Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 139

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 126

    Behave

    by Robert M. Sapolsky

  • Votes: 120

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    by Daniel Kahneman

  • Votes: 112

    Games People Play

    by Eric Berne

    The fortieth anniversary edition of the groundbreaking best seller examines the interpersonal defenses which individuals construct to avoid dealing with reality in everyday situations in a volume that features a new prologue , as well as commentary by Kurt Vonnegut from his original 1965 LIFE magazine review. Reissue. 20,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 90

    Paradoxes of Group Life

    by Kenwyn K. Smith

  • Votes: 90

    The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Collected Works of C. G. Jung)

    by C.G. Jung

  • Votes: 89

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 74

    The Cat in the Hat

    by Dr. Seuss

    The one and only Cat in the Hat from the iconic Dr. Seuss gets a brand new look, introducing his roller-coaster ride of mayhem to a new generation of readers. The iconic story from the one and only Dr. Seuss, now with a brand new look!When Sally and her brother are left alone, they think they're in for a dull day - until the Cat in the Hat steps in on the mat, bringing with him mayhem and madness! This is the classic book that every child should have the joy of reading.The wonderfully anarchic Cat in the Hat is one of the most popular characters in children's fiction, and this book is ideal for budding readers to tackle on their own.
  • Votes: 55

    How Are You? / ¿Cómo estás?

    by Angela Dominguez

  • Votes: 50

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 48

    How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big

    by Scott Adams

    "Dilbert creator Scott Adams offers his most personal book ever--a ... memoir of his many failures and what they eventually taught him about success. How do you go from hapless office worker to world-famous cartoonist and bestselling author in just a few years? No career guide can answer that, and not even Scott Adams (who actually did it) can give you a road map that works for everyone. But there's a lot to learn from his personal story, and a lot of humor along the way"--
  • Votes: 42

    The Psychology of Money

    by Morgan Housel

    Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.
  • Votes: 40

    The Education of a Value Investor

    by Guy Spier

  • Votes: 35

    Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition

    by Dr. Dan Ariely

  • Votes: 34

    The Body Keeps the Score

    by Bessel A. Van der Kolk

    Originally published by Viking Penguin, 2014.
  • Votes: 34

    The Laws of Human Nature

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 27

    Respectfully Quoted

    by Library of Congress

  • Votes: 22

    Grit

    by Angela Duckworth

    "In this must-read book for anyone striving to succeed, pioneering psychologist Angela Duckworth shows parents, educators, athletes, students, and business people--both seasoned and new--that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a focused persistence called "grit." Why do some people succeed and others fail? Sharing new insights from her landmark research on grit, MacArthur "genius" Angela Duckworth explains why talent is hardly a guarantor of success. Rather, other factors can be even more crucial such as identifying our passions and following through on our commitments. Drawing on her own powerful story as the daughter of a scientist who frequently bemoaned her lack of smarts, Duckworth describes her winding path through teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience, which led to the hypothesis that what really drives success is not "genius" but a special blend of passion and long-term perseverance. As a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Duckworth created her own "character lab" and set out to test her theory. Here, she takes readers into the field to visit teachers working in some of the toughest schools, cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee. She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance. Finally, she shares what she's learned from interviewing dozens of high achievers--from JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon to the cartoon editor of The New Yorker to Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll. Winningly personal, insightful, and even life-changing, Grit is a book about what goes through your head when you fall down, and how that--not talent or luck--makes all the difference"--
  • Votes: 22

    Prisons We Choose to Live Inside

    by Doris Lessing

  • Votes: 20

    Emotional Agility

    by Susan David

    'Essential reading.' - Susan Cain, author of Quiet Every day we speak around 16,000 words - but inside our minds we create tens of thousands more. Thoughts such as 'I'm not spending enough time with my children' or 'I'm not good enough to present my work' can seem to be unshakable facts. In reality, they're the judgemental opinions of our inner voice. Drawing on more than twenty years of academic research, consulting, and her own experiences overcoming adversity, Susan David PhD, a psychologist and faculty member at Harvard Medical School, has pioneered a new way to enable us to make peace with our inner self, achieve our most valued goals, make real change, and live life to the fullest. Susan David has found that emotionally agile people experience the same stresses and setbacks as anyone else. The difference is the emotionally agile know how to unhook themselves from unhelpful patterns, and how to create values-based success with better habits and behaviours. Emotional Agility describes a new way of living and relating to yourself and the world around you. Become aware of your true nature, learn to face your emotions with acceptance and generosity, act according to your deepest values, and flourish. 'An accessible, reader-friendly voyage. Emotional Agility can be helpful to anyone.' - Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence Susan David has a PhD in psychology and a post-doctorate in emotions research from Yale. She is a psychologist at the Harvard Medical School and a founder and director at the Harvard/McLean-affiliated Institute of Coaching. Susan is the CEO of Evidence Based Psychology, whose worldwide client list includes Ernst and Young Global, the UN Development Program, JP Morgan Chase and GlaxoSmithKline. She has edited a number of books including the Oxford Handbook of Happiness and her research has featured in theHarvard Business Review, TIME and the Wall Street Journal. Born in South Africa, Susan now lives in Boston with her family.
  • Votes: 20

    Never Split the Difference

    by VOSS/RAZ

    'A master of persuasion.' Forbes'This book blew my mind.' Adam Grant, bestselling author of OriginalsA former FBI hostage negotiator offers a new, field-tested approach to negotiating - effective in any situation. After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a kidnapping negotiator brought him face-to-face with bank robbers, gang leaders and terrorists. Never Split the Differencetakes you inside his world of high-stakes negotiations, revealing the nine key principles that helped Voss and his colleagues succeed when it mattered the most - when people?s lives were at stake. Rooted in the real-life experiences of an intelligence professional at the top of his game, Never Split the Differencewill give you the competitive edge in any discussion.'Filled with insights that apply to everyday negotiations.' Business Insider'A stupendous book.' The Week'It's rare that a book is so gripping and entertaining while still being actionable and applicable.' Inc.
  • Votes: 20

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 15

    Emotional Intelligence

    by Daniel Goleman

  • Votes: 14

    The Art of Thinking Clearly

    by Rolf Dobelli

    We are all guilty of cognitive biases, simple errors we make in day-to-day thinking. But by knowing what they are and how to identify them, we can avoid them and make better choices. The Art of Thinking Clearly shows that in order to lead happier, more prosperous lives, we don't need extra cunning, new ideas, shiny gadgets, or more frantic activity—all we need is less irrationality. Simple, clear, and always surprising, this book will change the way you think and transform your decision making. From why you should not accept a free drink to why you should walk out of a movie you don't like, from why it's so hard to predict the future to why you shouldn't watch the news, The Art of Thinking Clearly helps solve the puzzle of human reasoning.
  • Votes: 14

    Think Again

    by Adam Grant

  • Votes: 13

    The Behavioral Investor

    by Daniel Crosby

  • Votes: 13

    Tricks of the Mind by DERREN BROWN (2006-08-02)

  • Votes: 13

    Thinking in Bets

    by Annie Duke

    Poker champion turned business consultant Annie Duke teaches you how to get comfortable with uncertainty and make better decisions as a result. In Super Bowl XLIX, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll made one of the most controversial calls in football history: With 26 seconds remaining, and trailing by four at the Patriots' one-yard line, he called for a pass instead of a hand off to his star running back. The pass was intercepted and the Seahawks lost. Critics called it the dumbest play in history. But was the call really that bad? Or did Carroll actually make a great move that was ruined by bad luck? Even the best decision doesn't yield the best outcome every time. There's always an element of luck that you can't control, and there is always information that is hidden from view. So the key to long-term success (and avoiding worrying yourself to death) is to think in bets: How sure am I? What are the possible ways things could turn out? What decision has the highest odds of success? Did I land in the unlucky 10% on the strategy that works 90% of the time? Or is my success attributable to dumb luck rather than great decision making? Annie Duke, a former World Series of Poker champion turned business consultant, draws on examples from business, sports, politics, and (of course) poker to share tools anyone can use to embrace uncertainty and make better decisions. For most people, it's difficult to say "I'm not sure" in a world that values and, even, rewards the appearance of certainty. But professional poker players are comfortable with the fact that great decisions don't always lead to great outcomes and bad decisions don't always lead to bad outcomes. By shifting your thinking from a need for certainty to a goal of accurately assessing what you know and what you don't, you'll be less vulnerable to reactive emotions, knee-jerk biases, and destructive habits in your decision making. You'll become more confident, calm, compassionate and successful in the long run.
  • Votes: 13

    The Behavior Gap

    by Carl Richards

  • Votes: 13

    Originals

    by Adam Grant

    "Using surprising studies and stories spanning business, politics, sports, and entertainment, Grant explores how to recognize a good idea, speak up without getting silenced, build a coalition of allies, choose the right time to act, and manage fear and doubt; how parents and teachers can nurture originality in children; and how leaders can fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent"--
  • Votes: 13

    Attached

    by Amir Levine

  • Votes: 11

    The Marshmallow Test

    by Walter Mischel

  • Votes: 10

    The Happiness Hypothesis

    by Jonathan Haidt

  • Votes: 10

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    **THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLER** 'Interesting and provocative... It gives you a sense of how briefly we've been on this Earth' Barack Obama What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? Yuval Noah Harari challenges everything we know about being human in the perfect read for these unprecedented times. Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it: us. In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. 'I would recommend Sapiens to anyone who's interested in the history and future of our species' Bill Gates **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 9

    The Evolution of Desire

    by David M. Buss

  • Votes: 8

    How Emotions Are Made

    by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    'Fascinating . . . a thought-provoking journey into emotion science' The Wall Street Journal When you feel anxious, angry, happy, or surprised, what's really going on inside of you? Many scientists believe that emotions come from a specific part of the brain, triggered by the world around us. The thrill of seeing an old friend, the fear of losing someone we love - each of these sensations seems to arise automatically and uncontrollably from within us, finding expression on our faces and in our behaviour, carrying us away with the experience. This understanding of emotion has been around since Plato. But what if it is wrong? In How Emotions Are Made, pioneering psychologist and neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett draws on the latest scientific evidence to reveal that our common-sense ideas about emotions are dramatically, even dangerously, out of date - and that we have been paying the price. Emotions aren't universally pre-programmed in our brains and bodies; rather they are psychological experiences that each of us constructs based on our unique personal history, physiology and environment. This new view of emotions has serious implications: when judges issue lesser sentences for crimes of passion, when police officers fire at threatening suspects, or when doctors choose between one diagnosis and another, they're all, in some way, relying on the ancient assumption that emotions are hardwired into our brains and bodies. Revising that conception of emotion isn't just good science, Barrett shows; it's vital to our well-being and the health of society itself.
  • Votes: 8

    The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat

    by Oliver Sacks

    With an introduction by Will Self. A classic work of psychology, this international bestseller provides a groundbreaking insight into the human mind. If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self – himself – he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it. In this extraordinary book, Dr. Oliver Sacks recounts the stories of patients struggling to adapt to often bizarre worlds of neurological disorder. Here are people who can no longer recognize everyday objects or those they love; who are stricken with violent tics or shout involuntary obscenities; who have been dismissed as autistic or retarded, yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales illuminate what it means to be human. A provocative exploration of the mysteries of the human mind, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat is a million-copy bestseller by the twentieth century's greatest neurologist.
  • Votes: 7

    Hardwiring Happiness

    by Rick Hanson

  • Votes: 7

    Riveted

    by Jim Davies

  • Votes: 7

    Permission to Feel

    by Marc Brackett

  • Votes: 7

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides a new hardcover edition of the classic best-selling self-help book, which includes principles that can be applied to both business and life itself, in a book that focuses on how to best affectively communicate with people.
  • Votes: 6

    Believe

    by Erin McCarthy

  • Votes: 6

    Barking Up the Wrong Tree

    by Eric Barker

  • Votes: 6

    Compelling People

    by John Neffinger

  • Votes: 6

    Nonviolent Communication

    by Marshall B. Rosenberg PhD

  • Votes: 6

    Summary of The 48 Laws of Power

    by Book Avenue

  • Votes: 6

    No One Understands You and What to Do About It

    by Heidi Grant Halvorson

  • Votes: 6

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

    by Mark Manson

  • Votes: 6

    The Righteous Mind

    by Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.
  • Votes: 6

    The Denial of Death

    by Ernest Becker

  • Votes: 6

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

    William Golding's Lord of the Flies is a dystopian classic: 'exciting, relevant and thought-provoking' (Stephen King). When a group of schoolboys are stranded on a desert island, what could go wrong? 'One of my favorite books - I read it every couple of years.' (Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games) A plane crashes on a desert island. The only survivors are a group of schoolboys. By day, they discover fantastic wildlife and dazzling beaches, learning to survive; at night, they are haunted by nightmares of a primitive beast. Orphaned by society, it isn't long before their innocent childhood games devolve into a savage, murderous hunt ... 'Stands out mightily in my memory ... Such a strong statement about the human heart.' (Patricia Cornwell) 'Terrifying and haunting.' (Kingsley Amis) 'Beautifully written, tragic and provocative.' (E. M. Forster) ONE OF THE BBC'S ICONIC 'NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD' What readers are saying: 'Every real human being should read this ... This is what we are.' 'It's brilliant, it's captivating, it's thought provoking and brutal and for some, its truly terrifying.' 'It can be read and re-read many times, and every time something new will appear.' 'There is a reason why this is studied at school ... Excellent read.' 'This is one of the few books I've read that I keep on my Kindle to read again.' 'I revisit this every few years and it's always fresh and impressive ... One of the best books I've ever read.'
  • Votes: 5

    The Path

    by Peter Mallouk

  • Votes: 5

    All About Love

    by bell hooks

  • Votes: 5

    The Courage to Be Disliked

    by Ichiro Kishimi

    “Marie Kondo, but for your brain.” —HelloGiggles “Compelling from front to back. Highly recommend.” —Marc Andreessen Reading this book could change your life. The Courage to Be Disliked, already an enormous bestseller in Asia with more than 3.5 million copies sold, demonstrates how to unlock the power within yourself to be the person you truly want to be. Is happiness something you choose for yourself? The Courage to Be Disliked presents a simple and straightforward answer. Using the theories of Alfred Adler, one of the three giants of nineteenth-century psychology alongside Freud and Jung, this book follows an illuminating dialogue between a philosopher and a young man. Over the course of five conversations, the philosopher helps his student to understand how each of us is able to determine the direction of our own life, free from the shackles of past traumas and the expectations of others. Rich in wisdom, The Courage to Be Disliked will guide you through the concepts of self-forgiveness, self-care, and mind decluttering. It is a deeply liberating way of thinking, allowing you to develop the courage to change and ignore the limitations that you might be placing on yourself. This plainspoken and profoundly moving book unlocks the power within you to find lasting happiness and be the person you truly want to be. Millions have already benefited from its teachings, now you can too.
  • Votes: 5

    My Grandmother's Hands

    by Resmaa Menakem

  • Votes: 5

    The Influential Mind

    by Tali Sharot

  • Votes: 5

    Talking to Strangers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

    THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 'Compelling, haunting, tragic stories . . . resonate long after you put the book down' James McConnachie, Sunday Times Book of the Year The routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy. The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon. The false conviction of Amanda Knox. Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie, read a face or judge a stranger's motives? Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature, where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous consequences.
  • Votes: 5

    Evolutionary Psychology

    by David M Buss

  • Votes: 4

    On the Psychology of Military Incompetence

    by Norman F Dixon

  • Votes: 4

    Actionable Gamification

    by Yu-kai Chou

    Learn all about implementing a good gamification design into your products, workplace, and lifestyle Key Features Explore what makes a game fun and engaging Gain insight into the Octalysis Framework and its applications Discover the potential of the Core Drives of gamification through real-world scenarios Book Description Effective gamification is a combination of game design, game dynamics, user experience, and ROI-driving business implementations. This book explores the interplay between these disciplines and captures the core principles that contribute to a good gamification design. The book starts with an overview of the Octalysis Framework and the 8 Core Drives that can be used to build strategies around the various systems that make games engaging. As the book progresses, each chapter delves deep into a Core Drive, explaining its design and how it should be used. Finally, to apply all the concepts and techniques that you learn throughout, the book contains a brief showcase of using the Octalysis Framework to design a project experience from scratch. After reading this book, you'll have the knowledge and skills to enable the widespread adoption of good gamification and human-focused design in all types of industries. What you will learn Discover ways to use gamification techniques in real-world situations Design fun, engaging, and rewarding experiences with Octalysis Understand what gamification means and how to categorize it Leverage the power of different Core Drives in your applications Explore how Left Brain and Right Brain Core Drives differ in motivation and design methodologies Examine the fascinating intricacies of White Hat and Black Hat Core Drives Who this book is for Anyone who wants to implement gamification principles and techniques into their products, workplace, and lifestyle will find this book useful.
  • Votes: 4

    The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell

    by Aldous Huxley

  • Votes: 4

    Everybody Lies

    by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

  • Votes: 4

    The Chimp Paradox

    by Steve Dr. Peters

  • Votes: 4

    Don Quixote (Penguin Classics)

    by Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra

  • Votes: 4

    The Blank Slate

    by Steven Pinker

  • Votes: 4

    Tiny Habits

    by BJ Fogg Ph.D

  • Votes: 4

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 3

    What Every BODY is Saying

    by Joe Navarro

  • Votes: 3

    Becoming Evil

    by James Waller

  • Votes: 3

    Prometheus Rising

    by Robert Anton Wilson

  • Votes: 3

    Anna Karenina

    by graf Leo Tolstoy

    Presents the nineteenth-century Russian novelist's classic in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society
  • Votes: 3

    Poor Charlie's Almanack

    by Charles T. Munger

  • Votes: 3

    Emotions Revealed, Second Edition

    by Paul Ekman Ph.D.

  • Votes: 3

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 3

    Monsters and Magical Sticks

    by Steven Heller

  • Votes: 3

    The Giving Tree

    by Shel Silverstein

    As The Giving Tree turns fifty, this timeless classic is available for the first time ever in ebook format. This digital edition allows young readers and lifelong fans to continue the legacy and love of a household classic that will now reach an even wider audience. Never before have Shel Silverstein's children's books appeared in a format other than hardcover. Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein's poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another's capacity to love in return. Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit. And don't miss these other Shel Silverstein ebooks, Where the Sidewalk Ends, and A Light in the Attic!
  • Votes: 3

    In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts

    by MD Gabor Maté

  • Votes: 3

    Nudge

    by Richard H. Thaler

    Offering a groundbreaking study of the application of the science of choice, a guide that uses colorful examples from all aspects of life demonstrates how it is possible to design environments that make it more likely for us to act in our own interests. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    The Elephant in the Brain

    by Kevin Simler

    "This book exposes our unconscious selfish motives, those we're reluctant to discuss or even think about. These motives drive our body language, laughter, and conversation, as well as venerated institutions like art, school, charity, medicine, politics, and religion"--
  • Votes: 3

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 3

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 3

    The Social Animal Twelfth Edition

    by Elliot Aronson

  • Votes: 2

    How We Know What Isn't So

    by Thomas Gilovich

    Thomas Gilovich offers a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. When can we trust what we believe—that "teams and players have winning streaks," that "flattery works," or that "the more people who agree, the more likely they are to be right"—and when are such beliefs suspect? Thomas Gilovich offers a guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life. Illustrating his points with examples, and supporting them with the latest research findings, he documents the cognitive, social, and motivational processes that distort our thoughts, beliefs, judgments and decisions. In a rapidly changing world, the biases and stereotypes that help us process an overload of complex information inevitably distort what we would like to believe is reality. Awareness of our propensity to make these systematic errors, Gilovich argues, is the first step to more effective analysis and action.
  • Votes: 2

    Inner Engineering

    by Sadhguru

    "The founder of the Isha Foundation, an all-volunteer organization involved in large-scale humanitarian, educational, and environmental projects, Sadhguru is a thought leader on a epic scale. His mission is to improve the quality and experience of life, from the individual to the global. He has distilled a system of practices from the ancient yogic sciences that will deepen your perception and bring about a shift in the very way you experience your life, work, relationships, and the world you inhabit. It is a profound system of self-exploration and transformation, based on the radical premise that it is possible for a human being to evolve consciously. Unlike biological evolution, which happens without your conscious participation, spiritual evolution can happen consciously. All it takes is willingness."
  • Votes: 2

    The Screwtape Letters

    by C. S. Lewis

    The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis is a classic masterpiece of religious satire that entertains readers with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to "Our Father Below." At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis's The Screwtape Letters is the most engaging account of temptation—and triumph over it—ever written.
  • Votes: 2

    The Criminal Personality

    by Samuel Yochelson

  • Votes: 2

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

  • Votes: 2

    Wisdom of Psychopaths

    by Kevin Dutton

  • Votes: 2

    Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart

    by Gordon Livingston

  • Votes: 2

    Traffic

    by Tom Vanderbilt

  • Votes: 2

    The Parasitic Mind

    by Gad Saad

  • Votes: 2

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 2

    Designing for Behavior Change

    by Stephen Wendel

  • Votes: 2

    Moda All-Stars - On a Roll

    by Lissa Alexander

  • Votes: 2

    Understanding Human Nature

    by Alfred Adler

  • Votes: 2

    The Power of Now

    by Eckhart Tolle

    The author shares the secret of his own self-realization and the philosophy for living in the present he has developed.
  • Votes: 2

    Psychological Commentaries on the Teaching of Gurdjieff and Ouspensky

    by Maurice Nicoll

  • Votes: 2

    I Recommend

    by James D. Ployhar

  • Votes: 2

    Stumbling on Happiness

    by Daniel Gilbert

  • Votes: 2

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 2

    Misbehaving

    by Richard H. Thaler

    RICHARD H. THALER: WINNER OF THE 2017 NOBEL PRIZE IN ECONOMICS Shortlisted for the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award ECONOMIST, FINANCIAL TIMES and EVENING STANDARD books of the year From the renowned and entertaining behavioural economist and co-author of the seminal work Nudge, Misbehaving is an irreverent and enlightening look into human foibles. Traditional economics assumes that rational forces shape everything. Behavioural economics knows better. Richard Thaler has spent his career studying the notion that humans are central to the economy - and that we're error-prone individuals, not Spock-like automatons. Now behavioural economics is hugely influential, changing the way we think not just about money, but about ourselves, our world and all kinds of everyday decisions. Whether buying an alarm clock, selling football tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists. In other words, we misbehave. Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments. Coupling recent discoveries in human psychology with a practical understanding of incentives and market behaviour, Thaler enlightens readers about how to make smarter decisions in an increasingly mystifying world. He reveals how behavioural economic analysis opens up new ways to look at everything from household finance to assigning faculty offices in a new building, to TV quiz shows, sports transfer seasons, and businesses like Uber. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers and policy makers are both profound and entertaining.
  • Votes: 1

    Power vs. Force

    by David R. Hawkins M.D. Ph.D

  • Votes: 1

    A Really Big Lunch

    by Jim Harrison

  • Votes: 1

    Humankind

    by Rutger Bregman

  • Votes: 1

    The Mechanical Mind

    by Tim Crane

  • Votes: 1

    Crowds and Power

    by Elias Canetti

  • Votes: 1

    The Interpretation of Dreams

    by Sigmund Freud

  • Votes: 1

    The Bell Jar

    by Sylvia Plath

    Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.
  • Votes: 1

    Gates of Fire

    by Steven Pressfield

    Chronicles the battle of three hundred Spartan warriors against a huge force of Persian soldiers in 480 B.C. against the background of life in ancient Sparta and its extraordinary culture.
  • Votes: 1

    Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World

    by René Girard

    This is the single fullest summation of the ideas of one of the most eminent and controversial cultural theorists of our time.
  • Votes: 1

    The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog

    by Bruce D Perry

  • Votes: 1

    Leaders Eat Last

    by Simon Sinek

    " The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WHAT and HOW. Start With Why became an instant classic, with a loyal following among Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, governments, and the highest levels of the U.S. Military. Now Sinek is back to reveal the next step in creating happier and healthier organizations. He helps us understand, in simple terms, the biology of trust and cooperation and why they're essential to our success and fulfillment. Organizations that create environments in which trust and cooperation thrive vastly out perform their competition. And, not coincidentally, their employees love working there. But "truly human" cultures don't just happen; they are intentionally created by great leaders. Leaders who, in hard times, would sooner sacrifice their numbers to protect their people, rather than sacrifice people to protect their numbers, are rewarded with deeply loyal teams that consistently contribute their best efforts, ideas and passion. As he did in Start With Why, Sinek illustrates his points with fascinating true stories from many fields. He implores us to act sooner rather than later, because our stressful jobs are literally killing us. And he offers surprisingly simple steps for building a truly human organization"--
  • Votes: 1

    Buddha's Brain

    by Rick Hanson

  • Votes: 1

    I Hope This Helps

    by Nakeia Homer

  • Votes: 1

    Eumeswil

    by Ernst Jünger

    A political novel set in a futuristic state, run by a tyrant and narrated by the tyrant's historian. The novel's originality lies in its willingness to question such generally accepted ideas as democracy and mass education. By a well-known German writer.
  • Votes: 1

    Antiracist Baby Picture Book

    by Ibram X. Kendi

  • Votes: 1

    Mindset

    by Carol S. Dweck

    Reveals how established attitudes affect all aspects of one's life, explains the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, and stresses the need to be open to change in order to achieve fulfillment and success.
  • Votes: 1

    The Aesthetic Brain

    by Anjan Chatterjee

  • Votes: 1

    Love & Will

    by Rollo May

  • Votes: 1

    Little Red Riding Hood (Keepsake Stories)

    by Candice Ransom

  • Votes: 1

    Psychological Types

    by C. G. Jung

  • Votes: 1

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Saved

    by Colleen Charles

  • Votes: 1

    Modern Man in Search of a Soul

    by Christopher Prince

  • Votes: 1

    Childhood Disrupted

    by Donna Jackson Nakazawa

  • Votes: 1

    Introduction to Psychology

    by Clifford T. Morgan

  • Votes: 1

    Psycho-Cybernetics

    by Maxwell Maltz

    Previously published Wiltshire, 1967. Guide to personal health and success
  • Votes: 1

    The Best of Fyodor Dostoevsky

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    This collection, unique to the Modern Library, gathers seven of Dostoevsky's key works and shows him to be equally adept at the short story as with the novel. Exploring many of the same themes as in his longer works, these small masterpieces move from the tender and romantic White Nights, an archetypal nineteenth-century morality tale of pathos and loss, to the famous Notes from the Underground, a story of guilt, ineffectiveness, and uncompromising cynicism, and the first major work of existential literature. Among Dostoevsky's prototypical characters is Yemelyan in The Honest Thief, whose tragedy turns on an inability to resist crime. Presented in chronological order, in David Magarshack's celebrated translation, this is the definitive edition of Dostoevsky's best stories.
  • Votes: 1

    The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity

    by Carlo M. Cipolla

  • Votes: 1

    Shantaram

    by Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 1

    The Forty Rules of Love

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 1

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides suggestions for successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations
  • Votes: 1

    Quiet Power & Quiet The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking By Susan Cain 2 Books Collection Set

    by Susan Cain

  • Votes: 1

    The Inner Game of Tennis

    by W. Timothy Gallwey

    Concentrates upon overcoming mental attitudes that adversely affect tennis performance, including learning to relax, effectively concentrating, and discarding bad habits
  • Votes: 1

    The Happiness Advantage

    by Shawn Achor

  • Votes: 1

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    Choice Theory

    by William Glasser M.D.

    Dr. William Glasser offers a new psychology that, if practiced, could reverse our widespread inability to get along with one another, an inability that is the source of almost all unhappiness. For progress in human relationships, he explains that we must give up the punishing, relationship–destroying external control psychology. For example, if you are in an unhappy relationship right now, he proposes that one or both of you could be using external control psychology on the other. He goes further. And suggests that misery is always related to a current unsatisfying relationship. Contrary to what you may believe, your troubles are always now, never in the past. No one can change what happened yesterday.
  • Votes: 1

    The Happiness Trap

    by Russ Harris

    Draws on the principles Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to explain how mindfulness can overcome common emotional problems and help individuals escape self-defeating habits and rise above fears to create a richer, more meaningful life.
  • Votes: 1

    The Origins and History of Consciousness (Princeton Classics, 9)

    by Erich Neumann

    The Origins and History of Consciousness draws on a full range of world mythology to show how individual consciousness undergoes the same archetypal stages of development as human consciousness as a whole. Erich Neumann was one of C. G. Jung's most creative students and a renowned practitioner of analytical psychology in his own right. In this influential book, Neumann shows how the stages begin and end with the symbol of the Uroboros, the tail-eating serpent. The intermediate stages are projected in the universal myths of the World Creation, Great Mother, Separation of the World Parents, Birth of the Hero, Slaying of the Dragon, Rescue of the Captive, and Transformation and Deification of the Hero. Throughout the sequence, the Hero is the evolving ego consciousness. Featuring a foreword by Jung, this Princeton Classics edition introduces a new generation of readers to this eloquent and enduring work.
  • Votes: 1

    Already Free

    by Bruce Tift MA LMFT

  • Votes: 1

    An Anthropologist On Mars

    by Oliver Sacks

  • Votes: 1

    Felt Time

    by Marc Wittmann

  • Votes: 1

    The Violent Potter

    by Shobna Subramanian

  • Votes: 1

    We Need to Talk

    by Celeste Headlee

  • Votes: 1

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

    by William James

  • Votes: 1

    The Ten Types of Human

    by Dexter Dias

  • Votes: 1

    The Three Christs of Ypsilanti

    by Milton Rokeach

  • Votes: 1

    The Naked Ape

    by Desmond Morris

    FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY EDITION - WITH A NEW PREFACE BY THE AUTHOR Here is the Naked Ape at his most primal - in love, at work, at war. Meet man as he really is: relative to the apes, stripped of his veneer as we see him courting, making love, sleeping, socialising, grooming, playing. Zoologist Desmond Morris's classic takes its place alongside Darwin's Origin of the Species, presenting man not as a fallen angel, but as a risen ape, remarkable in his resilience, energy and imagination, yet an animal nonetheless, in danger of forgetting his origins. With its penetrating insights on man's beginnings, sex life, habits and our astonishing bonds to the animal kingdom, The Naked Ape is a landmark, at once provocative, compelling and timeless. 'Original, provocative and brilliantly entertaining. It's the sort of book that changes people's lives' Sunday Times
  • Votes: 1

    The Undoing Project

    by Michael Lewis

    Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis's own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms. The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield--both had important careers in the Israeli military--and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn't remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter. This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind's view of its own mind.
  • Votes: 1

    The Person and the Situation

    by Lee Ross

  • Votes: 1

    Loneliness

    by John T. Cacioppo

  • Votes: 1

    Art of Seduction

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 1

    The Case Against Reality

    by Donald Hoffman

    A groundbreaking examination of human perception.
  • Votes: 1

    Fierce Conversations

    by Susan Scott

  • Votes: 1

    Affective Neuroscience

    by Jaak Panksepp

  • Votes: 1

    People of the Lie

    by M. Scott Peck

  • Votes: 1

    The Godfather

    by Mario Puzo

    An inside fictional portrait journeys inside the world of the Cosa Nostra and its operations to chronicle the lives and fortunes of Mafia leader Vito Corleone, his family, and his underworld domain. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    There Are So Many Beautiful Reasons To Be Happy

    by Leaf and Lake Journals

  • Votes: 1

    Neon Genesis Evangelion, Vol. 2

    by Yoshiyuki Sadamoto

  • Votes: 1

    Spy the Lie

    by Philip Houston

  • Votes: 1

    The Prince

    by Niccolò Machiavelli

    The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli, is a 16th-century political treatise. The Prince is sometimes claimed to be one of the first works of modern philosophy, especially modern political philosophy, in which the effective truth is taken to be more important than any abstract ideal. It was also in direct conflict with the dominant Catholic and scholastic doctrines of the time concerning politics and ethics.The Prince has the general theme of accepting that the aims of princes-such as glory and survival-can justify the use of immoral means to achieve those ends.Although it is relatively short, the treatise is the most remembered of Machiavelli's works and the one most responsible for bringing the word "Machiavellian" into usage as a pejorative. It even contributed to the modern negative connotations of the words "politics" and "politician" in western countries. In terms of subject matter it overlaps with the much longer Discourses on Livy, which was written a few years later.Machiavelli emphasized the need for realism, as opposed to idealism. Along with this, he stresses the difference between human-beings and animals since "there are two ways of contending, one in accordance with the laws, the other by force; the first of which is proper to men, the second to beast". In The Prince he does not explain what he thinks the best ethical or political goals are, except the control of one's own fortune, as opposed to waiting to see what chance brings. Machiavelli took it for granted that would-be leaders naturally aim at glory or honor. He associated these goals with a need for "virtue" and "prudence" in a leader, and saw such virtues as essential to good politics and indeed the common good. That great men should develop and use their virtue and prudence was a traditional theme of advice to Christian princes. And that more virtue meant less reliance on chance was a classically influenced "humanist commonplace" in Machiavelli's time, as Fischer says, even if it was somewhat controversial. However, Machiavelli went far beyond other authors in his time, who in his opinion left things to fortune, and therefore to bad rulers, because of their Christian beliefs. He used the words "virtue" and "prudence" to refer to glory-seeking and spirited excellence of character, in strong contrast to the traditional Christian uses of those terms, but more keeping with the original pre-Christian Greek and Roman concepts from which they derived. He encouraged ambition and risk taking. So in another break with tradition, he treated not only stability, but also radical innovation, as possible aims of a prince in a political community. Managing major reforms can show off a Prince's virtue and give him glory. He clearly felt Italy needed major reform in his time, and this opinion of his time is widely shared.Machiavelli's descriptions in The Prince encourage leaders to attempt to control their fortune gloriously, to the extreme extent that some situations may call for a fresh "founding" (or re-founding) of the "modes and orders" that define a community, despite the danger and necessary evil and lawlessness of such a project. Founding a wholly new state, or even a new religion, using injustice and immorality has even been called the chief theme of The Prince. Machiavelli justifies this position by explaining how if "a prince did not win love he may escape hate" by personifying injustice and immorality; therefore, he will never loosen his grip since "fear is held by the apprehension of punishment" and never diminishes as time goes by. For a political theorist to do this in public was one of Machiavelli's clearest breaks not just with medieval scholasticism, but with the classical tradition of political philosophy, especially the favorite philosopher of Catholicism at the time, Aristotle. This is one of Machiavelli's most lasting influences upon modernity.
  • Votes: 1

    The Joyous Science (Penguin Classics)

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Votes: 1

    Think Like a Monk

    by Jay Shetty

  • Votes: 1

    Decisive

    by Chip Heath

  • Votes: 1

    Wild Rituals

    by Caitlin O'Connell

  • Votes: 1

    Motivation and Personality

    by Thom Janson

  • Votes: 1

    The Q Pill

    by Jaquan Davis

  • Votes: 1

    The Molecule of More

    by Daniel Z. Lieberman

  • Votes: 1

    The Power of Habit

    by Charles Duhigg

  • Votes: 1

    The Hour Between Dog and Wolf

    by John Coates

  • Votes: 1

    Ordinary Men

    by Christopher R. Browning

  • Votes: 1

    The Psychopath Test

    by Jon Ronson

  • Votes: 1

    Limitless

    by Jim Kwik

  • Votes: 1

    Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life

    by Steven C. Hayes

  • Votes: 1

    The Iliad

    by Homer

  • Votes: 1

    Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters

    by Alan Miller

    Now available in paperback?a provocative new look at biology, evolution, and human behavior ?as disturbing [as it is] fascinating? (Publishers Weekly). Why are most neurosurgeons male and most kindergarten teachers female? Why aren?t there more women on death row? Why do so many male politicians ruin their careers with sex scandals? Why and how do we really fall in love? This engaging book uses the latest research from the field of evolutionary psychology to shed light on why we do the things we do?from life plans to everyday decisions. With a healthy disregard for political correctness, Miller and Kanazawa reexamine the fact that our brains and bodies are hardwired to carry out an evolutionary mission? an inescapable human nature that actually stopped evolving about 10,000 years ago.
  • Votes: 1

    Awaken the Giant Within

    by Tony Robbins

    Are you in charge of your life? Or are you being swept away by things that are seemingly out of your control? In AWAKEN THE GIANT WITHIN, Anthony Robbins, the bestselling author of UNLIMITED POWER, shows the reader how to take immediate control of their mental, emotional, physical and financial destiny.Anthony Robbins has devoted more than half his life to helping people discover and develop their own unique qualities of greatness. He is considered one the world's leading exponents in the science of peak performance and is committed to assisting people in achieving personal and professionl mastery. 'AWAKEN THE GIANT WITHIN is a fascinating, intriguing presentation of cutting edge findings and insights across a broad spectrum of issues, including the growing consciousness that true success is anchored in enduring values and service to others' STEPHEN R. COVEY Author of bestselling THE 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE
  • Votes: 1

    Psychology For Dummies, 3rd Edition

    by Adam Cash

  • Votes: 1

    The Mothers

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    Philosophical Baby

    by Alison Gopnik

  • Votes: 1

    The Secret

    by Rhonda Byrne

  • Votes: 1

    Punished by Rewards

    by Alfie Kohn

    Criticizes the system of motivating through reward, offering arguments for motivating people by working with them instead of doing things to them
  • Votes: 1

    12 Rules for Life

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Learning

    by Josh Waitzkin

    An eight-time national chess champion and world champion martial artist shares the lessons he has learned from two very different competitive arenas, identifying key principles about learning and performance that readers can apply to their life goals. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Greek Mythology

    by Liv Albert

    Finally sort out who’s who in Greek mythology—from gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everyone in between! Greek mythology continues to appear in popular movies and books today but have you ever wondered about where these characters started out? Discover the origins of your favorite characters from Greek mythology with this collection of profiles to tell you who’s who in classical lore! In Greek Mythology, you will discover the backstories of the heroes, villains, gods, and goddesses that enjoy popularity in today’s shows and films. With comprehensive entries that outline each character’s name, roles, related symbols, and foundational myths, you can get to know the roots of these personas and better understand the stories they inspire today. With this character-focused, handy reference, you will never be confused about Ancient Greece!
  • Votes: 1

    Deep Survival

    by Laurence Gonzales

  • Votes: 1

    Meditations

    by Marcus Aurelius

    The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 1

    The Evolution Of Desire

    by David M. Buss

  • Votes: 1

    Human Action

    by Ludwig Von Mises

  • Votes: 1

    Games Criminals Play

    by Bud Allen

  • Votes: 1

    How The Secret Changed My Life

    by Rhonda Byrne

  • Votes: 1

    Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

    by Lori Gottlieb

  • Votes: 1

    Steering by Starlight

    by Martha Beck

  • Votes: 1

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

    The revolutionary literary vision that sowed the seeds of Objectivism, Ayn Rand's groundbreaking philosophy, and brought her immediate worldwide acclaim. This modern classic is the story of intransigent young architect Howard Roark, whose integrity was as unyielding as granite...of Dominique Francon, the exquisitely beautiful woman who loved Roark passionately, but married his worst enemy...and of the fanatic denunciation unleashed by an enraged society against a great creator. As fresh today as it was then, Rand’s provocative novel presents one of the most challenging ideas in all of fiction—that man’s ego is the fountainhead of human progress... “A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly...This is the only novel of ideas written by an American woman that I can recall.”—The New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    Alchemy

    by Rory Sutherland

    The legendary advertising guru—Ogilvy UK’s vice chairman—and star of three massively popular TED Talks, blends the science of human behavior with his vast experience in the art of persuasion in this incomparable book that decodes successful branding and marketing in the vein of Freakonomics, Thinking Fast and Slow, and The Power of Habit. When Rory Sutherland was a trainee working on a direct mail campaign at the famed advertising firm OgilvyOne, he noticed that very small changes in design often had immense effects on the number of consumer responses. Yet no one he worked with knew why. Sutherland began taking stock of each effective yet nebulous trick—”the thing which has no name”—he discovered. As he rose in the advertising industry, he began to understand why these things had no name: no one was interested in quantifying them, cataloguing them, or really investigating them. So, he did it himself. Like classic behavioral economists Daniel Kahneman and Richard Thaler, Sutherland peels away hidden, often irrational human behaviors that explain how the world around us functions. In How to Be an Alchemist he examines why certain ads work and the broader truths they tell us about who we are. Why do people prefer stripy toothpaste, and how might that help us design retirement plans that young people would actually buy? Why do we think orange juice is healthy, and how does the same principle guide our feelings about nuclear reactors? Why do budget airlines advertise services they don’t offer—and what might insurance companies learn from them about keeping healthcare costs low? Filled with startling and profound conclusions, Sutherland’s journey through the world of advertising and its surprising lessons for human behavior is insightful, brilliant, eye-opening, and irresistibly fun.
  • Votes: 1

    Maps of Meaning

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 1

    The Wisdom of Crowds (The Age of Madness, 3)

    by Joe Abercrombie

  • Votes: 1

    My Memoirs

    by Richard Huxtable

  • Votes: 1

    Letting Go

    by David R. Hawkins M.D. Ph.D

  • Votes: 1

    Learned Optimism

    by Martin E. P. Seligman