Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 208

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 157

    The Kite Runner

    by KhaledHosseini

  • Votes: 129

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 95

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 78

    Behave

    by Robert M. Sapolsky

  • Votes: 62

    The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

    by Robin Sharma

    An internationally bestselling fable about a spiritual journey, littered with powerful life lessons that teach us how to abandon consumerism in order to embrace destiny, live life to the full and discover joy.
  • Votes: 51

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 44

    Meditations

    by Marcus Aurelius

    The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 42

    Annihilation of Caste

    by B.R. Ambedkar

  • Votes: 40

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

    by Mark Manson

  • Votes: 37

    The Life of a Scilly Sergeant

    by Colin Taylor

  • Votes: 33

    Ragged

    by Gretchen Ronnevik

  • Votes: 33

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 30

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    **THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLER** 'Interesting and provocative... It gives you a sense of how briefly we've been on this Earth' Barack Obama What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? Yuval Noah Harari challenges everything we know about being human in the perfect read for these unprecedented times. Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it: us. In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. 'I would recommend Sapiens to anyone who's interested in the history and future of our species' Bill Gates **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 30

    1984

    by George Orwell

    Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities
  • Votes: 30

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 29

    Yes, And

    by Kelly Leonard

    Executives from The Second City—the world’s premier comedy theater and school of improvisation—reveal improvisational techniques that can help any organization develop innovators, encourage adaptable leaders, and build transformational businesses. For more than fifty years, The Second City comedy theater in Chicago has been a training ground for some of the best comic minds in the industry—including John Belushi, Bill Murray, Gilda Radner, Mike Myers, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, and Tina Fey. But it also provides one-of-a-kind leadership training to cutting-edge companies, nonprofits, and public sector organizations—all aimed at increasing creativity, collaboration, and teamwork. The rules for leadership and teamwork have changed, and the skills that got professionals ahead a generation ago don’t work anymore. Now The Second City provides a new toolkit individuals and organizations can use to thrive in a world increasingly shaped by speed, social communication, and decentralization. Based on eight principles of improvisation, Yes, And helps to develop these skills and foster them in high-potential leaders and their teams, including: Mastering the ability to co-create in an ensemble Fostering a “yes, and” approach to work Embracing failure to accelerate high performance Leading by listening and by learning to follow Innovating by making something out of nothing Yes, And is a must-read for professionals and organizations, helping to develop the invaluable leadership skills needed to succeed today.
  • Votes: 25

    The Narrow Road to the Deep North

    by Richard Flanagan

  • Votes: 25

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    The tragic story of the friendship between two migrant workers, George and mentally retarded Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm
  • Votes: 25

    The Trial

    by Franz Kafka

    The story of The Trial's publication is almost as fascinating as the novel itself. Kafka intended his parable of alienation in a mysterious bureaucracy to be burned, along with the rest of his diaries and manuscripts, after his death in 1924. Yet his friend Max Brod pressed forward to prepare The Trial and the rest of his papers for publication.
  • Votes: 24

    Autobiography of a Yogi

    by Yogananda (Paramahansa)

  • Votes: 24

    The Secret

    by Rhonda Byrne

  • Votes: 23

    The Fault in Our Stars

    by John Green

    I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, then all at once. Despite the tumour-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. Praise for The Fault in Our Stars: Sunday Times (Culture) 'A touching, often fiercely funny novel' The Sun on Sunday (Fabulous Magazine) 'So good I think it should be compulsory reading for everyone!' Daily Express 'John Green brilliantly captures the voices of a young generation while instilling it with the wisdom of a life that has lived too much yet will never live enough' The Metro - 2013 Best Fiction 'The love affair of two terminally ill teenagers could be mawkish. In fact, it's funny, clever, irreverent and life-affirming.' Grazia 'So good!' Good Housekeeping 'As funny as it is heartbreaking... we defy you not to fall in love with its main characters, Hazel and Augustus.' The Tablet 'A humourous and poignant love story... It's terrifically funny... as well as a moving exploration of loss and grief. And no, it's so much not just for teenage cancer sufferers... it's for everyone.' Bliss 'If you need inspiration when it comes to making the most of a moment, this one is for you' Mizz 'Insightful, bold, irreverent and raw, if this doesn't make you cry, it'll definitely make you think, laugh and maybe even fall in love yourself!'
  • Votes: 21

    On Nineteen Eighty-Four

    by Abbott Gleason

  • Votes: 21

    Patients Encyclopedia of Urinary Tract Infection, Sexual Cystitis and Interstitial Cystitis

    by Angela Kilmartin

  • Votes: 19

    The Gulag Archipelago

    by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

  • Votes: 18

    A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 18

    One Hundred Years of Solitude

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.
  • Votes: 17

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 16

    The Day the World Came to Town

    by Jim DeFede

  • Votes: 15

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Votes: 14

    Beloved

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 14

    The Holy Geeta

    by Swami Chinmayananda

  • Votes: 12

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 11

    The Book of Awesome

    by Neil Pasricha

  • Votes: 11

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.
  • Votes: 11

    The Handmaid's Tale

    by Margaret Atwood

  • Votes: 10

    Darkness at Noon

    by Arthur Koestler

    First published in 1941, a classic portrait of a Soviet revolutionary who is imprisoned and tortured under Stalin's rule finds him agonizingly reflecting on his ironic career under the totalitarian movement.
  • Votes: 9

    The Nones

    by Ryan P. Burge

    In The Nones: Where They Came From, Who They Are, and Where They Are Going, Ryan P. Burge details a comprehensive picture of an increasingly significant group--Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. The growth of the nones in American society has been dramatic. In 1972, just 5 percent of Americans claimed "no religion" on the General Social Survey. In 2018, that number rose to 23.7 percent, making the nones as numerous as both evangelical Protestants and Roman Catholics. Every indication is that the nones will be the largest religious group in the United States in the next decade. Burge illustrates his precise but accessible descriptions with charts and graphs drawn from over a dozen carefully curated datasets, some tracking changes in American religion over a long period of time, others large enough to allow a statistical deep dive on subgroups such as atheists and agnostics. Burge also draws on data that tracks how individuals move in and out of religion over time, helping readers understand what type of people become nones and what factors lead an individual to return to religion. The Nones gives readers a nuanced, accurate, and meaningful picture of the growing number of Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. Burge explains how this rise happened, who the nones are, and what they mean for the future of American religion.
  • Votes: 9

    Forgotten

    by Linda Hervieux

  • Votes: 9

    The Midnight Library

    by Matt Haig

  • Votes: 9

    Harry Potter Box Set

    by J. K. Rowling

  • Votes: 8

    How to Lie with Statistics

    by Darrell Huff

    If you want to outsmart a crook, learn his tricks—Darrell Huff explains exactly how in the classic How to Lie with Statistics. From distorted graphs and biased samples to misleading averages, there are countless statistical dodges that lend cover to anyone with an ax to grind or a product to sell. With abundant examples and illustrations, Darrell Huff’s lively and engaging primer clarifies the basic principles of statistics and explains how they’re used to present information in honest and not-so-honest ways. Now even more indispensable in our data-driven world than it was when first published, How to Lie with Statistics is the book that generations of readers have relied on to keep from being fooled.
  • Votes: 8

    1066 And All That

    by W. C. Sellar

  • Votes: 8

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    by Milan Kundera

    A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals—while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel “the unbearable lightness of being.” A major achievement from one of the world’s truly great writers, Milan Kundera’s magnificent novel of passion and politics, infidelity and ideas, encompasses the extremes of comedy and tragedy, illuminating all aspects of human existence.
  • Votes: 8

    The Stand

    by Stephen King

    A monumentally devastating plague leaves only a few survivors who, while experiencing dreams of a battle between good and evil, move toward an actual confrontation as they migrate to Boulder, Colorado.
  • Votes: 8

    Agreed

    by Patty Newbold

  • Votes: 8

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 8

    The Stranger

    by Albert Camus

    An ordinary man is unwittingly caught up in a senseless murder in Algeria
  • Votes: 8

    The Forty Rules of Love

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 8

    Caste

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. "[Caste] should be at the top of every American's reading list."--Chicago Tribune "As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power--which groups have it and which do not." In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people's lives and behavior and the nation's fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people--including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball's Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others--she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.
  • Votes: 7

    The Five People You Meet in Heaven

    by Mitch Albom

    The first novel in the Heaven series from the internationally bestselling author, Mitch Albom. THE FIVE PEOPLE YOU MEET IN HEAVEN is a wonderfully moving fable that addresses the meaning of life, and life after death, in the poignant way that made TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE such an astonishing book. The novel's protagonist is an elderly amusement park maintenance worker named Eddie who, while operating a ride called the 'Free Fall', dies while trying to save a young girl who gets in the way of a falling cart that hurtles to earth. Eddie goes to heaven, where he meets five people who were unexpectedly instrumental in some way in his life. While each guide takes him through heaven, Eddie learns a little bit more about what his time on earth meant, what he was supposed to have learned, and what his true purpose on earth was. Throughout there are dramatic flashbacks where we see scenes from his troubled childhood, his years in the army in the Philippines jungle, and with his first and only love, his wife Marguerite. THE FIVE PEOPLE YOU MEET IN HEAVEN is the perfect book to follow TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE. Its compellingly affecting themes and lyrical writing will fascinate Mitch Albom's huge readership.
  • Votes: 7

    I Am the Messenger

    by Markus Zusak

  • Votes: 7

    The Giving Tree

    by Shel Silverstein

    As The Giving Tree turns fifty, this timeless classic is available for the first time ever in ebook format. This digital edition allows young readers and lifelong fans to continue the legacy and love of a household classic that will now reach an even wider audience. Never before have Shel Silverstein's children's books appeared in a format other than hardcover. Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein's poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another's capacity to love in return. Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit. And don't miss these other Shel Silverstein ebooks, Where the Sidewalk Ends, and A Light in the Attic!
  • Votes: 7

    Flowers for Algernon

    by Daniel Keyes

    The Heinemann Plays series offers contemporary drama and classic plays in durable classroom editions. Many have large casts and an equal mix of boy and girl parts. This play is a dramatization of Daniel Keyes's story about a retarded adult who desperately wants to be able to read and write.
  • Votes: 7

    Don Quixote (Penguin Classics)

    by Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra

  • Votes: 7

    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

    In Rich Dad Poor Dad, the #1 Personal Finance book of all time, Robert Kiyosaki shares the story of his two dad: his real father, whom he calls his poor dad,’ and the father of his best friend, the man who became his mentor and his rich dad.’ One man was well educated and an employee all his life, the other’s education was street smarts” over traditional classroom education and he took the path of entrepreneurship a road that led him to become one of the wealthiest men in Hawaii. Robert’s poor dad struggled financially all his life, and these two dads these very different points of view of money, investing, and employment shaped Robert’s thinking about money.Robert has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people, around the world, think about money and investing and he has become a global advocate for financial education and the path to financial freedom. Rich Dad Poor Dad (and the Rich Dad series it spawned) has sold over 36 million copies in English and translated editions around the world.Rich Dad Poor Dad will explode the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich challenge the belief that your house is an asset show parents why they can’t rely on the school system to teach their kidsabout money define, once and for all, an asset and a liability explain the difference between good debt and bad debt teach you to see the world of money from different perspectives discuss the shift in mindset that can put you on the road to financial freedom
  • Votes: 6

    Problems In General Physics by IE Irodov's - Vol. I

  • Votes: 6

    The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse By Charlie Mackesy & The Art of Happiness By Dalai Lama 2 Books Collection Set

    by Charlie Mackesy

  • Votes: 6

    The Power of One

    by Bryce Courtenay

  • Votes: 6

    The Little Prince

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    When a pilot finds himself alone and stranded with a broken-down plane, a little prince is his only companion living on a strange deserted planet. Full of wisdom, humour and delight, this book while intended for children is also a favourite of adults for its quirkiness and insight.
  • Votes: 6

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 6

    Shrimad Bhagwat Geeta

    by Rajkot Gurukul

  • Votes: 6

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

    by Stephen R. Covey

    A leading management consultant outlines seven organizational rules for improving effectiveness and increasing productivity at work and at home.
  • Votes: 6

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides a new hardcover edition of the classic best-selling self-help book, which includes principles that can be applied to both business and life itself, in a book that focuses on how to best affectively communicate with people.
  • Votes: 5

    The Way We Live

    by Stafford Cliff

  • Votes: 5

    Invisible Man

    by Ralph Ellison

    Invisible Man is a milestone in American literature, a book that has continued to engage readers since its appearance in 1952. A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of "the Brotherhood", and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be. The book is a passionate and witty tour de force of style, strongly influenced by T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Joyce, and Dostoevsky.
  • Votes: 5

    Framed Perspective Vol. 1

    by Marcos Mateu-Mestre

  • Votes: 5

    On Tyranny

    by Timothy Snyder

    In previous books, Holocaust historian Timothy Snyder dissected the events and values that enabled the rise of Hitler and Stalin and the execution of their catastrophic policies. With Twenty Lessons, Snyder draws from the darkest hours of the twentieth century to provide hope for the twenty-first. As he writes, "Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism and communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience."
  • Votes: 5

    The Madness of Crowds

    by Douglas Murray

  • Votes: 5

    A Fighting Chance

    by Elizabeth Warren

  • Votes: 5

    The Perks of Being a Wallflower

    by Stephen Chbosky

  • Votes: 5

    Because of You

    by Dawn French

  • Votes: 5

    House of Leaves

    by Mark Z. Danielewski

  • Votes: 5

    Les Miserables

    by Victor Hugo

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • Votes: 5

    The Master

    by Colm Toibin

  • Votes: 5

    Absolutely Almost

    by Lisa Graff

  • Votes: 4

    The Art of Racing in the Rain

    by Garth Stein

    Nearing the end of his life, Enzo, a dog with a philosopher's soul, tries to bring together the family, pulled apart by a three year custody battle between daughter Zoe's maternal grandparents and her father Denny, a race car driver.
  • Votes: 4

    Still Grazing

    by Hugh Masikela

  • Votes: 4

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 4

    Americanah

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

  • Votes: 4

    The Island on Bird Street

    by Uri Orlev

  • Votes: 4

    The Color of Law

    by Richard Rothstein

    Lauded by Ta-Nehisi Coates for his "brilliant" and "fine understanding of the machinery of government policy" (The Atlantic), Richard Rothstein has painstakingly documented how American cities, from San Francisco to Boston, became so racially divided. Rothstein describes how federal, state, and local governments systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning, public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities, subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs, tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation, and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. He demonstrates that such policies still influence tragedies in places like Ferguson and Baltimore. Scholars have separately described many of these policies, but until now, no author has brought them together to explode the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces. Like The New Jim Crow, Rothstein's groundbreaking history forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.
  • Votes: 4

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown

  • Votes: 4

    To Kill a Mocking Bird

    by Harper Lee

  • Votes: 4

    As a Man Thinketh

    by James Allen

  • Votes: 4

    On the Road

    by Jack Kerouac

    Follows the counterculture escapades of members of the Beat generation as they seek pleasure and meaning while traveling coast to coast
  • Votes: 4

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 4

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

    The revolutionary literary vision that sowed the seeds of Objectivism, Ayn Rand's groundbreaking philosophy, and brought her immediate worldwide acclaim. This modern classic is the story of intransigent young architect Howard Roark, whose integrity was as unyielding as granite...of Dominique Francon, the exquisitely beautiful woman who loved Roark passionately, but married his worst enemy...and of the fanatic denunciation unleashed by an enraged society against a great creator. As fresh today as it was then, Rand’s provocative novel presents one of the most challenging ideas in all of fiction—that man’s ego is the fountainhead of human progress... “A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly...This is the only novel of ideas written by an American woman that I can recall.”—The New York Times
  • Votes: 4

    War and Peace (Vintage Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

    Presents a new translation of the classic reflecting the life and times of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars, in a book accompanied by an index of historical figures, textual annotation, a chapter summary, and an introduction.
  • Votes: 4

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

  • Votes: 4

    Tuesdays with Morrie

    by Mitch Albom

    Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague? Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it? For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Mitch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final 'class': lessons in how to live. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world. Praise for Tuesdays with Morrie: 'This is a true story that shines and leaves you forever warmed by its afterglow' Amy Tan 'A moving tribute to embracing life' Glasgow Herald 'An extraordinary contribution to the literature of death' Boston Globe 'A beautifully written book of great clarity and wisdom that lovingly captures the simplicity beyond life's complexities' M Scott Peck
  • Votes: 4

    Wonder

    by R. J. Palacio

  • Votes: 4

    Out There

    by The Editors of Outside Magazine

  • Votes: 3

    I Love You from Miffy

    by Dick Bruna

  • Votes: 3

    The House of Sleep

    by Jonathan Coe

  • Votes: 3

    Fake History

    by Otto English

  • Votes: 3

    The Great Controversy

    by Ellen G. White

    Beginning with the destruction of Jerusalem and continuing through the persecutions of Christians in the Roman Empire, the apostasy of the Dark Ages, the shining light of the Reformation, and the worldwide religious awakening of the nineteenth century, this volume traces the conflict into the future, to the Second Coming of Jesus and the glories of the earth made new. In this concluding volume, the author powerfully points out the principles involved in the impending conflict and how each person can stand firmly for God and His truth.
  • Votes: 3

    My Tutu Went AWOL

    by Iestyn Edwards

  • Votes: 3

    Dancing on Seaside (1)

    by Julius James DeAngelus

  • Votes: 3

    Graceling

    by Kristin Cashore

    In a world where people born with an exceptional skill, known as a Grace, are feared and exploited, Katsa carries the burden of a skill even she despises: the Grace of killing. She lives under the command of her Uncle Randa, King of the Middluns, and is expected to carry out his dirty work, punishing and torturing anyone who displeases him. Breaking arms and cutting off fingers are her stock-in-trade. Finding life under his rule increasingly unbearable, Katsa forms an underground Council whose purpose is to combat the destructive behaviour of the seven kings - after all, the Middluns is only one of the Seven Kingdoms, each of them ruled by their own king and his personal agenda for power. When the Council hears that the King of Liend's father has been kidnapped Katsa investigates ... and stumbles across a mystery. Who would want to kidnap him, and why? And who was the extraordinary Graced fighter who challenged her fighting skills, for the first time, as she and the Council rushed the old man to saftey? Something dark and deadly is rising in the north and creeping across the continent, and behind it all lurks the shadowy figure of a one-eyed king ...
  • Votes: 3

    Coldharbour

    by John Mead

  • Votes: 3

    Forged

    by Jason Evert

  • Votes: 3

    How the Word Is Passed

    by Clint Smith

    Black Harvard Doctorate in Poetics launches poetry that explores modern blackness. Clint Smith's debut poetry collection, Counting Descent, is a coming of age story that seeks to complicate our conception of lineage and tradition. Smith explores the cognitive dissonance that results from belonging to a community that unapologetically celebrates black humanity while living in a world that often renders blackness a caricature of fear. His poems move fluidly across personal and political histories, all the while reflecting on the social construction of our lived experiences. Smith brings the reader on a powerful journey forcing us to reflect on all that we learn growing up, and all that we seek to unlearn moving forward. - Winner, 2017 Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Award - Finalist, 2017 NAACP Image Awards - 2017 'One Book One New Orleans' Book Selection
  • Votes: 3

    A History of Interest Rates, Fourth Edition (Wiley Finance)

    by Sidney Homer

  • Votes: 3

    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

    by Mildred D. Taylor

  • Votes: 3

    The Bonfire of the Vanities

    by Tom Wolfe

  • Votes: 3

    THE TRUTH

    by PETER GRAINGER

  • Votes: 3

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 3

    Ikigai

    by Héctor García

  • Votes: 3

    Things Fall Apart

    by Chinua Achebe

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele
  • Votes: 3

    The Warmth of Other Suns

    by Isabel Wilkerson

    Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.
  • Votes: 3

    The Old Man and the Sea

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 3

    Walden

    by Henry David Thoreau

  • Votes: 3

    Great Expectations (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 3

    Jonathan Livingston Seagull

    by Richard Bach

    Because he spends so much time perfecting his flying form instead of concentrating on getting food, a seagull is ostracized by the rest of the flock.
  • Votes: 3

    Anna Karenina

    by graf Leo Tolstoy

    Presents the nineteenth-century Russian novelist's classic in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society
  • Votes: 3

    James Baldwin

    by James Baldwin

  • Votes: 3

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 3

    It Ends with Us

    by Colleen Hoover

    In this “brave and heartbreaking novel that digs its claws into you and doesn’t let go, long after you’ve finished it” (Anna Todd, New York Times bestselling author) from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of All Your Perfects, a workaholic with a too-good-to-be-true romance can’t stop thinking about her first love. Lily hasn’t always had it easy, but that’s never stopped her from working hard for the life she wants. She’s come a long way from the small town where she grew up—she graduated from college, moved to Boston, and started her own business. And when she feels a spark with a gorgeous neurosurgeon named Ryle Kincaid, everything in Lily’s life seems too good to be true. Ryle is assertive, stubborn, maybe even a little arrogant. He’s also sensitive, brilliant, and has a total soft spot for Lily. And the way he looks in scrubs certainly doesn’t hurt. Lily can’t get him out of her head. But Ryle’s complete aversion to relationships is disturbing. Even as Lily finds herself becoming the exception to his “no dating” rule, she can’t help but wonder what made him that way in the first place. As questions about her new relationship overwhelm her, so do thoughts of Atlas Corrigan—her first love and a link to the past she left behind. He was her kindred spirit, her protector. When Atlas suddenly reappears, everything Lily has built with Ryle is threatened. An honest, evocative, and tender novel, It Ends with Us is “a glorious and touching read, a forever keeper. The kind of book that gets handed down” (USA TODAY).
  • Votes: 3

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 3

    Looking for Alaska

    by John Green

    The authors definitive edition of this unmissable first novel from bestselling and award-winning author of THE FAULT IN OUR STARS and TURTLES ALL THE WAY DOWN. Contains: • a brand-new introduction from John Green • never-before-seen passages from original manuscript • a Q&A with the author, responding to fans’ favourite questions
  • Votes: 3

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    by Daniel Kahneman

  • Votes: 3

    The Old Man and The Sea, Book Cover May Vary

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 3

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 3

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 3

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

    by Oscar Wilde

    A handsome, dissolute man who sells his soul for eternal youth is horrified to see the reflection of his degeneration in the distorted features of his portrait.
  • Votes: 3

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

    A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners, Guy Montag, suddenly realizes their merit.
  • Votes: 3

    Who Moved My Cheese

    by Spencer Johnson

    THE #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER WITH OVER 28 MILLION COPIES IN PRINT! A timeless business classic, Who Moved My Cheese? uses a simple parable to reveal profound truths about dealing with change so that you can enjoy less stress and more success in your work and in your life. It would be all so easy if you had a map to the Maze. If the same old routines worked. If they'd just stop moving "The Cheese." But things keep changing... Most people are fearful of change, both personal and professional, because they don't have any control over how or when it happens to them. Since change happens either to the individual or by the individual, Dr. Spencer Johnson, the coauthor of the multimillion bestseller The One Minute Manager, uses a deceptively simple story to show that when it comes to living in a rapidly changing world, what matters most is your attitude. Exploring a simple way to take the fear and anxiety out of managing the future, Who Moved My Cheese? can help you discover how to anticipate, acknowledge, and accept change in order to have a positive impact on your job, your relationships, and every aspect of your life.
  • Votes: 3

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

    William Golding's Lord of the Flies is a dystopian classic: 'exciting, relevant and thought-provoking' (Stephen King). When a group of schoolboys are stranded on a desert island, what could go wrong? 'One of my favorite books - I read it every couple of years.' (Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games) A plane crashes on a desert island. The only survivors are a group of schoolboys. By day, they discover fantastic wildlife and dazzling beaches, learning to survive; at night, they are haunted by nightmares of a primitive beast. Orphaned by society, it isn't long before their innocent childhood games devolve into a savage, murderous hunt ... 'Stands out mightily in my memory ... Such a strong statement about the human heart.' (Patricia Cornwell) 'Terrifying and haunting.' (Kingsley Amis) 'Beautifully written, tragic and provocative.' (E. M. Forster) ONE OF THE BBC'S ICONIC 'NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD' What readers are saying: 'Every real human being should read this ... This is what we are.' 'It's brilliant, it's captivating, it's thought provoking and brutal and for some, its truly terrifying.' 'It can be read and re-read many times, and every time something new will appear.' 'There is a reason why this is studied at school ... Excellent read.' 'This is one of the few books I've read that I keep on my Kindle to read again.' 'I revisit this every few years and it's always fresh and impressive ... One of the best books I've ever read.'
  • Votes: 2

    Gifted Hands

    by Ben Carson M.D.

  • Votes: 2

    It's Not You, It's Biology.

    by Joe Quirk

  • Votes: 2

    Dear Mr. Henshaw

    by Beverly Cleary

  • Votes: 2

    The Shadow and Bone Trilogy Boxed Set

    by Leigh Bardugo

  • Votes: 2

    A Whole Life

    by Robert Seethaler

  • Votes: 2

    The Six of Crows Duology Boxed Set

    by Leigh Bardugo

    Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Leigh Bardugo's Six of Crows duology - comprising Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom - is a gripping and memorable fantasy epic, perfect for fans of George R. R. Martin, Laini Taylor, and Holly Black. Read it before you see it! Set in the same world as the stunning Shadow and Bone trilogy, characters in these books will be brought to life on-screen in the Netflix original series, Shadow and Bone, coming soon! Six of Crows Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams - but he can't pull it off alone. A convict with a thirst for revenge. A sharpshooter who can't walk away from a wager. A runaway with a privileged past. A spy known as the Wraith. A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums. A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes. Kaz's crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction - if they don't kill each other first. Crooked Kingdom Double-crossed and badly weakened, Kaz's crew is low on resources, allies, and hope. As powerful forces from around the world descend on Ketterdam to root out the secrets of the dangerous drug known as Jurda Parem, old rivals and new enemies emerge to challenge Kaz's cunning and test the team's fragile loyalties. A war will be waged on the city's dark and twisting streets - a battle for revenge and redemption that will decide the fate of the Grisha world. Read all the books in the Grishaverse! The Shadow and Bone Trilogy (previously published as The Grisha Trilogy) Shadow and Bone Siege and Storm Ruin and Rising The Six of Crows Duology Six of Crows Crooked Kingdom The King of Scars Duology King of Scars Rule of Wolves The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic The Lives of Saints Also available: Six of Crows: Collector's Edition Crooked Kingdom: Collector's Edition Shadow and Bone: Collector's Edition Praise for the Grishaverse "A master of fantasy." - The Huffington Post "Utterly, extremely bewitching." - The Guardian "The best magic universe since Harry Potter." - Bustle "This is what fantasy is for." - The New York Times Book Review "[A] world that feels real enough to have its own passport stamp." - NPR "The darker it gets for the good guys, the better." - Entertainment Weekly "Sultry, sweeping and picturesque . . . Impossible to put down." - USA Today "There's a level of emotional and historical sophistication within Bardugo's original epic fantasy that sets it apart." - Vanity Fair "Unlike anything I've ever read." - Veronica Roth, bestselling author of Divergent "Bardugo crafts a first-rate adventure, a poignant romance, and an intriguing mystery!" - Rick Riordan, bestselling author of the Percy Jackson series
  • Votes: 2

    The Three-Body Problem

    by Cixin Liu

    The Three-Body Problem is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple award winning phenomenon from China's most beloved science fiction author, Liu Cixin. Set against the backdrop of China's Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilization on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them take over a world seen as corrupt, or to fight against the invasion. The result is a science fiction masterpiece of enormous scope and vision.
  • Votes: 2

    God Is Not Great

    by Christopher Hitchens

  • Votes: 2

    Nineteen Minutes

    by Jodi Picoult

  • Votes: 2

    Entitled

    by Kate Manne

  • Votes: 2

    El principito (Spanish)

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

  • Votes: 2

    Thirukkural (Tamil - English)

    by Kavikkuyil Dr. Anaivaariyar

  • Votes: 2

    Project Hail Mary

    by Andy Weir

  • Votes: 2

    The Pillars of the Earth

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 2

    Believe Me

    by JP Delaney

  • Votes: 2

    Stories from the Strange Place

    by Michael James Rizzotte

  • Votes: 2

    Messages from the Masters

    by Brian Weiss MD

  • Votes: 2

    The Second Curve

    by Charles Handy

  • Votes: 2

    Beyond the Howls of Mountain Dogs

    by Shawn Wayne Langhans

  • Votes: 2

    The Purpose

    by Dr. Alice Cheung

  • Votes: 2

    The Prophets

    by Robert Jones Jr.

    "A new kind of epic...A grand achievement...While The Prophets' dreamy realism recalls the work of Toni Morrison...its penetrating focus on social dynamics stands out more singularly." --Entertainment Weekly A singular and stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence. Isaiah was Samuel's and Samuel was Isaiah's. That was the way it was since the beginning, and the way it was to be until the end. In the barn they tended to the animals, but also to each other, transforming the hollowed-out shed into a place of human refuge, a source of intimacy and hope in a world ruled by vicious masters. But when an older man--a fellow slave--seeks to gain favor by preaching the master's gospel on the plantation, the enslaved begin to turn on their own. Isaiah and Samuel's love, which was once so simple, is seen as sinful and a clear danger to the plantation's harmony. With a lyricism reminiscent of Toni Morrison, Robert Jones, Jr., fiercely summons the voices of slaver and enslaved alike, from Isaiah and Samuel to the calculating slave master to the long line of women that surround them, women who have carried the soul of the plantation on their shoulders. As tensions build and the weight of centuries--of ancestors and future generations to come--culminates in a climactic reckoning, The Prophets masterfully reveals the pain and suffering of inheritance, but is also shot through with hope, beauty, and truth, portraying the enormous, heroic power of love.
  • Votes: 2

    Manchild in the Promised Land

    by Claude Brown

  • Votes: 2

    Many Lives, Many Masters

    by Brian L. Weiss

  • Votes: 2

    The Palace of Illusions

    by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

  • Votes: 2

    The Book of Secrets

    by Osho

  • Votes: 2

    The Order of Time

    by Carlo Rovelli

  • Votes: 2

    The Winds of War

    by Herman Wouk

  • Votes: 2

    A Passage to India

    by E.M. Forster

    In a scathing indictment of British imperialism, Forster's once controversial novel portrays two Englishwomen who experience misunderstanding and cultural conflict after they travel to India
  • Votes: 2

    Between Death and Life

    by Dolores Cannon

  • Votes: 2

    Unbound

    by Neal Lozano

  • Votes: 2

    The Kid Who Dared to Dream

    by Heather Proffitt

  • Votes: 2

    The Communist Manifesto

    by Karl Marx

    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential works. From the musings of intellectuals such as Thomas Paine in Common Sense to the striking personal narrative of Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our intellectual history through the words of the exceptional few. Originally published as a political pamphlet in 1848, amidst the revolutions in Europe, The Communist Manifesto documents Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s theories on society and politics. It does so by defining the state of the class system in contemporary Europe—in which a larger, lower class is controlled and oppressed by a tyrannical, oppressive upper class. The Manifesto argues that, at some point in history, the lower class will inevitably realize their potential and exploitation and subsequently revolt. Once this occurs, Marx and Engels argue, there will be an uprising among proletariats that shifts political and economic power, ultimately resulting in the dismantling of class systems and capitalism. Additionally, in the Manifesto, Marx and Engels also predict the future state of the global economy and discuss their viewpoints on private property, while also addressing many other topics pertinent to today’s world. Although written nearly 170 years ago, The Communist Manifesto is still widely read and cited. Amid the current turmoil between social classes and the societies of the world, its revolutionary prose and ideas can still yield ripe food for thought.
  • Votes: 2

    The Problem of the Old Testament

    by Duane A. Garrett

  • Votes: 2

    Break Point

    by Ilie Nastase

  • Votes: 2

    Reclaim Your Heart

    by Yasmin Mogahed

  • Votes: 2

    A Woman of Substance (Emma Harte Series Book 1)

    by Barbara Taylor Bradford

  • Votes: 2

    Wild Embers

    by Nikita Gill

  • Votes: 2

    The Night Villa

    by Carol Goodman

  • Votes: 2

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    by Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Votes: 2

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 2

    Outliers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 2

    Ulysses

    by James Joyce

  • Votes: 2

    What I Know for Sure

    by Oprah Winfrey

  • Votes: 2

    Siddhartha

    by Hermann Hesse

    Siddhartha is an allegorical novel by Hermann Hesse which deals with the spiritual journey of an Indian boy called Siddhartha during the time of the Buddha. The book was written in German, in a simple, yet powerful and lyrical style. It was first published in 1922, after Hesse had spent some time in India in the 1910s. The story revolves around a young man who leaves his home and family on a quest for the Truth. Embarking on a journey that takes him from the austerities of renunciation to the profligacy of wealth. That leads him through the range of human experiences from hunger and want, to passion, pleasure, pain, greed, yearning, boredom, love, despair and hope. A journey that leads finally to the river, where he gains peace and eventually wisdom. This is the story of Siddhartha as told by Nobel Laureate Hermann Hesse in his most influential work.
  • Votes: 2

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 2

    Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction
  • Votes: 2

    Mistborn

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 2

    Never Let Me Go

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 2

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    THE PHENOMENAL INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER – 1 MILLION COPIES SOLD Transform your life with tiny changes in behaviour – starting now. People think when you want to change your life, you need to think big. But world-renowned habits expert James Clear has discovered another way. He knows that real change comes from the compound effect of hundreds of small decisions – doing two push-ups a day, waking up five minutes early, or holding a single short phone call. He calls them atomic habits. In this ground-breaking book, Clears reveals exactly how these minuscule changes can grow into such life-altering outcomes. He uncovers a handful of simple life hacks (the forgotten art of Habit Stacking, the unexpected power of the Two Minute Rule, or the trick to entering the Goldilocks Zone), and delves into cutting-edge psychology and neuroscience to explain why they matter. Along the way, he tells inspiring stories of Olympic gold medalists, leading CEOs, and distinguished scientists who have used the science of tiny habits to stay productive, motivated, and happy. These small changes will have a revolutionary effect on your career, your relationships, and your life. ________________________________ ‘A supremely practical and useful book.’ Mark Manson, author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck ‘James Clear has spent years honing the art and studying the science of habits. This engaging, hands-on book is the guide you need to break bad routines and make good ones.’ Adam Grant, author of Originals ‘Atomic Habits is a step-by-step manual for changing routines.’ Books of the Month, Financial Times ‘A special book that will change how you approach your day and live your life.’ Ryan Holiday, author of The Obstacle is the Way
  • Votes: 2

    The Quran

    by Allah

  • Votes: 2

    Mink River

    by Brian Doyle

  • Votes: 2

    Sandman Box Set

    by Neil Gaiman

  • Votes: 2

    A Time to Kill

    by John Grisham

  • Votes: 2

    The Outsiders

    by William Thorndike

    It's time to redefine the CEO success story. Meet eight iconoclastic leaders who helmed firms where returns on average outperformed the S&P 500 by more than 20 times.
  • Votes: 2

    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Harper Perennial Deluxe Editions)

    by Betty Smith

  • Votes: 2

    The Subtle ART of not giving a FUCK

    by Carrigleagh Books

  • Votes: 2

    Think Like a Monk

    by Jay Shetty

  • Votes: 2

    Watership Down

    by Richard Adams

    WINNER of the Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Class Animated Program Now a Netflix animated miniseries starring James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, and Oscar and Grammy award-winner Sir Ben Kingsley. A worldwide bestseller for more than forty years, Watership Down is the compelling tale of a band of wild rabbits struggling to hold onto their place in the world—“a classic yarn of discovery and struggle” (The New York Times). Richard Adams’s Watership Down is a timeless classic and one of the most beloved novels of all time. Set in the Hampshire Downs in Southern England, an idyllic rural landscape, this stirring tale of “suspense, hot pursuit, and derring-do” (Chicago Tribune) follows a band of rabbits in flight from the incursion of man and the destruction of their home. Led by a stouthearted pair of brothers, they travel forth from their native Sandleford warren through harrowing trials to a mysterious promised land and a more perfect society. “A marvelous story of rebellion, exile, and survival” (Sunday Telegraph) this is an unforgettable literary classic for all ages.
  • Votes: 2

    A Brief History of Time

    by Stephen Hawking

    An anniversary edition of a now-classic survey of the origin and nature of the universe features a new introduction by the author and a new chapter on the possibility of time travel and "wormholes" in space
  • Votes: 1

    Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul

    by Jack Canfield

  • Votes: 1

    Life of Pi

    by Yann Martel

    MORE THAN SEVEN MILLION COPIES SOLD The beloved and bestselling novel and winner of the Booker Prize, Life of Pi. New York Times Bestseller * Los Angeles Times Bestseller * Washington Post Bestseller * San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller * Chicago Tribune Bestseller "A story to make you believe in the soul-sustaining power of fiction."—Los Angeles Times Book Review After the sinking of a cargo ship, a solitary lifeboat remains bobbing on the wild blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen-year-old boy named Pi, a hyena, a wounded zebra, an orangutan—and a 450-pound royal bengal tiger. The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary and beloved works of fiction in recent years. Universally acclaimed upon publication, Life of Pi is a modern classic.
  • Votes: 1

    Go Set a Watchman

    by Harper Lee

    A historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, bestselling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014. Go Set a Watchman features many of the characters from To Kill a Mockingbird some twenty years later. Returning home to Maycomb to visit her father, Jean Louise Finch—Scout—struggles with issues both personal and political, involving Atticus, society, and the small Alabama town that shaped her. Exploring how the characters from To Kill a Mockingbird are adjusting to the turbulent events transforming mid-1950s America, Go Set a Watchman casts a fascinating new light on Harper Lee’s enduring classic. Moving, funny and compelling, it stands as a magnificent novel in its own right.
  • Votes: 1

    The Lost Symbol (Robert Langdon)

    by Dan Brown

    *INCLUDES A SNEAK PREVIEW OF ORIGIN,THE NEW THRILLER BY DAN BROWN: OUT 3RD OCTOBER. PRE-ORDER TODAY* --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Capitol Building, Washington DC: Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon believes he is here to give a lecture. He is wrong. Within minutes of his arrival, a shocking object is discovered. It is a gruesome invitation into an ancient world of hidden wisdom. When Langdon's mentor, Peter Solomon - prominent mason and philanthropist - is kidnapped, Langdon realizes that his only hope of saving his friend's life is to accept this mysterious summons. It is to take him on a breathless chase through Washington's dark history. All that was familiar is changed into a shadowy, mythical world in which Masonic secrets and never-before-seen revelations seem to be leading him to a single impossible and inconceivable truth...
  • Votes: 1

    The Silmarillion

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 1

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 1

    The Diary of a Young Girl

    by Anne Frank

  • Votes: 1

    Faithful Place

    by Tana French

    'Breathtaking -- an elaborately twisted ballad of class resentments, family burdens, regret and passion' The Washington Post 'An author of exceptional talent and insight' Sunday Independent 'In all your life, only a few moments matter. I was lucky. I got to see one of mine face to face, and recognise it for what it was.' The course of Frank Mackey's life is set by one defining moment when he was nineteen. The time his girlfriend, Rosie Daly, failed to turn up for their rendezvous in Faithful Place, failed to run away with him to London as planned. Frank never heard from, or of, her again. Twenty years on, Frank is still in Dublin, working as an undercover cop. He's cut all ties with his dysfunctional family. Until his sister calls to say that Rosie's suitcase has been found ...
  • Votes: 1

    Cold Mountain

    by Charles Frazier

  • Votes: 1

    Into Thin Air

    by Jon Krakauer

    The author describes his spring 1996 trek to Mt. Everest, a disastrous expedition that claimed the lives of eight climbers, and explains why he survived
  • Votes: 1

    Early Indians

    by Tony Joseph

  • Votes: 1

    The Mass Strike - Rosa Luxemburg

    by Rosa Luxemburg

  • Votes: 1

    A Fine Balance

    by Rohinton Mistry

    With a compassionate realism and narrative sweep that recall the work of Charles Dickens, this magnificent novel captures all the cruelty and corruption, dignity and heroism, of India. The time is 1975. The place is an unnamed city by the sea. The government has just declared a State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers--a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village--will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future. As the characters move from distrust to friendship and from friendship to love, A Fine Balance creates an enduring panorama of the human spirit in an inhuman state.
  • Votes: 1

    The Notebook

    by Nicholas Sparks

  • Votes: 1

    The Name of Jesus

    by Kenneth E. Hagin

  • Votes: 1

    I Spent My Summer Vacation Kidnapped into Space

    by Martyn N. Godfrey

  • Votes: 1

    Pianist Of Yarmouk

    by Aeham Ahmad

  • Votes: 1

    On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    by Ocean Vuong

    ** The Sunday Times and New York Times Bestseller ** Brilliant, heartbreaking and highly original, Ocean Vuong’s debut novel is a shattering portrait of a family, and a testament to the redemptive power of storytelling. ‘A marvel’ MARLON JAMES This is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. Written when the speaker, Little Dog, is in his late twenties, the letter unearths a family’s history that began before he was born. It tells of Vietnam, of the lasting impact of war, and of his family’s struggle to forge a new future. And it serves as a doorway into parts of Little Dog’s life his mother has never known – episodes of bewilderment, fear and passion – all the while moving closer to an unforgettable revelation. ‘A masterpiece’ MAX PORTER ‘Luminous, shattering, urgent, necessary’ CELESTE NG ‘Deeply moving... Little Dog’s story is the story of modern America’ Daily Telegraph ‘Vuong has originality running through his veins’ The Times SHORTLISTED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL DYLAN THOMAS PRIZE 2020 FINALIST FOR THE PEN/FAULKNER AWARD 2020
  • Votes: 1

    Blue Highways

    by William Least Heat Moon

  • Votes: 1

    Evicted

    by Matthew Desmond

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | KIRKUS PRIZE FOR NONFICTION FINALIST | LONGLISTED FOR THE PEN/JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH AWARD FOR NONFICTION | NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR by The New York Times Book Review * The Boston Globe * The Washington Post * NPR * Entertainment Weekly * The New Yorker * Bloomberg * Esquire * San Francisco Chronicle * Milwaukee Journal Sentinel * St. Louis Post-Dispatch * Politico * Bookpage * Kirkus Reviews * Amazon * Barnes and Noble Review * Apple * Library Journal * Chicago Public Library * Publishers Weekly * Booklist * Shelf Awareness From Harvard sociologist and MacArthur "Genius" Matthew Desmond, a landmark work of scholarship and reportage that will forever change the way we look at poverty in America In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, "Love don't pay the bills." She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America's vast inequality--and to people's determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible. - New York Times Book Review, 100 Notable Books of 2016 - Los Angeles Times, The 10 Most Important Books of 2016 - Washington Post, Top 10 Title for 2016
  • Votes: 1

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

    by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    One of the most chilling novels ever written about the oppression of totalitarian regimes--and the first to open Western eyes to the terrors of Stalin's prison camps, this book allowed Solzhenitsyn, who later became Russia's conscience in exile, to challenge the brutal might of the Soviet Union.
  • Votes: 1

    Cosmos by Carl Sagan (2013-12-10)

    by Carl Sagan

  • Votes: 1

    Emerald Hills of the Heart

    by M. Fethullah Gülen

  • Votes: 1

    Ghost Boys

    by Jewell Parker Rhodes

  • Votes: 1

    The Better Angels of Our Nature

    by Steven Pinker

    Presents a controversial history of violence which argues that today's world is the most peaceful time in human existence, drawing on psychological insights into intrinsic values that are causing people to condemn violence as an acceptable measure.
  • Votes: 1

    Dante's Divine Comedy Set

    by Dante Alighieri

  • Votes: 1

    The Science of Self-Learning

    by Peter Hollins

  • Votes: 1

    The Ten Trusts

    by Jane Goodall

  • Votes: 1

    The Denial of Death

    by Ernest Becker

  • Votes: 1

    The Shack

    by William P. Young

  • Votes: 1

    Know My Name

    by Chanel Miller

  • Votes: 1

    The Tin Drum

    by Günter Grass

    To mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of this classic, a new translation of the Nobel Prize winner's story is offered, which includes a huge cast of intriguing characters, including Oskar Matzerath, the indomitable drummer; his family; Oskar's midget friends Bebra and Roswitha Raguna; and more. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    There There

    by Tommy Orange

  • Votes: 1

    The Shining

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    The Thursday Murder Club

    by Richard Osman

  • Votes: 1

    A Farewell to Arms

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 1

    On My Honor

    by Marion Dane Bauer

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Good Kiss

    by James Crumley

  • Votes: 1

    Orphans through My Window

    by Thomas Kent

  • Votes: 1

    Unwitting Accomplice

    by Freda Vasilopoulos

  • Votes: 1

    Shatter Me (Shatter Me, 1)

    by Tahereh Mafi

  • Votes: 1

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

    A cloth bag containing eight copies of the title.
  • Votes: 1

    Patanjali yoga sutra by swami vivekanand

    by Swami Vivekanand

  • Votes: 1

    The Power Broker

    by Robert A. Caro

  • Votes: 1

    Everything Sad Is Untrue

    by Daniel Nayeri

  • Votes: 1

    Amen

    by Karyn D. Kedar

    Prayer is an articulation of our noblest desires, our deepest yearnings, and our darkest places. The prayers in this collection speak directly to the complexity of human life--whether you seek expression for joy, wonder, perplexity, or heartache, for personal use or for your community, you will find here a voice for your experience that will help you linger in the blessings and move forward through the pain. This collection includes prayers for personal use, prayers for use at communal gatherings, prayers and readings for moments of grief and moments of joy, a collection of daily Psalms, and focus phrases and questions for meditation. These readings for contemplative practice and communal gatherings will aid in the search for clarity, for strength beyond what we know, and for an affirmation of holiness, of goodness, of the grandeur of God.
  • Votes: 1

    Think

    by Simon Blackburn

    This is a book about the big questions in life: knowledge, consciousness, fate, God, truth, goodness, justice. It is for anyone who thinks there are big questions lurking out there, but does not know how to approach them. Written by the author of the bestselling Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, Think sets out to explain what they are and why they are important.
  • Votes: 1

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    Outlander

    by Diana Gabaldon

    THE FIRST NOVEL IN THE BESTSELLING OUTLANDER SERIES. As seen on Amazon Prime TV. What if your future was the past? 1946, and Claire Randall goes to the Scottish Highlands with her husband Frank. It’s a second honeymoon, a chance to learn how war has changed them and to re-establish their loving marriage. But one afternoon, Claire walks through a circle of standing stones and vanishes into 1743, where the first person she meets is a British army officer - her husband’s six-times great-grandfather. Unfortunately, Black Jack Randall is not the man his descendant is, and while trying to escape him, Claire falls into the hands of a gang of Scottish outlaws, and finds herself a Sassenach - an outlander - in danger from both Jacobites and Redcoats. Marooned amid danger, passion and violence, her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives. (Previously published as Cross Stitch)
  • Votes: 1

    When Things Fall Apart

    by Pema Chodron

  • Votes: 1

    Anthem

    by Ayn Rand

    In a future world, only one man dares to think, strive, and love as an individual in the midst of a paralyzing collective humanity.
  • Votes: 1

    The March of Folly

    by Barbara W. Tuchman

  • Votes: 1

    Why You Act the Way You Do

    by Tim LaHaye

  • Votes: 1

    Tuck Everlasting

    by Natalie Babbit

  • Votes: 1

    The Brothers Karmazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • Votes: 1

    The Dead Zone

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    Why Cucumbers Are Better Than Men

    by The Cucumber Group

  • Votes: 1

    Dead Aid

    by Dambisa Moyo

  • Votes: 1

    The Halloween Tree

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 1

    Mourning Glories

    by L Carrico Russell

  • Votes: 1

    Ways of Seeing

    by John Berger

    Ways of Seeing is a key art-historical work that continues to provoke widespread debate. It is comprised of seven different essays, three of which are pictorial and the other containing texts and images. Berger first examines the relationship between seeing and knowing, discussing how our assumptions affect how we see a painting. He moves on to consider the role of women in artwork, particularly regarding the female nude. The third essay deals with oil painting looking at the relationship between subjects and ownership. Finally, Berger addresses the idea of ownership in a consumerist society, discussing the power of imagery in advertising, with particular regards to photography.
  • Votes: 1

    Hard Times

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    Ponniyin Selvan

    by Kalki R Krishnamurthy

  • Votes: 1

    The Creature from Jekyll Island

    by G. Edward Griffin

    G. Edward Griffin is to be commended for this splendid work. At first glance The Creature from Jekyll Island is a huge book. While this may be daunting to some, once the book is actually started, it flows smoothly and reads quickly. There are so many fascinating tidbits of information here that the reader won't even be concerned about the size of the book. The title refers to the formation of the Federal Reserve System, which occurred at a secret meeting at Jekyll Island, Georgia in 1910. It was at this meeting, as Griffin relates, that the "Money Trust", composed of the richest and most powerful bankers in the world, along with a U.S. Senator, wrote the proposal to launch the Federal Reserve System (which Griffin calls a banking cartel) to control the financial system so that the bankers will always come out on top.
  • Votes: 1

    The Hound of the Baskervilles

    by Arthur Conan Sir Doyle

    Arthur Conan Doyle's classic Sherlock Holmes tale investigates a fearsome animal and a family curse, retold for younger readersWritten by in 1902, "The Hound of the Baskervilles" is one of his most frightening books. It tells the story of the curse of the Baskerville family--a family haunted by a terrifying hound on Dartmoor. The beast is thought to be responsible for killing many members of the Baskerville family. Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson arrive to investigate. This retelling has been shortened and illustrated for younger readers.
  • Votes: 1

    Let My People Go.

    by Albert John Luthuli

  • Votes: 1

    Guns, Germs, and Steel

    by Jared Diamond Ph.D.

  • Votes: 1

    The Devil Rides Out (Duke de Richleau)

    by Dennis Wheatley

  • Votes: 1

    How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

    by Bill Gates

  • Votes: 1

    Talking to Strangers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

    THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 'Compelling, haunting, tragic stories . . . resonate long after you put the book down' James McConnachie, Sunday Times Book of the Year The routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy. The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon. The false conviction of Amanda Knox. Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie, read a face or judge a stranger's motives? Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature, where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous consequences.
  • Votes: 1

    The Lesser Key of Solomon

    by Aleister Crowley

    Trade paperback edition of Aleister Crowley's and S.L. MacGregor Mather's The Lesser Key of Solomon. This edition is fully illustrated and contains over 100 of the original, or exact replicas of the 1904 edition illustrations.The Lesser Key of Solomon, or the Clavicula Salomonis Regis, or Lemegeton, is a compilation of materials and writings from ancient sources making up a text book of magic or ?grimoire.' Portions of this book can be traced back to the mid-16th to 17th centuries, when occult researchers such as Cornelius Agrippa and Johannes Trithemisus assembled what they discovered during their investigations into their own great works.As a modern grimoire, the Lesser Key of Solomon has seen several editions with various authors and editors taking liberty to edit and translate the ancient writings and source material. In 1898, Arthur Edward Waite published his The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, which contained large portions of the Lemegeton. He was followed by Mathers and Crowley in 1904 who published The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon. Many others have assembled their own version of this ancient material since, and it is important to realize that it is the contents rather than the book itself that make up the Lesser Key. Traditionally, the source material is divided into five books: Ars Goetia, Ars Theurgia Goetia, Ars Paulina, Ars Almadel, and Ars Notoria. Mathers and Crowley indicate their edition is a translation of the first.In the preface to this edition, it is explained that a ?Secret Chief? of the Rosicrucian Order directed the completion of the book. The original editor was a G. H. Fra. D.D.C.F. who translated ancient texts from French, Hebrew, and Latin, but was unable to complete his labors because of the martial assaults of the Four Great Princes. Crowley was then asked to step in and finish what the previous author had begun. Traditionally, S. L. MacGregor Mathers is credited as the translator of this edition, and Crowley is given the title of editor.
  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Mormon

    by Joseph Smith

    Just as a growing interest in millennialism at the turn of this century has rejuvenated religious debate and questions concerning the fate of the world, so did Mormonism develop from millennial enthusiasm early in the nineteenth century. Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism, and a provocative, even controversial figure in history, declared that he had been given the authority to restore the true church in the latter days. The primary source of Smith's latter-day revelation is The Book of Mormon, and to fully understand his role as the founder of the Mormon faith, one must also understand The Book of Mormon and how it came to be. Unfortunately, the literature about Joseph Smith and The Book of Mormon is permeated with contradiction and controversy. In the first edition of this impressive work, David Persuitte provided a significant amount of revealing biographical information about Smith that resolved many of the controversies concerning his character. He also presented an extensive comparative analysis positing that the probable conceptual source for The Book of Mormon was a book entitled View of the Hebrews; or the Tribes of Israel in America, which was written by an early New England minister named Ethan Smith. Now in an expanded and revised second edition incorporating many new findings relating to the origin of The Book of Mormon, Mr. Persuitte’s book continues to shed much new light on the path Joseph Smith took toward founding the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
  • Votes: 1

    If You`re Riding a Horse and It Dies, Get Off

    by Jim Grant

  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Not Giving A FUCK

    by ANS Studio

  • Votes: 1

    Mrs. Dalloway

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 1

    Road to Juneau

    by Liam Quane

  • Votes: 1

    Blink

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 1

    Invisible Women

    by Caroline Criado Perez

  • Votes: 1

    Treasure Island (Signet Classics)

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Votes: 1

    Patron Saints of Nothing

    by Randy Ribay

  • Votes: 1

    Kokoro

    by Natsume Soseki

  • Votes: 1

    Tess of the d'Urbervilles Illustrated

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 1

    The Name of the Rose

    by Umberto Eco

  • Votes: 1

    SHRIMAD BHAGWAT GITA THE SONG CELESTIAL 'GEETOPNISHAD'

    by Ashok Kumar Yog

  • Votes: 1

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 1

    Hollow Kingdom

    by Kira Jane Buxton

    A humorous, big-hearted romp through the apocalypse, where even a cowardly crow can become a hero. Perfect for fans of Dawn of the Dead and Isaac Marion's Warm Bodies. 'A thoroughly enjoyable account of the end of the world as we know it. The Secret Life of Pets meets The Walking Dead.' Karen Joy Fowler 'It's transformative, poignant, and funny as hell. S.T. the irrepressible, cursing crow is my new favourite apocalyptic hero.' Helen Macdonald, New York Times bestselling author of H Is for Hawk S.T. is a domesticated crow. He is a bird of simple pleasures: hanging out with his owner Big Jim, trading insults with Seattle's wild crows (those idiots) and enjoying the finest food humankind has to offer: Cheetos. But when Big Jim's eyeball falls out of his head, S.T. starts to feel like something isn't right. His most tried-and-true remedies - from beak-delivered beer to the slobbering affection of the loyal, but dim-witted, dog Dennis - fail to cure his owner. S.T. is left with no choice but to venture out into a frightening new world, where he discovers that the neighbours are devouring each other, and the local wildlife is abuzz with rumours of dangerous new predators roaming Seattle... Humanity's extinction has arrived, and the only one determined to save it is a foul-mouthed crow. Readers love Hollow Kingdom... 'Beguilingly different' Bookist (starred review) '...wildly original and inventive, funny and profane' Laurie Frankel, author of This is How It Always Is 'I love this book so much! I wanted to set it on fire while hugging it.' Jamie Ford, New York Times bestselling author of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
  • Votes: 1

    Turning Pain Into Strength

    by Michelle Eberwein

  • Votes: 1

    Option B

    by Sheryl Sandberg

  • Votes: 1

    Bleak House

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

    by V. E. Schwab

    In the vein of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Life After Life, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is New York Times bestselling author V. E. Schwab’s genre-defying tour de force. A Life No One Will Remember. A Story You Will Never Forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.
  • Votes: 1

    Freedom from the Known

    by Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • Votes: 1

    Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, 1)

    by Sarah J. Maas

    The book that started the phenomenon. Sarah J. Maas's global #1 bestselling THRONE OF GLASS series has taken the world by storm. Meet Celaena Sardothien. Beautiful. Deadly. Destined for greatness. In the dark, filthy salt mines of Endovier, an eighteen-year-old girl is serving a life sentence. She is a trained assassin, the best of her kind, but she made a fatal mistake. She got caught. Young Captain Westfall offers her a deal: her freedom in return for one huge sacrifice. Celaena must represent the prince in a to-the-death tournament - fighting the most gifted thieves and assassins in the land. Live or die, Celaena will be free. Win or lose, she is about to discover her true destiny. But will her assassin's heart be melted?
  • Votes: 1

    Pakistan

    by Khan Imran

  • Votes: 1

    Being Mortal

    by Atul Gawande

    A prominent surgeon argues against modern medical practices that extend life at the expense of quality of life while isolating the dying, outlining suggestions for freer, more fulfilling approaches to death that enable more dignified and comfortable choices.
  • Votes: 1

    My Policeman

    by Bethan Roberts

  • Votes: 1

    Rebecca

    by Daphne Du Maurier

  • Votes: 1

    Trinity

    by Leon Uris

    Recounts the interrelationships, clashes, and common concerns of the Catholic, hill-farming Larkins of Donegal, the aristocratic and British Hubbles, and the Scottish-Presbyterian MacLeods of Belfast during the years from the 1840's famine to the 1916 Easter Rising.
  • Votes: 1

    Bullies and Saints

    by John Dickson

  • Votes: 1

    XX

    by Rian Hughes

  • Votes: 1

    Echoes of Vietnam | A Soldier's Voice is Heard

    by Ronald Kays

  • Votes: 1

    Smaller and Smaller Circles

    by F.H. Batacan

  • Votes: 1

    Way to Victory

    by Hidy Ochiai

  • Votes: 1

    The Flamethrowers

    by Rachel Kushner

  • Votes: 1

    Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

    by John Perkins

  • Votes: 1

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

    A breathtakingly original rendering of the Trojan War, shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction 2012.
  • Votes: 1

    Artists

    by DK

  • Votes: 1

    The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon)

    by Dan Brown

    For the first time, all four Robert Langdon thrillers are now available as one ebook bundle. If you haven't read a Dan Brown yet, now's the time. ANGELS AND DEMONS The countdown to oblivion has started - who will stop the clock? A famous scientist is found dead, a mysterious symbol burned into his skin. Many miles away in Rome, the world’s cardinals gather to elect a new pope. Little do they know that beneath their feet, a vast bomb has started to tick. Professor Robert Langdon must work out the link between these two seemingly unconnected events if he is stop the Vatican being blown sky high. THE DA VINCI CODE The race to uncover the oldest secret has begun . . . An eminent man is brutally murdered in the world’s most famous museum. Around his body are a ring of codes, hastily drawn in blood. He died to protect a long-kept secret which Professor Robert Langdon must now uncover. It will be a race against time to decipher this final message. Can he get there before the killers do? THE LOST SYMBOL To save a life, you must first crack the code . . . A mysterious invitation brings Professor Robert Langdon to Washington DC. But all is not as it seems in this powerful city. An ancient organization plans to reassert itself. And he is the only man standing in its way. If he is to prevent a terrible plan being executed, Langdon must decipher a series of increasingly bloody clues. But first he has to make sure he stays alive . . . INFERNO The world is in danger - who will save it? Robert Langdon wakes up in a Florence hospital with no clue how he got there. But another attack on his life makes it very clear – someone wants him dead. And fast. To survive, Langdon must work out who it is. And then he must answer the next question – why?
  • Votes: 1

    Are You My Mother ?

    by P.D. Eastman

  • Votes: 1

    Fallen Leaves

    by Will Durant

  • Votes: 1

    The Famished Road

    by Ben Okri

    WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE ‘So long as we are alive, so long as we feel, so long as we love, everything in us is an energy we can use’ The narrator, Azaro, is an abiku, a spirit child, who in the Yoruba tradition of Nigeria exists between life and death. He is born into a world of poverty, ignorance and injustice, but Azaro awakens with a smile on his face. Nearly called back to the land of the dead, he is resurrected. But in their efforts to save their child, Azaro's loving parents are made destitute. The tension between the land of the living, with its violence and political struggles, and the temptations of the carefree kingdom of the spirits propels this latter-day Lazarus's story. Despite belonging to a spirit world made of enchantment, where there is no suffering, Azaro chooses to stay in the land of the Living: to feel it, endure it, know it and love it. This is his story. ‘In a magnificent feat of sustained imaginative writing, Okri spins a tale that is epic and intimate at the same time. The Famished Road rekindled my sense of wonder. It made me, at age 50, look at the world through the wide eyes of a child’ Michael Palin
  • Votes: 1

    The Pearl

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 1

    Les Mis‚rables (ABR)

    by Victor Hugo

  • Votes: 1

    Small Gods

    by Terry Pratchett

  • Votes: 1

    Bungalow 2

    by Danielle Steel

  • Votes: 1

    The Red Tent

    by Anita Diamant

    In The Red Tent Anita Diamant brings the fascinating biblical character of Dinah to vivid life. Her name is Dinah. In the Bible her fate is merely hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the verses of the Book of Genesis that recount the life of Jacob and his infamous dozen sons. Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is an extraordinary and engrossing tale of ancient womanhood and family honour. Told in Dinah's voice, it opens with the story of her mothers – the four wives of Jacob – each of whom embodies unique feminine traits, and concludes with Dinah's own startling and unforgettable story of betrayal, grief and love. Deeply affecting and intimate, The Red Tent combines outstandingly rich storytelling with an original insight into women's society in a fascinating period of early history and such is its warmth and candour, it is guaranteed to win the hearts and minds of women across the world. 'I genuinely fell into this rich and colourful world and Dinah and Leah have stayed with me as ancestors and sisters brought to life by Anita Diamant's imaginative novel' - Maureen Lipman. Adapted as a TV mini series starring Rebecca Ferguson and Minnie Driver.
  • Votes: 1

    A Room of One's Own

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 1

    Day of Tears

    by Julius Lester

  • Votes: 1

    The Gift of the Magi

    by O. Henry

  • Votes: 1

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 1

    There Are So Many Beautiful Reasons To Be Happy

    by Leaf and Lake Journals

  • Votes: 1

    Lonesome Dove

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 1

    0 Days Without Sarcasm

    by YeoYs Sarcasm

  • Votes: 1

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 1

    CUENTOS DEL PASAJERO VOLUMEN I (Spanish Edition)

    by Charlie Ramírez

    "The Call of Cthulhu" is a short story by American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft and Illustrated by Allen Davis. It is the only story written by Lovecraft in which the extraterrestrial entity Cthulhu himself makes a major appearance. The story is written in a documentary style, with three independent narratives linked together by the device of a narrator discovering notes left by a deceased relative.The narrator pieces together the whole truth and disturbing significance of the information he possesses, illustrating the story's first line: "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far."
  • Votes: 1

    Shantaram

    by Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    Manufacturing Consent

    by Edward S. Herman

    Examines the political role played by the media in shaping events, assesses the relationship between the media and the corporations that control and finance them, and discusses the fine distinctions between news and propaganda.
  • Votes: 1

    Master of the Game

    by Sidney Sheldon

  • Votes: 1

    Down And Out In Paris And London

    by George Orwell

  • Votes: 1

    Human Action

    by Ludwig von Mises

  • Votes: 1

    Ebenezer

    by Mr Douglas A Bass

  • Votes: 1

    Into the Wilderness

    by Sara Donati

  • Votes: 1

    The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

    by Mitch Albom

  • Votes: 1

    The Demon-Haunted World

    by Carl Sagan

  • Votes: 1

    The Almanack of Naval Ravikant

    by Eric Jorgenson

    Getting rich is not just about luck; happiness is not just a trait we are born with. These aspirations may seem out of reach, but building wealth and being happy are skills we can learn. So what are these skills, and how do we learn them? What are the principles that should guide our efforts? What does progress really look like? Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur, philosopher, and investor who has captivated the world with his principles for building wealth and creating long-term happiness. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant is a collection of Naval's wisdom and experience from the last ten years, shared as a curation of his most insightful interviews and poignant reflections. This isn't a how-to book, or a step-by-step gimmick. Instead, through Naval's own words, you will learn how to walk your own unique path toward a happier, wealthier life.
  • Votes: 1

    Ashes of Her Love

    by Pierre Alex Jeanty

  • Votes: 1

    Proof of Heaven

    by Eben Alexander

  • Votes: 1

    ARIYA KAI THE SECRET OF COLONY L.I.F.E.

    by F. Z. ZACH

  • Votes: 1

    Jude the Obscure

    by Thomas Hardy

  • Votes: 1

    Why Marx Was Right

    by Terry Eagleton

  • Votes: 1

    What Would the Spice Girls Do?

    by Lauren Bravo

  • Votes: 1

    Think and Grow Rich

    by Napoleon Hill

  • Votes: 1

    Welcome to the Monkey House

    by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

  • Votes: 1

    Homo Deus

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods. Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda. What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus. With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future.
  • Votes: 1

    Satyarth Prakash (Hindi Edition)

    by Dayanand Saraswati

  • Votes: 1

    Last Seen Leaving

    by Caleb Roehrig

  • Votes: 1

    Martin Eden By Jack London Annotated.

    by Jack London

  • Votes: 1

    A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

    by Dave Eggers

  • Votes: 1

    Pride and Prejudice

    by Jane Austen

  • Votes: 1

    The Bancroft Strategy

    by Robert Ludlum

  • Votes: 1

    Never Split the Difference

    by VOSS/RAZ

    'A master of persuasion.' Forbes'This book blew my mind.' Adam Grant, bestselling author of OriginalsA former FBI hostage negotiator offers a new, field-tested approach to negotiating - effective in any situation. After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a kidnapping negotiator brought him face-to-face with bank robbers, gang leaders and terrorists. Never Split the Differencetakes you inside his world of high-stakes negotiations, revealing the nine key principles that helped Voss and his colleagues succeed when it mattered the most - when people?s lives were at stake. Rooted in the real-life experiences of an intelligence professional at the top of his game, Never Split the Differencewill give you the competitive edge in any discussion.'Filled with insights that apply to everyday negotiations.' Business Insider'A stupendous book.' The Week'It's rare that a book is so gripping and entertaining while still being actionable and applicable.' Inc.
  • Votes: 1

    The Day of the Jackal

    by Frederick Forsyth

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Days of Socrates

    by Plato

    'Consider just this, and give your minds to this alone: whether or not what I say is just' Plato's account of Socrates' trial and death (399 BC) is a significant moment in Classical literature and the life of Classical Athens. In these four dialogues, Plato develops the Socratic belief in responsibility for one's self and shows Socrates living and dying under his philosophy. In Euthyphro, Socrates debates goodness outside the courthouse; Apology sees him in court, rebutting all charges of impiety; in Crito, he refuses an entreaty to escape from prison; and in Phaedo, Socrates faces his impending death with calmness and skilful discussion of immortality. Christopher Rowe's introduction to his powerful new translation examines the book's themes of identity and confrontation, and explores how its content is less historical fact than a promotion of Plato's Socratic philosophy.
  • Votes: 1

    The Upanishads, 2nd Edition

    by Eknath Easwaran

  • Votes: 1

    The Way Things Should Be

    by Carrie L Carr

  • Votes: 1

    The Silent Patient

    by Alex Michaelides

    The instant #1 New York Times bestseller "An unforgettable—and Hollywood-bound—new thriller... A mix of Hitchcockian suspense, Agatha Christie plotting, and Greek tragedy." —Entertainment Weekly The Silent Patient is a shocking psychological thriller of a woman’s act of violence against her husband—and of the therapist obsessed with uncovering her motive. Alicia Berenson’s life is seemingly perfect. A famous painter married to an in-demand fashion photographer, she lives in a grand house with big windows overlooking a park in one of London’s most desirable areas. One evening her husband Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot, and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word. Alicia’s refusal to talk, or give any kind of explanation, turns a domestic tragedy into something far grander, a mystery that captures the public imagination and casts Alicia into notoriety. The price of her art skyrockets, and she, the silent patient, is hidden away from the tabloids and spotlight at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London. Theo Faber is a criminal psychotherapist who has waited a long time for the opportunity to work with Alicia. His determination to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of why she shot her husband takes him down a twisting path into his own motivations—a search for the truth that threatens to consume him....
  • Votes: 1

    The Glass Bead Game

    by Hermann Hesse

  • Votes: 1

    How to Survive a Pandemic

    by Michael Greger

  • Votes: 1

    Deep Work

    by Cal Newport

  • Votes: 1

    CALIFORNIA, THE LIES BEHIND THE SUNSHINE

    by MS. BOSS LADY

  • Votes: 1

    Leo Gray and the Lunar Eclipse

    by K.J. Kruk

  • Votes: 1

    The Penguin Lessons

    by Tom Michell

  • Votes: 1

    Finally

    by Wendy Mass

  • Votes: 1

    Shibumi

    by Trevanian

    Forced out of retirement, a reluctant assassin must face his most dangerous enemy. Nicolai Hel is a westerner brought up in Japan and is the protégé of a Japanese Go master. Hel survived the destruction of Hiroshima to emerge as the world's most artful lover and its most accomplished assassin. Hel is a genius, a mystic, and a master of language and culture, and his secret is his determination to attain a rare kind of personal excellence, a state of effortless perfection known only as shibumi. Now living in an isolated mountain fortress, Hel is unwillingly drawn back into the life he'd tried to leave behind when a beautiful young stranger arrives at his door, seeking help and refuge. It soon becomes clear that Hel is being tracked by a deadly force -- a sinister organisation known only as the Mother Company. The battle lines are drawn: ruthless power and corruption on one side, and on the other . . .shibumi.
  • Votes: 1

    The Laws of Human Nature

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 1

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Cosmos

    by Carl Sagan

  • Votes: 1

    Ella Enchanted (Trophy Newbery)

    by Gail Carson Levine

  • Votes: 1

    IB Physics Course Book

    by Michael Bowen-Jones

  • Votes: 1

    Just for Starters

  • Votes: 1

    The Ocean at the End of the Lane

    by Neil Gaiman

  • Votes: 1

    The Power of Habit

    by Charles Duhigg

  • Votes: 1

    The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

    by William L. Shirer

    Chronicles the Nazi's rise to power, conquest of Europe, and dramatic defeat at the hands of the Allies.
  • Votes: 1

    Poetics

    by Aristotle

  • Votes: 1

    The Sneetches and Other Stories

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    Dear Evan Hansen

    by Val Emmich

  • Votes: 1

    The Worst Hard Time

    by Timothy Egan

  • Votes: 1

    The House in the Cerulean Sea

    by TJ Klune

    A NEW YORK TIMES AND USA TODAY BESTSELLER! A 2021 Alex Award winner! The 2021 RUSA Reading List: Fantasy Winner! An Indie Next Pick! One of Publishers Weekly's "Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2020" One of Book Riot’s “20 Must-Read Feel-Good Fantasies” Lambda Literary Award-winning author TJ Klune’s bestselling, breakout contemporary fantasy that's "1984 meets The Umbrella Academy with a pinch of Douglas Adams thrown in." (Gail Carriger) Linus Baker is a by-the-book case worker in the Department in Charge of Magical Youth. He's tasked with determining whether six dangerous magical children are likely to bring about the end of the world. Arthur Parnassus is the master of the orphanage. He would do anything to keep the children safe, even if it means the world will burn. And his secrets will come to light. The House in the Cerulean Sea is an enchanting love story, masterfully told, about the profound experience of discovering an unlikely family in an unexpected place—and realizing that family is yours. "1984 meets The Umbrella Academy with a pinch of Douglas Adams thrown in." —Gail Carriger, New York Times bestselling author of Soulless At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
  • Votes: 1

    Pulling Your Own Strings

    by Wayne W Dyer

  • Votes: 1

    The Beach

    by Alex Garland

  • Votes: 1

    Black Rednecks and White Liberals

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 1

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 1

    You Must Set Forth at Dawn

    by Wole Soyinka

  • Votes: 1

    Stranger in a Strange Land

    by Robert A. Heinlein

  • Votes: 1

    Multiple Streams of Income

    by Robert G. Allen

  • Votes: 1

    Klara and the Sun

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 1

    Common Sense

    by Thomas Paine

  • Votes: 1

    The Bhagwat Gita

    by RR Varma

  • Votes: 1

    If Tomorrow Comes

    by Sidney Sheldon

  • Votes: 1

    How to Get Away With Murder in America

    by Evan Wright

  • Votes: 1

    Why We Sleep

    by Matthew Walker

    "Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, wellness, and longevity ... An explosion of scientific discoveries in the last twenty years has shed new light on this fundamental aspect of our lives. Now ... neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker gives us a new understanding of the vital importance of sleep and dreaming"--Amazon.com.
  • Votes: 1

    The Happiness Equation

    by Neil Pasricha

  • Votes: 1

    Summary & Study Guide The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan

    by BookRags

  • Votes: 1

    The Urban Monk

    by Pedram Shojai

  • Votes: 1

    The Freedom Writers Diary Teacher's Guide

    by Erin Gruwell

  • Votes: 1

    Challenger Deep

    by Neal Shusterman

  • Votes: 1

    Asian Waters

    by Humphrey Hawksley

  • Votes: 1

    Testament of Youth (Penguin Classics)

    by Vera Brittain

    Much of what we know and feel about the First World War we owe to Vera Brittain's elegiac yet unsparing book, which set a standard for memoirists from Martha Gellhorn to Lillian Hellman. Abandoning her studies at Oxford in 1915 to enlist as a nurse in the armed services, Brittain served in London, in Malta, and on the Western Front. By war's end she had lost virtually everyone she loved. "Testament of Youth" is both a record of what she lived through and an elegy for a vanished generation. Hailed by the "Times Literary Supplement" as a book that helped "both form and define the mood of its time," it speaks to any generation that has been irrevocably changed by war.
  • Votes: 1

    A Scanner Darkly

    by Philip K. Dick

  • Votes: 1

    Of Gods, Humans and Beasts

    by Arnold Wishman

  • Votes: 1

    Shooting For The Moon

    by Michael Kerry White

  • Votes: 1

    Phone Book

    by TellsPress. Studio

  • Votes: 1

    Iris Incredible

    by J.S. Frankel

  • Votes: 1

    The Sandman

    by Lars Kepler

  • Votes: 1

    Shoe Dog

    by Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.
  • Votes: 1

    This One Sky Day

    by ROSS Leone

    'A true feat of imagination and wonder.' Nikesh Shukla 'It blisters with life, love, grief and magic.' Niven Govinden 'Stunning.' Kei Miller Dawn breaks across the archipelago of Popisho. The world is stirring awake again, each resident with their own list of things to do: A wedding feast to conjure and cook An infidelity to investigate A lost soul to set free As the sun rises two star-crossed lovers try to find their way back to one another across this single day. When night falls, all have been given a gift, and many are no longer the same. The sky is pink, and some wonder if it will ever be blue again. What readers are saying 'Brimming with and life and love and just absolutely gorgeous writing. a one-of-a-kind novel.' 'I couldn't put it down and I will be recommending it to everyone.' 'A story luxuriously and confidently told, which is sumptuous from sentence to sentence. There is both literal and literary magic here.' 'This book is bursting at the seams with beauty! Magic! Love! Imagination! It is a burst of colour and flame.' 'It's hard to explain, but if you love getting lost in a story, this could be one for you.'
  • Votes: 1

    Oh So Good

    by Brenda Kay

  • Votes: 1

    Seven Blind Mice (Reading Railroad)

    by Ed Young

  • Votes: 1

    Right Honourable Chimpanzee

    by Georgi Markov

  • Votes: 1

    Astavakra Samhita

    by translated by Swami Nityaswarupananda

  • Votes: 1

    A Child Called It

    by Dave Pelzer

  • Votes: 1

    The Lords of Discipline

    by Pat Conroy

  • Votes: 1

    The God Delusion

    by Richard Dawkins

    Argues that belief in God is irrational, and describes examples of religion's negative influences on society throughout the centuries, such as war, bigotry, child abuse, and violence.
  • Votes: 1

    American Marxism

    by Mark R. Levin

  • Votes: 1

    The Emperor's Handbook

    by Marcus Aurelius

  • Votes: 1

    The Righteous Mind

    by Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.
  • Votes: 1

    Indian Horse

    by Richard Wagamese

  • Votes: 1

    The Rules of Wealth

    by Richard Templar

  • Votes: 1

    Withering Heights Annotated (Penguin Classics)

    by Emily Bronte

  • Votes: 1

    The Iliad

    by Homer

  • Votes: 1

    Small Great Things

    by Jodi Picoult

  • Votes: 1

    All About Love

    by bell hooks

  • Votes: 1

    All Quiet on the Western Front

    by Erich Maria Remarque

  • Votes: 1

    Being and Time

    by Martin Heidegger

  • Votes: 1

    My Own Liberator

    by Dikgang Moseneke

  • Votes: 1

    We Were Liars

    by E. Lockhart

    A Zoella Bookclub title 2016 1. Read this book. 2. On reaching the final page, you may experience an urgent need to read it all over again. 3. Check your friends have read it. 4. NOW YOU ARE FREE TO TALK TO THEM ABOUT IT ENDLESSLY Winner of Goodreads Best Young Adult Fiction Book 2014 'E. Lockhart is one of our most important novelists, and she has given us her best book yet. Thrilling, beautiful, and blisteringly smart, We Were Liars is utterly unforgettable.' - John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars 'Irresistible' - New York Times Book Review 'Haunting, sophisticated' - Wall Street Journal 'Bowl-you-over' - Cosmopolitan 'So freaking good' - Sarah Dessen 'Such beautiful writing' - Libba Bray 'Beautiful and disturbing' - Justine Larbalestier 'Better than the hype' - Lauren Oliver We are the Liars. We are beautiful, privileged and live a life of carefree luxury. We are cracked and broken. A story of love and romance. A tale of tragedy. Which are lies? Which is truth?
  • Votes: 1

    Switch On Your Brain

    by Dr. Caroline Leaf

  • Votes: 1

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    by Eric Carle

  • Votes: 1

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    by Alan Paton

    Cry the Beloved Countryis the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its contemporaneity, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry the Beloved Countryis a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.
  • Votes: 1

    Understanding Power

    by Noam Chomsky

    An introduction to Noam Chomsky's views on the politics of power discusses third-party politics in the United States, the suppression of dissent, U.S. foreign and domestic policy, and the role of the media.
  • Votes: 1

    Sunshine country

    by Kristiny Royovej (Kristina Roy)

  • Votes: 1

    The Woman in White (Penguin Classics)

    by Wilkie Collins