Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 62

    A Working Class State of Mind

    by Colin Burnett

    Written entirely in East coast Scots A Working Class State of Mind, the debut book by Colin Burnett, brings the everyday reality and language of life in Scotland to the surface. Colin's fiction takes themes in the social sciences and animates them in vivid ethnographic portrayals of what it means to be working class in Scotland today. Delving into the tragic exploits of Aldo as well as his long time suffering best friends Dougie and Craig, the book follows these and other characters as they make their way in a city more divided along class lines than ever before.
  • Votes: 42

    Trainspotting

    by Irvine Welsh

  • Votes: 29

    The Young Team

    by Graeme Armstrong

    The Times top ten bestseller. ‘An instant Scottish classic’ – The Skinny ‘A swaggering, incendiary debut’ – Guardian ‘Trainspotting for a new generation’ – Independent ‘Dialect that fizzes off the page’ – Observer ‘One of the most admired young voices in British fiction’ – The Times 2005. Glasgow is named Europe’s Murder Capital, driven by a violent territorial gang and knife culture. In the housing schemes of adjacent Lanarkshire, Scotland’s former industrial heartland, wee boys become postcode warriors. 2004. Azzy Williams joins the Young Team [YTP]. A brutal gang conflict with their deadly rivals, the Young Toi [YTB] begins. 2012. Azzy dreams of another life. He faces his toughest fight of all – the fight for a different future. Expect Buckfast. Expect bravado. Expect street philosophy. Expect rave culture. Expect anxiety. Expect addiction. Expect a serious facial injury every six hours. Expect murder. Hope for a way out. Inspired by the experiences of its author, Graeme Armstrong, The Young Team is an energetic novel, full of the loyalty, laughs, mischief, boredom, violence and threat of life on these streets. It looks beyond the tabloid stereotypes to tell a powerful story about the realities of life for young people in Britain today.
  • Votes: 19

    The Dead of Jura (Inspector Angus Blue Book 2)

    by Allan Martin

    On the Scottish Hebridean Island of Islay, five corpses are dug up by a peat-cutter. All of them have been shot in the back of the head, execution style. Sent across from the mainland to investigate, Inspector Angus Blue and his team slowly piece together the little evidence they have, and discover the men were killed on a wartime base, over 70 years ago. But there are still secrets worth protecting, and even killing for. Who can Inspector Blue trust? Reviews of The Peat Dead: "A mystery so redolent of its island setting that you practically smell the peat and whisky on the pages." - Douglas Skelton" This atmospheric crime novel set on Islay gripped me from the start. A book that shows decades-old crimes cast long shadows." - Sarah Ward
  • Votes: 15

    The Cut

    by Chris Brookmyre

    The entertaining, moving, and unpredictable new thriller from multi-award-winning bestseller Chris Brookmyre is a wholly original masterpiece and the best crime novel of 2021. Millie Spark can kill anyone. A special effects make-up artist, her talent is to create realistic scenes of bloody violence. Then, one day, she wakes to find her lover dead in her bed. Twenty-five years later, her sentence for murder served, Millicent is ready to give up on her broken life - until she meets troubled film student and reluctant petty thief Jerry. Together, they begin to discover that all was not what it seemed on that fateful night . . . and someone doesn't want them to find out why.
  • Votes: 13

    The God of All Small Boys

    by Joseph Lamb

  • Votes: 13

    Incipience

    by L Gourley

    'Fans of Marian Keyes will love Lucy Robinson's giggle-inducing humour and relatable characters. With a twist that will leave you speechless, this is a must' Glamour TWO GOOD FRIENDS. TWO BIG SECRETS. WHAT ARE THEY RUNNING AWAY FROM? Annie has a secret. But if she's not going to tell, we won't either. It's a heart-breaking secret she wishes she didn't have - yet Annie isn't broken, not quite yet. Especially now there's someone out there who seems determined to fix her. Kate has run away. But she's not going to tell us why - that would defeat the point of running, wouldn't it? It's proving difficult to reinvent herself, however, with one person always on her mind. Scratch beneath the surface and nobody is really who they seem. Even Annie and Kate, two old friends, aren't entirely sure who they are any more. Perhaps you can work it out, before their pasts catch up with them for good . . . If you love Rosie Walsh, Marian Keyes and Paige Toon you'll love this! ____________ 'What a book! Fabulous characters, dark secrets and a clever, compulsive plot that will take you completely by surprise. Read it!' Lucy Diamond 'I couldn't put this book down: a fabulously original love story' Lucy Dillon 'Enthralling from the get-go and packed with an irresistible blend of brilliant characters, intriguing drama and a plot twist that will slam-dunk your brain into the middle of next week' Isabelle Broom 'Intriguing and uplifting - a real page-turner full of humour and mystery, with a pair of heroines you'll welcome into your heart' Julie Cohen
  • Votes: 13

    The Siege of Caerlaverock

    by Barbara Henderson

    12-year-old Ada is a laundress of little consequence but the new castle commander Brian de Berclay has his evil eye on her. Perhaps she shouldn't have secretly fed the young prisoner in the tower.But when the King of England crosses the border with an army of over 3000 strong, Ada, her friend Godfrey and all at Caerlaverock suddenly find themselves under attack, with only 60 men for protection.Soon, rocks and flaming arrows rain from the sky over Castle Caerlaverock - and Ada has a dangerous choice to make.
  • Votes: 11

    Unspoken

    by Henry Cole

    In this wordless picture book, a young Southern farm girl discovers a runaway slave hiding behind the corn crib in the barn and decides to help him.
  • Votes: 11

    Fish Town

    by J. T. Blatty

    Fish Town is an inspired documentary project focused on preserving, through photography and oral history recordings, the cultural and environmental remains of southeastern Louisiana's fishing communities. Owing to a dying wild-caught seafood industry and a rapidly vanishing coastline, the places and people who are multigenerations deep in Louisiana's fishing traditions have been quietly slipping into extinction for decades, many without a form of historic preservation. These are the same towns that not only have made New Orleans an epicenter of fresh seafood dining but have traditionally served as getaway places for New Orleanian families, an escape to nature where time can be spent together sport fishing on the lakes and bayous and gathering around crab and crawfish boils. J. T. Blatty has been traveling "down the road" from her home in New Orleans since 2009, capturing these places and people as no one previously has. Fish Town includes 137 color photographs taken by Blatty between 2012 and 2017. Interspersed throughout are text narratives transcribed from audio recordings with long-standing members of the fishing communities, many of whose ancestors came to Louisiana during the late 1600s. J. T. Blatty is a freelance photographer, writer, and artist based in New Orleans. Her photographs have been exhibited internationally and have appeared in CNN Photos, Charleston Magazine, National Geographic Traveler, The Daily Beast, the Oxford American, Savannah Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, and USA Today, among other publications. Craig E. Colten is the Carl O. Sauer Professor of Geography at Louisiana State University and the author, most recently, of Southern Waters: The Limits to Abundance. Distributed for George F. Thompson Publishing
  • Votes: 8

    The Bridge

    by Iain Banks

    The man who wakes up in the extraordinary world of a bridge has amnesia, and his doctor doesn't seem to want to cure him. Does it matter? Exploring the bridge occupies most of his days. But at night there are his dreams... Dreams in which desperate men drive sealed carriages across barren mountains to a bizarre rendezvous; an illiterate barbarian storms an enchanted tower under a stream of verbal abuse; and broken men walk forever over bridges without end, taunted by visions of a doomed sexuality. Lying in bed unconscious after an accident wouldn't be much fun, you'd think. Oh yes? It depends who and what you've left behind. Which is the stranger reality, day or night? Frequently hilarious and consistently disturbing, THE BRIDGE is a novel of outrageous contrasts, constructed chaos and elegant absurdities. Why customers are loving The Bridge: "Banks' Wasp Factory is frequently called 'One of the 20th century's 100 greatest novels'. It pales in comparison to The Bridge!" - Amazon Reviewer, 5 stars "Mindblowing! This is the first Iain Banks novel I have read and needless to say I'll be back for more." - Amazon Reviewer, 5 stars
  • Votes: 8

    The Lion Wakes (Kingdom)

    by Robert Low

    The first novel in The Kingdom Series as Robert Low moves from the Vikings to the making of Scotland.
  • Votes: 8

    And the Land Lay Still

    by James Robertson

    And the Land Lay Still is the sweeping Scottish epic by James Robertson And the Land Lay Still is nothing less than the story of a nation. James Robertson's breathtaking novel is a portrait of modern Scotland as seen through the eyes of natives and immigrants, journalists and politicians, drop-outs and spooks, all trying to make their way through a country in the throes of great and rapid change. It is a moving, sweeping story of family, friendship, struggle and hope - epic in every sense. The winner of the Saltire Society Scottish Book of the Year Award 2010, And the Land Lay Still is a masterful insight into Scotland's history in the twentieth century and a moving, beautifully written novel of intertwined stories. 'Toweringly ambitious, virtually flawlessly realized, a masterpiece and, without a doubt, my book of the year' Daily Mail 'A jam-packed, dizzying piece of fiction' Scotland on Sunday 'Gripping, vivid, beautifully realized' The Times 'Engrossing' Daily Telegraph 'Powerful and moving. A brilliant and multifaceted saga of Scottish life in the second half of the twentieth century' Sunday Times 'Brilliant and thoughtful. Eminently readable, subtle and profound' Independent on Sunday 'Bold, discursive and deep, Robertson's sweeping history of life and politics in 20th-century Scotland should not be ignored' Ian Rankin, Observer Books of the Year James Robertson is the author of three previous novels: The Fanatic, Joseph Knight and The Testament of Gideon Mack, which is available in Penguin. Joseph Knight was awarded the two major Scottish literary awards in 2003/4 - the Saltire Book of the Year and the Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year - and The Testament of Gideon Mack was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, picked by Richard and Judy's Book Club, and shortlisted for the Saltire Book of the Year award.
  • Votes: 7

    Scabby Queen

    by Kirstin Innes

    ‘Gripping and moving. A literary triumph’ Nicola Sturgeon ‘A humane and searching story’ Ian Rankin ‘Kirstin Innes is aiming high, writing for readers in the early days of a better nation’ A.L. Kennedy A NEW STATESMAN BOOK OF THE YEAR • A SCOTSMAN BOOK OF THE YEAR
  • Votes: 6

    Global Scots

    by Henry McLeish

    The history alone could not explain the colonys disastrous outcome; you really had to stand on the shore of Punta Escoces to realize that the Scots were bound to disaster the moment they chose the site to bear the name Caledonia. The bay was a beautiful, deadly trap. On 2 November 1698 a fleet landed on the Isthmus of Darien to create a colony and launch a new Scottish trading empire. Eighteen months later, the colony had seen the loss of ten ships, almost 400,000 and the lives of 2,000 souls. Nat Edwards invites himself to Panama, the real-life setting for an almost unbelievable 17th century expedition of Scottish hope and adventure. His erratic odyssey to find the lost graves of the Scots settlers neatly blends pirates, street riots, treasure hunters, indigenous peoples and killer bees, with the astonishing facts he sets out with. Nats discoveries are often frustrating, occasionally freakish, but always fascinating.
  • Votes: 6

    The Window Seat

    by Aminatta Forna

    A stunning new collection of essays from the award-winning author of Happiness, The Window Seat explores border crossings both literal and philosophical, our relationship with the natural world, and the stories that we tell ourselves.
  • Votes: 5

    Euphoric Recall

    by Aidan Martin

    Young Aidan Martin's life is about to change forever. A powerful and true story of trauma, addiction, recovery and hope in the working-class town of Livingston, Scotland. A gripping read from beginning to end.
  • Votes: 5

    The Sewing Machine

    by Natalie Fergie

    Over 100,000 copies sold 'A tapestry of strong characters and accomplished writing' Herald Scotland It is 1911, and Jean is about to join the mass strike at the Singer factory. For her, nothing will be the same again. Decades later, in Edinburgh, Connie sews coded moments of her life into a notebook, as her mother did before her. More than a hundred years after his grandmother’s sewing machine was made, Fred discovers a treasure trove of documents. His family history is laid out before him in a patchwork of unfamiliar handwriting and colourful seams. He starts to unpick the secrets of four generations, one stitch at a time.
  • Votes: 5

    No Worries

    by Bella Mente Press

    Are anxiety and worried thoughts making you feel restless and panicked? Are they preventing you from feeling positive and optimistic about your day-to-day life? If so, manage your thoughts and lift your spirits using this beautiful daily journal as your guide. No Worries is a 12-week anxiety journal that will help you process what's on your mind and gently re-frame your thoughts, so you can manage your worries before they start to spiral out of control. It was designed to meet you where you are now and guide you toward developing a practice of taking a few minutes each day to reflect on your thoughts, identify the sources of your anxiety, get in the habit of positive thinking, and prioritize your overall wellness and mental health. No Worries includes: Daily Journaling Pages Space to check in on your mood, reflect on your thoughts and anxiety triggers, practice daily gratitude, and honor any positive thoughts or moments from your day. Self-Care Ideas: Suggestions for simple ways to take care of yourself and start to feel better. Emotional Support Cheat Sheet: Write down who you love, what you value, things you enjoy, and favorite quotes for whenever life feels uncertain Mindfulness Matters: Tips for finding a few minutes of peace and quiet each day. Fear-Setting Exercises Manage your biggest worries and shift your perspective so you can stop stressing and take meaningful action. Habit Trackers: A page to help you remember to prioritize self-care and the habits that are important to you each week. Therapy Reflections: Reflect on your sessions (if you are seeing a therapist or counselor) and record what you learned and how it made you feel. Monthly Progress: Pages for you to look back on your month overall and check in on your satisfaction in different areas of your life. Anxiety might be making you feel like you're walking on pins and needles. But by using the No Worries journal, you'll be making a positive step forward toward coping with your anxiety, caring for your mental health, and feeling better each day.
  • Votes: 5

    The Outrun

    by Amy Liptrot

    THE SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE 2016 WAINWRIGHT PRIZE SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 ONDAATJE PRIZE SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2016 WELLCOME PRIZE At the age of thirty, Amy Liptrot finds herself washed up back home on Orkney. Standing unstable on the island, she tries to come to terms with the addiction that has swallowed the last decade of her life. As she spends her mornings swimming in the bracingly cold sea, her days tracking Orkney's wildlife, and her nights searching the sky for the Merry Dancers, Amy discovers how the wild can restore life and renew hope.
  • Votes: 4

    Creating Great Choices

    by Jennifer Riel

    Move Beyond Trade-Off Thinking When it comes to our hardest choices, it can seem as though making trade-offs is inevitable. But what about those crucial times when accepting the obvious trade-off just isn't good enough? What do we do when the choices in front of us don't get us what we need? In those cases, rather than choosing the least worst option, we can use the models in front of us to create a new and superior answer. This is integrative thinking. First introduced by world-renowned strategic thinker Roger Martin in The Opposable Mind, integrative thinking is an approach to problem solving that uses opposing ideas as the basis for innovation. Now, in Creating Great Choices, Martin and his longtime thinking partner Jennifer Riel vividly illustrate how integrative thinking works, and how to do it. The book includes fresh stories of successful integrative thinkers that will demystify the process of creative problem solving, as well as practical tools and exercises to help readers engage with the ideas. And it lays out the authors' four-step methodology for creating great choices, which can be applied in virtually any context. The result is a replicable, thoughtful approach to finding a "third and better way" to make important choices in the face of unacceptable trade‐offs. Insightful and instructive, Creating Great Choices blends storytelling, theory, and hands-on advice to help any leader or manager facing a tough choice.
  • Votes: 4

    Talk of the Toun

    by Helen MacKinven

    An uplifting black comedy of love, family life and friendship, Talk of the Toun is a bittersweet coming-of-age tale set in the summer of 1985, in working class, central belt Scotland.
  • Votes: 4

    Daisy on the Outer Line

    by Ross Sayers

    When Daisy trashes her stepdad's funeral, she gets blind drunk and wakes up on the Glasgow subway to find she has travelled back in time. To make amends for her behaviour, she must save a life - but she doesn't know who, how, or where to begin.
  • Votes: 4

    How to be both

    by Ali Smith

    WINNER OF THE BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2015 WINNER OF THE GOLDSMITHS PRIZE 2014 SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2014 WINNER OF THE 2014 COSTA NOVEL AWARD WINNER OF THE SALTIRE SOCIETY LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2014 NOMINATED FOR THE FOLIO PRIZE 2015 'Brims with palpable joy' Daily Telegraph 'She's a genius, genuinely modern in the heroic, glorious sense' Alain de Botton 'I take my hat off to Ali Smith. Her writing lifts the soul' Evening Standard How to be both is a novel all about art's versatility. Borrowing from painting's fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it's a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There's a renaissance artist of the 1460s. There's the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real - and all life's givens get given a second chance. Passionate, compassionate, vitally inventive and scrupulously playful, Ali Smith's novels are like nothing else.
  • Votes: 4

    For a Chance to Forget

    by Donald Nicolson

  • Votes: 4

    His Bloody Project

    by Graeme MaCrae Burnet

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2016. WINNER, Saltire Society Fiction Book of the Year 2016. The year is 1869. A brutal triple murder in a remote community in the Scottish Highlands leads to the arrest of a young man by the name of Roderick Macrae. A memoir written by the accused makes it clear that he is guilty, but it falls to the country’s finest legal and psychiatric minds to uncover what drove him to commit such merciless acts of violence. Was he mad? Only the persuasive powers of his advocate stand between Macrae and the gallows. Graeme Macrae Burnet tells an irresistible and original story about the provisional nature of truth, even when the facts seem clear. His Bloody Project is a mesmerising literary thriller set in an unforgiving landscape where the exercise of power is arbitrary.
  • Votes: 4

    The Trick Is To Keep Breathing (Vintage Classics)

    by Janice Galloway

    From the corner of a darkened room Joy Stone watches herself. As memories of the deaths of her lover and mother surface unbidden, life for Joy narrows âe" to negotiating each day, each encounter, each second; to finding the trick to keep living. Told with shattering clarity and wry wit, this is a Scottish classic fit for our time.
  • Votes: 4

    Shuggie Bain

    by Douglas Stuart

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020 Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020 The Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year 2020 'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' – Observer It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest. Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place. Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell. 'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' – The judges of the Booker Prize
  • Votes: 3

    Stay Mad, Sweetheart

    by Heleen Kist

    A dark yet empowering tale of female revenge exploring the grey areas of consent, insidious harassment and discrimination at work. A topical and engaging thriller with its feet firmly in the #MeToo era. It's 9 to 5 meets Suits with a dash of Black Mirror.
  • Votes: 3

    Tonguit

    by Harry Giles

  • Votes: 3

    Shapeshifters

    by Aimee Meredith Cox

    In Shapeshifters Aimee Meredith Cox explores how young Black women in a Detroit homeless shelter contest stereotypes, critique their status as partial citizens, and negotiate poverty, racism, and gender violence to create and imagine lives for themselves. Based on eight years of fieldwork at the Fresh Start shelter, Cox shows how the shelter's residents—who range in age from fifteen to twenty-two—employ strategic methods she characterizes as choreography to disrupt the social hierarchies and prescriptive narratives that work to marginalize them. Among these are dance and poetry, which residents learn in shelter workshops. These outlets for performance and self-expression, Cox shows, are key to the residents exercising their agency, while their creation of alternative family structures demands a rethinking of notions of care, protection, and love. Cox also uses these young women's experiences to tell larger stories: of Detroit's history, the Great Migration, deindustrialization, the politics of respectability, and the construction of Black girls and women as social problems. With Shapeshifters Cox gives a voice to young Black women who find creative and non-normative solutions to the problems that come with being young, Black, and female in America.
  • Votes: 3

    War on the Border

    by Jeff Guinn

    "The dramatic story of how U.S.-Mexico border tensions erupted into open warfare in 1916, as a U.S. military expedition crossed the border to try to capture Mexican guerrilla Pancho Villa--a military incursion whose effects still haunt the border region to this day"--
  • Votes: 3

    The Living Mountain

    by Nan Shepherd

  • Votes: 3

    Moder Dy

    by Roseanne Watt

    This eagerly awaited debut collection from Shetland poet Roseanne Watt contains profound, assured and wilfully spare poems that are built from the sight, sound and heartbeat of the land as much as from the sea.
  • Votes: 3

    Always A Pleasure

    by Jan Gifford

    The author describes a friendship with a seventy-eight year old man she met in a pottery class. "A close look at a surprising ten-year friendship, spanning age and gender, centered around pottery, sharing confidences and dealing with loss."
  • Votes: 2

    The Island Home

    by Libby Page

    'A perfect, warm escape from these cold, dark times' Kate Eberlen 'Bursting with hope and heart' Cathy Bramley 'Wonderfully engaging . . . beautifully drawn' Mike Gayle 'Radiates warmth, happiness and hope' Veronica Henry ----- Lorna's world is small but safe. She loves her daughter, and the two of them is all that matters. But after nearly twenty years, she and Ella are suddenly leaving London for the Isle of Kip, the tiny remote Scottish island where Lorna grew up. Alice's world is tiny but full. She loves the community on Kip, her yoga classes drawing women across the tiny island together. Now Lorna's arrival might help their family finally mend itself - even if forgiveness means returning to the past... So with two decades, hundreds of miles and a lifetime's worth of secrets between Lorna and the island, can coming home mean starting again? ----- Join the community of readers who love Libby's bright, moving storytelling: 'A wonderfully evocative and enveloping novel about the joys and comforts of community and friendship and a perfect, warm escape from these cold, dark times' Kate Eberlen 'A tender, life-affirming story bursting with hope and heart' Cathy Bramley 'A tender tale about stepping out of the shadows of the past and navigating the route to a brighter future....this book not only takes the reader on a journey, but reminds us of the importance of finding our way back home' Mike Gayle 'The Island Home radiates warmth, happiness and hope. Libby is a truly gifted writer who weaves magic with her every word. Every page is a delight - gentle, comforting, reassuring and utterly charming' Veronica Henry 'A joy-filled love letter to the power of community and connection, and a sensitive commentary on loneliness and forgiveness too, all of which is conveyed with huge warmth and affection' Celia Reynolds 'A tender, heartfelt story, The Island Home explores every aspect of love and shows us it's never too late to fix what's broken. I left my heart with Lorna and Alice on the Isle of Kip' Lindsey Kelk 'A gorgeous, heart-lifting story of families and the secrets that bind us, with a setting that you can lose yourself in' Rachael Lucas
  • Votes: 2

    The Cutting Room

    by Louise Welsh

    When Rilke, a dissolute auctioneer, comes upon a hidden collection of violent and highly disturbing photographs, he feels compelled to discover more about the deceased owner who coveted them. Soon he finds himself sucked into an underworld of crime, depravity and secret desire, fighting for his life. Louise Welsh's writing is stylish and captivating; she combines aspects of a detective story with shades of the gothic. The result is a page-turning and deliciously original debut. The Cutting Room has won the Crime Writers Association award for debut crime novels, the John Creasey Memorial Dagger, and has been longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award.
  • Votes: 2

    Whirligig

    by Paul Fleischman

    When sixteen-year-old Brent Bishop inadvertently causes the death of a young woman, he is sent on an unusual journey of repentance, building wind toys across the land. In his most ambitious novel to date, Newbery winner Paul Fleischman traces Brent's healing pilgrimage from Washington State to California, Florida, and Maine, and describes the many lives set into new motion by the ingenious creations Brent leaves behind. Paul Fleischman is the master of multivoiced books for younger readers. In Whirligig he has created a novel about hidden connections that is itself a wonder of spinning hearts and grand surprises.
  • Votes: 2

    Yey!

    by UAB Kidkis

    Sketchbook Journal Notebook is designed for Sketching, Drawing, Doodling, Painting or Writing. It has a simple rectangular frame with rounded corners which provides crisp and clean open space to draw within. Perfect for kids, adults and college students. Say everybody Happy Thanksgiving Day! Celebrate this special thankfull day and to attend the traditional turkey dinner. You will love the way yo look this design. Perfect design for anyone to commemorate this holiday. Funny and cool looking design especially for using at November holiday Thanksgiving Day celebration. It is an Original and spectacular gift idea for mother, father or friends
  • Votes: 2

    Bruce Trilogy

    by Nigel Tranter

    This trilogy tells the story of Robert the Bruce and how, tutored and encouraged by the heroic William Wallace, he determined to continue the fight for an independent Scotland, sustained by a passionate love for his land. This edition collects together Steps to the Empty Throne, Price of the King's Peace and Path of the Hero King, written by the master of Scottish historical fiction Nigel Tranter.
  • Votes: 2

    Soul Sisters

    by Lesley Lokko

    Soul Sisters by Lesley Lokko is a rich, intergenerational tale of love, race, power and secrets which centres on the lifelong friendship between two women: Scottish Jen McFadden and South African-born Kemisa Mashabane, known to her friends as Kemi. Since childhood, Jen and Kemi have lived like sisters in the McFadden family home in Edinburgh, brought together by a shared family history which stretches back generations. Kemi was educated in Britain alongside Jen and the girls could not be closer; nor could they be more different in the paths they take in life. But the ties that bind them are strong and complicated, and a dark family secret exists in their joint history. Solam Rhoyi is from South Africa’s black political elite. Handsome, charismatic, charming, and a successful young banker, he meets both Kemi and Jen on a trip to London and sweeps them off their feet. Partly influenced by her interest in Solam, and partly on a journey of self-discovery, Kemi, now 31, decides to return to the country of her birth for the first time. Jen, seeking an escape from her father’s overbearing presence, decides to go with her. In Johannesburg, it becomes clear that Solam is looking for the perfect wife to facilitate his soaring political ambitions. But who will he choose? All the while, the real story behind the two families’ connection threatens to reveal itself – with devastating consequences . . .
  • Votes: 2

    The Turn of the Key

    by Ruth Ware

  • Votes: 2

    The Angel in the Stone

    by R.L McKinney

    Having returned to his childhood home in the West Highlands, Calum leads a quiet life. More than two decades after his brother Finn fell to his death, he still relives the event and struggles to find peace of mind. It isn’t so easy, however: his mother, Mary, has Alzheimer’s Disease and his estranged daughter Catriona has arrived out of the blue. Unexpectedly, Calum has his mother and daughter living with him and the house becomes a crucible of old resentments, disappointments, unspoken revelations and fragile but enduring love. Together and separately, Calum, Mary and Catriona retrace the events that have brought them to this point and made them who they are.
  • Votes: 2

    The Book of Strange New Things

    by Michel Faber

    'I am with you always, even unto the end of the world . . .' Peter Leigh is a missionary called to go on the journey of a lifetime. Leaving behind his beloved wife, Bea, he boards a flight for a remote and unfamiliar land, a place where the locals are hungry for the teachings of the Bible - his 'book of strange new things'. It is a quest that will challenge Peter's beliefs, his understanding of the limits of the human body and, most of all, his love for Bea. The Book of Strange New Things is a wildly original tale of adventure, faith and the ties that might hold two people together when they are worlds apart. This momentous novel, Faber's first since The Crimson Petal and the White, sees him at his expectation-defying best. WINNER OF THE SALTIRE BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD SHORTLISTED FOR THE ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD AS HEARD ON BBC RADIO 4
  • Votes: 2

    The Nowhere Emporium

    by Ross MacKenzie

    When the mysterious Nowhere Emporium arrives in Glasgow, orphan Daniel Holmes stumbles upon it quite by accident. Before long, the 'shop from nowhere' -- and its owner, Mr Silver -- draw Daniel into a breathtaking world of magic and enchantment. Recruited as Mr Silver's apprentice, Daniel learns the secrets of the Emporium's vast labyrinth of passageways and rooms -- rooms that contain wonders beyond anything Daniel has ever imagined. But when Mr Silver disappears, and a shadow from the past threatens everything, the Emporium and all its wonders begin to crumble. Can Daniel save his home, and his new friends, before the Nowhere Emporium is destroyed forever? Scottish Children's Book Award winner Ross MacKenzie unleashes a riot of imagination, colour and fantasy in this astonishing adventure, perfect for fans of Philip Pullman, Corneila Funke and Neil Gaiman.
  • Votes: 2

    The Single Dad’s Handbook

    by Lynsey James

    ‘You know it’s gonna be a five star review when you’ve read a whole book in a day...ABSOLUTELY STUNNING!!!!!!!! ...up there for me with PS I Love You’ Reader review Welcome to The Single Dad’s Handbook, your comprehensive guide to life without me when I pop my clogs!
  • Votes: 2

    The WASP FACTORY

    by Iain Banks

    The polarizing literary debut by Scottish author Ian Banks, The Wasp Factory is the bizarre, imaginative, disturbing, and darkly comic look into the mind of a child psychopath. Meet Frank Cauldhame. Just sixteen, and unconventional to say the least: Two years after I killed Blyth I murdered my young brother Paul, for quite different and more fundamental reasons than I'd disposed of Blyth, and then a year after that I did for my young cousin Esmerelda, more or less on a whim. That's my score to date. Three. I haven't killed anybody for years, and don't intend to ever again. It was just a stage I was going through.
  • Votes: 2

    The Magic Flag Mystery (Blaze Dog Detective)

    by Lin Anderson

  • Votes: 2

    The Testament of Gideon Mack

    by James Robertson

    A critical success on both sides of the Atlantic, this darkly imaginative novel from Scottish author James Robertson takes a tantalizing trip into the spiritual by way of a haunting paranormal mystery. When Reverend Gideon Mack, a good minister despite his atheism, tumbles into a deep ravine called the Black Jaws, he is presumed dead. Three days later, however, he emerges bruised but alive-and insistent that his rescuer was Satan himself. Against the background of an incredulous world, Mack's disturbing odyssey and the tortuous life that led to it create a mesmerizing meditation on faith, mortality, and the power of the unknown.
  • Votes: 2

    The Silver Darlings

    by Neil Miller Gunn

  • Votes: 2

    The Crow Road

    by Iain Banks

    'His masterpiece' Jay Rayner 'One of the best opening lines of any novel... a warm, witty and ultimately very poignant book' Guardian An outstanding contemporary novel, about which readers say: 'Banks' masterpiece' 'Iain Banks at his best' 'Read this immediately' 'A story full of wonderful characters' 'It was the day my grandmother exploded. I sat in the crematorium, listening to my Uncle Hamish quietly snoring in harmony to Bach's Mass in B Minor, and I reflected that it always seemed to be death that drew me back to Gallanach.' Prentice McHoan has returned to the bosom of his complex but enduring Scottish family. Full of questions about the McHoan past, present and future, he is also deeply preoccupied: mainly with death, sex, drink, God and illegal substances...
  • Votes: 2

    Motherwell

    by Deborah Orr

    Just shy of 18, Deborah Orr left Motherwell - the town she both loved and hated - to go to university. It was a decision her mother railed against from the moment the idea was raised. Win had very little agency in the world, every choice was determined by the men in her life. And strangely, she wanted the same for her daughter. Attending university wasn't for the likes of the Orr family. Worse still, it would mean leaving Win behind - and Win wanted Deborah with her at all times, rather like she wanted her arm with her at all times. But while she managed to escape, Deborah's severing from her family was only superficial. She continued to travel back to Motherwell, fantasizing about the day that Win might come to accept her as good enough. Though of course it was never meant to be.
  • Votes: 2

    The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

    by Muriel Spark

    'Muriel Spark's most celebrated novel . . . This ruthlessly and destructively romantic school ma'am is one of the giants of post-war fiction' Independent 'A brilliantly psychological fugue' Observer The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is Muriel Spark's most significant and celebrated novel, and remains as dazzling as when it was first published in 1961. Miss Jean Brodie is a teacher unlike any other, proud and cultured, enigmatic and freethinking; a romantic, with progressive, sometimes shocking ideas and aspirations for the girls in her charge. At the Marcia Blaine Academy she takes a select group of girls under her wing. Spellbound by Miss Brodie's unconventional teaching, these devoted pupils form the Brodie set. But as the girls enter their teenage years and they become increasingly drawn in by Miss Brodie's personal life, her ambitions for them take a startling and dark turn with devastating consequences.
  • Votes: 2

    A Polar Bear Called Forth

    by A P Pullan

    Children are already learning at birth, and they develop and learn at a rapid pace in their early years. This provides a critical foundation for lifelong progress, and the adults who provide for the care and the education of young children bear a great responsibility for their health, development, and learning. Despite the fact that they share the same objective - to nurture young children and secure their future success - the various practitioners who contribute to the care and the education of children from birth through age 8 are not acknowledged as a workforce unified by the common knowledge and competencies needed to do their jobs well. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8 explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. This report examines the current capacities and practices of the workforce, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government agencies and other funders who support and oversee these systems. This book then makes recommendations to improve the quality of professional practice and the practice environment for care and education professionals. These detailed recommendations create a blueprint for action that builds on a unifying foundation of child development and early learning, shared knowledge and competencies for care and education professionals, and principles for effective professional learning. Young children thrive and learn best when they have secure, positive relationships with adults who are knowledgeable about how to support their development and learning and are responsive to their individual progress. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8 offers guidance on system changes to improve the quality of professional practice, specific actions to improve professional learning systems and workforce development, and research to continue to build the knowledge base in ways that will directly advance and inform future actions. The recommendations of this book provide an opportunity to improve the quality of the care and the education that children receive, and ultimately improve outcomes for children.
  • Votes: 1

    The Gods of Frequency

    by Shane Johnstone

    At the peak of a festival in the Western Isles, a working class, untrained, hard drinking Glaswegian musician experiences a pivotal moment in his musical journey. He spends the next seven years battling to recreate this moment, on the outskirts of an industry swamped in privilege. A modern perspective on the Scottish music industry.
  • Votes: 1

    Blood and Guilt

    by Sophie Grossalber

    »We all have the potential to turn into monsters.« Vampires. Werewolves. Hunters. Three stories, three choices. In New Orleans, vampire king Damien Moreau is torn between his position of power and his conscience. Connor O'Rileigh wakes up in the Scottish Highlands after a full moon - in the middle of the murder spree of a bloodthirsty beast. In the icy foothills of the Himalayas, huntress Xi Lei has to question her deepest beliefs and judge supposed innocents to protect the world.
  • Votes: 1

    The Darlings

    by Angela Jackson

    A controversial new novel from the winner of the Edinburgh International Book Festival First Book Award. When Mark Darling is 15 years old, he is the golden boy, captain of the school soccer team, admired by all who know him. Until he kills his best friend in a freak accident. He spends the next decade drifting between the therapy couch and dead-end pursuits. Then along comes Sadie. A mender by nature, she tries her best to fix him and has enough energy to carry them both through the next few years. One evening, Mark bumps into an old schoolfriend, Ruby. She saw the accident first hand. He is pulled towards her by a force stronger than logic: the universal need to reconcile one's childhood wounds. This is his chance to, once again, feel the enveloping warmth of unconditional love. But can he leave behind the woman who rescued him from the pit of despair, the wife he loves? His unborn child? This is a story about how childhood experiences can profoundly impact how we behave as adults. It's a story about betrayal, infidelity, and how we often blinker ourselves to see a version of the truth that is more palatable to us.
  • Votes: 1

    The Bookshop

    by Penelope Fitzgerald

    From the Booker Prize-winning author of ‘Offshore’, ‘The Blue Flower’ and ‘Innocence’ comes this Booker Prize-shortlisted story of books and busybodies in East Anglia.
  • Votes: 1

    A disaffection

    by James Kelman

    Patrick Doyle is a twenty-nine-year-old teacher in an ordinary comprehensive school. Isolated, frustrated and increasingly bitter at the system he is employed to maintain, he begins his rebellion, fuelled by drink and his passionate, unrequited love for a fellow teacher.
  • Votes: 1

    Beside The Ocean Of Time

    by George Mackay Brown

    In this novel set on the fictitious island of Norday in the Orkneys, George Mackay Brown beckons us into the imaginary world of the young Thorfinn Ragnarson, the son of a crofter. In his day-dreams he relives the history of this island people, travelling back in time to join Viking adventurers at the court of the Byzantine Emperor in Constantinople, then accompanying a Falstaffian knight to the battle of Bannockburn. Thorfinn wakes to the twentieth century and a community whose way of life, steeped in legend and tradition, has remained unchanged for centuries. But as the boy grows up - and falls in love with a vivacious and mysterious stranger - the transforming effect of modern civilization brings momentous and irreversible changes to the island. During the Second World War Thorfinn finds himself in a German prisoner-of-war camp, and it is here that he discovers his gifts as a writer. Long afterwards he returns, now a successful novelist, to a deserted and battle-scarred island. Searching for the peace and freedom of mind he had in abundance as a child, he finds instead something he didn't even know he was looking for. George Mackay Brown intertwines myth and reality to create a novel of deceptive simplicity. The story of Thorfinn and the island of Norday is a universal and profound one, rooted in the timeless landscape of the Orkneys, the inspiration of all his writing.
  • Votes: 1

    Love on the Rocks

    by Simon Los

    Cold-blooded bargirls, naive tourists and sordid scams - it was all in a night's work for Pattaya bar manager Simon Los.
  • Votes: 1

    Never Any Doubt (Never Say Never)

    by Diane Ziock

    Never Any Doubt, told from both the male and female point of view, is a story about the importance of friendship, the recognition of strength, and realizing that sometimes first love really is forever.Teenage romances don't usually last. At that age, no one is certain where their next pimple will appear, much less if a couple will stand the test of time. Paige Turner and Carter Sullivan had a connection from the moment they met at age twelve. Paige thought her relationship with Carter was different. Parting after graduation due to his obstinacy, she was disillusioned and heartbroken. Carter let Paige go so she could chase her dreams. After endlessly regretting his decision, he is determined to find her and win her back. Paige has never forgotten Carter either. At their ten-year high school reunion, after a thousand miles and a decade of separation, they rekindle their love affair. Yet despite Carter's persistence and their undeniable chemistry, Paige questions her ability to commit to a relationship due to a devastating event that occurred while they were apart and now jeopardizes their future.
  • Votes: 1

    At the Loch of the Green Corrie. Andrew Grieg

    by Andrew Greig

    A homage to a remarkable poet and his world. 'At The Loch of Green Corrie is more than merely elegant, more than a collection of albeit fascinating insights, laugh-out-loud observations and impressively broad erudition' - Sunday Herald 'You could easily make a case that Andrew Greig has the greatest range of any living Scottish writer' - Scotsman For many years Andrew Greig saw the poet Norman MacCaig as a father figure. Months before his death, MacCaig's enigmatic final request to Greig was that he fish for him at the Loch of the Green Corrie; the location, even the real name of his destination was more mysterious still. His search took in days of outdoor living, meetings, and fishing with friends in the remote hill lochs of far North-West Scotland. It led, finally, to the waters of the Green Corrie, which would come to reflect Greig's own life, his thoughts on poetry, geology and land ownership in the Highlands and the ambiguous roles of whisky, love and male friendship. At the Loch of the Green Corrie is a richly atmospheric narrative, a celebration of losing and recovering oneself in a unique landscape, the consideration of a particular culture, and a homage to a remarkable poet and his world.
  • Votes: 1

    Bloody Orkney

    by Ken Lussey

  • Votes: 1

    Poverty Safari

    by Darren McGarvey

  • Votes: 1

    Oor Big Braw Cosmos

    by Rab Wilson

    This new fascinating collaboration between eminent Scots astronomer John C. Brown and renowned Scots poet Rab Wilson combines a beginner's introduction to the scientific workings of the universe together with inspired poems and haikus, and superb imagery from astro-photographers and artists.
  • Votes: 1

    Jacobites by Name

    by Sean T. Rassleagh

    Edinburgh 2025. Six years after Brexit. The New Georgian wing of the Tories is in firm control and determined to take the UK back to the 1700s.To avert a second independence referendum Westminster have appointed a Viceroy to run Scotland. Thousands of police from other parts of the UK are being flown in to assert control. Meanwhile the Scottish Government's black-ops department, the Tourism Advanced Research Projects Agency, is working on weaponising midges as a doomsday weapon to force Westminster to concede independence and a group of brilliant Edinburgh University professors is colluding with the Vatican to stage a third Jacobite rebellion.Science fiction mixes with political satire and occasional heresy in a lighthearted romp with more jokes than Dan Brown and less swearing than Irvine Welsh.
  • Votes: 1

    The Bass Rock

    by Evie Wyld

    'A modern gothic triumph' Max Porter The Bass Rock has for centuries watched over the lives that pass under its shadow on the Scottish mainland. And across the centuries the fates of three women are linked: to this place, to each other. In the early 1700s, Sarah, accused of being a witch, flees for her life. In the aftermath of the Second World War, Ruth navigates a new house, a new husband and the strange waters of the local community. Six decades later, the house stands empty. Viv, mourning the death of her father, catalogues Ruth's belongings and discovers her place in the past - and perhaps a way forward. Each woman's choices are circumscribed by the men in their lives. But in sisterhood there is the hope of survival and new life... WINNER OF THE STELLA PRIZE _______________ PRAISE FOR THE BASS ROCK: 'Daring, heartfelt, explosive' Daisy Johnson 'A vividly imagined portrait' Sunday Times 'Dark, disturbing and very sophisticated' William Boyd 'Wonderfully subtle and magnificently savage' Claire Fuller
  • Votes: 1

    Care For Me

    by Farah Cook

    Some secrets follow you wherever you go . . . When Afrah arrives at Ravenswood Lodge Care Home for the first time, she feels far from home. Her daughter, Amira, didn't want to send her away from the comfort and familiarity of her surroundings but she's struggling to cope. Ravenswood Lodge was meant to be a safe space for Afrah. But when her belongings start vanishing, her family photographs, her jewellery, her pill boxes, Amira and the staff say it's just Afrah's imagination, it's just her failing memory. But Afrah is adamant someone is playing games with her. She knows Ravenswood Lodge isn't safe for her. Someone wants her gone. At home, Amira is looking through her mother's belongings, tidying things away, bringing order to her house. Until she stumbles upon some strange newspaper clippings, stories her mother has become fixated on. Is it just a coincidence, or could her mother be telling the truth about Ravenswood Lodge? Does someone want revenge? Elizabeth is Missing meets I Let You Go in this page-turning psychological suspense novel from debut author Farah Cook. Perfect for fans of Clare Mackintosh and K L Slater.
  • Votes: 1

    The Visitor

    by Paul Levitz

    Unstoppable. Untraceable. Unkillable. Who is the Visitor? Why are the leaders of the worldterrified of him? And will they live long enough to find out? The world changes right here in a thrilling sci-fimystery from Eisner Hall of Fame writer Paul Levitz (Legion ofSuper-Heroes) and Russ Manning Award-nominated artist MJ KIM (FAITH:DREAMSIDE)! Collecting THE VISITOR #1-6.
  • Votes: 1

    Lowborn

    by Kerry Hudson

    A powerful, personal agenda-changing exploration of poverty in today’s Britain. 'When every day of your life you have been told you have nothing of value to offer, that you are worth nothing to society, can you ever escape that sense of being ‘lowborn’ no matter how far you’ve come?’ Kerry Hudson is proudly working class but she was never proudly poor. The poverty she grew up in was all-encompassing, grinding and often dehumanising. Always on the move with her single mother, Kerry attended nine primary schools and five secondaries, living in B&Bs and council flats. She scores eight out of ten on the Adverse Childhood Experiences measure of childhood trauma. Twenty years later, Kerry’s life is unrecognisable. She’s a prizewinning novelist who has travelled the world. She has a secure home, a loving partner and access to art, music, film and books. But she often finds herself looking over her shoulder, caught somehow between two worlds. Lowborn is Kerry’s exploration of where she came from. She revisits the towns she grew up in to try to discover what being poor really means in Britain today and whether anything has changed. ‘One of the most important books of the year’ Guardian
  • Votes: 1

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 1

    American Gods

    by Neil Gaiman

    Now a STARZ® Original Series produced by FremantleMedia North America starring Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, and Pablo Schreiber. Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow’s best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday. A trickster and a rogue, Wednesday seems to know more about Shadow than Shadow does himself. Life as Wednesday’s bodyguard, driver, and errand boy is far more interesting and dangerous than Shadow ever imagined. Soon Shadow learns that the past never dies . . . and that beneath the placid surface of everyday life a storm is brewing—an epic war for the very soul of America—and that he is standing squarely in its path. “Mystery, satire, sex, horror, poetic prose—American Gods uses all these to keep the reader turning the pages.”—Washington Post
  • Votes: 1

    Recipes From Behind the Curtain

    by Julie Kristine

    The first cookbook from Philadelphia's phenomenal Brown Betty Dessert Boutique When three generations of African-American women decided to open a bakery in Philadelphia, they had no idea how quickly the accolades would come. With high praise from Rachael Ray magazine and other corners of the culinary world, the Brown Betty Dessert Boutique has found fame with their amazing poundcakes, cheesecakes, pies, and cookies, among other delectable treats. This delicious cookbook features both the secret recipes that Brown Betty's fans can't wait to get their hands on, as well as the personal stories that explain the evocative names of such recipes as Alice's Two Step and Strawberry Letter. Features recipes that combine old-fashioned treats with thrilling contemporary flavors like sweet potato poundcake and dark cherry cheesecake Includes gorgeous and mouthwatering full-color photography throughout For home bakers who want to experience the best of Brown Betty in their own homes or dessert-lovers looking for something new, The Brown Betty Cookbook offers both inspiration and delectation.
  • Votes: 1

    Hotel World

    by Ali Smith

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE and the ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION A masterful, exuberant novel from the acclaimed author of How to be both and the ongoing Seasonal quartet 'Ali Smith has got style, ideas and punch. Read her' Jeanette Winterson 'As infectious as a pop song, the story bursts open from the very first page and demands to be read in one sitting' The Times 'Hotel World is essential reading from a major talent' Independent Five people: four are living, three are strangers, two are sisters, one is dead. In her highly acclaimed and most ambitious book to date, the brilliant young Scottish writer Ali Smith brings alive five unforgettable characters and traces their intersecting lives. This is a short novel with big themes (time, chance, money, death) but an eye for tiny detail: the taste of dust, the weight of a few coins in the hand, the pleasurable pain of a stone in one's shoe . . .
  • Votes: 1

    Scottish Girls About Town

    by Jenny Colgan

    Meet the Clanswomen... International bestselling authors Jenny Colgan, Isla Dewar, and Muriel Gray lead off this dazzling collection of stories by popular and rising Scottish women authors. A sometimes wild, sometimes poignant romp through the lives of Scotswomen, Scottish Girls About Town revels in the universal hilarity and strife of being a girl! They're looking for something moor. In Jenny Colgan's "The Fringes," a hapless heroine heads to the Edinburgh "Fringe" -- a massive theatrical and musical festival -- for a night of her own disastrous drama. Isla Dewar offers up "In the Garden of Mrs. Pink," one woman's look back at her girlhood and the life lessons she learned from an eccentric neighbor. In Muriel Gray's "School-Gate Mums," a single mother with killer instincts settles the score with one of the mothers at her son's school. Whether they're racing their flatmates in a weight-loss contest, reconnecting with long-lost friends, or grappling with the men in their lives, these daughters of Scotland prove that no one can top their audacious spirit and Highland charm.
  • Votes: 1

    A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World

    by C. A. Fletcher

    THE MOST POWERFUL STORY YOU'LL READ THIS YEAR. 'You'll remember A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World long after you finish reading' Peng Shepherd, author of The Book Of M 'Truly engrossing . . . brings hope and humanity to a cold and scary world' Keith Stuart, author of A Boy Made of Blocks 'I promise you're going to love it' Louisa Morgan, author of A Secret History of Witches 'Epic in scope, enthralling, and full of human warmth' M. R. Carey, author of The Girl with all the Gifts THE WORLD HAS ENDED. AT LEAST WE STILL HAVE DOGS. My name's Griz. I've never been to school, I've never had friends, in my whole life I've not met enough people to play a game of football. My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, before all the people went away, but we were never lonely on our remote island. We had each other, and our dogs. Then the thief came. He told stories of the deserted towns and cities beyond our horizons. I liked him - until I woke to find he had stolen my dog. So I chased him out into the ruins of the world. I just want to get my dog back, but I found more than I ever imagined was possible. More about how the world ended. More about what my family's real story is. More about what really matters. 'This un-put-down-able story has everything - a well-imagined post-apocalyptic world, great characters, incredible suspense, and, of course, the fierce love of some very good dogs' Kirkus (starred review) 'A story that is as heart-warming as it is heart-breaking' Fantasy Hive 'Extraordinary and quite magnificent . . . 10/10' Starburst A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World is the most moving story you'll read this year. Perfect for readers of Life of Pi, The Girl with all the Gifts or Station Eleven - Griz's tale mixes sadness and hope in one unforgettable character's quest amid the remnants of our fragile civilisation.
  • Votes: 1

    Mayflies

    by Andrew O'Hagan

  • Votes: 1

    Buddha Da (Canons)

    by Anne Donovan

    Anne Marie's Da, a Glaswegian painter and decorator, has always been game for a laugh. So when he first tells his family that he's taking up meditation at the Buddhist Centre in town, no one takes him seriously. But as Jimmy becomes more involved in his search for the spiritual his beliefs start to come into conflict with the needs of his wife, Liz, and cracks begin to form in their previously happy family.With grace, humour and humility Anne Donovan's beloved debut tells the story of one man's search for a higher power. But in his search for meaning, Jimmy might be about to lose the thing that matters most.
  • Votes: 1

    Scotland for Quiet Moments

    by Nellie Merthe Erkenbach

    Scotland is a country full of history, stories and secrets. Often, the three cannot be separated. That is what makes this country so wonderful and unique. These stories have been discovered and gathered for Erkenbach's blog, "Graveyards of Scotland", over many years. Her main sources were historical travel guides from the 18th and 19th centuries, where the finds were scary, beautiful, funny, and sometimes, cruel. This unusual approach to a country's history has produced amazing results. You don't have to share the author's passion for cemeteries to enjoy this book; only a small number of the stories in this collection take place in graveyards, though they do all end in them, so perhaps it helps.The fairy hill in Inverness, a nitrate murder on Shetland, a family of left-handers, wolves, Robert the Bruce and William Wallace shown in a new light, the secret bay of the writer Gavin Maxwell, a murdering poet and everything about Scotland except whisky, sheep and tartan. Scotland for experts, not for beginners.Make yourself comfortable in your favourite armchair and enjoy "Scotland for Quiet Moments".
  • Votes: 1

    This Is Memorial Device

    by David Keenan

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE GORDON BURN PRIZE 2017 ROUGH TRADE BOOK OF THE MONTH LRB BOOK OF THE WEEK CAUGHT BY THE RIVER BOOK OF THE MONTH SHORTLISTED FOR THE COLLYER BRISTOW PRIZE This Is Memorial Device, the debut novel by David Keenan, is a love letter to the small towns of Lanarkshire in the west of Scotland in the late 1970s and early 80s as they were temporarily transformed by the endless possibilities that came out of the freefall from punk rock. It follows a cast of misfits, drop-outs, small town visionaries and would-be artists and musicians through a period of time where anything seemed possible, a moment where art and the demands it made were as serious as your life. At its core is the story of Memorial Device, a mythic post-punk group that could have gone all the way were it not for the visionary excess and uncompromising bloody-minded belief that served to confirm them as underground legends. Written in a series of hallucinatory first-person eye-witness accounts that capture the prosaic madness of the time and place, heady with the magic of youth recalled, This Is Memorial Device combines the formal experimentation of David Foster Wallace at his peak circa Brief Interviews With Hideous Men with moments of delirious psychedelic modernism, laugh out loud bathos and tender poignancy.
  • Votes: 1

    Daisy Chain

    by Maggie Ritchie

    Lily Crawford and Jeanie Taylor, from very different backgrounds, are firm friends from their childhoods in Kirkcudbright. They share their ambitions for their futures, Lily to be an artist, Jeanie to be a dancer. The two women's eventful lives are intertwined. In the years before the First World War, the girls lose touch when Jeanie runs away from home and joins a dance company, while Lily attends The Mack, Glasgow's famous school of art designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. A chance meeting reunites them and together they discover a Glasgow at the height of its wealth and power as the Second City of the Empire - and a city of poverty and overcrowding. Separated once again after the war, Lily and Jeanie find themselves on opposite sides of the world. Lily follows her husband to Shanghai while Jeanie's dance career brings her international fame. But the glamour and dissolution of 1920s Shanghai finally lead Lily into peril. Her only hope of survival lies with her old friend Jeanie, as the two women turn to desperate measures to free Lily from danger. Inspired by the eventful and colourful lives of the pioneering women artists The Glasgow Girls, particularly that of Eleanor Allen Moore, Daisy Chain is a story of independence, women's art, resilience and female friendship, set against the turbulent background of the early years of the 20th century.
  • Votes: 1

    Call of the Wild

    by Kimberly Ann Johnson

    From trauma educator and somatic guide Kimberly Ann Johnson comes a cutting-edge guide for tapping into the wisdom and resilience of the body to rewire the nervous system, heal from trauma, and live fully. In an increasingly polarized world where trauma is often publicly renegotiated, our nervous systems are on high alert. From skyrocketing rates of depression and anxiety to physical illnesses such as autoimmune diseases and digestive disorders, many women today find themselves living out of alignment with their bodies. Kimberly Johnson is a somatic practitioner, birth doula, and postpartum educator who specializes in helping women recover from all forms of trauma. In her work, she’s seen the same themes play out time and again. In a culture that prioritizes executive function and “mind over matter,” many women are suffering from deeply unresolved pain that causes mental and physical stagnation and illness. In Call of the Wild, Johnson offers an eye-opening look at this epidemic as well as an informative view of the human nervous system and how it responds to difficult events. From the “small t” traumas of getting ghosted, experiencing a fall-out with a close friend, or swerving to avoid a car accident to the “capital T” traumas of sexual assault, an upending natural disaster, or a life-threatening illness—Johnson explains how the nervous system both protects us from immediate harm and creates reverberations that ripple through a lifetime. In this practical, empowering guide, Johnson shows readers how to metabolize these nervous system responses, allowing everyone to come home to their deepest, most intuitive and whole selves. Following her supportive advice, readers will learn how to move from wholeness, tapping into the innate wisdom of their senses, soothing frayed nerves and reconnecting with their “animal selves.” While we cannot cure the painful cultural rifts inflicting our society, there is a path forward—through our bodies.
  • Votes: 1

    Being Scottish in Italy

    by Fraser Lauchlan

    Everybody loves Italy. Well, ok, maybe not everyone. But a lot of people do. Including me. After 12 years of living in Scotland, my Italian wife abruptly announced to me on a cold, grey November morning that she wanted to move back home. Home being the beautiful Italian island of Sardinia, slap bang in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. After having lived almost all of my life in Scotland, I suddenly found myself facing the reality of moving to a different country, a different climate and a different language to all that I had known. A lot of it was good. A lot of it wasn't so good. But most of the time, I tried to see the funny side. This is the story of someone coping with Being Scottish in Italy.
  • Votes: 1

    Macbeth

    by Shaun Manning

  • Votes: 1

    The Gathering Night

    by Margaret Elphinstone

    Between Grandmother Mountain and the cold sea, Alaia and her family live off the land. But when one of her brothers goes hunting and never returns, the fragile balance of life is upset. Half-starved and maddened with grief, Alaia's mother follows her visions and goes in search of her lost son. Then a stranger from a rival tribe appears on their hearth seeking shelter. Are his stories of a great wave and a people perished really to be believed? What else could drive a man to travel alone between tribes in the depths of winter? Hopes of resolution come when Alaia's mother returns home as a Go-Between, one able to commune with the spirits. But as all the Auk people come together for their annual Gathering Night, who there will listen to the voice of a woman?
  • Votes: 1

    After You’d Gone

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    Alice Raikes boards a train at King’s Cross to visit her sisters in Scotland. Hours later, she steps into traffic on a busy London road and is taken to hospital in a coma. Who or what did she see in Edinburgh that made her return to London so suddenly? Was the accident a suicide attempt? And what exactly do her family, waiting at her bedside, have to hide? Sliding between different levels of consciousness, Alice listens to the conversations around her, and begins sifting through recollections of her past and a recently curtailed love affair.
  • Votes: 1

    Circles and Stones

    by Kenneth Baxter

    Originally published: Zebra Books, 1997.
  • Votes: 1

    The Complete McAuslan

    by George MacDonald Fraser

    George MacDonald Fraser's hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army are collected together for the first time in one volume. Private McAuslan, J., the Dirtiest Soldier in the World (alias the Tartan Caliban, or the Highland Division's answer to the Pekin Man) first demonstrated his unfitness for service in The General Danced at Dawn. He continued his disorderly advance, losing, soiling or destroying his equipment, through the pages of McAuslan in the Rough. The final volume, The Sheikh and the Dustbin, pursues the career of the great incompetent as he shambles across North African and Scotland, swinging his right arm in time with his right leg and tripping over his untied laces. His admirers know him as court-martial defendant, ghost-catcher, star-crossed lover and golf caddie extraordinary. Whether map-reading his erratic way through the Sahara by night or confronting Arab rioters, McAuslan's talent for catastrophe is guaranteed. Now, the inimitable McAuslan stories are collected together in one glorious volume.
  • Votes: 1

    The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    From the Costa Award winning, bestselling author of THIS MUST BE THE PLACE and I AM, I AM, I AM, comes an intense, breathtakingly accomplished story of a woman's life stolen, and reclaimed. 'Unputdownable' Ali Smith Edinburgh in the 1930s. The Lennox family is having trouble with its youngest daughter. Esme is outspoken, unconventional, and repeatedly embarrasses them in polite society. Something will have to be done. Years later, a young woman named Iris Lockhart receives a letter informing her that she has a great-aunt in a psychiatric unit who is about to be released. Iris has never heard of Esme Lennox and the one person who should know more, her grandmother Kitty, seems unable to answer Iris's questions. What could Esme have done to warrant a lifetime in an institution? And how is it possible for a person to be so completely erased from a family's history?