollständige Neuausgabe mit einer Biographie des Autors. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2016. Textgrundlage ist die Ausgabe: Griechische Tragiker: Aischylos, Sophokles, Euripides. Hg. v. Wolf Hartmut Friedrich, übers. v. J. G. Droysen (Aischylos), K. W. F. Solger (Sophokles), J. A. Hartung (Euripides), München: Winkler, 1958. Die Paginierung obiger Ausgabe wird in dieser Neuausgabe als Marginalie zeilengenau mitgeführt. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage unter Verwendung des Bildes: Evelyn De Morgan, Medea, um 1900. Gesetzt aus der Minion Pro, 11 pt.
  • Votes: 10

    For Whom the Bell Tolls

    by Ernest Hemingway

    Ernest Hemingway's masterpiece on war, love, loyalty, and honor tells the story of Robert Jordan, an antifascist American fighting in the Spanish Civil War. In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from “the good fight” and one of the foremost classics of war literature. For Whom the Bell Tolls tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades, is attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain. In his portrayal of Jordan’s love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of a guerilla leader’s last stand, Hemingway creates a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author’s previous works, For Whom the Bell Tolls stands as one of the best war novels ever written.
  • Votes: 10

    The Age of Innocence

    by Edith Wharton

    As Newland Archer prepares to marry docile May Welland, the return of the mysterious Countess Olenska turns his life upside down
  • Votes: 10

    The Hunger Games Trilogy

    by Suzanne Collins

    The stunning Hunger Games trilogy is complete!The extraordinary, ground breaking New York Times bestsellers The Hunger Games and Catching Fire, along with the third book in The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay, are available for the first time ever in e-book. Stunning, gripping, and powerful. The trilogy is now complete!
  • Votes: 10

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

    by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

  • Votes: 10

    Ceremony

    by Leslie Marmon Silko

    The great Native American Novel of a battered veteran returning home to heal his mind and spirit More than thirty-five years since its original publication, Ceremony remains one of the most profound and moving works of Native American literature, a novel that is itself a ceremony of healing. Tayo, a World War II veteran of mixed ancestry, returns to the Laguna Pueblo Reservation. He is deeply scarred by his experience as a prisoner of the Japanese and further wounded by the rejection he encounters from his people. Only by immersing himself in the Indian past can he begin to regain the peace that was taken from him. Masterfully written, filled with the somber majesty of Pueblo myth, Ceremony is a work of enduring power. The Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition contains a new preface by the author and an introduction by Larry McMurtry. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 10

    I Remember

    by Lee Bennett Hopkins

    A collection of works by poets and illustrators of diverse backgrounds sharing memorable childhood and family experiences and reflecting on their different heritages, traditions, and beliefs.
  • Votes: 9

    Snow Bound

    by Harry Mazer

    Two teenagers are stranded in a snowstorm when their car skids off the highway.
  • Votes: 9

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

    by Mark Haddon

    Discover this wise, blackly funny, radically imaginative novel that has sold over 10 million copies worldwide ‘A superb achievement. He is a wise and bleakly funny writer with rare gifts of empathy’ Ian McEwan, Sunday Times bestselling author of Atonement It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass in the middle of the lawn in front of Mrs Shears’ house. Its eyes were closed. It looked as if it was running on its side, the way dogs run when they think they are chasing a cat in a dream. But the dog was not running or asleep. The dog was dead. This is Christopher's story. There are also no lies in this story because Christopher can't tell lies. Christopher does not like strangers or the colours yellow or brown or being touched. On the other hand, he knows all the countries in the world and their capital cities and every prime number up to 7507. When Christopher decides to find out who killed the neighbour's dog, his mystery story becomes more complicated than he could have ever predicted. **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 9

    Sula

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 9

    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

    by Frederick Douglass

    Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick Douglass from Coterie Classics All Coterie Classics have been formatted for ereaders and devices and include a bonus link to the free audio book. “I have observed this in my experience of slavery, - that whenever my condition was improved, instead of its increasing my contentment, it only increased my desire to be free, and set me to thinking of plans to gain my freedom. I have found that, to make a contented slave, it is necessary to make a thoughtless one. It is necessary to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be made to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceased to be a man.” ― Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass’ first-person account of his journey from slave to educated and free transformed American thought and is an essential piece of reading from American history.
  • Votes: 9

    Fifth Business (Deptford Trilogy)

    by Robertson Davies

    The Manticore: "Around a mysterious death is woven a glittering, fantastical, cunningly contrived trilogy of novels. Luring the reader down labyrinthine tunnels of myth, history and magic"--Publisher website (May 2007).
  • Votes: 9

    Junior

    by Thomas Kemeny

  • Votes: 9

    The Bluest Eye (Vintage International)

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 9

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 9

    Fences

    by August Wilson

    From legendary playwright August Wilson comes the powerful, stunning dramatic bestseller that won him critical acclaim, including the Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize. Troy Maxson is a strong man, a hard man. He has had to be to survive. Troy Maxson has gone through life in an America where to be proud and black is to face pressures that could crush a man, body and soul. But the 1950s are yielding to the new spirit of liberation in the 1960s, a spirit that is changing the world Troy Maxson has learned to deal with the only way he can, a spirit that is making him a stranger, angry and afraid, in a world he never knew and to a wife and son he understands less and less. This is a modern classic, a book that deals with the impossibly difficult themes of race in America, set during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s. Now an Academy Award-winning film directed by and starring Denzel Washington, along with Academy Award and Golden Globe winner Viola Davis.
  • Votes: 9

    The Poisonwood Bible

    by Barbara Kingsolver

    Barbara Kingsolver's acclaimed international bestseller tells the story of an American missionary family in the Congo during a poignant chapter in African history. It spins the tale of the fierce evangelical Baptist, Nathan Price, who takes his wife and four daughters on a missionary journey into the heart of darkness of the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them to Africa all they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it - from garden seeds to the King James Bible - is calamitously transformed on African soil. Told from the perspective of the five women, this is a compelling exploration of African history, religion, family, and the many paths to redemption. The Poisonwood Bible was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1999 and was chosen as the best reading group novel ever at the Penguin/Orange Awards. It continues to be read and adored by millions worldwide.
  • Votes: 9

    Oliver Twist (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 9

    All I Can Recall

    by Paul Genega

    At turns elegiac and sardonic poetry, which looks to the past to make sense of the present.
  • Votes: 8

    Everyday SEL in High School

    by Carla Tantillo Philibert

    With this new book from educational consultant Carla Tantillo Philibert, you’ll gain practical strategies for teaching Social-Emotional Learning (SEL), mindfulness, movement, and team-building to help your students grow into contributing and compassionate citizens of the world. You’ll find out how to lead students through meditation activities, simple yoga poses, breathing techniques, and other practical methods to help you proactively manage your classroom by meeting your students’ SEL needs. Topics include: • Empowering your students to understand their emotions, improve their focus, manage stress, and regulate their behavior • Introducing your students to the concept of mindfulness and how it fits within the SEL framework • Crafting an emotionally, physically, and mentally safe classroom climate and culture • Engaging your students in activities to strengthen peer-to-peer communication, community-building, and leadership skills • Providing your students the safe space to test their SEL skills through experiential learning, team work, and class discussions • Honing your own SEL competency through professional development so both you and your students can get the most out of your school’s SEL experience This book also offers a set of Professional Development Facilitator’s Guides to help you and your colleagues master the core competencies of SEL and implement them effectively across your school or district. The appendix provides additional strategies for teaching personal space, Safe Touch, and making mindful accommodations for students who have experienced trauma.
  • Votes: 8

    Band of Brothers

    by Stephen E. Ambrose

  • Votes: 8

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    by Roald Dahl

  • Votes: 8

    Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)

    by E. B. White

  • Votes: 8

    James and the Giant Peach

    by Roald Dahl

  • Votes: 8

    All the Pretty Horses (The Border Trilogy, Book 1)

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 8

    Far from the Madding Crowd (Penguin Classics)

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 8

    Uncle Tom's Cabin

    by Harriet Beecher Stowe

  • Votes: 8

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 8

    The Once and Future King

    by T. H. White

    The extraordinary story of a boy called Wart – ignored by everyone except his tutor, Merlin – who goes on to become King Arthur.
  • Votes: 8

    Angela's Ashes

    by Frank McCourt

  • Votes: 8

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    by Anonymous

    Why buy our paperbacks? Expedited shipping High Quality Paper Made in USA Standard Font size of 10 for all books 30 Days Money Back Guarantee BEWARE of Low-quality sellers Don't buy cheap paperbacks just to save a few dollars. Most of them use low-quality papers & binding. Their pages fall off easily. Some of them even use very small font size of 6 or less to increase their profit margin. It makes their books completely unreadable. How is this book unique? Unabridged (100% Original content) Font adjustments & biography included Illustrated The Epic of Gilgamesh by Anonymous The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia that is often regarded as the earliest surviving great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk, dating from the Third Dynasty of Ur (circa 2100 BC). These independent stories were later used as source material for a combined epic. The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shutur eli sharri ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Only a few tablets of it have survived. The later "Standard" version dates from the 13th to the 10th centuries BC and bears the incipit Sha naqba imuru ("He who Saw the Deep", in modern terms: "He who Sees the Unknown"). Approximately two thirds of this longer, twelve-tablet version have been recovered. Some of the best copies were discovered in the library ruins of the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Ashurbanipal. The first half of the story discusses Gilgamesh, king of Uruk, and Enkidu, a wild man created by the gods to stop Gilgamesh from oppressing the people of Uruk. After an initial fight, Gilgamesh and Enkidu become close friends. Together, they journey to the Cedar Mountain and defeat Humbaba, its monstrous guardian. Later they kill the Bull of Heaven, which the goddess Ishtar sends to punish Gilgamesh for spurning her advances. As a punishment for these actions, the gods sentence Enkidu to death. In the second half of the epic, distress about Enkidu's death causes Gilgamesh to undertake a long and perilous journey to discover the secret of eternal life. He eventually learns that "Life, which you look for, you will never find. For when the gods created man, they let death be his share, and life withheld in their own hands". However, because of his great building projects, his account of Siduri's advice, and what the immortal man Utnapishtim told him about the Great Flood, Gilgamesh's fame survived his death. His story has been translated into many languages, and in recent years has featured in works of popular fiction.
  • Votes: 8

    The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz

    by Mordecai Richler

    A young, likeable Jewish hustler, member of the third generation of a Jewish immigrant family in Montreal, struggles to prosper despite his zany family and, in the process, learns about life. Reprint.
  • Votes: 8

    The Hound of the Baskervilles

    by Arthur Conan Sir Doyle

    Arthur Conan Doyle's classic Sherlock Holmes tale investigates a fearsome animal and a family curse, retold for younger readersWritten by in 1902, "The Hound of the Baskervilles" is one of his most frightening books. It tells the story of the curse of the Baskerville family--a family haunted by a terrifying hound on Dartmoor. The beast is thought to be responsible for killing many members of the Baskerville family. Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson arrive to investigate. This retelling has been shortened and illustrated for younger readers.
  • Votes: 8

    Alas, Babylon

    by Pat Frank

  • Votes: 8

    Wonder

    by R. J. Palacio

  • Votes: 8

    Black Like Me

    by John Howard Griffin

  • Votes: 7

    Anna Karenina

    by graf Leo Tolstoy

    Presents the nineteenth-century Russian novelist's classic in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society
  • Votes: 7

    Woman Warrior

    by Maxine Hong Kingston

    A Chinese American woman tells of the Chinese myths, family stories and events of her California childhood that have shaped her identity.
  • Votes: 7

    Lolita

    by Vladimir Nabokov

  • Votes: 7

    David Copperfield

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 7

    The Witch of Blackbird Pond

    by Elizabeth George Speare

    Sixteen-year-old Kit Tyler is marked by suspicion and disapproval from the moment she arrives on the unfamiliar shores of colonial Connecticut in 1687. Alone and desperate, she has been forced to leave her beloved home on the island of Barbados and join a family she has never met. Torn between her quest for belonging and her desire to be true to herself, Kit struggles to survive in a hostile place. Just when it seems she must give up, she finds a kindred spirit. But Kit’s friendship with Hannah Tupper, believed by the colonists to be a witch, proves more taboo than she could have imagined and ultimately forces Kit to choose between her heart and her duty. Elizabeth George Speare won the 1959 Newbery Medal for this portrayal of a heroine whom readers will admire for her unwavering sense of truth as well as her infinite capacity to love.
  • Votes: 7

    The House of the Spirits

    by Isabel Allende

    The Trueba family embodies strong feelings. This family saga starts at the beginning of the 20th century and continues through the assassination of Allende in 1973.
  • Votes: 6

    Le Morte Darthur

    by Sir Thomas Malory

    Tells the stories of King Arthur, Merlin, Lancelot, Queen Guenever, and Tristram and Isolde
  • Votes: 6

    Number the Stars

    by Lois Lowry

  • Votes: 6

    The Federalist Papers

    by Alexander Hamilton

  • Votes: 6

    Fight Club

    by Chuck Palahniuk

    Every weekend, in basements and parking lots across the country, young men with good white-collar jobs and absent fathers take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded for as long as they have to. Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything. Fight Club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter and dark, anarchic genius. And it's only the beginning of his plans for revenge on a world where cancer support groups have the corner on human warmth.
  • Votes: 6

    Long Day's Journey into Night

    by Eugene O'Neill

    A true modern classic from one of the twentieth century's most significant writers, Long Day's Journey into Night is an intensely autobiographical, magnificently tragic portrait of the author's own family - a play so acutely personal that he insisted it was not published until after his death. One single day in the Tyrones' Connecticut home. James Tyrone Snr is a miser, a talented actor who even squanders his talent in an undemanding role; eldest son Jamie is an affable, whoremongering alcoholic and confirmed ne'er-do well; youngest son Edmund is poetic, sensitive, suffering from a respiratory condition and deep-seated disillusionment; and their mother Mary, living in a haze of self-delusion and morphine addiction. Existing together under this roof, and the profound weight of the past, they subtly tear one another apart, shred by shred. 'Set in 1912, the year of O'Neill's own attempted suicide, it is an attempt to understand himself and those to whom he was irrevocably tied by fate and by love. It is the finest and most powerful play to have come out of America' Christopher Bigsby Eugene O'Neill's play Long Day's Journey into Night was written in 1939-41, and first published in 1956 (after O'Neill's death in 1953). It was first performed at the Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm, in February 1956, and had its first American production at Helen Hayes Theater, New York, in November that year. It won the Tony Award for Best Play, and O'Neill was posthumously awarded the 1957 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. This edition includes a full introduction, biographical sketch and chronology.
  • Votes: 6

    Purple Hibiscus

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    The limits of fifteen-year-old Kambili’s world are defined by the high walls of her family estate and the dictates of her fanatically religious father. Her life is regulated by schedules: prayer, sleep, study, prayer.
  • Votes: 6

    A Portrait of Dorian Grey

    by Ms. Dru Simon

  • Votes: 6

    Equus

    by Peter Shaffer

    An explosive play that took critics and audiences by storm, Equus is Peter Shaffer's exploration of the way modern society has destroyed our ability to feel passion. Alan Strang is a disturbed youth whose dangerous obsession with horses leads him to commit an unspeakable act of violence. As psychiatrist Martin Dysart struggles to understand the motivation for Alan's brutality, he is increasingly drawn into Alan's web and eventually forced to question his own sanity. Equus is a timeless classic and a cornerstone of contemporary drama that delves into the darkest recesses of human existence.
  • Votes: 6

    The Turn of the Screw (American Classics Edition)

    by Henry James

  • Votes: 6

    The Bridge of San Luis Rey (Perennial Classics)

    by Thornton Wilder

    This beautiful new edition of Thornton Wilder's classic novel features previously unpublished notes and other illuminating documentary material as well as an updated afterword by his nephew, Tappan Wilder, and a foreword by Russell Banks. "On Friday noon, July the twentieth, 1714, the finest bridge in all Peru broke and precipitated five travelers into the gulf below." With this celebrated sentence, one of the towering achievements in American fiction, and a novel read throughout the world, begins. By fate or chance, a monk has witnessed the collapse. Brother Juniper, moved by the tragedy, embarks on a quest to prove a higher order is at work in the deaths of those who perished. His search leads readers on a timeless investigation into the nature of love and the meaning of the human condition.
  • Votes: 6

    Tess of The D'ubervilles (Illustrated)

    by Thomas Hardy

    This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘Tess of the D’urbervilles’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Thomas Hardy’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. The Delphi Classics edition of Hardy includes original annotations and illustrations relating to the life and works of the author, as well as individual tables of contents, allowing you to navigate eBooks quickly and easily. eBook features: * The complete unabridged text of ‘Tess of the D’urbervilles’ * Beautifully illustrated with images related to Hardy’s works * Individual contents table, allowing easy navigation around the eBook * Excellent formatting of the textPlease visit www.delphiclassics.com to learn more about our wide range of titles
  • Votes: 6

    When the Legends Die

    by Hal Borland

    A young Native American raised in the forest is suddenly thrust into the modern world, in this novel by the author of The Dog Who Came to Stay. Thomas Black Bull’s parents forsook the life of a modern reservation and took to ancient paths in the woods, teaching their young son the stories and customs of his ancestors. But Tom’s life changes forever when he loses his father in a tragic accident and his mother dies shortly afterward. When Tom is discovered alone in the forest with only a bear cub as a companion, life becomes difficult. Soon, well-meaning teachers endeavor to reform him, a rodeo attempts to turn him into an act, and nearly everyone he meets tries to take control of his life. Powerful and timeless, When the Legends Die is a captivating story of one boy learning to live in harmony with both civilization and wilderness.
  • Votes: 6

    HAHA

    by W. Maxwell Prince

  • Votes: 6

    #Romeo&Juliet

    by H. Ash Tag

  • Votes: 6

    And Then There Were None

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 6

    Cold Mountain

    by Charles Frazier

  • Votes: 6

    Wide Sargasso Sea

    by Jean Rhys

    Antoinette Cosway is a Creole heiress - product of an inbred, decadent, expatriate community - a sensitive girl at once beguiled and repelled by the lush Jamaican landscape. Soon after her marriage to Rochester rumours of madness in the Cosway family poison Rochester's mind against her.
  • Votes: 6

    Inherit the Wind

    by Jerome Lawrence

    THE STORY: The critics talk about the play: Magnificently written...one of the most exciting dramas of the last decade. --NY News. A tidal wave of a drama...More than any other play in memory based on history and aiming at a contemporary parallel, IN
  • Votes: 5

    Under the Banner of Heaven

    by Jon Krakauer

    Traces the events that surrounded the 1984 murder of a woman and her child by fundamentalist Mormons Ron and Dan Lafferty, exploring the belief systems and traditions, including polygamy, that mark the faith's most extreme factions and what their practices reflect about the nature of religion in America. Reader's Guide available. Reprint. 300,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 5

    The Diamond as Big as the Ritz

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    A teenager from a small Mississippi River town is sent to a private boarding school near Boston, surrounded by wealthy classmates, but has a secret that would amaze them all.
  • Votes: 5

    Cyrano de Bergerac (Signet Classics)

    by Edmond Rostand

    Translates the classic French story of the master swordsman, noble in stature, whose unpleasant appearance prevents him from courting the beautiful woman with whom he has fallen in love. Reissue.
  • Votes: 5

    Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant

    by Anne Tyler

    Through every family run memories which bind it together – despite everything. The Tulls of Baltimore are no exception. Abandoned by her salesman husband, Pearl is left to bring up her three children alone – Cody, a flawed devil, Ezra, a flawed saint, and Jenny, errant and passionate. Now, as Pearl lies dying, stiffly encased in her pride and solitude, the past is unlocked and with it its secrets. **ANNE TYLER HAS SOLD OVER 1 MILLION BOOKS WORLDWIDE** ‘One of my favourite authors ’ Liane Moriarty ‘She spins gold' Elizabeth Buchan ‘Anne Tyler has no peer’ Anita Shreve ‘A masterly author’ Sebastian Faulks
  • Votes: 5

    The Hate U Give

    by Angie Thomas

  • Votes: 5

    Tartuffe, by Moliere

    by Jean Baptiste Poquelin de Moliere

    Including "The Ridiculous Precieuses, The School for Husbands, The School for Wives, Don Juan, The Versailles Impromptu," and "The Critique of the School for Wives," this collection showcases the talent of perhaps the greatest and best-loved French playwright. Revised reissue.
  • Votes: 5

    The Communist Manifesto

    by Karl Marx

    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential works. From the musings of intellectuals such as Thomas Paine in Common Sense to the striking personal narrative of Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our intellectual history through the words of the exceptional few. Originally published as a political pamphlet in 1848, amidst the revolutions in Europe, The Communist Manifesto documents Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s theories on society and politics. It does so by defining the state of the class system in contemporary Europe—in which a larger, lower class is controlled and oppressed by a tyrannical, oppressive upper class. The Manifesto argues that, at some point in history, the lower class will inevitably realize their potential and exploitation and subsequently revolt. Once this occurs, Marx and Engels argue, there will be an uprising among proletariats that shifts political and economic power, ultimately resulting in the dismantling of class systems and capitalism. Additionally, in the Manifesto, Marx and Engels also predict the future state of the global economy and discuss their viewpoints on private property, while also addressing many other topics pertinent to today’s world. Although written nearly 170 years ago, The Communist Manifesto is still widely read and cited. Amid the current turmoil between social classes and the societies of the world, its revolutionary prose and ideas can still yield ripe food for thought.
  • Votes: 5

    The World

    by Richard Haass

  • Votes: 5

    The Return of the Native (Penguin Classics)

    by Thomas Hardy

    By the author of Schindler's Ark and master storyteller, Thomas Keneally, a vibrant novel about Charles Dickens' son and his adventures in the Australian Outback. In 1868, Charles Dickens dispatches his youngest child to Australia. Like his brother Alfred before him, sixteen-year-old Edward is expected to learn to apply himself in what his father considers to be the new land of opportunity. Posted to a remote sheep station in New South Wales, Edward discovers that Charles Dickens' fame has reached even there, as has the gossip about his father's scandalous liaison with an actress. Amid colonists, ex-convicts, local tribespeople and a handful of eligible young women, Edward strives to be his own man - and keep secret the fact that he's read none of his father's novels. Conjuring up a life of sheep-droving, horse-racing and cricket tournaments in a community riven with tensions and prejudice, the story of Edward's adventures also affords an intimate portrait of Dickens' himself. This vivacious novel is classic Keneally: historical figures and events re-imagined with verve, humour and compassion.
  • Votes: 5

    Gone With the Wind

    by Margaret Mitchell

  • Votes: 5

    Into Thin Air

    by Jon Krakauer

    The author describes his spring 1996 trek to Mt. Everest, a disastrous expedition that claimed the lives of eight climbers, and explains why he survived
  • Votes: 5

    The Clan of the Cave Bear

    by Jean M. Auel

    Ayla, an injured and orphaned child adopted by a primitive tribe, carries within her the seed and hope of humankind in this epic of survival and destiny set at the dawn of prehistory. Reissue.
  • Votes: 5

    Snow Falling on Cedars

    by David Guterson

    He saw the soft cedars of San Piedro Island, its high, rolling hills, the low mist that lay in long streamers against its beaches, the whitecaps riffling its shoreline. The moon had risen already behind the island – a quarter moon, pale and indefinite, as ethereal and translucent as the wisps of cloud that travelled the skies. A fisherman is found dead in the net of his boat off the coast of a North American island. When a local Japanese-American man is charged with his murder, it becomes clear that what is at stake is more than one man's guilt. For on San Piedro, memories grow as thickly as cedar trees – memories of a charmed romance between a white boy and a Japanese girl. Above all, the island is haunted by what happened to its Japanese residents during the Second World War, when an entire community was sent into exile while its neighbours watched.
  • Votes: 5

    Pilgrim’s Progress (Bunyan)

    by John Bunyan

    One of the most powerful dramas of Christian faith ever written, this captivating allegory of man's religious journey in search of salvation follows the pilgrim as he travels an obstacle-filled road to the Celestial City. Along the way, he is confronted by monsters and spiritual terrors, among them Worldly Wiseman, Giant Despair, and the demons of the Valley of the Shadow of Death. An enormously influential 17th-century classic, universally known for its simplicity, vigor, and beauty of language.
  • Votes: 5

    A People's History of the United States

    by Howard Zinn

  • Votes: 5

    The Heart

    by Maylis de Kerangal

  • Votes: 5

    Greek Mythology

    by Liv Albert

    Finally sort out who’s who in Greek mythology—from gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everyone in between! Greek mythology continues to appear in popular movies and books today but have you ever wondered about where these characters started out? Discover the origins of your favorite characters from Greek mythology with this collection of profiles to tell you who’s who in classical lore! In Greek Mythology, you will discover the backstories of the heroes, villains, gods, and goddesses that enjoy popularity in today’s shows and films. With comprehensive entries that outline each character’s name, roles, related symbols, and foundational myths, you can get to know the roots of these personas and better understand the stories they inspire today. With this character-focused, handy reference, you will never be confused about Ancient Greece!
  • Votes: 5

    The Perks of Being a Wallflower

    by Stephen Chbosky

  • Votes: 5

    Monster

    by Walter Dean Myers

    This New York Times bestselling novel from acclaimed author Walter Dean Myers tells the story of Steve Harmon, a teenage boy in juvenile detention and on trial. Presented as a screenplay of Steve's own imagination, and peppered with journal entries, the book shows how one single decision can change our whole lives. Monster is a multi-award-winning, provocative coming-of-age story that was the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award recipient, an ALA Best Book, a Coretta Scott King Honor selection, and a National Book Award finalist. Monster is now a major motion picture called All Rise and starring Jennifer Hudson, Kelvin Harrison, Jr., Nas, and A$AP Rocky. The late Walter Dean Myers was a National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, who was known for his commitment to realistically depicting kids from his hometown of Harlem.
  • Votes: 5

    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

    by Jonathan Safran Foer

  • Votes: 5

    The Fault in Our Stars

    by John Green

    I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, then all at once. Despite the tumour-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. Praise for The Fault in Our Stars: Sunday Times (Culture) 'A touching, often fiercely funny novel' The Sun on Sunday (Fabulous Magazine) 'So good I think it should be compulsory reading for everyone!' Daily Express 'John Green brilliantly captures the voices of a young generation while instilling it with the wisdom of a life that has lived too much yet will never live enough' The Metro - 2013 Best Fiction 'The love affair of two terminally ill teenagers could be mawkish. In fact, it's funny, clever, irreverent and life-affirming.' Grazia 'So good!' Good Housekeeping 'As funny as it is heartbreaking... we defy you not to fall in love with its main characters, Hazel and Augustus.' The Tablet 'A humourous and poignant love story... It's terrifically funny... as well as a moving exploration of loss and grief. And no, it's so much not just for teenage cancer sufferers... it's for everyone.' Bliss 'If you need inspiration when it comes to making the most of a moment, this one is for you' Mizz 'Insightful, bold, irreverent and raw, if this doesn't make you cry, it'll definitely make you think, laugh and maybe even fall in love yourself!'
  • Votes: 5

    The Inferno (Signet Classics)

    by Dante Alighieri

    In the first part of Dante's epic poem about the three realms of the Christian afterlife, a spiritual pilgrim is led by Virgil through the nine circles of Hell.
  • Votes: 5

    Tuesdays with Morrie

    by Mitch Albom

    Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague? Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it? For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Mitch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final 'class': lessons in how to live. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world. Praise for Tuesdays with Morrie: 'This is a true story that shines and leaves you forever warmed by its afterglow' Amy Tan 'A moving tribute to embracing life' Glasgow Herald 'An extraordinary contribution to the literature of death' Boston Globe 'A beautifully written book of great clarity and wisdom that lovingly captures the simplicity beyond life's complexities' M Scott Peck
  • Votes: 5

    Guess what? I can remember now!

    by HH Styles CO

    Professional resume and cover letter writers reveal their inside secrets for creating phenomenal cover letters that get attention and land interviews. Features more than 150 sample cover letters written for all types of job seekers, including the Before-and-After transformations that can make boring letters fabulous.
  • Votes: 5

    Ishmael

    by Daniel Quinn

    An award-winning, compelling novel of spiritual adventure about a gorilla named Ishmael, who possesses immense wisdom, and the man who becomes his pupil, offers answers to the world's most pressing moral dilemmas. Reprint.
  • Votes: 5

    War and Peace (Vintage Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

    Presents a new translation of the classic reflecting the life and times of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars, in a book accompanied by an index of historical figures, textual annotation, a chapter summary, and an introduction.
  • Votes: 5

    Nation

    by Terry Pratchett

    Widely thought of as the best book Terry Pratchett ever wrote, this is a story of a Nation, a story of a friendship, a story of growing up and the truths we must learn. It is epic in every sense . . . Prepare for the world to be turned upside down . . . For Mau, halfway between boy and man, it happens when a great wave destroys his entire village. For Daphne, it’s when the same wave crashes her ship into the island that was once Mau’s home. Everything they once had is now so far away, lost to distance and time. But when Daphne stops trying to shoot Mau (she did apologise for it), and instead uses a salvaged invitation card to invite him to tea, they discover a new home can be theirs. And then people start arriving on the island – some very good, some very bad. And it’s soon clear that Daphne and Mau must fight for their Nation. Then a discovery is made that will change the entire world forever . . .
  • Votes: 5

    A Passage to India

    by E.M. Forster

    In a scathing indictment of British imperialism, Forster's once controversial novel portrays two Englishwomen who experience misunderstanding and cultural conflict after they travel to India
  • Votes: 5

    Ordinary People

    by Judith Guest

    GUEST/ORDINARY PEOPLE
  • Votes: 5

    The Devil in the White City

    by Erik Larson

    An account of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 relates the stories of two men who shaped the history of the event--architect Daniel H. Burnham, who coordinated its construction, and serial killer Herman Mudgett.
  • Votes: 5

    Bartleby, The Scrivener A Story of Wall-Street

    by Herman Melville

    "Bartleby, the Scrivener is a short story by the American writer Herman Melville, first serialized anonymously in two parts in the November and December 1853 issues of Putnam's Magazine, and reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. In the story, a Wall Street lawyer hires a new clerk who, after an initial bout of hard work, refuses to make copies or do any other task required of him, with the words, "I would prefer not to".Numerous critical essays have been published about the story, which scholar Robert Milder describes as "unquestionably the masterpiece of the short fiction" in the Melville canon.
  • Votes: 4

    Travels in West Africa

    by Mary H. Kingsley

    Reproduction of the original: Travels in West Africa (Congo Francaise, Corisco and Cameroons ) by Mary H. Kingsley
  • Votes: 4

    Empty World

    by John Christopher

    Moving to a small village with his grandparents after a devastating accident, Neil endures a terrible plague that kills the world's adults, an event that compels him to make a treacherous journey to London in search of other survivors. By the author of the Tripods trilogy. Simultaneous and eBook.
  • Votes: 4

    Time Bomb

    by Joelle Charbonneau

    Seven students trapped in their school after a bomb goes off must fight to survive while also discovering who among them is the bomber in this provocative new thriller from the author of the New York Times bestselling Testing Trilogy. Perfect for fans of This Is Where It Ends. A congressman's daughter who has to be perfect. A star quarterback with a secret. A guy who's tired of being ignored. A clarinet player who's done trying to fit in. An orphaned rebel who wants to teach someone a lesson. A guy who wants people to see him, not his religion. They couldn't be more different, but before the morning's over, they'll all be trapped in a school that's been rocked by a bombing. When they hear that someone inside is the bomber, they'll also be looking to one another for answers. Told from multiple perspectives, Time Bomb will keep readers guessing about who the bomber could be--and what motivated such drastic action.
  • Votes: 4

    The Painted Bird

  • Votes: 4

    Vincent and Theo

    by Deborah Heiligman

    Printz Honor Book • YALSA Nonfiction Award Winner • Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Winner • SCBWI Golden Kite Winner • Cybils Senior High Nonfiction Award Winner From the author of National Book Award finalist Charles and Emma comes an incredible story of brotherly love. The deep and enduring friendship between Vincent and Theo Van Gogh shaped both brothers' lives. Confidant, champion, sympathizer, friend—Theo supported Vincent as he struggled to find his path in life. They shared everything, swapping stories of lovers and friends, successes and disappointments, dreams and ambitions. Meticulously researched, drawing on the 658 letters Vincent wrote to Theo during his lifetime, Deborah Heiligman weaves a tale of two lives intertwined and the extraordinary love of the Van Gogh brothers.
  • Votes: 4

    Schindler's List

    by Thomas Keneally

    In remembrance of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and the Nazi concentration camps, this award-winning, bestselling work of Holocaust fiction, inspiration for the classic film and “masterful account of the growth of the human soul” (Los Angeles Times Book Review), returns with an all-new introduction and beautifully redesigned cover. An “extraordinary” (New York Review of Books) novel based on the true story of how German war profiteer and factory director Oskar Schindler came to save more Jews from the gas chambers than any other single person during World War II. In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, author of The Book of Science and Antiquities and The Daughter of Mars, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler’s Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil. “Astounding…in this case the truth is far more powerful than anything the imagination could invent” (Newsweek).
  • Votes: 4

    The War of 1812

    by Donald R Hickey

    This comprehensive and authoritative history of the War of 1812, thoroughly revised for the 200th anniversary of the historic conflict, is a myth-shattering study that will inform and entertain students, historians, and general readers alike. Donald R. Hickey explores the military, diplomatic, and domestic history of our second war with Great Britain, bringing the study up to date with recent scholarship on all aspects of the war, from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada. The newly expanded The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict, Bicentennial Edition includes additional information on the British forces, American Indians, and military operations such as the importance of logistics and the use and capabilities of weaponry. Hickey explains how the war promoted American nationalism and manifest destiny, stimulated peacetime defense spending, and enhanced America's reputation abroad. He also shows that the war sparked bloody conflicts between pro-war Republican and anti-war Federalist neighbors, dealt a crippling blow to American Indians, and solidified the United States's antipathy toward the British.
  • Votes: 4

    Remembering Babylon

    by David Malouf

    A searing and magnificent picture of Australia at the moment of its foundation, with early settlers staking out their small patch of land and terrified by the harsh and alien continent. Focussing on the hostility between the early British inhabitants and the native Aborigines. Remembering Bablyon tells the tragic and compelling story of a boy who finds himself caught between the two worlds. Shot through with humour, and written with the poetic intensity that characterised Malouf's An Imaginary Life, this is a novel of epic scope yet it is simple, compassionate and universal: a classic.
  • Votes: 4

    Flights

    by Olga Tokarczuk

    WINNER OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE WINNER OF THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST FOR TRANSLATED LITERATURE A visionary work of fiction by "A writer on the level of W. G. Sebald" (Annie Proulx) "A magnificent writer." — Svetlana Alexievich, Nobel Prize-winning author of Secondhand Time "A beautifully fragmented look at man's longing for permanence.... Ambitious and complex." — Washington Post From the incomparably original Polish writer Olga Tokarczuk, Flights interweaves reflections on travel with an in-depth exploration of the human body, broaching life, death, motion, and migration. Chopin's heart is carried back to Warsaw in secret by his adoring sister. A woman must return to her native Poland in order to poison her terminally ill high school sweetheart, and a young man slowly descends into madness when his wife and child mysteriously vanish during a vacation and just as suddenly reappear. Through these brilliantly imagined characters and stories, interwoven with haunting, playful, and revelatory meditations, Flights explores what it means to be a traveler, a wanderer, a body in motion not only through space but through time. Where are you from? Where are you coming in from? Where are you going? we call to the traveler. Enchanting, unsettling, and wholly original, Flights is a master storyteller's answer.
  • Votes: 4

    The Year We Disappeared

    by Cylin Busby

    When Cylin Busby was nine years old, she was obsessed with the Muppets and her pet turtle. Then everything changed. Her police officer father, John, was driving to work when someone levelled a shotgun at his window. The blasts that followed left him clinging to life, yet he managed to write down the name of the only person he thought could have pulled the trigger. John Busby was scheduled to testify in an upcoming trial against the family of a local criminal with rumoured mob connections. It became clear that there was a definite suspect. Overnight, the Busbys went from being an average family to one under 24-hour armed protection, with police escorts to school and no contact with friends. Worse, the gunman was still on the loose, and it seemed only a matter of time before he would come after John again - or someone else in the family! With few choices left, the Busby family went into hiding, severing all ties to the only life they had ever known. This hard-hitting, graphic and compelling account of Cylin's family's escape from the mob is ultimately a story of survival and triumph.
  • Votes: 4

    Zemsta

    by Wesley Still

  • Votes: 4

    The Government Inspector

    by adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher from the original by Nikolai Gogol

  • Votes: 4

    Hills Like White Elephants

    by Ernest Hemingway

    A man and his girlfriend wait for a train to Madrid at station in rural Spain, the almost casual nature of their conversation evading the true emotional depth of what’s happening between the two of them. “Hills Like White Elephants” is considered to be among Ernest Hemingway’s best short fiction, showcasing the author’s powerful ability to strip writing down to its bare bones and allow the reader’s imagination to fill in the subtext. One of America’s foremost journalists and authors, Ernest Hemingway as also a master of the short story genre, penning more than fifty short stories during his career, many of which featured one of his most popular prose characters, Nick Adams. The most popular of Hemingway’s short stories include “Hills Like White Elephants,” “Indian Camp,” “The Big Two-Hearted River,” and “The Snows of Kilimanjaro.” HarperCollins brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperCollins short-stories collection to build your digital library.
  • Votes: 4

    The New Jim Crow

    by Michelle Alexander

    A tenth-anniversary edition of the iconic bestseller--"one of the most influential books of the past 20 years," according to the Chronicle of Higher Education--with a new preface by the author Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander's unforgettable argument that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is "undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S." Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.
  • Votes: 4

    The Five People You Meet in Heaven

    by Mitch Albom

  • Votes: 4

    Haroun and the Sea of Stories

    by Salman Rushdie

  • Votes: 4

    A Lesson Before Dying (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Ernest J. Gaines

    “This majestic, moving novel is an instant classic, a book that will be read, discussed and taught beyond the rest of our lives.”—Chicago Tribune Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, A Lesson Before Dying is a deep and compassionate novel about a young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to visit a black youth on death row for a crime he didn't commit. Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting. From the critically acclaimed author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.
  • Votes: 4

    La casa de Bernarda Alba (Focus Student Edition) (Spanish Edition)

    by Federico Garcia Lorca

    Bernarda Alba is a widow, and her five daughters are incarcerated in mourning along with her. One by one they make a bid for freedom, with tragic consequences. Lorca's tale depicts the repression of women within Catholic Spain in the years before the war. The House of Bernarda Alba is Lorca's last and possibly finest play, completed shortly before he was murdered by Nationalist sympathisers at the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. Inspired by real characters and described by the author as 'a true record of village life', it is a tragic tale of frustration and explosive passions in a household of women rulled by a tyrannical mother. Edited with invaluable student notes - a must for students of Spanish drama
  • Votes: 4

    Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

    by Tennessee Williams

    Maggie the Cat fights for the lives of her damaged and drinking husband Brick, herself, and their unborn children in the revised version of Williams' acclaimed dramatization of Big Daddy's birthday and deathday party and family gathering
  • Votes: 4

    A Man for All Seasons

    by Robert Bolt

    A Man for All Seasons dramatises the conflict between King Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More. It depicts the confrontation between church and state, theology and politics, absolute power and individual freedom. Throughout the play Sir Thomas More's eloquence and endurance, his purity, saintliness and tenacity in the face of ever-growing threats to his beliefs and family, earn him status as one of modern drama's greatest tragic heroes. The play was first staged in 1960 at the Globe Theatre in London and was voted New York's Best Foreign Play in 1962. In 1966 it was made into an Academy Award-winning film by Fred Zinneman starring Paul Scofield."A Man for All Seasons is a stark play, sparse in its narrative, sinewy in its writing, which confirms Mr Bolt as a genuine and solid playwright, a force in our awakening theatre." (Daily Mail)
  • Votes: 4

    The Babbit

    by Jon Milly

    Starting with the figure of the bold, boisterous girl in the mid-19th century and ending with the “girl power” movement of the 1990’s, Tomboys is the first full-length critical study of this gender-bending code of female conduct. Michelle Abate uncovers the origins, charts the trajectory, and traces the literary and cultural transformations that the concept of “tomboy” has undergone in the United States. Abate focuses on literature including Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and Carson McCullers's The Member of the Wedding and films such as Peter Bogdanovich's Paper Moon and Jon Avnet's Fried Green Tomatoes. She also draws onlesser-known texts like E.D.E.N. Southworth's once wildly popular 1859 novel The Hidden Hand, Cold War lesbian pulp fiction, and New Queer Cinema from the 1990s. Tomboys also explores the gender and sexual dynamics of tomboyism, and offers intriguing discussions of race and ethnicity's role in the construction of the enduring cultural archetype. Abate’s insightful analysis provides useful, thought-provoking connections between different literary works and eras. The result demystifies this cultural phenomenon and challenges readers to consider tomboys in a whole new light.
  • Votes: 4

    Cancer Ward

    by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

    Cancer Ward examines the relationship of a group of people in the cancer ward of a provincial Soviet hospital in 1955, two years after Stalin's death. We see them under normal circumstances, and also reexamined at the eleventh hour of illness. Together they represent a remarkable cross-section of contemporary Russian characters and attitudes. The experiences of the central character, Oleg Kostoglotov, closely reflect the author's own: Solzhenitsyn himself became a patient in a cancer ward in the mid-1950s, on his release from a labor camp, and later recovered. Translated by Nicholas Bethell and David Burg.
  • Votes: 4

    The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 4

    A Separate Piece (Real Life Stuff Book 1)

    by Robyn Spencer

  • Votes: 4

    What I Remember

    by Tess Kielhamer

    I want to share with you what I remember from the other side. Many memories pertaining prior to conception. How we choose our lives. God gives us options and an amount of love there are no words for. This book will lift you and give you some peace and understanding. Not from me but from Heaven. What I remember of Heaven, God and the Angels. God has specific assignments for you to do. You were shown your assignments and you happily agreed. You saw all details of all the days within your life and the variations within them. As I share what I remember of the other side I also share with you how I remember picking my life as well.
  • Votes: 4

    Dead Man Walking

    by Helen Prejean

    In 1982, Sister Helen Prejean became the spiritual advisor to Patrick Sonnier, the convicted killer of two teenagers who was sentenced to die in the electric chair of Louisiana’s Angola State Prison. In the months before Sonnier’s death, the Roman Catholic nun came to know a man who was as terrified as he had once been terrifying. She also came to know the families of the victims and the men whose job it was to execute—men who often harbored doubts about the rightness of what they were doing. Out of that dreadful intimacy comes a profoundly moving spiritual journey through our system of capital punishment. Here Sister Helen confronts both the plight of the condemned and the rage of the bereaved, the fears of a society shattered by violence and the Christian imperative of love. On its original publication in 1993, Dead Man Walking emerged as an unprecedented look at the human consequences of the death penalty. Now, some two decades later, this story—which has inspired a film, a stage play, an opera and a musical album—is more gut-wrenching than ever, stirring deep and life-changing reflection in all who encounter it.
  • Votes: 4

    Breakfast of Champions

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 4

    Farenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 4

    Treasure Island (Signet Classics)

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Votes: 4

    The Mayor of Caster bridge Illustrated

    by Thomas Hardy

    The Mayor of Casterbridge: The Life and Death of a Man of Character is an 1886 novel by the English author Thomas Hardy. One of Hardy's Wessex novels, it is set in a fictional rural England with Casterbridge standing in for Dorchester in Dorset where the author spent his youth. It was first published as a weekly serialisation from January 1886.The novel is considered to be one of Hardy's masterpieces, although it has been criticised for incorporating too many incidents: a consequence of the author trying to include something in every weekly published instalment.
  • Votes: 4

    Jurassic Park

    by Michael Crichton

  • Votes: 4

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 4

    Johnny Tremain

    by Esther Hoskins Forbes

    After injuring his hand, a silversmith's apprentice in Boston becomes a messenger for the Sons of Liberty in the days before the American Revolution.
  • Votes: 4

    White Fang

    by Jack London

  • Votes: 4

    The God of Small Things

    by Arundhati Roy

    The year is 1969. In the state of Kerala, on the southernmost tip of India, a skyblue Plymouth with chrome tailfins is stranded on the highway amid a Marxist workers' demonstration. Inside the car sit two-egg twins Rahel and Esthappen, and so begins their tale.... Armed only with the invincible innocence of children, they fashion a childhood for themselves in the shade of the wreck that is their family - their lonely, lovely mother, Ammu (who loves by night the man her children love by day), their blind grandmother, Mammachi (who plays Handel on her violin), their beloved uncle Chacko (Rhodes scholar, pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher), their enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grandaunt), and the ghost of an imperial entomologist's moth (with unusually dense dorsal tufts). When their English cousin, Sophie Mol, and her mother, Margaret Kochamma, arrive on a Christmas visit, Esthappen and Rahel learn that Things Can Change in a Day. That lives can twist into new, ugly shapes, even cease forever, beside their river "graygreen. With fish in it. With the sky and trees in it. And at night, the broken yellow moon in it."
  • Votes: 4

    All the King's Men

    by Robert Penn Warren

    Willie Stark's obsession with political power leads to the ultimate corruption of his gubernatorial administration.
  • Votes: 4

    The Three Musketeers

    by Alexandre Dumas

  • Votes: 4

    On The Beach

    by nevil shute

    "On the Beach" is a 1957 post-apocalyptic novel written by British-Australian author Nevil Shute after he emigrated to Australia. The novel details the experiences of a mixed group of people in Melbourne as they await the arrival of deadly radiation spreading towards them from the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war a year previously. As the radiation approaches each person deals with their impending death in different ways.
  • Votes: 4

    Jude the Obscure

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 4

    My Family and Other Animals

    by Gerald Durrell

    Apart from naturalist Gerald Durrell (the youngest) and Larry (Lawrence Durrell, the novelist), the family of Gerald comprised their widowed mother, the gun-mad Leslie, and diet-obsessed sister Margo together with Roger the dog. This title offers an autobiographical account of five years in the childhood of Gerald.
  • Votes: 4

    A Wrinkle in Time

    by Medeleine L'Engle

  • Votes: 4

    The Princess Bride

    by William Goldman

  • Votes: 4

    The Color of Water

    by James McBride

    With a new Introduction to this touching homage to his mother, the author paints a portrait of growing up in a black neighborhood as the child of an interracial marriage. Although raised an Orthodox Jew in the South, McBride's mother abandoned her heritage, moved to Harlem, and married a black man.
  • Votes: 4

    In No Particular Order

    by Jean Blane Flannery

    Social workers represent the largest body of addiction and mental health service providers, and there is a consistent need for up-to-date information. Social Work Practice in the Addictions is a comprehensive evidence-based volume. Contributing authors of this volume have been carefully selected to ensure representation of the leading social work addiction researchers. Additionally, researchers from other allied fields, including psychiatry, psychology, and public health, will also be involved to ensure a strong interdisciplinary perspective. Unlike other texts on addiction, this book incorporates ideas of social justice, practice with diverse communities, and ethics to represent the entire knowledge base of social work.
  • Votes: 4

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    by Rebecca Skloot

    Documents the story of how scientists took cells from an unsuspecting descendant of freed slaves and created a human cell line that has been kept alive indefinitely, enabling discoveries in such areas as cancer research, in vitro fertilization and gene mapping. Includes reading-group guide. Reprint. A best-selling book.
  • Votes: 4

    Kindred

    by Octavia E. Butler

    Dana, a black woman, finds herself repeatedly transported to the antebellum South, where she must make sure that Rufus, the plantation owner's son, survives to father Dana's ancestor.
  • Votes: 4

    Shane

    by Jack Schaefer

    Shane, a stranger the Starretts take in to their home in Wyoming in 1889, becomes involved in a feud between a cattle rancher and the local homesteaders.
  • Votes: 4

    Idylls of the King (Penguin Classics)

    by Alfred Tennyson

    Tennyson had a life-long interest in the legend of King Arthur and after the huge success of his poem 'Morte d'Arthur' he built on the theme with this series of twelve poems, written in two periods of intense creativity over nearly twenty years. Idylls of the King traces the story of Arthur's rule, from his first encounter with Guinevere and the quest for the Holy Grail to the adultery of his Queen with Launcelot and the King's death in a final battle that spells the ruin of his kingdom. Told with lyrical and dreamlike eloquence, Tennyson's depiction of the Round Table reflects a longing for a past age of valour and chivalry. And in his depiction of King Arthur he created a hero imbued with the values of the Victorian age - one who embodies the highest ideals of manhood and kingship.
  • Votes: 4

    Doctor Faustus (Norton Critical Editions)

    by Christopher Marlowe

    Renaissance England's great tragedy of intellectual overreaching is as relevant and unsettling today as it was when first performed at the end of the sixteenth century.
  • Votes: 4

    Murder in the Cathedral, Book Cover May Vary

    by T. S. Eliot

    The verse dramatization of the medieval murder of Thomas Becket at Canterbury by the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. The Archbishop Thomas Becket speaks fatal words before he is martyred in T. S. Eliot’s best-known drama, based on the murder of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170. Praised for its poetically masterful handling of issues of faith, politics, and the common good, T. S. Eliot’s play bolstered his reputation as the most significant poet of his time. It has been performed on stage, film, and television since 1935 and was the basis for the opera Assassinio nella Cattedrale by the Italian composer Ildebrando Pizzetti.
  • Votes: 4

    The Call of the Wild (Reader's Library Classics)

    by Jack London

    Two classic tales of dogs, one part wolf and one a Saint Bernard/Scotch shepherd mix that becomes leader of a wolf pack, as they have adventures in the Yukon wilderness with both humans and other animals.
  • Votes: 3

    The Dollhouse Flower Shop

    by Angie Scarr

    A riot of flowers in polymer clay. Stencilling with a mix of solid polymer clay and liquid clays is a new adventure. These ideas look at using polymer clay to produce beautiful, delicate flowers and plants which are resistant to moisture, semi translucent, in delicate, subtle or glorious colours without individual painting of leaves and petals.
  • Votes: 3

    Amusing Ourselves to Death

    by Neil Postman

    Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    The Centaur

    by John Updike

    In a small Pennsylvania town in the late 1940s, schoolteacher George Caldwell yearns to find some meaning in his life. Alone with his teenage son for three days in a blizzard, Caldwell sees his son grow and change as he himself begins to lost touch with his life. Interwoven with the myth of Chiron, the noblest centaur, and his own relationship to Prometheus, The Centaur is one of John Updike's most brilliant and unusual novels.
  • Votes: 3

    The Playboy of the Western World and Riders to the Sea

    by J. M. Synge

    Two lyrical, beautifully crafted dramas set among the folk of the Aran Islands and western Irish coastlands. Reprinted from authoritative editions, complete with Synge's preface to The Playboy of the Western World. New introductory Note.
  • Votes: 3

    Under the Greenwood Tree (Penguin Classics)

    by Thomas Hardy

    'At sight of him had the pink of her cheeks increased, lessened, or did it continue to cover its normal area of ground? It was a question meditated several hundreds of times by her visitor in after-hours - the meditation, after wearying involutions, always ending in one way, that it was impossible to say' The arrival of two newcomers in the quiet village of Mellstock arouses a bitter feud and leaves a convoluted love affair in its wake. While the Reverend Maybold creates a furore among the village's musicians with his decision to abolish the church's traditional 'string choir' and replace it with a modern mechanical organ, the new schoolteacher, Fancy Day, causes an upheaval of a more romantic nature, winning the hearts of three very different men - a local farmer, a church musician and Maybold himself. Under the Greenwood Tree follows the ensuing maze of intrigue and passion with gentle humour and sympathy, deftly evoking the richness of village life, yet tinged with melancholy for a rural world that Hardy saw fast disappearing. The Penguin English Library - 100 editions of the best fiction in English, from the eighteenth century and the very first novels to the beginning of the First World War.
  • Votes: 3

    A Perfect Day for Bananafish

    by Shmoop

    The "original, first-rate, serious, and beautiful" short fiction (New York Times Book Review) that introduced J. D. Salinger to American readers in the years after World War II, including "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" and the first appearance of Salinger's fictional Glass family. Nine exceptional stories from one of the great literary voices of the twentieth century. Witty, urbane, and frequently affecting, Nine Stories sits alongside Salinger's very best work--a treasure that will passed down for many generations to come. The stories: A Perfect Day for Bananafish Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut Just Before the War with the Eskimos The Laughing Man Down at the Dinghy For Esmé--with Love and Squalor Pretty Mouth and Green My Eyes De Daumier-Smith's Blue Period Teddy
  • Votes: 3

    To the Best of My Recollection

    by Kathleen Lashier

  • Votes: 3

    The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights

    by John Steinbeck

    Steinbeck's only work of fantasy literature—in a deluxe edition with a foreword by Christopher Paolini, New York Times bestselling author of Eragon, Eldest and Brisingr A Penguin Classic Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur was the first book that John Steinbeck truly enjoyed reading as a child. Fascinated by Arthurian tales of adventure, knighthood, honor and friendship, in addition to the challenging nuances of the original Anglo-Saxon language, Steinbeck set out to render these stories faithfully and with keen animation for a modern audience. Here then is Steinbeck’s modernization of the adventure of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, featuring the icons of Arthurian legend—including King Arthur, Merlin, Morgan le Fay, the incomparable Queen Guinevere, and Arthur's purest knight, Sir Lancelot of the Lake. These enduring tales of loyalty and betrayal in the time of Camelot flicker with the wonder and magic of an era past but not forgotten. Steinbeck's retelling will capture the attention and imagination of legions of Steinbeck fans, including those who love Arthurian romances, as well as countless readers of science fiction and fantasy literature. This edition features a new foreword by Christopher Paolini, author of the number-one New York Times bestselling novels Eragon, Eldest, and Brisingr. It also includes the letters John Steinbeck wrote to his literary agent, Elizabeth Otis, and to Chase Horton, the original editor of this volume. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 3

    A Handful of Dust

    by Evelyn Waugh

  • Votes: 3

    Memoirs of an Invisible Man

    by H. F. Saint

    When a freak accident leaves stock analyst Nick Halloway completely invisible, he is pursued by intelligence agents, amasses a fortune, and battles against desperate loneliness
  • Votes: 3

    Player Piano

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 3

    The First Lady

    by James Patterson

    In James Patterson's new stand-alone thriller, one secret can bring down a government when the President's affair to remember becomes a nightmare he wishes he could forget. Sally Grissom is a top secret service agent in charge of the Presidential Protection team. She knows that something is amiss when she is summoned to a private meeting with the President and his Chief of Staff without any witnesses. But she couldn't have predicted that she'd be forced to take on an investigation surrounding the mysterious disappearance of the First Lady--with strict orders to keep it a secret. The First Lady's absence comes in the wake of the scandalous, public revelation of the president's affair, so at first it seems as though she is simply cutting off all contact as she recuperates at a horse farm in Virginia. What begins as an innocent respite quickly reveals itself as a twisted case when the White House receives a ransom note along with the First Lady's finger.
  • Votes: 3

    If I Die in a Combat Zone

    by Tim O'Brien

    A classic from the New York Times bestselling author of The Things They Carried "One of the best, most disturbing, and most powerful books about the shame that was / is Vietnam." —Minneapolis Star and Tribune Before writing his award-winning Going After Cacciato, Tim O'Brien gave us this intensely personal account of his year as a foot soldier in Vietnam. The author takes us with him to experience combat from behind an infantryman's rifle, to walk the minefields of My Lai, to crawl into the ghostly tunnels, and to explore the ambiguities of manhood and morality in a war gone terribly wrong. Beautifully written and searingly heartfelt, If I Die in a Combat Zone is a masterwork of its genre. Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content.
  • Votes: 3

    The Wave

    by Todd Strasser

  • Votes: 3

    A Vision of Light

    by Judith Merkle Riley

    A village girl receives a divine vision that will lead her into the chambers of the English Inquisition... Young, wealthy and twice married, Margaret has a modest enough ambition: she wishes to write a book. But this is 1355, and the notion of a woman wanting to record her experiences and thoughts is not just arrogant, it’s possibly heretical. Three clerics contemptuously decline to be Margaret’s scribe, and it is only starvation that persuades Brother Gregory, a renegade Carthusian friar with a mysterious past, to take on the unseemly task of chronicling her life. As she narrates her life story, an extraordinary tale unfolds filled with perilous brushes with death, where a mix of miracle and Margaret’s innate intellect pull her through. But this is a world where a clever woman is at constant risk of being accused of witchcraft... A Vision of Light, first in the critically acclaimed historical Margaret of Ashbury Trilogy is a remarkable novel that challenges all of our notions about women’s roles in the medieval era, perfect for fans of Ariana Franklin, Sarah Perry and Jessie Burton. ‘Both arresting and absorbing’ The New York Times ‘Fascinating and factual...If all chronicles of earthly life were recorded with such drama, flair, and wit, the world would be full of history majors’ Los Angeles Times
  • Votes: 3

    The Fall

    by Albert Camus

  • Votes: 3

    A Sound of Thunder (Tale Blazers

    by Ray D Bradbury

  • Votes: 3

    Hard Times

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 3

    Breathing Underwater

    by Sarah Allen

    A heartwarming, relevant middle grade novel about a twelve-year-old girl who wants to be a photographer going on a road trip with her older sister recovering from depression, and learning that loving someone doesn't come with its own map.
  • Votes: 3

    The Da Vinci Code

    by Josh McDowell

    A journey of discovery-- " I never knew all that"--"I have to admit: I'm hooked"--"That's pretty persuasive"--"What does that tell you?"--"What difference does it make?"--A quest fulfilled.
  • Votes: 3

    Wild Swans

    by Jung Chang

  • Votes: 3

    Lamb to the Slaughter (Serenity's Plain Secrets)

    by Karen Ann Hopkins

    "A well-crafted tale of murder begotten by the collision of two incompatible worlds." -Kirkus Reviews Some Amish communities aren't so cozy. The death of a teenage Amish girl in a cornfield looks like an accident, but sheriff Serenity Adams suspects foul play. To solve the murder, she must investigate the nearby Amish community with the help of a man who was shunned years ago. At first glance, the case seems obvious. The poor girl was probably accidently shot during hunting season, but when the elders of the Amish community and even the girl's parents react with uncaring subdued behavior, Serenity becomes suspicious. As she delves deeper into the secretive community that she grew up beside, she discovers a gruesome crime from the past that may very well be related to the Amish girl's shooting. Serenity's persistence leads her to a stunning discovery that not only threatens to destroy her blossoming romance with Daniel Bachman, but may even take her life in the end.
  • Votes: 3

    A Room of One's Own

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 3

    The Diviners (The Diviners, 1)

    by Libba Bray

    During one month in the autumn of election year 2000, scores of movie-business strivers are focused on one goal: getting a piece of an elusive, but surely huge, television saga, the one that opens with Huns sweeping through Mongolia and closes with a Mormon diviner in the Las Vegas desert; the sure-to-please-everyone multigenerational TV miniseries about diviners, those miracle workers who bring water to perpetually thirsty (and hungry and love-starved) humankind. Among the wannabes: Vanessa Meandro, hot-tempered head of Means of Production, an indie film company; her harried and varied staff; a Sikh cab driver, promoted to the office of -theory and practice of TV; a bipolar bicycle messenger, who makes a fateful mis-delivery; two celebrity publicists, the Vanderbilt girls; a thriller writer who gives Botox parties; the daughter of an L.A. big-shot, who is hired to fetch Vanessa's Krispy Kremes and more; a word man who coined the phrase -- inspired by a true story; and a supreme court justice who wants to write the script.A few true artists surface in the course of Moody's rollicking but intricately woven novel, and real emotion eventually blossoms for most of Vanessa's staff at Means of Production, even herself. The Diviners is a cautionary tale about pointless ambition; a richly detailed look at the interlocking worlds of money, politics, addiction, sex, work, and family in modern America; and a masterpiece of comedy that will bring Rick Moody to a still higher level of appreciation.
  • Votes: 3

    Hunger of Memory

    by Richard Rodriguez

    Hunger of Memory is the story of Mexican-American Richard Rodriguez, who begins his schooling in Sacramento, California, knowing just 50 words of English, and concludes his university studies in the stately quiet of the reading room of the British Museum. Here is the poignant journey of a “minority student” who pays the cost of his social assimilation and academic success with a painful alienation — from his past, his parents, his culture — and so describes the high price of “making it” in middle-class America. Provocative in its positions on affirmative action and bilingual education, Hunger of Memory is a powerful political statement, a profound study of the importance of language ... and the moving, intimate portrait of a boy struggling to become a man.
  • Votes: 3

    The Things They Carried

    by Tim O'Brien

    A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds and lives since it burst onto the literary scene, The Things They Carried is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling. The Things They Carried depicts the men of Alpha Company: Jimmy Cross, Henry Dobbins, Rat Kiley, Mitchell Sanders, Norman Bowker, Kiowa, and the character Tim O’Brien, who has survived his tour in Vietnam to become a father and writer at the age of forty-three. Taught everywhere—from high school classrooms to graduate seminars in creative writing—it has become required reading for any American and continues to challenge readers in their perceptions of fact and fiction, war and peace, courage and fear and longing. The Things They Carried won France's prestigious Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize; it was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.
  • Votes: 3

    Deathwatch

    by Robb White

    "An exciting novel of suspense, based on a fight to the finish between an honest and courageous young man and a cynical business tycoon who believes that anything can be had for a price."--Horn Book. An ALA Best of the Best Books for Young Adults, Edgar Allan Poe Mystery Writers Award, A New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year, New York Public Library--Books for the Teen Age.
  • Votes: 3

    Something Wicked This Way Comes

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 3

    The Cross and the Switchblade

    by David Wilkerson

    The dramatic and inspiring true story of a small town minister called to help inner city kids everyone else believed were beyond hope... David Wilkerson was just a young preacher in the Pennsylvania hills when he was stunned by a new calling from God: go to New York City to speak to seven young gang members on trial for murder. But something much greater was to come. Once in New York, David was inspired to stay for a lifetime of helping troubled teenagers get free of drugs and crime. With the word of God in his ears, he founded an inner-city ministry still known as the Teen Challenge to change their paths and alter thousands of lives forever.
  • Votes: 3

    The Tell-Tale Heart (Bantam Classics)

    by Edgar Allan Poe

    A selection of Poe's poetry and sixteen of his best-known tales, including "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Black Cat," and "The Pit and the Pendulum."
  • Votes: 3

    Murder on the Orient Express

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 3

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

    A cloth bag containing eight copies of the title.
  • Votes: 3

    The Bloody Chamber

    by Angela Carter

    WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY HELEN SIMPSON From familiar fairy tales and legends âe" Red Riding Hood, Bluebeard, Puss in Boots, Beauty and the Beast, vampires and werewolves âe" Angela Carter has created an absorbing collection of dark, sensual, fantastic stories.
  • Votes: 3

    The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds

    by Paul Zindel

    Paul Zindel's compelling and inspirational Pulitzer Prize-winning play that was made into a motion picture directed by Paul Newman starring Joanne Woodward. The old, converted vegetable shop where Tillie lives is more like a madhouse than a home. Tillie's mother, Beatrice, is bitter and cruel, yet desperate for her daughters' love. Her sister, Ruth, suffers epileptic fits and sneaks cigarettes every chance she gets. In the midst of chaos, Tillie struggles to keep her focus and dreams alive. Tillie — keeper of rabbits, dreamer of atoms, true believer in life, hope, and the effect of gamma rays on man-in-the-moon marigolds.
  • Votes: 3

    Renewing Catholic Schools

    by R. Jared Staudt

    The specific concern in What We Hold in Trust comes to this: the Catholic university that sees its principal purpose in terms of the active life, of career, and of changing the world, undermines the contemplative and more deep-rooted purpose of the university. If a university adopts the language of technical and social change as its main and exclusive purpose, it will weaken the deeper roots of the university’s liberal arts and Catholic mission. The language of the activist, of changing the world through social justice, equality and inclusion, or of the technician through market-oriented incentives, plays an important role in university life. We need to change the world for the better and universities play an important role, but both the activist and technician will be co-opted by our age of hyper-activity and technocratic organizations if there is not first a contemplative outlook on the world that receives reality rather than constructs it. To address this need for roots What We Hold in Trust unfolds in four chapters that will demonstrate how essential it is for the faculty, administrators, and trustees of Catholic universities to think philosophically and theologically (Chapter One), historically (Chapter Two) and institutionally (Chapters Three and Four). What we desperately need today are leaders in Catholic universities who understand the roots of the institutions they serve, who can wisely order the goods of the university, who know what is primary and what is secondary, and who can distinguish fads and slogans from authentic reform. We need leaders who are in touch with their history and have a love for tradition, and in particular for the Catholic tradition. Without this vision, our universities may grow in size, but shrink in purpose. They may be richer but not wiser.
  • Votes: 3

    Z for Zachariah

    by Robert C. O'Brien

    Believing herself to be the only survivor of a nuclear war, Ann Burden greets a wandering stranger with excitement and suspicion. An ALA Notable Book & ALA Best Book for Young Adults. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    The Raven

    by Edgar Allan Poe

  • Votes: 3

    Sophie's World

    by Jostein Gaarder

    A page-turning novel that is also an exploration of the great philosophical concepts of Western thought, Sophie's World has fired the imagination of readers all over the world, with more than twenty million copies in print. One day fourteen-year-old Sophie Amundsen comes home from school to find in her mailbox two notes, with one question on each: "Who are you?" and "Where does the world come from?" From that irresistible beginning, Sophie becomes obsessed with questions that take her far beyond what she knows of her Norwegian village. Through those letters, she enrolls in a kind of correspondence course, covering Socrates to Sartre, with a mysterious philosopher, while receiving letters addressed to another girl. Who is Hilde? And why does her mail keep turning up? To unravel this riddle, Sophie must use the philosophy she is learning--but the truth turns out to be far more complicated than she could have imagined.
  • Votes: 3

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 3

    Born a Crime

    by Trevor Noah

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man's coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Michiko Kakutani, New York Times * USA Today * San Francisco Chronicle * NPR * Esquire * Newsday * Booklist Trevor Noah's unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents' indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa's tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man's relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother--his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother's unconventional, unconditional love. Praise for Born a Crime "[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah's] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah's family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author's remarkable mother."--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "[An] unforgettable memoir."--Parade "What makes Born a Crime such a soul-nourishing pleasure, even with all its darker edges and perilous turns, is reading Noah recount in brisk, warmly conversational prose how he learned to negotiate his way through the bullying and ostracism. . . . What also helped was having a mother like Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. . . . Consider Born a Crime another such gift to her--and an enormous gift to the rest of us."--USA Today "[Noah] thrives with the help of his astonishingly fearless mother. . . . Their fierce bond makes this story soar."--People
  • Votes: 3

    The Trial

    by Franz Kafka

    The story of The Trial's publication is almost as fascinating as the novel itself. Kafka intended his parable of alienation in a mysterious bureaucracy to be burned, along with the rest of his diaries and manuscripts, after his death in 1924. Yet his friend Max Brod pressed forward to prepare The Trial and the rest of his papers for publication.
  • Votes: 3

    Kaffir Boy

    by Mark Mathabane

    A Black writer describes his childhood in South Africa under apartheid and recounts how Arthur Ashe and Stan Smith helped him leave for America on a tennis scholarship
  • Votes: 3

    The Hot Zone

    by Richard Preston

    Imagine a killer with the infectiousness of the common cold and power of the Black Death. Imagine something so deadly that it wipes out 90% of those it touches. Imagine an organism against which there is no defence. But you don't need to imagine. Such a killer exists: it is a virus and its name is Ebola. The Hot Zone tells what happens when the unthinkable becomes reality: when a deadly virus, from the rain forests of Africa, crosses continents and infects a monkey house ten miles from the White House. Ebola is that reality. It has the power to decimate the world's population. Try not to panic. It will be back. There is nothing you can do...
  • Votes: 3

    Dreyer's English

    by Benjamin Dreyer

    A witty, informative guide to writing from Random House's longtime copy chief and one of Twitter's leading language gurus--a twenty-first-century Elements of Style. We're all of us writers: We write term papers and office memos, letters to teachers and product reviews, appeals to politicians, journals, and blog entries. Some of us write books. All of us write emails. And we all want to write them better: We want to make our points more clearly, more elegantly; we want our writing to be appreciated, to be more effective; we want--to be quite honest--to make fewer mistakes. Benjamin Dreyer is here to help. As authoritative as it is amusing, Dreyer's English distills everything Random House copy chief Benjamin Dreyer has learned from the scores of books he has copyedited into a useful guide not just for writers but for everyone who wants to put their best foot forward in writing prose. Dreyer offers lessons on the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar, including how to navigate the words he calls the confusables, such as tricky homophones; the myriad ways to use (and misuse) a comma; and how to recognize--though not necessarily do away with--the passive voice. People are sharing their writing more than ever and this book lays out, clearly and comprehensibly, everything writers can do to keep readers focused on the real reason writers write: to communicate their ideas clearly and effectively. Chockful of advice, insider wisdom, and fun facts on the rules (and nonrules) of the English language, this book will prove invaluable to everyone who wants to shore up their writing skills, mandatory for people who spend their time editing and shaping other people's prose, and--perhaps best of all--an utter treat for anyone who simply revels in language.
  • Votes: 3

    The Dollhouse

    by Sara Ennis

    Alfred needs Dolls. Blonde, blue-eyed human dolls that will help him rewrite his past and change his future. Twins Angel and Bud are used to making do. Their dad is in prison, and mom won’t win parenting awards. Bud thrives on neglect, but Angel isn’t so strong. Now they’re captives in a place called the Dollhouse, and things have gone from bad to worse. The Dolls are forced to re-stage old photographs, but satisfying Alfred is not easy. He has a twisted sense of humor and a violent temper that explodes when things don’t go his way — and sometimes when they do. Angel knows that if she and the other Dolls are to survive this warped playtime, she can no longer be needy and afraid. She must prove how strong she can be — fast. There aren’t many photos left …
  • Votes: 3

    The Sound of Waves

    by Yukio Mishima

    Set in a remote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. It tells of Shinji, a young fisherman and Hatsue, the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village. Shinji is entranced at the sight of Hatsue in the twilight on the beach and they fall in love. When the villagers' gossip threatens to divide them, Shinki must risk his life to prove his worth.
  • Votes: 3

    The Fellowship of the Ring

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 3

    Their Eyes Were Watching God

    by Zora Neale Hurston

    Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel by African-American writer Zora Neale Hurston. It is considered a classic of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, and it is likely Hurston's best known work.
  • Votes: 3

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown

  • Votes: 3

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 3

    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

    by Mildred D. Taylor

  • Votes: 3

    Fathers and Sons (Oxford World's Classics)

    by Ivan Turgenev

    Fathers and Sons is one of the greatest nineteenth century Russian novels, and has long been acclaimed as Turgenev's finest work. It is a political novel set in a domestic context, with a universal theme, the generational divide between fathers and sons. Set in 1859 at the moment when the Russian autocratic state began to move hesitantly towards social and political reform, the novel explores the conflict between the liberal-minded fathers of Russian reformist sympathies and their free-thinking intellectual sons whose revolutionary ideology threatened the stability of the state.
  • Votes: 3

    Harry Potter Box Set

    by J. K. Rowling

  • Votes: 3

    Atonement

    by Ian McEwan

  • Votes: 3

    The Greek Plays

    by Sophocles

    A landmark anthology of the masterpieces of Greek drama, featuring all-new, highly accessible translations of some of the world’s most beloved plays, including Agamemnon, Prometheus Bound, Bacchae, Electra, Medea, Antigone, and Oedipus the King Featuring translations by Emily Wilson, Frank Nisetich, Sarah Ruden, Rachel Kitzinger, Mary Lefkowitz, and James Romm The great plays of Ancient Greece are among the most enduring and important legacies of the Western world. Not only is the influence of Greek drama palpable in everything from Shakespeare to modern television, the insights contained in Greek tragedy have shaped our perceptions of the nature of human life. Poets, philosophers, and politicians have long borrowed and adapted the ideas and language of Greek drama to help them make sense of their own times. This exciting curated anthology features a cross section of the most popular—and most widely taught—plays in the Greek canon. Fresh translations into contemporary English breathe new life into the texts while capturing, as faithfully as possible, their original meaning. This outstanding collection also offers short biographies of the playwrights, enlightening and clarifying introductions to the plays, and helpful annotations at the bottom of each page. Appendices by prominent classicists on such topics as “Greek Drama and Politics,” “The Theater of Dionysus,” and “Plato and Aristotle on Tragedy” give the reader a rich contextual background. A detailed time line of the dramas, as well as a list of adaptations of Greek drama to literature, stage, and film from the time of Seneca to the present, helps chart the history of Greek tragedy and illustrate its influence on our culture from the Roman Empire to the present day. With a veritable who’s who of today’s most renowned and distinguished classical translators, The Greek Plays is certain to be the definitive text for years to come. Praise for The Greek Plays “Mary Lefkowitz and James Romm deftly have gathered strong new translations from Frank Nisetich, Sarah Ruden, Rachel Kitzinger, Emily Wilson, as well as from Mary Lefkowitz and James Romm themselves. There is a freshness and pungency in these new translations that should last a long time. I admire also the introductions to the plays and the biographies and annotations provided. Closing essays by five distinguished classicists—the brilliant Daniel Mendelsohn and the equally skilled David Rosenbloom, Joshua Billings, Mary-Kay Gamel, and Gregory Hays—all enlightened me. This seems to me a helpful light into our gathering darkness.”—Harold Bloom
  • Votes: 3

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 3

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

    The revolutionary literary vision that sowed the seeds of Objectivism, Ayn Rand's groundbreaking philosophy, and brought her immediate worldwide acclaim. This modern classic is the story of intransigent young architect Howard Roark, whose integrity was as unyielding as granite...of Dominique Francon, the exquisitely beautiful woman who loved Roark passionately, but married his worst enemy...and of the fanatic denunciation unleashed by an enraged society against a great creator. As fresh today as it was then, Rand’s provocative novel presents one of the most challenging ideas in all of fiction—that man’s ego is the fountainhead of human progress... “A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly...This is the only novel of ideas written by an American woman that I can recall.”—The New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction
  • Votes: 3

    More Shakespeare Stories

    by Andrew Matthews

    Murder most foul... An action-packed retelling of Shakespeare's dark tale of revenge and murder. With notes on Shakespeare and the Globe theatre and Love and Death in Anthony and Cleopatra. The tales have been retold using accessible language and with the help of Tony Ross's engaging black-and-white illustrations, each play is vividly brought to life allowing these culturally enriching stories to be shared with as wide an audience as possible. Have you read all of The Shakespeare Stories books? Available in this series: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, Much Ado About Nothing, The Merchant of Venice, Henry V, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III, and King Lear.
  • Votes: 3

    Shogun

    by James Clavell

  • Votes: 3

    Sister Carrie (Dover Thrift Editions)

    by Theodore Dreiser

    The first masterpiece of the American naturalistic movement, Sister Carrie made its controversial debut in 1900. Condemned for its alleged immorality, the novel traces the fortunes of a small-town girl's rise from obscurity to fame.
  • Votes: 2

    The Deeds of God through the Franks

    by Robert Levine

    First English translation of important text of the First Crusade.
  • Votes: 2

    The Invention of Wings

    by Sue Monk Kidd

    Don't miss the extraordinary new novel from Sue Monk Kidd, The Book of Longings - published on 21st April 2020, and available to pre-order now The Invention of Wings: The No. 1 New York Times bestseller. A powerful and extraordinary novel about the unlikely friendship between two exceptional women during the last years of slavery in the US. From the celebrated author of the multi-million-copy-bestselling novel The Secret Life of Bees. 'Fascinating... A splendid tribute to a pair of true heroines' The Times 'Wonderful - well-written, moving and engaging by turns, and always compelling' Daily Mail 'A remarkable novel that heightened my sense of what it meant to be a woman - slave or free' Oprah Winfrey 'A resonant, illuminating novel' Observer Sarah Grimké is the middle daughter. Her mother says she's difficult and her father says she's remarkable. On Sarah's eleventh birthday, Hetty 'Handful' Grimké is taken from the slave quarters she shares with her mother, wrapped in lavender ribbons, and presented to Sarah as a gift. Sarah knows that what she does next will unleash a world of trouble. She also knows that she cannot accept another person as a present. And so, indeed, the trouble begins ... A powerful, sweeping novel, inspired by real events, and set in the American Deep South in the nineteenth century, The Invention of Wings evokes a world of shocking contrasts, of beauty and ugliness, of otherwise respectable people living daily with cruelty they fail to recognise; and celebrates the power of friendship and sisterhood against all the odds. What readers say about The Invention of Wings: 'You cannot fault Sue Monk Kidd's writing; she very adeptly speaks with both Sarah and Handful's voice. The pictures she paints are vivid, compelling and haunting; this is not a novel I will easily forget' Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars 'I was not expecting this book to grab my heartstrings and pull the way that it did' Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars 'The weaving of fact and fiction into a powerful novel covering abolition of slavery, women's ambitions in 19th century America, love, family, betrayal and hope for a better future make compelling reading' Amazon reviewer, 5 stars 'Unforgettable. This book was completely and utterly dynamic. From the first word to the last I was enthralled with Sarah and Handful. So powerful' Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars
  • Votes: 2

    Little Big Man

    by Thomas Berger

  • Votes: 2

    Oh Yeah?

    by Edward Angly

    Diagrams on lining-papers."Published November 13, 1931 ... third printing (revised edition) January, 1932."
  • Votes: 2

    Pigs in Heaven

    by Barbara Kingsolver

    Mother and adopted daughter, Taylor and Turtle Greer, are back in this spellbinding sequel about family, heartbreak and love. Six-year-old Turtle Greer witnesses a freak accident at the Hoover Dam during a tour of the Grand Canyon with her guardian, Taylor. Her insistence on what she has seen, and her mother's belief in her, lead to a man's dramatic rescue. The mother and adopted daughter duo soon become nationwide heroes - even landing themselves a guest appearance on the Oprah Winfrey show. But Turtle's moment of celebrity draws her into a conflict of historic proportions stemming right back to her Cherokee roots. The crisis quickly envelops not only Turtle and her guardian, but everyone else who touches their lives in a complex web connecting their future with their past. Embark on a unforgettable road trip from rural Kentucky and the urban Southwest to Heaven, Oklahoma, and the Cherokee Nation, testing the boundaries of family and the many separate truths about the ties that bind.
  • Votes: 2

    Dreamland Burning

    by Jennifer Latham

    A compelling dual-narrated tale from Jennifer Latham that questions how far we've come with race relations. Some bodies won't stay buried. Some stories need to be told. When seventeen-year-old Rowan Chase finds a skeleton on her family's property, she has no idea that investigating the brutal century-old murder will lead to a summer of painful discoveries about the present and the past. Nearly one hundred years earlier, a misguided violent encounter propels seventeen-year-old Will Tillman into a racial firestorm. In a country rife with violence against blacks and a hometown segregated by Jim Crow, Will must make hard choices on a painful journey towards self discovery and face his inner demons in order to do what's right the night Tulsa burns. Through intricately interwoven alternating perspectives, Jennifer Latham's lightning-paced page-turner brings the Tulsa race riot of 1921 to blazing life and raises important questions about the complex state of US race relations--both yesterday and today.
  • Votes: 2

    The Dead

    by James Joyce

  • Votes: 2

    Gilligan's Island Bible Study (Study Guide)

    by Stephen Skelton

    Various episodes of the television program Gilligan's Island are used to illustrate Biblical principles.
  • Votes: 2

    Daredevils (The Hardy Boys #159)

    by Franklin W. Dixon

    Stunt work is dangerous enough, but someone is looking to really push stuntman McCauley over the edge. So when Mr. Hardy agrees to look into Terrence’s odd string of accidents, Frank and Joe decide to make it a family affair. Things get really interesting when Joe poses as Terrence to protect him—and when the culprit captures the Hardy boys’ parents to use as bait.
  • Votes: 2

    West Side Story

    by Irving Shulman

    Tony and Maria find their love threatened by the hatred of two rival New York street gangs
  • Votes: 2

    The Penderwicks

    by Jeanne Birdsall

    The Penderwicks: four sisters, as different as chalk from cheese, yet as close as can be. The eldest, Rosalind, is responsible and practical; Skye, stubborn and feisty; dreamy, artistic, budding novelist, Jane; and shy little Batty, who doesn't go anywhere without her butterfly wings. And not forgetting Hound, their large lumbering lovable dog. The four girls and their absent-minded father head off for their summer holidays, but instead of the cosy tumbledown cottage they expect, they find themselves on a huge estate called Arundel, with magnificent gardens ripe for exploring. It isn't long before they become embroiled in all sorts of scrapes with new-found friend, Jeffrey - but his mother, the icy-hearted Mrs Tifton, must be avoided at all costs. Chaotic adventures ensue, and it soon becomes a summer the sisters will never forget...
  • Votes: 2

    An Irish Country Doctor

    by Patrick Taylor

    Barry Laverty, a recent medical school graduate, jumps at the chance to join a rural practice in Ballybucklebo, Northern Ireland, until he meets his boss Dr. O'Reilly, a difficult older physician with his own way of doing things.
  • Votes: 2

    Shakespeare

    by William Shakespeare

  • Votes: 2

    Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

    by Amy Chua

    Updated with a new postscript by Amy Chua and a letter from her eldest daughter, Sophia Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. It was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how you can be humbled by a thirteen-year-old. Witty, entertaining and provocative, this is a unique and important book that will transform your perspective of parenting forever.
  • Votes: 2

    The Whiteness of the Whale

    by Paul Graham

    First published in late 2007, New York-based photographer Paul Graham's "A Shimmer of Possibility" was hailed as "one of the most important advances in contemporary photographic practice that has taken place in a long while" and was said to "redefine what a photobook can be." Inspired by Chekhov's short stories, the book is a series of photographic vignettes--taken from 2004-2006--of quotidian moments in contemporary American life, which Graham occasionally punctuates with the sublime. For example, there is an image of a man mowing his lawn while it begins to rain and the sun illuminates each drop. These filmic haiku avoid summation; life simply flows past, enveloping the viewer in its beauty. Comprised of 12 individual hardcover books, the first limited edition of 1,000 copies sold out immediately. This new paperback edition, published concurrently with an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, unites the 12 books in one volume.
  • Votes: 2

    All Quiet on the Eastern Front

    by Anthony T. Bouscaren

    Military authorities, diplomats, and political observers discuss the tragedy of United States involvement in Vietnam and its aftermath from a predominantly conservative point of view
  • Votes: 2

    Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

    by Tim Rice

  • Votes: 2

    I Seem to Be a Verb

    by R. Buckminster Fuller

    Buckminster Fullers explorations as an architect, engineer, philosopher and futurist are extended into experimental book form through his collaboration with producer Jerome Agel and designer Quentin Fiore. I Seem to Be A Verbs utopian plans, clever insights and light-hearted musings rub elbows with revelatory and often jolting reminders that we are in motion, full of impulsive nerves, flowing blood and constant thought. This fun and challenging book is packed with images, dense layouts and narratives reading both front to back and in reverse. All this to remind us that we are verbs, not nouns! Buckminster Fuller was awarded 25 patents, invented the geodesic dome, the dymaxion car and was expelled from Harvard twice. I Seem to Be a Verb was originally published in 1970. I am convinced that creativity is a priori to the integrity of the universe and that life is regenerative and conformity meaningless. R. Buckminster Fuller.
  • Votes: 2

    American Pastoral

    by Philip Roth

    An ordinary man finds that his life has been made extraordinary by the catastrophic intrusion of history when, in 1968 his adored daughter plants a bomb that kills a stranger, hurling her father out of the longed-for American pastoral and into the indigenous American berserk.
  • Votes: 2

    A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings

    by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    Strange, wondrous things happen in these two short stories, which are both the perfect introduction to Gabriel García Márquez, and a wonderful read for anyone who loves the magic and marvels of his novels.After days of rain, a couple find an old man with huge wings in their courtyard in 'A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings' - but is he an angel? Accompanying 'A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings' is the short story 'The Sea of Lost Time', in which a seaside town is brought back to life by a curious smell of roses.
  • Votes: 2

    The Serengeti Rules

    by Sean B. Carroll

    Now the subject of a feature film that the New York Times calls "spellbinding" How does life work? How does nature produce the right numbers of zebras and lions on the African savanna, or fish in the ocean? How do our bodies produce the right numbers of cells in our organs and bloodstream? In The Serengeti Rules, award-winning biologist and author Sean Carroll tells the stories of the pioneering scientists who sought the answers to such simple yet profoundly important questions, and shows how their discoveries matter for our health and the health of the planet we depend upon. One of the most important revelations about the natural world is that everything is regulated—there are rules that regulate the amount of every molecule in our bodies and rules that govern the numbers of every animal and plant in the wild. And the most surprising revelation about the rules that regulate life at such different scales is that they are remarkably similar—there is a common underlying logic of life. Carroll recounts how our deep knowledge of the rules and logic of the human body has spurred the advent of revolutionary life-saving medicines, and makes the compelling case that it is now time to use the Serengeti Rules to heal our ailing planet. A bold and inspiring synthesis by one of our most accomplished biologists and gifted storytellers, The Serengeti Rules is the first book to illuminate how life works at vastly different scales. Read it and you will never look at the world the same way again.
  • Votes: 2

    The Ramayana

    by Ramesh Menon

  • Votes: 2

    Advise and Consent (The Advise and Consent Series)

    by Allen Drury

    #1 New York Times bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner. A seminal work of political fiction-as relevant today as when it was first published. A sweeping tale of corruption and ambition cuts across the landscape of Washington, DC, with the breadth and realism that only an astute observer and insider can convey.
  • Votes: 2

    Factory Girls

    by Leslie T. Chang

  • Votes: 2

    Perfume

    by Jean-Claude Ellena

    To women the whole world over, perfume means glamour, and in the world of perfume, Jean-Claude Ellena is a superstar. In this one-of-a-kind book, the master himself takes you through the doors of his laboratory and explains the process of creating precious fragrances, revealing the key methods and recipes involved in this mysterious alchemy. Perfume is a cutthroat, secretive multibillion-dollar industry, and Ellena provides an insider’s tour, guiding us from initial inspiration through the mixing of essences and synthetic elements, to the deluxe packaging and marketing in elegant boutiques worldwide, and even the increasingly complicated safety standards that are set in motion for each bottle of perfume that is manufactured. He explains how the sense of smell works, using a palette of fragrant materials, and how he personally chooses and composes a perfume. He also reveals his unique way of creating a fragrance by playing with our olfactory memories in order to make the perfume seductive and desired by men and women the world over. Perfume illuminates the world of scent and manufactured desire by a perfumer who has had clients the likes of Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Bulgari, and Hermés.
  • Votes: 2

    The Leg of Lamb

    by Benjamin Péret

    A foundational classic of Surrealist literature, The Leg of Lamb brings together the arch-Surrealist Benjamin Péret's short prose: a smorgasbord of automatic writing and fantastical narratives employing everything from the cinematic antics of Buster Keaton and slapstick animation to the storytelling devices of detective novels, alchemical operations and mythology. The Leg of Lamb consists of 24 delirious narratives, including the novella-length works "And the Breasts Were Dying" and "There Was a Little Bakeress." Péret's adult fairy tales bear equal allegiance to Lewis Carroll and the Marquis de Sade, and present one of the clearest examples of Surrealist humor, in which the boundaries between character and object blur, and where a coat rack, artichoke or a pile of manure is just as likely as Napoléon, El Cid or Pope Pius VII to take on the role of hero and adventurer. Péret himself edited this collection toward the end of his life. Originally published in French in 1957, almost all of the stories in this collection had been written in the 1920s, half of them even preceding André Breton's Manifesto of Surrealism. The Leg of Lamb offers not only a highpoint of Surrealist automatic writing, but a key chapter in the genesis of the Surrealist movement.
  • Votes: 2

    Ironweed

    by William J. Kennedy

    The beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, basis of the film starring Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep. Francis Phelan, ex-big-leaguer, part-time gravedigger, full-time bum with the gift of gab, is back in town. He left Albany twenty-two years earlier after he dropped his infant son accidentally, and the boy died. Now he's on the way back to the wife and home he abandoned, haunted at every corner by the ghosts of his violent life. Francis; his wino ladyfriend of nine years, Helen; and his stumblebum pal, Rudy, shuffle their ragtag way through the city's bleakest streets, surviving on gumption, muscatel, and black wit. estiny is not their business. 'The premise of Ironweed was so unpromising, that in marketing terms the writer still to this day finds it funny: the story of a bunch of itinerant alcoholics, knocking around Kennedy's hometown, falling out, having visions, trying to pass for sober to cadge a bed for the night in the homeless shelter.' Guardian 'But for all the rich variety of prose and event, from hallucination to bedrock realism to slapstick and to blessed quotidian peace, ''Ironweed'' is more austere than its predecessors. It is more fierce, but also more forgiving.' Quoted from the classic New York Times review of Ironweed, which made it an overnight sensation.
  • Votes: 2

    The One You Don't See Coming (Stories to Learn and Draw by)

    by Kathy Carman Henderson

    Kathy Carman Henderson tells her version of an African folk tale, leaving spaces for the reader or listener to create their own illustrations. In this story, three young hunters search for a strange creature they have never seen. Read the story carefully to figure out what the creature was. Use the learning helps included to relate the story to many other subjects, including problem solving. Take the challenge. Use your eyes and your brain. Tack your illustrations into the book with a bit of tape and they can be changed if you come up with a better idea. The observation skills you will practice here can help you in many other areas of learning and life.
  • Votes: 2

    The Oresteia

    by Aeschylus

    One of the founding documents of Western culture and the only surviving ancient Greek trilogy, the Oresteia of Aeschylus is one of the great tragedies of all time. The three plays of the Oresteia portray the bloody events that follow the victorious return of King Agamemnon from the Trojan War, at the start of which he had sacrificed his daughter Iphigeneia to secure divine favor. After Iphi-geneia’s mother, Clytemnestra, kills her husband in revenge, she in turn is murdered by their son Orestes with his sister Electra’s encouragement. Orestes is pursued by the Furies and put on trial, his fate decided by the goddess Athena. Far more than the story of murder and ven-geance in the royal house of Atreus, the Oresteia serves as a dramatic parable of the evolution of justice and civilization that is still powerful after 2,500 years. The trilogy is presented here in George Thomson’s classic translation, renowned for its fidelity to the rhythms and richness of the original Greek.
  • Votes: 2

    Love in the Time of Cholera

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    Set on the Caribbean coast of South America, this love story brings together Fermina Daza, her distinguished husband, and a man who has secretly loved her for more than fifty years.
  • Votes: 2

    The Virginian

    by Owen Wister

    He is the Virginian-the first fully realized cowboy hero in American literature, a near-mythic figure whose idealized image has profoundly influenced our national consciousness. This enduring work of fiction marks the birth of a legend that lives with us still.
  • Votes: 2

    Born in Blood

    by John J. Robinson

    Its mysterious symbols and rituals had been used in secret for centuries before Freemasonry revealed itself in 1717. But where had this powerful organization come from and why had Freemasonry been attacked by the Roman Catholic Church? Robinson answers those questions and more.
  • Votes: 2

    The Pilgrim's Progress

    by John Bunyan

    "In John Bunyan's classic allegory, Christian abandons his family and the City of Destruction and sets off to find salvation. His path is straight but not easy, and he is beset by trials, including the terrible violence of the destructive Apollyon and the Giant Despair, as he pursues his pilgrimage through the Slough of Despond, the Delectable Mountains and Vanity Fair towards the Celestial City. In the second part of the narrative his wife, Christiana, is escorted by Great-Heart through the same difficult terrain. Written with the urgency of persecuted faith and a fiery imagination, The Pilgrim's Progress is a spiritual as well as a literary classic." "In his introduction, Roger Pooley discusses Bunyan's life and theology, as well as the text's biblical and historical backdrop, its success and critical history. This edition also includes accompanying seventeenth-century illustrations, a chronology, suggested further reading, notes and an index."--BOOK JACKET.
  • Votes: 2

    The Far Pavilions

    by M. M. Kaye

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels that Shaped the World' The Far Pavilions is the story of an English man - Ashton Pelham-Martyn - brought up as a Hindu. It is the story of his passionate, but dangerous love for Juli, an Indian princess. It is the story of divided loyalties, of friendship that endures till death, of high adventure and of the clash between East and West. To the burning plains and snow-capped mountains of this great, humming continent, M.M. Kaye brings her exceptional gifts of storytelling and meticulous historical accuracy, plus her insight into the human heart. 'Magnificent' Evening Standard 'A long, romantic adventure story of the highest calibre ... wildly exciting' Daily Telegraph
  • Votes: 2

    Through Gates of Splendor

    by Elisabeth Elliot

    Documents the lives of missionaries who sought to convert the Huao Indians of Ecuador.
  • Votes: 2

    The Glory Field

    by Walter Dean Myers

    Follows five generations of an African-American family, from the capture and enslavement of the first ancestor, through the Civil War and the end of segregation, to a troubled cousin's reunion with his family. An ALA Best Book for Young Adults. Reissue.
  • Votes: 2

    Bartleby, the Scrivener

    by Herman Melville

    "Bartleby, the Scrivener is a short story by the American writer Herman Melville, first serialized anonymously in two parts in the November and December 1853 issues of Putnam's Magazine, and reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. In the story, a Wall Street lawyer hires a new clerk who, after an initial bout of hard work, refuses to make copies or do any other task required of him, with the words, "I would prefer not to".Numerous critical essays have been published about the story, which scholar Robert Milder describes as "unquestionably the masterpiece of the short fiction" in the Melville canon.
  • Votes: 2

    Swiss Family Robinson (Illustrated Classic)

    by Johann David Wyss

    The Swiss Family Robinson is about the Robinson family comprising the father, mother and their four young sons who get shipwrecked on their way from Switzerland to New Guinea. Before long, the family is on shore and exploring a deserted island full of exotic animals, charming locations and hidden dangers. Cut off from the comforts and companionship of other humans, they use their familiarity with natural history to find the resources and build the tools to construct a canoe, weave cloth, irrigate a garden, tame animals and construct dwellings. Soon they become masters of their new environment, rising to its many challenges and using their ingenuity to avail themselves of its abundant resources. This adventurous tale of survival demonstrates how one can overcome odds through sheer grit and determination; optimism; boundless enthusiasm; perseverance; hard work and self-reliance.
  • Votes: 2

    Building Your Field of Dreams

    by Mary Manin Morrissey

    Building Your Field of Dreams is both a compelling personal story and a practical and inspiring guide for anyone who has ever hoped for a better life. Mary Morrissey's own dreams were nearly shattered at age 16, when pregnancy forced her into a reluctant marriage that nevertheless became the crucible for remarkable lessons in faith. As she was tested by the near-death of one of her children, by life-threatening kidney disease, and by years of struggling to make ends meet, she clung to her determination to be a minister. Now, with powerful examples from many dream-builders she has known, she shows how anyone can identify their deepest desires, build a partnership with God, confront obstacles and failure, and overcome the mental blocks that keep us from our potential. It's a great message, compellingly delivered by a great teacher. From the Trade Paperback edition.
  • Votes: 2

    Wise Blood

    by Flannery O'Connor

    Wise Blood, Flannery O'Connor's first novel, is the story of Hazel Motes who, released from the armed services, returns to the evangelical Deep South. There he begins a private battle against the religiosity of the community and in particular against Asa Hawkes, the 'blind' preacher, and his degenerate fifteen-year-old daughter. In desperation Hazel founds his own religion, 'The Church without Christ', and this extraordinary narrative moves towards its savage and macabre resolution. 'A literary talent that has about it the uniqueness of greatness.' Sunday Telegraph 'No other major American writer of our century has constructed a fictional world so energetically and forthrightly charged by religious investigation.' The New Yorker 'A genius.' New York Times
  • Votes: 2

    The Hiding Place

    by Corrie Ten Boom

  • Votes: 2

    My Name Is Asher Lev

    by Chaim Potok

    Asher Lev is a gifted loner, the artist who painted the sensational Brooklyn Crucifixion. Into it he poured all the anguish and torment a Jew can feel when torn between the faith of his fathers and the calling of his art. Here Asher Lev plunges back into his childhood and recounts the story of love and conflict which dragged him to this crossroads.
  • Votes: 2

    HAHAHA!

    by Noah Rose Books

  • Votes: 2

    STILL LIFE WITH RICE

    by Helie Lee

    As told by her granddaughter, the biography of a Korean woman born in 1912 into a socially repressive, male-dominated society, describes her struggles to overcome the pains of war, loss, and discrimination
  • Votes: 2

    The Trojan War

    by Olivia Colidge

    Retells legends of the heroes of the Trojan War, which began with Paris of Troy's abduction of Helen, wife of Menelaus, lord of Greece.
  • Votes: 2

    A Rumor of War

    by Philip Caputo

  • Votes: 2

    Rick Steves England

    by Rick Steves

    Hike the wild moors of Dartmoor, explore the scenic bays of Cornwall, and dive into history at Hadrian's Wall: England is yours to discover with Rick Steves! Inside Rick Steves England you'll find: Comprehensive coverage for spending two weeks or more in England Rick's strategic advice on how to get the most out of your time and money, with rankings of his must-see favorites Top sights and hidden gems, from the ancient and mysterious Stonehenge to cozy corner pubs How to connect with local culture: Enjoy an evening at the theatre, take high tea in a classic hotel, or cheer on the team with fans at a football match Beat the crowds, skip the lines, and avoid tourist traps with Rick's candid, humorous insight The best places to eat, sleep, and relax with a pint Self-guided walking tours of lively neighborhoods, historic sites, and museums Detailed neighborhood and museum maps for exploring on the go Useful resources including a packing list, a phrase book of British slang, a historical overview, and recommended reading Over 900 bible-thin pages include everything worth seeing without weighing you down Complete, up-to-date information on London, Windsor and Cambridge, Canterbury, Dover, Brighton, Portsmouth, Dartmoor, Cornwall, Penzance, St. Ives, Penwith Peninsula, Bath, Glastonbury, Wells, Avebury, Stonehenge, Salisbury, Oxford, the Cotswolds, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwick, Coventry, Ironbridge Gorge, Liverpool, Blackpool, the Lake District, Yorkshire, Durham, and more Make the most of every day and every dollar with Rick Steves England. Visiting for less than two weeks? Try Rick Steves Best of England.
  • Votes: 2

    Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town

    by Stephen Leacock

    This vintage book contains Stephen Leacock's 1912 sequence of stories, "Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town". Commonly hailed as being amongst the most important examples of humorous Canadian literature, "Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town" is set in Mariposa, a microcosm of Canadian society populated by hilarious small-town stereotypes. Contents include: "The Hostelry of Mr. Smith", "The Speculations of Jefferson Thorpe", "The Marine Excursions of the Knights of Pythias", "The Ministrations of the Rev. Mr. Drone", "The Whirlwind Campaign in Mariposa", "The Beacon on the Hill", "The Extraordinary Entanglement of Mr. Pupkin", "The Fore-ordained Attachment of Zena Pepperleigh and Peter Pupkin", et cetera. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction. This book was first published in 1912.
  • Votes: 2

    The Stone Gods

    by Jeanette Winterson

    The Stone Gods is one of Jeanette Winterson's most imaginative novels about love. On the airwaves, all the talk is of the new blue planet - pristine and habitable, like our own 65 million years ago, before we took it to the edge of destruction. And off the air, Billie and Spike are falling in love. What will happen when their story combines with the world's story, as they whirl towards Planet Blue, into the future? Will they - and we - ever find a safe landing place? Jeanette Winterson OBE, whose writing has won the Whitbread Award for Best First Novel, the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize and the E.M. Forster Award, is the author of some of the most purely imaginative and pleasurable novels of recent times, from Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit to her first book for children, Tanglewreck. She is also the author of the essays Art Objects. Visit her website at www.jeanettewinterson.com
  • Votes: 2

    I Never Promised You A Rose Garden

    by Joanne Greenberg

    Suffering from schizophrenia, sixteen-year-old Deborah struggles to overcome her illness and rejoin the real world with the help of her hospital psychiatrist, in a new edition of the classic, semi-autobiographical novel. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 2

    Alive

    by Piers Paul Read

    The #1 New York Times bestseller and the true story behind the film: A rugby team resorts to the unthinkable after a plane crash in the Andes. Spirits were high when the Fairchild F-227 took off from Mendoza, Argentina, and headed for Santiago, Chile. On board were forty-five people, including an amateur rugby team from Uruguay and their friends and family. The skies were clear that Friday, October 13, 1972, and at 3:30 p.m., the Fairchild’s pilot reported their altitude at 15,000 feet. But one minute later, the Santiago control tower lost all contact with the aircraft. For eight days, Chileans, Uruguayans, and Argentinians searched for it, but snowfall in the Andes had been heavy, and the odds of locating any wreckage were slim. Ten weeks later, a Chilean peasant in a remote valley noticed two haggard men desperately gesticulating to him from across a river. He threw them a pen and paper, and the note they tossed back read: “I come from a plane that fell in the mountains . . .” Sixteen of the original forty-five passengers on the F-227 survived its horrific crash. In the remote glacial wilderness, they camped in the plane’s fuselage, where they faced freezing temperatures, life-threatening injuries, an avalanche, and imminent starvation. As their meager food supplies ran out, and after they heard on a patched-together radio that the search parties had been called off, it seemed like all hope was lost. To save their own lives, these men and women not only had to keep their faith, they had to make an impossible decision: Should they eat the flesh of their dead friends? A remarkable story of endurance and determination, friendship and the human spirit, Alive is the dramatic bestselling account of one of the most harrowing quests for survival in modern times.
  • Votes: 2

    Soul on Ice

    by Eldridge Cleaver

  • Votes: 2

    Zoo Story

    by Thomas French

    "This story, told by a master teller of such things, does more than take you inside the cages, fences, and walls of a zoo. It takes you inside the human heart, and an elephant's, and a primate's, and on and on. Tom French did in this book what he always does. He took real life and wrote it down for us, with eloquence and feeling and aching detail." -Rick Bragg, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author "An insightful and detailed look at the complex life of a zoo and its denizens, both animal and human." -Yann Martel, author of Life of Pi and Beatrice and Virgil Welcome to the savage and surprising world of Zoo Story, an unprecedented account of the secret life of a zoo and its inhabitants. Based on six years of research, the book follows a handful of unforgettable characters at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo: an alpha chimp with a weakness for blondes, a ferocious tiger who revels in Obsession perfume, and a brilliant but tyrannical CEO known as El Diablo Blanco. The sweeping narrative takes the reader from the African savannah to the forests of Panama and deep into the inner workings of a place some describe as a sanctuary and others condemn as a prison. Zoo Story shows us how these remarkable individuals live, how some die, and what their experiences reveal about the human desire to both exalt and control nature.
  • Votes: 2

    Our America

    by LeAlan Jones

    Interviews describe ghetto life
  • Votes: 2

    The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

    by John Boyne

  • Votes: 2

    Tuck Everlasting

    by Natalie Babbit

  • Votes: 2

    The Day of the Triffids

    by John Wyndham

    The classic postapocalyptic thriller with “all the reality of a vividly realized nightmare” (The Times, London). Triffids are odd, interesting little plants that grow in everyone’s garden. Triffids are no more than mere curiosities—until an event occurs that alters human life forever. What seems to be a spectacular meteor shower turns into a bizarre, green inferno that blinds everyone and renders humankind helpless. What follows is even stranger: spores from the inferno cause the triffids to suddenly take on a life of their own. They become large, crawling vegetation, with the ability to uproot and roam about the country, attacking humans and inflicting pain and agony. William Masen somehow managed to escape being blinded in the inferno, and now after leaving the hospital, he is one of the few survivors who can see. And he may be the only one who can save his species from chaos and eventual extinction . . . With more than a million copies sold, The Day of the Triffids is a landmark of speculative fiction, and “an outstanding and entertaining novel” (Library Journal). “A thoroughly English apocalypse, it rivals H. G. Wells in conveying how the everyday invaded by the alien would feel. No wonder Stephen King admires Wyndham so much.” —Ramsey Campbell “One of my all-time favorite novels. It’s absolutely convincing, full of little telling details, and that sweet, warm sensation of horror and mystery.” —Joe R. Lansdale
  • Votes: 2

    That Was Then, This Is Now

    by S. E. Hinton

    Another classic from the author of the internationally bestselling The Outsiders Continue celebrating 50 years of The Outsiders by reading this companion novel. That Was Then, This is Now is S. E. Hinton's moving portrait of the bond between best friends Bryon and Mark and the tensions that develop between them as they begin to grow up and grow apart. "A mature, disciplined novel which excites a response in the reader . . . Hard to forget."—The New York Times
  • Votes: 2

    Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes

    by Chris Crutcher

    Called a “masterpiece” in a starred review from School Library Journal, award-winning author Chris Crutcher’s acclaimed Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes is an enduring classic. This bestselling novel is about love, loyalty, and friendship in the face of adversity. “Superb plotting, extraordinary characters, and cracking narrative make this novel unforgettable.”—Publishers Weekly Sarah Byrnes and Eric Calhoune have been friends for years. When they were children, his weight and her scars made them both outcasts. Now Sarah Byrnes—the smartest, toughest person Eric has ever known—sits silent in a hospital. Eric must uncover the terrible secret she’s hiding before its dark current pulls them both under. Will appeal to fans of Marieke Nijkamp, Andrew Smith, and John Corey Whaley. “Once again, Chris Crutcher plunges his readers into life's tough issues within a compelling story filled with human compassion . . . with his characteristic intelligence, humor, and empathy."—ALAN Review An American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults
  • Votes: 2

    Graveyard Book

    by Neil Gaiman

    The first paperback edition of the glorious two-volume, full-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal–winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this stunning adaptation, now in paperback. Artists Kevin Nowlan, P. Craig Russell, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson, and Stephen B. Scott lend their own signature styles to create an imaginatively diverse and yet cohesive interpretation of Neil Gaiman's luminous novel. Volume One contains Chapter One through the Interlude, while Volume Two includes Chapter Six to the end.
  • Votes: 2

    Two Solitudes

    by Hugh MacLennan

    Winner of the Governor General’s Award for Fiction Canada Reads Selection (CBC), 2013 A landmark of nationalist fiction, Hugh MacLennan’s Two Solitudes is the story of two peoples within one nation, each with its own legend and ideas of what a nation should be. In his vivid portrayals of human drama in First World War–era Quebec, MacLennan focuses on two individuals whose love increases the prejudices that surround them until they discover that “love consists in this, that two solitudes protect, and touch and greet each other.” The novel centres around Paul Tallard and his struggles in reconciling the differences between the English identity of his love Heather Methuen and her family, and the French identity of his father. Against this backdrop the country is forming, the chasm between French and English communities growing deeper. Published in 1945, the novel popularized the use of “two solitudes” as referring to a perceived lack of communication between English- and French-speaking Canadians.
  • Votes: 2

    Spoon River Anthology

    by Edgar Lee Masters

  • Votes: 2

    Hedda Gabler

    by Henrik Ibsen

    Classic Books Library presents this brand new edition of Henrik Ibsen’s play, “Hedda Gabler”, first performed in 1891. The play highlights the social issues of a woman navigating her life in a patriarchal world. Hedda’s challenges reflect Ibsen’s perceptions of female frustration and the struggle for self-expression and independence in a male-dominated society in this powerful work. Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) was a Norwegian poet and theatre director, and is considered to be one of the greatest playwrights of his time. Despite involvement in theatre production and writing throughout his youth, Ibsen did not achieve significant critical success until his thirties through such plays as ”Brand” (1865) and “Peer Gynt” (1867). Many consider him instrumental in the development of Modernism and Realism in theatrical practice.
  • Votes: 2

    How to Read Literature Like a Professor

    by Thomas C Foster

    A thoroughly revised and updated edition of Thomas C. Foster's classic guide—a lively and entertaining introduction to literature and literary basics, including symbols, themes, and contexts—that shows you how to make your everyday reading experience more rewarding and enjoyable. While many books can be enjoyed for their basic stories, there are often deeper literary meanings interwoven in these texts. How to Read Literature Like a Professor helps us to discover those hidden truths by looking at literature with the eyes—and the literary codes—of the ultimate professional reader: the college professor. What does it mean when a literary hero travels along a dusty road? When he hands a drink to his companion? When he's drenched in a sudden rain shower? Ranging from major themes to literary models, narrative devices, and form, Thomas C. Foster provides us with a broad overview of literature—a world where a road leads to a quest, a shared meal may signify a communion, and rain, whether cleansing or destructive, is never just a shower—and shows us how to make our reading experience more enriching, satisfying, and fun. This revised edition includes new chapters, a new preface, and a new epilogue, and incorporates updated teaching points that Foster has developed over the past decade.
  • Votes: 2

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

    by Simon Armitage

    Christmas gift edition of Armitage's hugely popular translation: with revised text, and color illustrations by Clive Hicks-Jenkins
  • Votes: 2

    Rhinoceros Success

    by Scott Alexander

    Go get the life you want. Be a Rhinoceros! There is something dangerous about this book. Something big. Something full of power, energy and force of will. It could be about you. You could become three tons of thick-skinned, snorting hard-charging rhinoceros. It is time to go get the life you want.
  • Votes: 2

    Henderson the Rain King (Penguin Classics)

    by Saul Bellow

    An eccentric American millionaire, age 55, sets out to prove that there is more to life than waiting for death.
  • Votes: 2

    The Pit and the Pendulum

    by Edgar Allan Poe

    It is almost impossible to escape the Spanish Inquisition alive. However, Edgar Allan Poe’s unnamed narrator, after suffering innumerable tortures upon his body and soul in the hands of his tormenters, sees the light of the day at the very end of his sanity’s tether. Even despite the lack of supernatural elements, "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1842) has enjoyed and influenced several notable movie adaptations. Animations such as The "Flinstones", TV series like "Crime Scene Investigation", to films like Roger Corman’s "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1961), starring Vincent Price and some torture methods found in the "Saw" franchise, the story’s famous pendulum scene is a rather fruitful source of inspirations. Yet, despite the terrific torments, the story focuses primarily on how terror is implicitly depicted through the workings of the mind. Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American poet, author, and literary critic. Most famous for his poetry, short stories, and tales of the supernatural, mysterious, and macabre, he is also regarded as the inventor of the detective genre and a contributor to the emergence of science fiction, dark romanticism, and weird fiction. His most famous works include "The Raven" (1945), "The Black Cat" (1943), and "The Gold-Bug" (1843).
  • Votes: 2

    Warriors Don't Cry

    by Melba Pattillo Beals

    The author describes the threats and emotional abuse she endured from white student and adults along with her fears of endangering her family as she commited to being one of the first African American students to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957.
  • Votes: 2

    Arsenic and Old Lace

    by Joseph Kesselring

    An easy going drama critic discovers that his kind and gentle aunts have a bizarre habit of poisoning gentlemen callers and burying them in the cellar.
  • Votes: 2

    Nineteen Eighty-Four

    by GEORGE ORWELL

    A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick With extraordinary relevance and renewed popularity, George Orwell’s 1984 takes on new life in this edition. “Orwell saw, to his credit, that the act of falsifying reality is only secondarily a way of changing perceptions. It is, above all, a way of asserting power.”—The New Yorker In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be. Lionel Trilling said of Orwell’s masterpiece, “1984 is a profound, terrifying, and wholly fascinating book. It is a fantasy of the political future, and like any such fantasy, serves its author as a magnifying device for an examination of the present.” Though the year 1984 now exists in the past, Orwell’s novel remains an urgent call for the individual willing to speak truth to power.
  • Votes: 2

    A Canticle for Leibowitz

    by Walter M. Miller Jr.

  • Votes: 2

    Columbine

    by Dave Cullen

  • Votes: 2

    Like Water for Chocolate

    by Laura Esquivel

    The bestselling phenomenon and inspiration for the award-winning film. Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico blends poignant romance and bittersweet wit. This classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother's womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef, using cooking to express herself and sharing recipes with readers along the way.
  • Votes: 2

    Arrowsmith

    by Sinclair Lewis

  • Votes: 2

    The tin flute,

    by Gabrielle Roy

    A family in the Saint-Henri slums of Montreal struggles to overcome poverty and ignorance while searching for love.
  • Votes: 2

    Childhood's End

    by Arthur C. Clarke

  • Votes: 2

    Romeo and Juilet

    by William Shakespeare

    Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. This edition is unique through the computer-based colorization of Henry Courtney Selous's illustrations, which were originally created in black and white.
  • Votes: 2

    The Women of Brewster Place

    by Gloria Naylor

    The National Book Award-winning novel—and contemporary classic—that launched the brilliant career of Gloria Naylor “[A] shrewd and lyrical portrayal of many of the realities of black life . . . Miss Naylor bravely risks sentimentality and melodrama to write her compassion and outrage large, and she pulls it off triumphantly.” —The New York Times Book Review This e-book includes a foreword by Tayari Jones. In her heralded first novel, Gloria Naylor weaves together the stories of seven women living in Brewster Place, a bleak-inner city sanctuary, creating a powerful, moving portrait of the strengths, struggles, and hopes of black women in America. Vulnerable and resilient, openhanded and openhearted, these women forge their lives in a place that in turn threatens and protects—a common prison and a shared home. Naylor renders both loving and painful human experiences with simple eloquence and uncommon intuition. Adapted into a 1989 ABC miniseries starring Oprah Winfrey, The Women of Brewster Place is a touching and unforgettable read.
  • Votes: 2

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 2

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 2

    Travels with Charley in Search of America

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 2

    The Contender

    by Robert Lipsyte

    The breakthrough modern sports novel The Contender shows readers the true meaning of being a hero. This acclaimed novel by celebrated sportswriter Robert Lipsyte, the recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in YA fiction, is the story of a young boxer in Harlem who overcomes hardships and finds hope in the ring on his path to becoming a contender. Alfred Brooks is scared. He’s a high-school dropout, and his grocery store job is leading nowhere. His best friend is sinking further and further into drug addiction. Some street kids are after him for something he didn’t even do. So Alfred begins going to Donatelli’s Gym, a boxing club in Harlem that has trained champions. There he learns it’s the effort, not the win, that makes the boxer—that before you can be a champion, you have to be a contender. ALA Best of the Best Books for Young Adults * ALA Notable Children’s Book * New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age
  • Votes: 2

    Fabulous

    by madison moore

  • Votes: 2

    A Portrait of Dorian Gray

    by Oscar Wilde

    A handsome, dissolute man who sells his soul for eternal youth is horrified to see the reflection of his degeneration in the distorted features of his portrait.
  • Votes: 2

    A Wizard of Earthsea

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

    A boy grows to manhood while attempting to subdue the evil he unleashed on the world as an apprentice to the Master Wizard.
  • Votes: 2

    Mutiny on the Bounty

    by Charles Nordhoff

  • Votes: 2

    I Am the Cheese

    by Robert Cormier

    Before there was Lois Lowry’s The Giver or M. T. Anderson’s Feed, there was Robert Cormier’s I Am the Cheese, a subversive classic that broke new ground for YA literature. A boy’s search for his father becomes a desperate journey to unlock a secret past. But the past must not be remembered if the boy is to survive. As he searches for the truth that hovers at the edge of his mind, the boy—and readers—arrive at a shattering conclusion. “An absorbing, even brilliant job. The book is assembled in mosaic fashion: a tiny chip here, a chip there. . . . Everything is related to something else; everything builds and builds to a fearsome climax. . . . [Cormier] has the knack of making horror out of the ordinary, as the masters of suspense know how to do.”—The New York Times Book Review “A horrifying tale of government corruption, espionage, and counter espionage told by an innocent young victim. . . . The buildup of suspense is terrific.”—School Library Journal, starred review An ALA Notable Children’s Book A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year A Horn Book Fanfare A Library of Congress Children’s Book of the Year A Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award Nominee
  • Votes: 2

    After the First Death

    by Robert Cormier

    AFTER THE FIRST DEATH is a brilliantly tense hostage drama, by Robert Cormier, the acclaimed author of THE CHOCOLATE WAR. It is one of The Originals from Penguin - iconic, outspoken, first. On the outskirts of a small American town, a bus-load of young children is being held hostage. The hijackers are a cold and ruthless group, opposed to the secret government agency Inner Delta. At the centre of the battle are three teenagers. Miro is the terrorist with no past and no emotions. Kate is the bus driver, caught up in the nightmare, and Ben is the General's son who must act as a go-between. The Originals are the pioneers of fiction for young adults. From political awakening, war and unrequited love to addiction, teenage pregnancy and nuclear holocaust, The Originals confront big issues and articulate difficult truths. The collection includes: The Outsiders - S.E. Hinton, I Capture the Castle - Dodie Smith, Postcards from No Man's Land - Aidan Chambers, After the First Death - Robert Cormier, Dear Nobody - Berlie Doherty, The Endless Steppe - Esther Hautzig, Buddy - Nigel Hinton, Across the Barricades - Joan Lingard, The Twelfth Day of July - Joan Lingard, No Turning Back - Beverley Naidoo, Z for Zachariah - Richard C. O'Brien, The Wave - Morton Rhue, The Red Pony - John Steinbeck, The Pearl - John Steinbeck, Stone Cold - Robert Swindells.
  • Votes: 2

    The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

    by Christopher Paul Curtis

  • Votes: 2

    Anil's Ghost

    by Michael Ondaatje

  • Votes: 2

    The Agony and the Ecstasy

  • Votes: 2

    Oryx and Crake (The MaddAddam Trilogy)

    by Margaret Atwood

    By the author of THE HANDMAID'S TALE and ALIAS GRACE * Pigs might not fly but they are strangely altered. So, for that matter, are wolves and racoons. A man, once named Jimmy, lives in a tree, wrapped in old bedsheets, now calls himself Snowman. The voice of Oryx, the woman he loved, teasingly haunts him. And the green-eyed Children of Crake are, for some reason, his responsibility. * Praise for Oryx and Crake: 'In Jimmy, Atwood has created a great character: a tragic-comic artist of the future, part buffoon, part Orpheus. An adman who's a sad man; a jealous lover who's in perpetual mourning; a fantasist who can only remember the past' -INDEPENDENT 'Gripping and remarkably imagined' -LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS
  • Votes: 2

    On the Road

    by Jack Kerouac

    Follows the counterculture escapades of members of the Beat generation as they seek pleasure and meaning while traveling coast to coast
  • Votes: 2

    Twelve Angry Men (Penguin Classics)

    by Reginald Rose

  • Votes: 2

    MASTER HAROLD AND THE BOYS

    by Athol Fugard

    Drama set in South Africa during apartheid.
  • Votes: 2

    The Importance of Being Ernest

    by Justin Lloyd

    Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Ernest, the loveable blue-collar buffoon, was a staple in commercials, movies and an award-winning TV show. Today, millions of fans still mourn the loss of Jim Varney, who portrayed Ernest and who died at age 50 in 2000 of cancer. This biography traces Jim's journey from a child in Kentucky with dreams of being a stage and film actor to becoming an iconic entertainment figure in the tradition of Charlie Chaplin.
  • Votes: 2

    Patch of Blue

    by Elizabeth Kata

  • Votes: 2

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 2

    Angels In America

    by Tony Kushner

    A revised and complete edition of this modern classic, featuring a new foreword from author Tony Kushner.
  • Votes: 2

    Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolfe? Movie Tie-in Edition

    by Edward Albee

    When middle-aged Martha and her husband George are joined by the younger Nick and Honey for late-night drinks after a party, the stage is set for a night of drunken recriminations and revelations. Battle-lines are drawn as Martha and George drag their guests into their own private hell of a marriage.
  • Votes: 2

    Tinkers

    by Paul Harding

  • Votes: 2

    The Caine Mutiny

    by Herman Wouk

    Each decade new readers discover the characters and curious activities aboard the U.S.S. "Caine in this classic tale of pathos, humor, and scope.
  • Votes: 2

    How to Read a Shakespearean Play Text

    by Eugene Giddens

    An invaluable introductory guide for students on how to engage with the original printed texts of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.
  • Votes: 2

    Self-Reliance and Other Essays

    by Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) is one of America's pre-eminent philosophers. Born into a long line of ministers and preachers, Emerson went to Harvard at the tender age of 14, where he studied to fulfill his destiny and become a minister. Emerson eventually dropped out of this line of work, embarking on a career as a public speaker and serving as the intellectual center of a group called the Transcendentalist Club. Several other essays round out the collection, all of them utilizing Emerson's keen sense of the power of the individual. That Emerson is still in print today while some of his contemporaries are not is proof enough of the power and influence of his thought. Whether you agree with his arguments or not (and there is much here to disagree with), there is no denying that he has been enormously influential to American thinkers of his time and those who have come after him.
  • Votes: 2

    The Shining

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 2

    A Gathering of Old Men

    by Ernest J. Gaines

  • Votes: 2

    The Rocking-Horse Winner

    by D H Lawrence

    D.H. Lawrence [RL 7 IL 7-12] Desperate to please his aloof mother, Paul takes part in an eerie scheme to pick winning racehorses. Theme: desire for money and love. 44 pages. Tale Blazers.
  • Votes: 2

    The Deerslayer (Bantam Classics)

    by James Fenimore Cooper

    The last of the five Leatherstocking tales recalls Natty Bumpo's adventures as a young man among the Delaware Indians of New York State
  • Votes: 2

    The Help

    by Kathryn Stockett

  • Votes: 2

    Death in Venice (A Norton Critical Edition)

    by Thomas Mann

    Clayton Koelb's masterful translation improves upon its predecessors intwo ways: it renders Mann into American (not British) English, and itremains true to Mann's original text without sacrificing fluency. ForAmerican readers, this is the translation of choice. "Backgrounds and Contexts" includes Mann's working notes, which allowstudents to observe the author's creative process. The notes areavailable here for the first time in English. Illuminating selections from Mann's essays and letters are alsoreprinted, as are period maps of Munich, Venice, and the Lido. "Criticism" includes six essays—by Andre von Gronicka, Manfred Dierks, T.J. Reed, Dorrit Cohn, David Luke, and Robert Tobin—sure to stimulateclassroom discussion. A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.
  • Votes: 2

    The Fixer

    by Bernard Malamud

    A Jew in Tsarist Russia is accused of murdering a Catholic boy and suffers from mistreatment in prison.
  • Votes: 2

    As Far As I Can Remember

    by Michael Bawtree

    ÿ Michael Bawtree owes his cultured start in life to the rambling country house hotel his parents owned and managed in the 1950s. What it lacked in income it made up for in style and in the quality of the guests, who included dukes and professors as well as dozens of prominent names from the arts and academia, from C S Lewis and Iris Murdoch to Sir Adrian Boult. Unsurprisingly, Michael quickly developed a talent for literature, drama and music which eventually, after he had read English Language and Literature at Oxford with Christopher Ricks as his tutor, took him to Canada, where he embarked on a career in the theatre. As Far As I Remember is part 1 of Michael?s story, covering his formative years, from a wartime childhood and years at a rural prep school to an education at Radley College, where a close friendship with Peter Cook, already on the brink of fame as a comedian and satirist, helped to propel him towards a theatrical career. The story of his later life as a prominent actor, playwright and director in Canada will be told in Volume 2.
  • Votes: 2

    In the Heat of the Night

    by John Ball

    A 50th anniversary edition of the classic crime novel that inspired the Oscar-winning film starring Sidney Poitier. 'They call me Mr Tibbs!' A small southern town in the 1960s. A musician found dead on the highway. It's no surprise when white detectives arrest a black man for the murder. What is a surprise is that the black man - Virgil Tibbs - is himself a skilled homicide detective from California, whom inexperienced Chief Gillespie reluctantly recruits to help with the case. Faced with mounting local hostility and a police force that seems determined to see him fail, it isn't long before Tibbs - trained in karate and aikido - will have to fight not just for justice, but also for his own safety. The inspiration for the Academy Award-winning film starring Sidney Poitier, this iconic crime novel is a psychologically astute examination of racial prejudice, an atmospheric depiction of the American South in the sixties, and a brilliant, suspense-filled read set in the sultry heat of the night.
  • Votes: 2

    The Wife of Bath's Tale

    by Geoffrey Chaucer

    The classic respected series in a stunning new design. This edition of The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale from the highly-respected Selected Tales series includes the full, complete text in the original Middle English, along with an in-depth introduction by James Winny, detailed notes and a comprehensive glossary.
  • Votes: 2

    The Source

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 2

    The Round House

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 2

    Freshman Year

    by Victory Designs

  • Votes: 2

    33

    by Dr. David Serio

    The core elements of Chiropractic grew out of the thinking and philosophical concepts of D. D. Palmer, the founder of Chiropractic, and his son, B. J. Palmer. These principles were then compiled and transformed into thirty-three principles in R. W. Stephenson's groundbreaking textbook in 1927. These thirty-three principles offer a logical and deductive navigational process for locating, analyzing, and correcting vertebral subluxation, but their value does not end there. As Chiropractor and international speaker Dr. David Serio reveals, the thirty-three principles of Chiropractic are at their essence a philosophy for life. In 33, Serio asks Doctors of Chiropractic from around the world to explain chiropractic principles to the public. You'll discover how the principles add clarity and insight to our daily lives and our understanding of the universe. Serio supports his interviewees' thoughts with inspirational quotations and his own insightful comments and practical tips. From the core concept of universal intelligence to time, physical laws, adaptation, and human consciousness, the thirty-three principles offer a road map for a healthy, productive life. Chiropractic students, doctors, and even those who are simply curious about the enduring truths in life and health will find 33 an absorbing, intriguing exploration into the core values of a fascinating discipline.
  • Votes: 2

    Everything I Never Told You

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 2

    Intruder in the Dust

    by William Faulkner

    An elderly, proud black farmer, Lucas Beauchamp, is wrongfully arrested for the murder of a white man. The lynch mob are baying for his blood. His sole hope lies with a young white boy, bent on repaying an old favour, who with the help of Lucas's cynical lawyer will work to find the truth and hatch a risky plot to prove his innocence.
  • Votes: 2

    Interpreter of Maladies

    by Jhumpa Lahiri

    A debut collection of short fiction blends elements of Indian traditions with the complexities of American culture in such tales as "A Temporary Matter," in which a young Indian-American couple confronts their grief over the loss of a child, while their Boston neighborhood copes with a nightly blackout. Original. 20,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 2

    Maniac Magee

    by Jerry Spinelli

    A Newbery Medal winning modern classic about a racially divided small town and a boy who runs. Jeffrey Lionel "Maniac" Magee might have lived a normal life if a freak accident hadn't made him an orphan. After living with his unhappy and uptight aunt and uncle for eight years, he decides to run--and not just run away, but run. This is where the myth of Maniac Magee begins, as he changes the lives of a racially divided small town with his amazing and legendary feats.
  • Votes: 2

    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    The First Edition of this Norton Critical Edition was both an acclaimed classroom text and ahead of its time. This Second Edition offers the best in Wollstonecraft scholarship and criticism since 1976, providing the ideal means for studying the first feminist document written in English.
  • Votes: 2

    Biloxi Blues

    by Neil Simon

    A naive recruit is sent from the comforts of his Brooklyn home to basic training in Biloxi, Miss.
  • Votes: 2

    Robinson Crusoe (Signet Classics)

    by Daniel Defoe

  • Votes: 2

    The Perfect Kitchen

    by Barbara Sallick

    A chic, polished guide to creating your dream kitchen from the cofounder of Waterworks, with hundreds of images and practical advice. The kitchen is the heart of the home, the destination of every party, everyone's favorite gathering spot, where style and functionality must go hand in hand. Designing a kitchen is a vastly complicated affair, involving an array of appliances (movable and fixed) and storage zones, not to mention addressing the kitchen's role as a multifunctional social arena to be used from very early in the morning until late into the night. Creating a timeless, high-functioning space is daunting indeed. Where is one to begin? In The Perfect Kitchen, Waterworks cofounder Barbara Sallick explores the process of designing a kitchen in great and beautiful detail, from surfaces and finishes to storage, cabinetry, and hardware. The book is enriched by dozens of images of kitchens by esteemed designers such as Steven Gambrel, Gil Schafer, and Suzanne Kasler; essays by top food icons including Julia Turshen and Melissa Clark about their own kitchens; and important, how-to advice. Combining evocative, informative photography with an authoritative, engaging narrative, The Perfect Kitchen is an essential, lasting resource that will appeal to discerning homeowners and professionals alike looking for upscale visual inspiration and design advice.
  • Votes: 2

    The Namesake

    by Jhumpa Lahiri

    An incisive portrait of the immigrant experience follows the Ganguli family from their traditional life in India through their arrival in Massachusetts in the late 1960s and their difficult melding into an American way of life, in a debut novel that spans three decades, two continents, and two generations. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Interpreter of Maladies. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    Blood Wedding (Faber Drama)

    by Federico García Lorca

    Ted Hughes translates and adapts Lorca's 20th-century classic for an English-speaking audience. The story is based on a newspaper fragment which told of a family vendetta, where the daughter of one family ran away with the son of the enemy family. Hughes's captivating version premiered at the Young Vic Theatre, London, in September 1996.
  • Votes: 2

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    by Douglas Adams

  • Votes: 2

    Brown Girl Dreaming

    by Jacqueline Woodson

  • Votes: 2

    The Shipping News

    by E. Annie Proulx

  • Votes: 2

    Winesburg, Ohio

    by Sherwood Anderson

    This carefully crafted ebook: "Winesburg, Ohio (A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This ebook is a series of loosely linked short stories set in the fictional town of Winesburg, mostly written from late 1915 to early 1916. The stories are held together by George Willard, a resident to whom the community confide their personal stories and struggles. The townspeople are withdrawn and emotionally repressed and attempt in telling their stories to gain some sense of meaning and dignity in an otherwise desperate life. The work has received high critical acclaim and is considered one of the great American works of the 20th century. Sherwood Anderson (1876 – 1941) was an American novelist and short story writer, known for subjective and self-revealing works. Anderson published several short story collections, novels, memoirs, books of essays, and a book of poetry. He may be most influential for his effect on the next generation of young writers, as he inspired William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Thomas Wolfe.
  • Votes: 2

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    by Hunter S. Thompson

  • Votes: 2

    Paradise of the Blind

    by Duong Thu Huong

    Paradise of the Blind is an exquisite portrait of three Vietnamese women struggling to survive in a society where subservience to men is expected and Communist corruption crushes every dream. Through the eyes of Hang, a young woman in her twenties who has grown up amidst the slums and intermittent beauty of Hanoi, we come to know the tragedy of her family as land reform rips apart their village. When her uncle Chinh‘s political loyalties replace family devotion, Hang is torn between her mother‘s appalling self–sacrifice and the bitterness of her aunt who can avenge but not forgive. Only by freeing herself from the past will Hang be able to find dignity –– and a future.
  • Votes: 2

    Katherine

    by Anya Seton

  • Votes: 2

    The Decameron (Penguin Classics)

    by Giovanni Boccaccio

    Translated with an Introduction and Notes by G. H. McWilliam.
  • Votes: 2

    The Last Lecture

    by Randy Pausch

    'A phenomenon' SUNDAY TIMES A lot of professors give talks titled 'The Last Lecture'. Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave, 'Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams', wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because time is all you have and you may find one day that you have less than you think). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living. In this book, Randy Pausch has combined the humour, inspiration, and intelligence that made his lecture such a phenomenon and given it an indelible form. It is a book that will be shared for generations to come.
  • Votes: 1

    La Carreta

    by Rene Marques

  • Votes: 1

    A Study Guide for Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing"

    by Cengage Learning Gale

    A Study Guide for Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Short Stories for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Short Stories for Students for all of your research needs.
  • Votes: 1

    Broadway Bound

    by Neil Simon

    Third volume of authors autobiographical trilogy of plays, following Brighton Beach memoirs and Biloxi blues
  • Votes: 1

    We Need to Talk About Kevin

    by Lionel Shriver

  • Votes: 1

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch (Cliffs Notes)

    by Franz G. Blaha

  • Votes: 1

    The Idiot

    by Elif Batuman

    A New York Times Book Review Notable Book Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Longlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction "An addictive, sprawling epic; I wolfed it down.” —Miranda July, author of The First Bad Man and It Chooses You “Easily the funniest book I’ve read this year.” —GQ A portrait of the artist as a young woman. A novel about not just discovering but inventing oneself. The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings. At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan's friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin's summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer. With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman's fiction is unguarded against both life's affronts and its beauty--and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail. Named one the best books of the year by Refinery29 • Mashable One • Elle Magazine • The New York Times • Bookpage • Vogue • NPR • Buzzfeed •The Millions
  • Votes: 1

    The Black Pearl

    by Scott O'Dell

    A sixteen-year-old boy relates his discovery of the Pearl of Heaven and his near-fatal encounter with the feared sea monster, Manta Diablo.
  • Votes: 1

    The Nibelungenlied

    by Cyril Edwards

    The Nibelungenlied is the greatest medieval German heroic poem, a revenge saga on an epic scale, which tells how dragon-slayer Sivrit acquires the priceless hoard of the dwarvish Nibelungs, and of the tragic conflict between Kriemhilt and Hagen. This is the first prose translation for over forty years, with full introductory materials.
  • Votes: 1

    The Omnivore's Dilemma

    by Michael Pollan

    Pollan writes about the ecology of the food humans eat and why--what it is, in fact, that we are eating. Discussing industrial farming, organic food, and what it is like to hunt and gather food, this is a surprisingly honest and self-aware account of the evolution of the modern diet.
  • Votes: 1

    The Miracle Worker

    by William Gibson

    A text of the television play, intended for reading, of Anne Sullivan Macy's attempts to teach her pupil, Helen Keller, to communicate.
  • Votes: 1

    Clay's Quilt

    by Silas House

    A motherless young man must stitch his life together among his relatives and other lively folks of Free Creek Kentucky.
  • Votes: 1

    And Then There Were None; Book 1

    by Ken Smith

    Think about what would happen to this world that we live in today, if a virus killed off all the males of the earth. Due to the continuing effects of the virus, women cannot have male children. Men, knowing they would all be dead within a couple of years, take steps to help the women survive after them. After all the men are gone, how will women set up their governments, industry, military, countries? Will a cure for the virus ever be found so that male children can once more be born to women?
  • Votes: 1

    Esperanza Rising (Scholastic Gold)

    by Pam Muñoz Ryan

    Esperanza Rising joins the Scholastic Gold line, which features award-winning and beloved novels. Includes exclusive bonus content! Esperanza thought she'd always live a privileged life on her family's ranch in Mexico. She'd always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home filled with servants, and Mama, Papa, and Abuelita to care for her. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California and settle in a Mexican farm labor camp. Esperanza isn't ready for the hard work, financial struggles brought on by the Great Depression, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When Mama gets sick and a strike for better working conditions threatens to uproot their new life, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances-because Mama's life, and her own, depend on it.
  • Votes: 1

    The Misremembered Man

    by Christina McKenna

    This beautifully rendered portrait of life in rural Ireland charms and delights with its authentic characters and gentle humor. This vivid portrayal of the universal search for love brings with it a darker tale, one that is heartbreaking in its poignancy.
  • Votes: 1

    WE WERE TOGETHER I FORGET THE REST

    by cupidvalentine cupidvalentine

    When Pinkalicious loses a tooth, it's not just any tooth—it's her sweet tooth! Suddenly candy no longer tastes sweet! With her pinkatastic pen, Pinkalicious writes a note to the Tooth Fairy and tucks it under her pillow . . . only to hear from Cupid, the Easter Bunny, and a Christmas elf instead. It is not until the Tooth Fairy finally responds—and works some magic—that Pinkalicious discovers where sweetness really comes from. Fairy-tale characters and sparkling scenes make Silverlicious a sweet treat for all.
  • Votes: 1

    The Machine Stops

    by E.M. Forster

    E.M. Forster is best known for his exquisite novels, but these two affecting short stories brilliantly combine the fantastical with the allegorical. In 'The Machine Stops', humanity has isolated itself beneath the ground, enmeshed in automated comforts, and in 'The Celestial Omnibus' a young boy takes a trip his parents believe impossible.
  • Votes: 1

    A Tale Of Two Cites

    by Charles Dickens

    Great Stories in Easy English
  • Votes: 1

    The Sword of Shannara

    by Terry Brooks

    ***50 MILLION TERRY BROOKS COPIES SOLD AROUND THE WORLD*** THE SHANNARA CHRONICLES IS NOW A MAJOR TV SERIES Volume one in the classic bestselling series - from one of the all-time masters of fantasy 'Terry's place is at the head of the fantasy world' Philip Pullman Long ago, the world of the Four Lands was torn apart by the wars of ancient Evil. But in the Vale, the half-human, half-elfin Shea Ohmsford now lives in peace - until the mysterious, forbidding figure of the druid Allanon appears, to reveal that the supposedly long dead Warlock Lord lives again. Shea must embark upon the elemental quest to find the only weapon powerful enough to keep the creatures of darkness at bay: the fabled Sword of Shannara. Praise for Terry Brooks: 'A master of the craft . . . required reading' Brent Weeks 'I can't even begin to count how many of Terry Brooks's books I've read (and re-read) over the years' Patrick Rothfuss, author of The Name of the Wind 'I would not be writing epic fantasy today if not for Shannara' Peter V. Brett, author of The Painted Man 'If you haven't read Terry Brooks, you haven't read fantasy' Christopher Paolini, author of Eragon The original Shannara trilogy: THE SWORD OF SHANNARA THE ELFSTONES OF SHANNARA (now a major TV series: THE SHANNARA CHRONICLES) THE WISHSONG OF SHANNARA
  • Votes: 1

    Hidden Figures

    by Margot Lee Shetterly

  • Votes: 1

    I Know What You Did Last Summer

    by Lois Duncan

    Four teenagers try to conceal their responsibility for a hit-and-run accident while being pursued by a mystery figure seeking revenge.
  • Votes: 1

    Flowers in the Attic

    by V.C. Andrews

    Celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the enduring gothic masterpiece Flowers in the Attic—the unforgettable forbidden love story that earned V.C. Andrews a fiercely devoted fan base and became an international cult classic. At the top of the stairs there are four secrets hidden—blond, innocent, and fighting for their lives… They were a perfect and beautiful family—until a heartbreaking tragedy shattered their happiness. Now, for the sake of an inheritance that will ensure their future, the children must be hidden away out of sight, as if they never existed. They are kept in the attic of their grandmother’s labyrinthine mansion, isolated and alone. As the visits from their seemingly unconcerned mother slowly dwindle, the four children grow ever closer and depend upon one another to survive both this cramped world and their cruel grandmother. A suspenseful and thrilling tale of family, greed, murder, and forbidden love, Flowers in the Attic is the unputdownable first novel of the epic Dollanganger family saga. The Dollanganger series includes: Flowers in the Attic, Petals in the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, Garden of Shadows, Beneath the Attic, and Out of the Attic.
  • Votes: 1

    The Guide

    by R. K. Narayan

    For the centennial of his birth, R. K. Narayan's most celebrated novel Formerly India's most corrupt tourist guide, Raju—just released from prison—seeks refuge in an abandoned temple. Mistaken for a holy man, he plays the part and succeeds so well that God himself intervenes to put Raju's newfound sanctity to the test. Narayan's most celebrated novel, The Guide won him the National Prize of the Indian Literary Academy, his country's highest literary honor. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 1

    One Crazy Summer

    by Rita Williams-Garcia

    In this Newbery Honor novel, New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them. "This vibrant and moving award-winning novel has heart to spare."* Eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. But when the sisters arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with their mother, Cecile is nothing like they imagined. While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer. This moving, funny novel won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction and the Coretta Scott King Award and was a National Book Award Finalist. Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern's story continues in P.S. Be Eleven and Gone Crazy in Alabama. Readers who enjoy Christopher Paul Curtis's The Watsons Go to Birmingham and Jacqueline Woodson’s Brown Girl Dreaming will find much to love in One Crazy Summer. This novel was the first featured title for Marley D’s Reading Party, launched after the success of #1000BlackGirlBooks. Maria Russo, in a New York Times list of "great kids' books with diverse characters," called it "witty and original." *Brightly, in Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich's article "Knowing Our History to Build a Brighter Future: Books to Help Kids Understand the Fight for Racial Equality"
  • Votes: 1

    Sphere

    by Michael Crichton

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    Sarum

    by Edward Rutherfurd

  • Votes: 1

    A Man Who Would Be King

    by J.P. Reedman

    Harry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, stands accused of high treason against Richard III, the man he helped place on the throne and then, months later, betrayed.On the scaffold, he recalls, in first person, his life through the turbulent Wars of the Roses.Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, friend, enemy, traitor...and a suspect in the disappearance of the Princes in the Tower.
  • Votes: 1

    A Cartomante (Portuguese Edition)

    by Machado de Assis

    "The young man came to his senses right at the foot of the door. He told the coachman to wait for him, and walked briskly the length of the corridor, climbing the stairs. The light was bleak, the stairsteps were worn out from all the feet that had trod them, the handrail was sticky; but he, in his turn, did not see nor feel anything. He blundered up the stairs and knocked. Once nobody appeared, he considered turning back. It was too late: his blood boiled with curiosity, his temples throbed; he hit the door again with one, two, three knocks. A woman emerged; it was the fortune-teller." Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis was born on June 21, 1839. His father was Brazilian, and his mother, Portuguese. Machado attended a public school. He was a typographer and a proofreader, and in 1869, married Carolina Xavier de Novais. He made a name for himself in the public service, and in 1897 was elected as President of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. His works embrace almost all literary genres as he was a journalist, a novel and short-story writer, a poet and a playwright. He died at home in 1908 at the age of 69. Satire, social criticism, family customs, a deep view of the soul of man are some of the elements constituting his works. Machado de Assis is regarded as one of the greatest writers in the world among literary critics.
  • Votes: 1

    The Graduate

    by Charles Webb

    The novel about an aimless young man in 1960s America that inspired the classic film: “Moves with the speed and drive of a runaway locomotive.” —Chicago Sunday Review When Benjamin Braddock graduates from a small eastern college and comes home to his parents’ house, everyone wants to know what he’s going to do with his life. Benjamin has no idea. Feeling empty, embittered, and adrift, he stumbles into an affair with Mrs. Robinson, the wife of his father’s business partner. But then he falls in love with a woman closer to his own age: Mrs. Robinson’s daughter. A scathingly entertaining tale of idealism and materialism, corruption and conformity, The Graduate is both a darkly comic love-triangle tale and a sharp look at postwar suburbia. “He contrives some ludicrously funny situations and he keeps his story racing.” —The New York Times Book Review “His novel makes you want to laugh and it makes you want to cry.” —The Plain Dealer
  • Votes: 1

    I Have Lived A Thousand Years

    by Livia Bitton-Jackson

    What is death all about? What is life all about? So wonders thirteen-year-old Elli Friedmann as she fights for her life in a Nazi concentration camp. A remarkable memoir, I Have Lived a Thousand Years is a story of cruelty and suffering, but at the same time a story of hope, faith, perseverance, and love. It wasn’t long ago that Elli led a normal life that included family, friends, school, and thoughts about boys. A life in which Elli could lie and daydream for hours that she was a beautiful and elegant celebrated poet. But these adolescent daydreams quickly darken in March 1944, when the Nazis invade Hungary. First Elli can no longer attend school, have possessions, or talk to her neighbors. Then she and her family are forced to leave their house behind to move into a crowded ghetto, where privacy becomes a luxury of the past and food becomes a scarcity. Her strong will and faith allow Elli to manage and adjust, but what she doesn’t know is that this is only the beginning. The worst is yet to come...
  • Votes: 1

    Jagged Little Pill

    by Alanis Morissette

    (Piano/Vocal/Guitar Artist Songbook). A dozen songs from Alanis' runaway hit record: All I Really Want * Forgiven * Hand in My Pocket * Head Over Feet * Ironic * Mary Jane * Not the Doctor * Perfect * Right Through You * Wake Up * You Learn * You Oughta Know.
  • Votes: 1

    Woman at Point Zero

    by Nawal El Saadawi

    'An unforgettable, unmissable book for the new global feminist.' The Times 'All the men I did get to know filled me with but one desire: to lift my hand and bring it smashing down on his face.' So begins Firdaus's remarkable story of rebellion against a society founded on lies, hypocrisy, brutality and oppression. Born to a peasant family in the Egyptian countryside, Firdaus struggles through childhood, seeking compassion and knowledge in a world which gives her little of either. As she grows up and escapes the fetters of her childhood, each new relationship teaches her a bitter but liberating truth – that the only free people are those who want nothing, fear nothing and hope for nothing. This classic novel has been an inspiration to countless people across the world. Saadawi's searing indictment of society's brutal treatment of women continues to resonate today.
  • Votes: 1

    By Herbert Asbury - The Gangs of New York

    by Herbert Asbury

  • Votes: 1

    The Best of Fyodor Dostoevsky

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    This collection, unique to the Modern Library, gathers seven of Dostoevsky's key works and shows him to be equally adept at the short story as with the novel. Exploring many of the same themes as in his longer works, these small masterpieces move from the tender and romantic White Nights, an archetypal nineteenth-century morality tale of pathos and loss, to the famous Notes from the Underground, a story of guilt, ineffectiveness, and uncompromising cynicism, and the first major work of existential literature. Among Dostoevsky's prototypical characters is Yemelyan in The Honest Thief, whose tragedy turns on an inability to resist crime. Presented in chronological order, in David Magarshack's celebrated translation, this is the definitive edition of Dostoevsky's best stories.
  • Votes: 1

    The Red Tent

    by Anita Diamant

    In The Red Tent Anita Diamant brings the fascinating biblical character of Dinah to vivid life. Her name is Dinah. In the Bible her fate is merely hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the verses of the Book of Genesis that recount the life of Jacob and his infamous dozen sons. Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is an extraordinary and engrossing tale of ancient womanhood and family honour. Told in Dinah's voice, it opens with the story of her mothers – the four wives of Jacob – each of whom embodies unique feminine traits, and concludes with Dinah's own startling and unforgettable story of betrayal, grief and love. Deeply affecting and intimate, The Red Tent combines outstandingly rich storytelling with an original insight into women's society in a fascinating period of early history and such is its warmth and candour, it is guaranteed to win the hearts and minds of women across the world. 'I genuinely fell into this rich and colourful world and Dinah and Leah have stayed with me as ancestors and sisters brought to life by Anita Diamant's imaginative novel' - Maureen Lipman. Adapted as a TV mini series starring Rebecca Ferguson and Minnie Driver.
  • Votes: 1

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    by Philip K. Dick

    World War Terminus had left the Earth devastated. Through its ruins, bounty hunter Rick Deckard stalked, in search of the renegade replicants who were his prey. When he wasn't 'retiring' them with his laser weapon, he dreamed of owning a live animal - the ultimate status symbol in a world all but bereft of animal life. Then Rick got his chance: the assignment to kill six Nexus-6 targets, for a huge reward. But in Deckard's world things were never that simple, and his assignment quickly turned into a nightmare kaleidoscope of subterfuge and deceit - and the threat of death for the hunter rather than the hunted ...
  • Votes: 1

    50 jokes that i can remember

    by mr andrew mclean barclay

    Anthropology is the study of all humans in all times in all places. But it is so much more than that. "Anthropology requires strength, valor, and courage," Nancy Scheper-Hughes noted. "Pierre Bourdieu called anthropology a combat sport, an extreme sport as well as a tough and rigorous discipline. ... It teaches students not to be afraid of getting one's hands dirty, to get down in the dirt, and to commit yourself, body and mind. Susan Sontag called anthropology a "heroic" profession." What is the payoff for this heroic journey? You will find ideas that can carry you across rivers of doubt and over mountains of fear to find the the light and life of places forgotten. Real anthropology cannot be contained in a book. You have to go out and feel the world's jagged edges, wipe its dust from your brow, and at times, leave your blood in its soil. In this unique book, Dr. Michael Wesch shares many of his own adventures of being an anthropologist and what the science of human beings can tell us about the art of being human. This special first draft edition is a loose framework for more and more complete future chapters and writings. It serves as a companion to anth101.com, a free and open resource for instructors of cultural anthropology. This 2018 text is a revision of the "first draft edition" from 2017 and includes 7 new chapters.
  • Votes: 1

    The Class of 83

    by S. Hussain Zaidi

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    V for Vendetta

    by Alan Moore

  • Votes: 1

    Journey to Jo'burg

    by Beverley Naidoo

    The bestselling classic set in South Africa during the apartheid era, in which two siblings must face the dangers of their divided country. Mma lives and works in Johannesburg, far from the village thirteen-year-old Naledi and her younger brother, Tiro, call home. When their baby sister suddenly becomes very sick, Naledi and Tiro know that they need to bring their mother back in order to save their sister’s life. Bravely, secretly, they set off on the long journey to the big city to find Mma. It isn’t until they finally reach Jo’burg that they see up close what life is like for black citizens across South Africa—and begin to really question the unfair and dangerous laws of apartheid.
  • Votes: 1

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

    by Benjamin Franklin

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin was written by Benjamin Franklin from 1771 to 1790; however, Franklin himself appears to have called the work his Memoirs. Although it had a torturous publication history after Franklin's death, this work has become one of the most famous and influential examples of autobiography ever written.
  • Votes: 1

    She Stoops to Conquer (Dover Thrift Editions)

    by Oliver Goldsmith

    Charming satire concerns a young lady who poses as a serving girl to win the heart of a young gentleman too shy to court ladies of his own class. Notes.
  • Votes: 1

    Assata

    by Assata Shakur

  • Votes: 1

    The White Man's Burden

    by William Easterly

    From one of the world’s best-known development economists—an excoriating attack on the tragic hubris of the West’s efforts to improve the lot of the so-called developing world In his previous book, The Elusive Quest for Growth, William Easterly criticized the utter ineffectiveness of Western organizations to mitigate global poverty, and he was promptly fired by his then-employer, the World Bank. The White Man’s Burden is his widely anticipated counterpunch—a brilliant and blistering indictment of the West’s economic policies for the world’s poor. Sometimes angry, sometimes irreverent, but always clear-eyed and rigorous, Easterly argues that we in the West need to face our own history of ineptitude and draw the proper conclusions, especially at a time when the question of our ability to transplant Western institutions has become one of the most pressing issues we face.
  • Votes: 1

    Sense and Sensibility (Penguin Classics)

    by Jane Austen

  • Votes: 1

    Bambi

    by Felix Salten

    The classical tale of a young fawn's growing maturity and independence as he learns to face the hardships of his life.
  • Votes: 1

    The Song of Roland

    by Dorothy L. Sayers

  • Votes: 1

    Never Cry Wolf

    by Farley Mowat

  • Votes: 1

    The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

    by Tom Wolfe

    Describes the escapades of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, a drug-saturated group of hippies who get in and out of trouble with the law.
  • Votes: 1

    First They Killed My Father

    by Loung Ung

    Soon to be a major film, co-written and directed by Angelina Jolie Pitt Until the age of five, Loung Ung lived in Phnom Penh, one of seven children of a high-ranking government official. She was a precocious child who loved the open city markets, fried crickets, chicken fights and being cheeky to her parents. When Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge army stormed into Phnom Penh in April 1975, Loung's family fled their home and were eventually forced to disperse to survive. Loung was trained as a child soldier while her brothers and sisters were sent to labour camps. The surviving siblings were only finally reunited after the Vietnamese penetrated Cambodia and started to destroy the Khmer Rouge. Bolstered by the bravery of one brother, the vision of the others and the gentle kindness of her sister, Loung forged on to create for herself a courageous new life. First They Killed My Father is an unforgettable book told through the voice of the young and fearless Loung. It is a shocking and tragic tale of a girl who was determined to survive despite the odds.
  • Votes: 1

    Outcry in the Barrio

    by Freddie Garcia

  • Votes: 1

    The Bear

    by Andrew Krivak

    LibraryReads Pick! BuzzFeed “Most Anticipated Books of the Year” selection Buzz Books by Publishers Lunch selection From National Book Award in Fiction finalist Andrew Krivak comes a gorgeous fable of Earth’s last two human inhabitants, and a girl’s journey home In an Edenic future, a girl and her father live close to the land in the shadow of a lone mountain. They possess a few remnants of civilization: some books, a pane of glass, a set of flint and steel, a comb. The father teaches the girl how to fish and hunt, the secrets of the seasons and the stars. He is preparing her for an adulthood in harmony with nature, for they are the last of humankind. But when the girl finds herself alone in an unknown landscape, it is a bear that will lead her back home through a vast wilderness that offers the greatest lessons of all, if she can only learn to listen. A cautionary tale of human fragility, of love and loss, The Bear is a stunning tribute to the beauty of nature’s dominion. Andrew Krivak is the author of two previous novels: The Signal Flame, a Chautauqua Prize finalist, and The Sojourn, a National Book Award finalist and winner of both the Chautauqua Prize and Dayton Literary Peace Prize. He lives with his wife and three children in Somerville, Massachusetts, and Jaffrey, New Hampshire, in the shadow of Mount Monadnock, which inspired much of the landscape in The Bear.
  • Votes: 1

    The Watch That Ends the Night

    by Allan Wolf

    Recreates the 1912 sinking of the Titanic as observed by millionaire John Jacob Astor, a beautiful young Lebanese refugee finding first love, "Unsinkable" Molly Brown, Captain Smith, and others including the iceberg itself.
  • Votes: 1

    O Pioneers!

    by Willa Cather

    In this landmark of American fiction, Cather tells the story of young Alexandra Bergson, whose dying father leaves her in charge of the family and of the Nebraska lands they have struggled to farm.
  • Votes: 1

    Pudd'nhead Wilson

    by Mark Twain

    This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Classic includes a glossary and reader's notes to help the modern reader appreciate Twain's perspective on the human race.UNLEASHING THE ACERBIC WIT for which he was already famous, Mark Twain released Pudd'nhead Wilson in 1894 to a public not quite prepared for the American satirist's dark attack on lingering racism following the Civil War and the failure of Reconstruction. The stories of twin Italian circus performers, a beautiful slave, and a lawyer whose wry observations earn him the reputation of the village idiot converge in the fictional town of Dawson's Landing, Missouri, where the newly discovered use of fingerprints helps to expose the hypocrisy of late-Victorian morality and solve a murder.Each chapter begins with a quotation from Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar, and these Franklin-like aphorisms propel the story forward. As Twain himself said, "There ain't any weather in it, and there ain't any scenery-the story is stripped for flight!"And, once it takes off, there's no pausing until the last ironic twist is revealed. If you're already a fan of Mark Twain, you'll love Pudd'nhead Wilson. If you're not a fan, this book will make you one.
  • Votes: 1

    The Grass Is Singing

    by Doris Lessing

    This murder story features a Rhodesian farmer's wife and her houseboy.
  • Votes: 1

    Because I Can't Remember Everything

    by ms bernie berryman

    Twelve-year-old Molly and her ten-year-old brother, Michael, have never liked their seven-year-old stepsister, Heather. Ever since their parents got married, she's made Molly and Michael's life miserable. Now their parents have moved them all to the country to live in a house that used to be a church, with a cemetery in the backyard. If that's not bad enough, Heather starts talking to a ghost named Helen and warning Molly and Michael that Helen is coming for them. Molly feels certain Heather is in some kind of danger, but every time she tries to help, Heather twists things around to get her into trouble. It seems as if things can't get any worse. But they do—when Helen comes.
  • Votes: 1

    Winter's Tale

    by Mark Helprin

    Peter Lake--orphan, thief, mechanic extraordinare--and Athansor, a flying Brooklyn milkhorse, establish a reign of love and justice in New York City in the year 2000
  • Votes: 1

    Turtles All the Way Down

    by John Green

    Aza Holmes, a high school student with obsessive-compulsive disorder, becomes focused on searching for a fugitive billionaire.
  • Votes: 1

    Half of a Yellow Sun

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    THE WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION ‘WINNER OF WINNERS’ Winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction 2007, this is a heartbreaking, exquisitely written literary masterpiece
  • Votes: 1

    The Mask of the Red Death and Other Stories

    by Edgar Allan Poe

    "The Masque of the Red Death", originally published as "The Mask of the Red Death: A Fantasy", is an 1842 short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. The story follows Prince Prospero's attempts to avoid a dangerous plague, known as the Red Death, by hiding in his abbey. He, along with many other wealthy nobles, hosts a masquerade ballwithin seven rooms of the abbey, each decorated with a different color. In the midst of their revelry, a mysterious figure disguised as a Red Death victim enters and makes his way through each of the rooms. Prospero dies after confronting this stranger, whose "costume" proves to contain nothing tangible inside it; the guests also die in turn. Poe's story follows many traditions of Gothic fiction and is often analyzed as an allegory about the inevitability of death, though some critics advise against an allegorical reading. Many different interpretations have been presented, as well as attempts to identify the true nature of the titular disease. The story was first published in May 1842 in Graham's Magazineand has since been adapted in many different forms, including a 1964 film starring Vincent Price.
  • Votes: 1

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Surfacing

    by Margaret Atwood

    By the author of The Handmaid's Tale and Alias Grace 'One of the most important novels of the 20th century . . . utterly remarkable' New York Times A young woman returns to northern Quebec to the remote island of her childhood, with her lover and two friends, to investigate the mysterious disappearance of her father. Flooded with memories, she begins to realise that going home means entering not only another place but another time. As the wild island exerts its elemental hold and she is submerged in the language of the wilderness, she sees that what she is really looking for is her own past.
  • Votes: 1

    Darkness at Noon

    by Arthur Koestler

    First published in 1941, a classic portrait of a Soviet revolutionary who is imprisoned and tortured under Stalin's rule finds him agonizingly reflecting on his ironic career under the totalitarian movement.
  • Votes: 1

    20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Wordsworth Classics)

    by Jules Verne

  • Votes: 1

    The Cay

    by Theodore Taylor

    A tense and compulsive survival story of a young boy and an old man adrift on the ocean, then marooned on a tiny, deserted island. It is also a fascinating study of the relationship between Phillip, white, American, and influenced by his mother's prejudices, and the black man upon whom Phillip's life depends.
  • Votes: 1

    The Word for World is Forest

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 1

    Arcadia

    by Emmanuelle Bayamack-Tam

  • Votes: 1

    Nickel And Dimed

    by Barbara Ehrenreich

    The New York Times bestselling work of undercover reportage from our sharpest and most original social critic, with a new foreword by Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted Millions of Americans work full time, year round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that a job—any job—can be the ticket to a better life. But how does anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich left her home, took the cheapest lodgings she could find, and accepted whatever jobs she was offered. Moving from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, she worked as a waitress, a hotel maid, a cleaning woman, a nursing-home aide, and a Wal-Mart sales clerk. She lived in trailer parks and crumbling residential motels. Very quickly, she discovered that no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you int to live indoors. Nickel and Dimed reveals low-rent America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity—a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival. Read it for the smoldering clarity of Ehrenreich's perspective and for a rare view of how "prosperity" looks from the bottom. And now, in a new foreword, Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, explains why, twenty years on in America, Nickel and Dimed is more relevant than ever.
  • Votes: 1

    Tom Jones

    by Henry Fielding

  • Votes: 1

    Story of My Life

    by Sunny Morton

    Worksheets to use to record your or a loved ones life stories to preserve the memories from your entire life. Includes space to record your and immediate family members' vital statistics to use a a genealogical record.
  • Votes: 1

    La llamarada (Spanish Edition)

    by Enrique Laguerre

  • Votes: 1

    Little Bee

    by Chris Cleave

    Presents a tale of a precarious friendship between an illegal Nigerian refugee and a recent widow from suburban London, a story told from the alternating and disparate perspectives of both women.
  • Votes: 1

    A View from the Bridge (Penguin Classics)

    by Arthur Miller

    Eddie Carbone is a longshoreman and a straightforward man, with a strong sense of decency and of honour. For Eddie, it's a privilege to take in his wife's cousins, straight off the boat from Italy. But, as his niece begins to fall for one of them, it's clear that it's not just, as Eddie claims, that he's too strange, too sissy, too careless for her, but that something bigger, deeper is wrong, and wrong inside Eddie, in a way he can't face. Something which threatens the happiness of their whole family.
  • Votes: 1

    Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead

    by Tom Stoppard

    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead is a play which, as it were, takes place in the wings of Hamlet, and finds both humour and poignancy in the situation of the ill-fated attendant lords. The National Theatre production in April 1967 made Tom Stoppard's reputation virtually overnight. Its wit, stagecraft and verbal verve remain as exhilarating as they were then and the play has become a contemporary classic. 'One of the most original and engaging of post-war plays.' Daily Telegraph
  • Votes: 1

    The Street

    by Ann Petry

  • Votes: 1

    Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit

    by Jeanette Winterson

    This is the story of Jeanette, adopted and brought up by her mother as one of God's elect. Zealous and passionate, she seems seems destined for life as a missionary, but then she falls for one of her converts. At sixteen, Jeanette decides to leave the church, her home and her family, for the young woman she loves. Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious excess and human obsession. With a new introduction by the author 'Witty, bizarre, extraordinary and exhilarating' The Times 'She is a master of her material, a writer in whom great talent abides' Vanity Fair 'Many consider her to be the best living writer in this language... In her hands, words are fluid, radiant, humming' Evening Standard 'A novel that deserves revisiting' Observer 'A wonderful rites-of-passage novel' Mariella Frostrup
  • Votes: 1

    A Tale of Two Cities

    by Charles Dickens

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. With well over 200 million copies sold, it ranks amongst the most famous works in the history of literary fiction.The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralised by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same time period. It follows the lives of several characters through these events. The 45-chapter novel was published in 31 weekly instalments in Dickens's new literary periodical titled All the Year Round. From April 1859 to November 1859, Dickens also republished the chapters as eight monthly sections in green covers. All but three of Dickens's previous novels had appeared only as monthly instalments. The first weekly instalment of A Tale of Two Cities ran in the first issue of All the Year Round on 30 April 1859. The last ran thirty weeks later, on 26 November.
  • Votes: 1

    Dancing at Lughnasa

    by Brian Friel

    It is 1936 and harvest time in County Donegal. In a house just outside the village of Ballybeg live the five Mundy sisters, barely making ends meet, their ages ranging from twenty-six up to forty. The two male members of the household are brother Jack, a missionary priest, repatriated from Africa by his superiors after 25 years, and the seven-year-old child of the youngest sister. In depicting two days in the life of this menage, Brian Friel evokes not simply the interior landscape of a group of human beings trapped in their domestic situation, but the wider landscape, interior and exterior, Christian and pagan, of which they are a part.
  • Votes: 1

    Who Has Seen the Wind

    by W.O. Mitchell

    The story of young Brian, who learns about life and death, freedom and justice, as he comes of age in the Canadian prairies.
  • Votes: 1

    As For Me And My House Crafting Your Marriage To Last

    by Walter Wangerin Jr.

    Most books on marriage offer ten easy steps and twenty-five proven principles for achieving marital bliss. But Walter Wangerin side-steps such easy answers and offers us instead an intimate portrait of his own courtship and thirty-two year marriage-and a pastoral view of married life that inspires readers to view their own marriages with new honesty and hope. Wangerin's six tasks of marriage encourages couples to better understand and happily live out the vows they made, giving them tools to nurture and maintain a strong marital relationship. In his endorsement, Philip Yancey accurately describes this book as "an enduring classic and a book of wisdom, beauty, compassion, and piercing honesty."
  • Votes: 1

    The Fox; The Captain's Doll; The Ladybird

    by D. H. Lawrence

    The acclaimed author of Sons and Lovers explores the effects of war on humanity in three novellas. Written between November 1920 and December 1921, these novellas were enthusiastically received by D. H. Lawrence’s readers. Including the original ending of The Fox, the Cambridge edition adds new depth to the legacy of Lawrence’s story of a disruptive fox in a troublesome time. A visit to Austria in 1920 inspired the characters and settings of The Captain’s Doll, diving into a storied relationship between a Scottish soldier and a German countess in occupied Germany. Also featuring the original unedited edition of The Ladybird, a heartbreaking tale of a wounded soldier and the English nurse who tended his wounds, this is a complete collection of three of Lawrence’s brilliantly crafted war stories about human emotions and relationships.
  • Votes: 1

    Waiting for the Rain

    by Sheila Gordon

    A Study Guide for Sheila Gordon's "Waiting for the Rain," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.
  • Votes: 1

    Butterfly Revolution

    by William Butler

    Evil runs rampant when a young revolutionary turns the High Pines Summer Camp for Boys into her personal totalitarian domain
  • Votes: 1

    There Will Come Soft Rains (Tale Blazers

    by Ray D Bradbury

  • Votes: 1

    Of Beetles and Angels

    by Mawi Asgedom

    Read the remarkable true story of a young boy's journey from civil war in east Africa to a refugee camp in Sudan, to a childhood on welfare in an affluent American suburb, and eventually to a full-tuition scholarship at Harvard University. Following his father's advice to "treat all people-even the most unsightly beetles-as though they were angels sent from heaven," Mawi overcomes the challenges of language barriers, cultural differences, racial prejudice, and financial disadvantage to build a fulfilling, successful life for himself in his new home. Of Beetles and Angels is at once a harrowing survival story and a compelling examination of the refugee experience. With hundreds of thousands of copies sold since its initial publication, and as a frequent selection as one book/one school/one community reads, this unforgettable memoir continues to touch and inspire readers. This special expanded fifteenth anniversary edition includes a new introduction and afterword from the author, a discussion guide, and more.
  • Votes: 1

    Slouching Towards Bethlehem

    by Joan Didion

    Beautifully repackaged as part of the Picador Modern Classics Series, this special edition is small enough to fit in your pocket and bold enough to stand out on your bookshelf. Celebrated, iconic, and indispensable, Joan Didion’s first work of nonfiction, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, is considered a watershed moment in American writing. First published in 1968, the collection was critically praised as one of the “best prose written in this country.” More than perhaps any other book, this collection by one of the most distinctive prose stylists of our era captures the unique time and place of Joan Didion’s focus, exploring subjects such as John Wayne and Howard Hughes, growing up in California and the nature of good and evil in a Death Valley motel room, and, especially, the essence of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, the heart of the counterculture. As Joyce Carol Oates remarked: “[Didion] has been an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time, a memorable voice, partly eulogistic, partly despairing; always in control.”
  • Votes: 1

    Brighton Beach Memoirs

    by Neil Simon

    An autobiographical play based on the story of an extended family living in Brooklyn during the Depression, and their fifteen-year-old son, Eugene Jerome, who dreams of playing for the Yankees and becoming a writer.
  • Votes: 1

    Alice in Wonderland

    by Lewis Carroll

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is a the classic fantasy novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells of a girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as with children. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre. Its narrative course, structure, characters, and imagery have been enormously influential in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.
  • Votes: 1

    The Island of Dr. Moreau

    by H.G. Wells

    The Island of Dr. Moreau with a Book Club Bonus “But there are times when the little cloud spreads, until it obscures the sky. And those times I look around at my fellow men and I am reminded of some likeness of the beast-people, and I feel as though the animal is surging up in them. And I know they are neither wholly animal nor holy man, but an unstable combination of both.” ― H.G. Wells, The Island of Dr. Moreau The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells is a classic science fiction horror novel that tells the story of a reclusive mad-scientist on a hidden island. The Island of Dr. Moreau is a story that is more relevant today than ever before. If you haven't ever read it, or want to revisit this classic novel, now is a great time! This edition of The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells has been professionally formatted for e-readers and contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it.
  • Votes: 1

    The Adventure of The Speckled Band (Volume 8)

    by Arthur Conan Doyle

    The Valley of Fear is the fourth and final Sherlock Holmes novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is loosely based on the Molly Maguires and Pinkerton agent James McParland. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine between September 1914 and May 1915. The first book edition was copyrighted in 1914, and it was first published by George H. Doran Company in New York on 27 February 1915, and illustrated by Arthur I. Keller
  • Votes: 1

    Stranger in a Strange Land

    by Robert A. Heinlein

  • Votes: 1

    Nicholas and Alexandra

    by Robert K. Massie

    The story of the love that ended an empire In this commanding book, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Robert K. Massie sweeps readers back to the extraordinary world of Imperial Russia to tell the story of the Romanovs’ lives: Nicholas’s political naïveté, Alexandra’s obsession with the corrupt mystic Rasputin, and little Alexis’s brave struggle with hemophilia. Against a lavish backdrop of luxury and intrigue, Massie unfolds a powerful drama of passion and history—the story of a doomed empire and the death-marked royals who watched it crumble. BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Robert K. Massie's Catherine the Great. Praise for Nicholas and Alexandra “A larger-than-life drama.”—Saturday Review “A moving, rich book . . . [This] revealing, densely documented account of the last Romanovs focuses not on the great events . . . but on the royal family and their evil nemesis. . . . The tale is so bizarre, no melodrama is equal to it.”—Newsweek “A wonderfully rich tapestry, the colors fresh and clear, every strand sewn in with a sure hand. Mr. Massie describes those strange and terrible years with sympathy and understanding. . . . They come vividly before our eyes.”—The New York Times “An all-too-human picture . . . Both Nicholas and Alexandra with all their failings come truly alive, as does their almost storybook romance.”—Newsday “A magnificent and intimate picture . . . Not only the main characters but a whole era become alive and comprehensible.”—Harper’s
  • Votes: 1

    Old Testament

    by Victor H. Matthews

    This updated edition of a classroom standard provides an accessible introduction to the literature, history, and social context of the Old Testament.
  • Votes: 1

    The Oedipus Trilogy

    by Sophocles

    This elegant and uncommonly readable translation will make these seminal Greek tragedies accessible to a new generation of readers.
  • Votes: 1

    Moonfleet

    by J. Meade Falkner

    Moonfleet is a novel written by English writer J. Meade Falkner. A tale of smuggling, royal treasure and shipwreck, the book was extremely popular among children, mostly for its themes of adventure and gripping storyline. It remains a popular story widely read and is still sometimes studied in schools. "Moonfleet" begins as a mystery and an adventure story, a tale of smuggling set among the cliffs, caves, and downs of Dorset. What will be the outcome of the conflict between smugglers and revenue men? How can the hero, John Trenchard, discover the secret of Colonel John Mohune's treasure?
  • Votes: 1

    Writing Down the Bones

    by Natalie Goldberg

    Presents advice on how to write creatively, discussing the importance of discipline and offering a series of writing exercises.
  • Votes: 1

    Rain of Gold

    by Victor Villasenor

    Weaves the parallel stories of two Mexican-American families and two countries. Describes the volatile bootlegger who would become the author's father and the beautiful Lupe, his mother.
  • Votes: 1

    Six Characters in Search of an Author (Signet Classics)

    by Luigi Pirandello

    Exploring the absurdity and tragic isolation of human lives, the greatest of the Nobel Prize-winner's dramas, first performed in 1921, involves six family members who arrive at a theater and demand that it put on their life story. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    The Misfit's Manifesto (TED Books)

    by Lidia Yuknavitch

    The author explores the status of being a misfit as something to be embraced, and social misfits as being individuals of value who have a place in society, in a work that encourages people who have had difficulty finding their way to pursue their goals.
  • Votes: 1

    Murder on the Orient Express (Hindi)

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 1

    Piecing Me Together

    by Renée Watson

    2018 Newbery Honor Book and Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner 'Important and deeply moving' JOHN GREEN 'Timely and timeless' JACQUELINE WOODSON Jade is a girl striving for success in a world that seems like it's trying to break her. She knows she needs to take every opportunity that comes her way. And she has: every day Jade rides the bus away from her friends to a private school where she feels like an outsider, but where she has plenty of opportunities. But some opportunities Jade could do without, like the mentor programme for 'at-risk' girls. Just because her mentor is black doesn't mean she understands where Jade is coming from. Why is Jade always seen as someone to fix? But with a college scholarship promised at the end of it, how can Jade say no? Jade feels like her life is made up of hundreds of conflicting pieces. Will it ever fit together? Will she ever find her place in the world? More than anything, Jade just wants the opportunity to be real, to make a difference. NPR's Best Books of 2017 A 2017 New York Public Library Best Teen Book of the Year Chicago Public Library's Best Books of 2017 A School Library Journal Best Book of 2017 Kirkus Reviews' Best Teen Books of 2017 2018 Josette Frank Award Winner
  • Votes: 1

    A Walk in the Woods

    by Bill Bryson

    In the company of his friend Stephen Katz (last seen in the bestselling Neither Here nor There), Bill Bryson set off to hike the Appalachian Trail, the longest continuous footpath in the world. Ahead lay almost 2,200 miles of remote mountain wilderness filled with bears, moose, bobcats, rattlesnakes, poisonous plants, disease-bearing tics, the occasional chuckling murderer and - perhaps most alarming of all - people whose favourite pastime is discussing the relative merits of the external-frame backpack. Facing savage weather, merciless insects, unreliable maps and a fickle companion whose profoundest wish was to go to a motel and watch The X-Files, Bryson gamely struggled through the wilderness to achieve a lifetime's ambition - not to die outdoors.
  • Votes: 1

    Annie John

    by Jamaica Kincaid

    Annie John is a haunting and provocative story of a young girl growing up on the island of Antigua. A classic coming-of-age story in the tradition of The Catcher in the Rye and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Kincaid's novel focuses on a universal, tragic, and often comic theme: the loss of childhood. Annie's voice—urgent, demanding to be heard—is one that will not soon be forgotten by readers. An adored only child, Annie has until recently lived an idyllic life. She is inseparable from her beautiful mother, a powerful presence, who is the very center of the little girl's existence. Loved and cherished, Annie grows and thrives within her mother's benign shadow. Looking back on her childhood, she reflects, "It was in such a paradise that I lived." When she turns twelve, however, Annie's life changes, in ways that are often mysterious to her. She begins to question the cultural assumptions of her island world; at school she instinctively rebels against authority; and most frighteningly, her mother, seeing Annie as a "young lady," ceases to be the source of unconditional adoration and takes on the new and unfamiliar guise of adversary. At the end of her school years, Annie decides to leave Antigua and her family, but not without a measure of sorrow, especially for the mother she once knew and never ceases to mourn. "For I could not be sure," she reflects, "whether for the rest of my life I would be able to tell when it was really my mother and when it was really her shadow standing between me and the rest of the world."
  • Votes: 1

    On Wings of Eagles

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

    by Jamie Ford

    A chance discovery in boarded up old hotel brings back long forgotten memories and rekindles a forbidden love, swept aside during the chaos and heartbreak World War II and internment of Japanese families in the wake of Pearl Harbor.
  • Votes: 1

    Dragonlance Chronicles

    by Margaret Weis

    When dragons invade the land of Krynn, a small band of heroes, including a knight, barbarian, dwarf, and half-elf, begin the search for the magical Dragon Orb and Dragonlance.
  • Votes: 1

    The Sirens of Titan

    by Kurt Vonnegut

    Malachi Constant, "the richest man in America," gives up his indulgent lifestyle to follow an urgent calling to probe the depths of space. He participates in a Martian invasion of Earth, mates with the wife of an astronaut adrift on the tides of time, and follows the lure of the "Sirens of Titan."
  • Votes: 1

    Mother to Mother (Bluestreak)

    by Sindiwe Magona

    Sindiwe Magona's novel Mother to Mother explores the South African legacy of apartheid through the lens of a woman who remembers a life marked by oppression and injustice. Magona decided to write this novel when she discovered that Fulbright Scholar Amy Biehl, who had been killed while working to organize the nation's first ever democratic elections in 1993, died just a few yards away from her own permanent residence in Guguletu, Capetown. She then learned that one of the boys held responsible for the killing was in fact her neighbor's son. Magona began to imagine how easily it might have been her own son caught up in the wave of violence that day. The book is based on this real-life incident, and takes the form of an epistle to Amy Biehl's mother. The murderer's mother, Mandisi, writes about her life, the life of her child, and the colonized society that not only allowed, but perpetuated violence against women and impoverished black South Africans under the reign of apartheid. The result is not an apology for the murder, but a beautifully written exploration of the society that bred such violence.
  • Votes: 1

    A Bell for Adano

    by John Hersey

    This classic novel and winner of the Pulitzer Prize tells the story of an Italian-American major in World War II who wins the love and admiration of the local townspeople when he searches for a replacement for the 700-year-old town bell that had been melted down for bullets by the fascists. Although stituated during one of the most devastating experiences in human history, John Hersey's story speaks with unflinching patriotism and humanity.
  • Votes: 1

    World War Z

    by Max Brooks

    An account of the decade-long conflict between humankind and hordes of the predatory undead is told from the perspective of dozens of survivors who describe in their own words the epic human battle for survival.
  • Votes: 1

    Who Do You Think You Are?

    by Ray Leight

  • Votes: 1

    Bless the Beasts & Children (Enriched Classics)

    by Glendon Swarthout

    The neglected attendees of the Box Canyon Boys Camp find their lives turned around by Cotton, who, in a hot-wired pickup, challenges them to join efforts to save a herd of buffalo and discover themselves in the process.
  • Votes: 1

    Endurance

    by Alfred Lansing

  • Votes: 1

    Where the Sidewalk Ends

    by Shel Silverstein

    If you are a dreamer, come in, If you are a dreamer, A wisher, a liar, A hope-er, a pray-er, A magic bean buyer … Come in … for where the sidewalk ends, Shel Silverstein’s world begins. You’ll meet a boy who turns into a TV set, and a girl who eats a whale. The Unicorn and the Bloath live there, and so does Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout who will not take the garbage out. It is a place where you wash your shadow and plant diamond gardens, a place where shoes fly, sisters are auctioned off, and crocodiles go to the dentist. Shel Silverstein’s masterful collection of poems and drawings is at once outrageously funny and profound.
  • Votes: 1

    Ashes of Roses

    by MJ Auch

    When Rose Nolan arrives on Ellis Island as a seventeen-year-old Irish immigrant, she is looking for a land of opportunities; what she finds is far from all she'd dreamed. Stubborn and tenacious, she refuses to give up. Left alone to fend for herself and her younger sister, Rose is thrust into a hard-knock life of tenements and factory work. But even as she struggles, Rose finds small bright points in her new life--at the movies with her working friends and in the honest goals of her mentor, Gussie. Still, after her exhausting days as a working girl, Rose must face the confusion of balancing her need for simple fun with her more wary feelings about joining Gussie in her fight for better working conditions. When the devastating Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of 1911 rushes into Rose's life, her confusions are brought to an all-too-painful head. To whom and to what can she turn when everything around her is in ashes? Sharp, poignant, and stirringly real, MJ Auch has written a powerful historical novel that is hard to put down.
  • Votes: 1

    Word to Caesar

    by Geoffrey Trease

    Left an orphan by the uprising of the tribes in Britain, a young man must make his way across the Roman Empire to deliver a message of importance to Emperor Hadrian. Along the way he meets villains, charioteers, and at last the emporer he seeks. A great adventure story!
  • Votes: 1

    The Maze Runner (Book 1)

    by James Dashner

  • Votes: 1

    The Emperor of Ice-Cream

    by Gary M Almeter

    In The Emperor of Ice-Cream Gary Almeter recounts stories of his grandpa to determine how where a person is determines who they are.
  • Votes: 1

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    The Silver Sword

    by Ian Serraillier

    'If you meet Ruth or Edek or Bronia, you must tell them I'm going to Switzerland to find their mother. Tell them to follow as soon as they can’ Having lost their parents in the chaos of war, Ruth, Edek and Bronia are left alone to fend for themselves and hide from the Nazis amid the rubble and ruins of their city. They meet a ragged orphan boy, Jan, who treasures a paperknife - a silver sword - which was entrusted to him by an escaped prisoner of war. The three children realise that the escapee was their father, the silver sword a message that he is alive and searching for them. Together with Jan they begin a dangerous journey across the battlefields of Europe to find their parents. BACKSTORY: Read a letter from the author's daughter and find out about the amazing true stories that inspired The Silver Sword.
  • Votes: 1

    Not Drunk Enough Vol. 1 (1)

    by Tess Stone

    Logan is a repairman in the wrong place at the wrong time—which is a creepy corporate lab in the middle of the goddamn night. After fighting off a freaky creature, he joins forces with three other poor souls trapped inside the building. Who are they? What are they doing here? What the hell is going on? And will any of them get out alive? The first in a brand new series from the mind of Tessa Stone (Hanna Is Not a Boy's Name, Buzz!)!
  • Votes: 1

    Children of the Dust Bowl

    by Jerry Stanley

    Illus. with photographs from the Dust Bowl era. This true story took place at the emergency farm-labor camp immortalized in Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath. Ostracized as "dumb Okies," the children of Dust Bowl migrant laborers went without school--until Superintendent Leo Hart and 50 Okie kids built their own school in a nearby field.
  • Votes: 1

    Pride and Prejudice (Pride & Predjudice)

    by Nancy Butler

    Elizabeth Bennet finds her neighbour Fitzwilliam Darcy arrogant and conceited. The fact that he has meddled in the romantic relationship between her sister Jane and local aristocrat Charles Bingley makes him still more detestable. Darcy however is charmed by Elizabeth's wit and beauty, and has set his sight on her hand in marriage. Will Elizabeth's pride prevail?
  • Votes: 1

    Utilitarianism

    by John Stuart Mill

  • Votes: 1

    The Tale of Despereaux

    by Kate DiCamillo

    A brave mouse, a covetous rat, a wishful serving girl, and a princess named Pea come together in Kate DiCamillo's Newbery Medal–winning tale. Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other's lives. What happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out. With black-and-white illustrations and a refreshed cover by Timothy Basil Ering.
  • Votes: 1

    The Body

    by Bill Bryson

  • Votes: 1

    Rumble Fish

    by S. E. Hinton

    The classic YA novel RUMBLE FISH, written by celebrated novelist S.E. Hinton and immortalized by legendary film maker Francis Ford Coppola, now available as an eBook for the first time. Rusty James wants to be just like his big brother Motorcycle Boy - tough enough to be respected by everyone in the neighborhood. But Motorcycle Boy is also smart, so smart that Rusty James relies on him to bail him out of trouble. The brothers are inseparable, and Motorcycle Boy will always be there to watch his back, so there's nothing to worry about, right? Or so Rusty James believes, until his world falls apart and Motorcycle Boy isn't there to pick up the pieces. From the author of THE OUTSIDERS, S.E. Hinton looks into a world where hope is hard to find, and violence is a fact of life. “Stylistically superb. . . . This packs a punch that will leave readers of any age reeling.”—School Library Journal “Sharper in focus and more mature in style than Hinton’s The Outsiders.”—Booklist An ALA Best Books for Young Adults A School Library Journal Best Books of the Year
  • Votes: 1

    Exodus

    by Leon Uris

    Examines the phenomenon of Exodus and its influence on post-World War II understandings of Israel's beginnings.
  • Votes: 1

    The Secret History

    by Donna Tartt

    A transfer student from a small town in California, Richard Papen is determined to affect the ways of his Hampden College peers, and he begins his intense studies under the tutelage of eccentric Julian Morrow. BOMC & QPB Alt. Tour.
  • Votes: 1

    Rendezvous with Rama

    by Arthur C. Clarke

    In the year 2130, a mysterious and apparently untenanted alien spaceship, Rama, enters our solar system. The first product of an alien civilisation to be encountered by man, it reveals a world of technological marvels and an unparalleled artificial ecology. But what is its purpose in 2131? Who is inside it? And why?
  • Votes: 1

    An Edible History of Humanity

    by Tom Standage

    Throughout history, food has done more than simply provide sustenance. It has acted as a tool of social transformation, political organization, geopolitical competition, industrial development, military conflict and economic expansion. In An Edible History of Humanity Tom Standage serves up a hugely satisfying account of ways in which food has, indirectly, helped to shape and transform societies around the world. It is a dazzling account of gastronomic revolutions from pre-history to the present.
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