Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 2218

    The Gulag Archipelago

    by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

  • Votes: 419

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    Peopled by larger-than-life heroes and villains, charged with towering questions of good and evil, Atlas Shrugged is Ayn Rand’s magnum opus: a philosophical revolution told in the form of an action thriller—nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Who is John Galt? When he says that he will stop the motor of the world, is he a destroyer or a liberator? Why does he have to fight his battles not against his enemies but against those who need him most? Why does he fight his hardest battle against the woman he loves? You will know the answer to these questions when you discover the reason behind the baffling events that play havoc with the lives of the amazing men and women in this book. You will discover why a productive genius becomes a worthless playboy...why a great steel industrialist is working for his own destruction...why a composer gives up his career on the night of his triumph...why a beautiful woman who runs a transcontinental railroad falls in love with the man she has sworn to kill. Atlas Shrugged, a modern classic and Rand’s most extensive statement of Objectivism—her groundbreaking philosophy—offers the reader the spectacle of human greatness, depicted with all the poetry and power of one of the twentieth century’s leading artists.
  • Votes: 309

    1984

    by George Orwell

    Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities
  • Votes: 172

    Moneyball

    by Michael Lewis

  • Votes: 166

    The Book of Mormon

    by Joseph Smith

  • Votes: 161

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 156

    Mere Christianity

    by C. S. Lewis

  • Votes: 152

    The Fountainhead

    by Ayn Rand

    The revolutionary literary vision that sowed the seeds of Objectivism, Ayn Rand's groundbreaking philosophy, and brought her immediate worldwide acclaim. This modern classic is the story of intransigent young architect Howard Roark, whose integrity was as unyielding as granite...of Dominique Francon, the exquisitely beautiful woman who loved Roark passionately, but married his worst enemy...and of the fanatic denunciation unleashed by an enraged society against a great creator. As fresh today as it was then, Rand’s provocative novel presents one of the most challenging ideas in all of fiction—that man’s ego is the fountainhead of human progress... “A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly...This is the only novel of ideas written by an American woman that I can recall.”—The New York Times
  • Votes: 147

    We

    by Yevgeny Zamyatin

    “[Zamyatin’s] intuitive grasp of the irrational side of totalitarianism— human sacrifice, cruelty as an end in itself—makes [We] superior to Huxley’s [Brave New World].”—George Orwell Translated by Natasha Randall • Foreword by Bruce Sterling Written in 1921, We is set in the One State, where all live for the collective good and individual freedom does not exist. The novel takes the form of the diary of mathematician D-503, who, to his shock, experiences the most disruptive emotion imaginable: love. At once satirical and sobering—and now available in a powerful new translation—We is both a rediscovered classic and a work of tremendous relevance to our own times.
  • Votes: 141

    The Power of Now

    by Eckhart Tolle

    The author shares the secret of his own self-realization and the philosophy for living in the present he has developed.
  • Votes: 123

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 115

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 104

    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

    In Rich Dad Poor Dad, the #1 Personal Finance book of all time, Robert Kiyosaki shares the story of his two dad: his real father, whom he calls his poor dad,’ and the father of his best friend, the man who became his mentor and his rich dad.’ One man was well educated and an employee all his life, the other’s education was street smarts” over traditional classroom education and he took the path of entrepreneurship a road that led him to become one of the wealthiest men in Hawaii. Robert’s poor dad struggled financially all his life, and these two dads these very different points of view of money, investing, and employment shaped Robert’s thinking about money.Robert has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people, around the world, think about money and investing and he has become a global advocate for financial education and the path to financial freedom. Rich Dad Poor Dad (and the Rich Dad series it spawned) has sold over 36 million copies in English and translated editions around the world.Rich Dad Poor Dad will explode the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich challenge the belief that your house is an asset show parents why they can’t rely on the school system to teach their kidsabout money define, once and for all, an asset and a liability explain the difference between good debt and bad debt teach you to see the world of money from different perspectives discuss the shift in mindset that can put you on the road to financial freedom
  • Votes: 92

    Basic Economics

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 87

    The Giving Tree

    by Shel Silverstein

    As The Giving Tree turns fifty, this timeless classic is available for the first time ever in ebook format. This digital edition allows young readers and lifelong fans to continue the legacy and love of a household classic that will now reach an even wider audience. Never before have Shel Silverstein's children's books appeared in a format other than hardcover. Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein's poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another's capacity to love in return. Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit. And don't miss these other Shel Silverstein ebooks, Where the Sidewalk Ends, and A Light in the Attic!
  • Votes: 80

    Anatomy of the Soul

    by Curt Thompson

    Do you want to improve your relationships and experience lasting personal change? Join Curt Thompson, M.D., on an amazing journey to discover the surprising pathways for transformation hidden inside your own mind. Integrating new findings in neuroscience and attachment with Christian spirituality, Dr. Thompson reveals how it is possible to rewire your mind, altering your brain patterns and literally making you more like the person God intended you to be. Explaining discoveries about the brain in layman’s terms, he shows how you can be mentally transformed through spiritual practices, interaction with Scripture, and connections with other people. He also provides practical exercises to help you experience healing in areas where you’ve been struggling. Insightful and challenging, Anatomy of the Soul illustrates how learning about one of God’s most miraculous creations—your brain—can enrich your life, your relationships, and your impact on the world around you.
  • Votes: 78

    How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big

    by Scott Adams

    "Dilbert creator Scott Adams offers his most personal book ever--a ... memoir of his many failures and what they eventually taught him about success. How do you go from hapless office worker to world-famous cartoonist and bestselling author in just a few years? No career guide can answer that, and not even Scott Adams (who actually did it) can give you a road map that works for everyone. But there's a lot to learn from his personal story, and a lot of humor along the way"--
  • Votes: 61

    The Stranger

    by Albert Camus

    An ordinary man is unwittingly caught up in a senseless murder in Algeria
  • Votes: 56

    A Return to Modesty

    by Wendy Shalit

    Revised and updated, this fifteenth anniversary edition of A Return to Modesty reignites Wendy Shalit’s controversial claim that we have lost our respect for an essential virtue: modesty. When A Return to Modesty was first published in 1999, its argument launched a worldwide discussion about the possibility of innocence and romantic idealism. Wendy Shalit was the first to systematically critique the “hook-up” scene and outline the harms of making sexuality so public. Today, with social media increasingly blurring the line between public and private life, and with child exploitation on the rise, the concept of modesty is more relevant than ever. Updated with a new preface that addresses the unique problems facing society now, A Return to Modesty shows why “the lost virtue” of modesty is not a hang-up that we should set out to cure, but rather a wonderful instinct to be celebrated. A Return to Modesty is a deeply personal account as well as a fascinating intellectual exploration into everything from seventeenth-century manners to the 1948 tune “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” Beholden neither to social conservatives nor to feminists, Shalit reminds us that modesty is not prudery, but a natural instinct—and one that may be able to save us from ourselves.
  • Votes: 53

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 51

    How to Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides suggestions for successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations
  • Votes: 49

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

    by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    One of the most chilling novels ever written about the oppression of totalitarian regimes--and the first to open Western eyes to the terrors of Stalin's prison camps, this book allowed Solzhenitsyn, who later became Russia's conscience in exile, to challenge the brutal might of the Soviet Union.
  • Votes: 49

    A Severe Mercy

    by Sheldon Vanauken

  • Votes: 48

    The Magician's Nephew

    by C. S. Lewis

    The great Czech philosopher, educator, theologian, and bishop of the Unity of the Brethren, John Amos Comenius, is considered by many to be the father of modern education because he championed universal education. This inspiring and accessible book lays out his plans to spread knowledge throughout the world so as to ensure that boys and girls everywhere could be trained in a variety of subjects.
  • Votes: 48

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 47

    The Great Divorce

    by C. S. Lewis

  • Votes: 47

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 45

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 39

    The Iceberg Hermit (Point)

    by Arthur Roth

    Shipwrecked in 1757 on an iceberg in the Arctic seas with only an orphaned polar bear cub for companionship, seventeen-year-old Allan begins a seemingly hopeless struggle for survival.
  • Votes: 35

    Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War"

    by Patrick J. Buchanan

  • Votes: 34

    Gorilla Mindset

    by Mike Cernovich

    "Gorilla Mindset is not a self-help book. It's a how-to book. In Gorilla Mindset you will learn how to control your thoughts and emotions to live a life others envy. Although written for men, Gorilla Mindset has also been read by women who appreciate a direct approach to getting more out of life. Gorilla Mindset is an entire system that, when coupled with specific mindset shifts and habits, will change the way you think, feel and live your life. Applying Gorilla Mindset to your life (make no mistake, this is a book you must apply) will improve your health and fitness, lead to more money and career advancement, and help you have deeper, more meaningful relationships (or more casual ones; it's your choice). Your thinking will become clear. You will have more focus. You will know exactly what steps to take to change your life. Join countless others who changed with lives with Gorilla Mindset"--
  • Votes: 32

    The Keys To Winning Friends & Influencing People

    by M. Usman

    In the present book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, Dale Carnegie says, “You can make someone want to do what you want them to do by seeing the situation from the other person’s point of view and arousing in the other person an eager want.” You learn how to make people like you, win people over to your way of thinking, and change people without causing offense or arousing resentment. For instance, “let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers” and “talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person.” This book is all about building relationships. With good relationships, personal and business successes are easy and swift to achieve. Twelve Ways to Win People to Your Way of Thinking 1. The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it. 2. Show respect for the other person's opinions. Never say "You're wrong." 3. If you're wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically. 4. Begin in a friendly way. 5. Start with questions to which the other person will answer yes. 6. Let the other person do a great deal of the talking. 7. Let the other person feel the idea is his or hers. 8. Try honestly to see things from the other person's point of view. 9. Be sympathetic with the other person's ideas and desires. 10. Appeal to the nobler motives. 11. Dramatize your ideas. 12.Throw down a challenge.
  • Votes: 30

    The Grapes of Wrath

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 30

    Closing of the American Mind

    by Allan Bloom

  • Votes: 29

    The Old Man and The Sea, Book Cover May Vary

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 29

    12 Rules for Life

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 28

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 27

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

  • Votes: 27

    The Bitcoin Standard

    by Saifedean Ammous

    When a pseudonymous programmer introduced “a new electronic cash system that’s fully peer-to-peer, with no trusted third party” to a small online mailing list in 2008, very few paid attention. Ten years later, and against all odds, this upstart autonomous decentralized software offers an unstoppable and globally-accessible hard money alternative to modern central banks. The Bitcoin Standard analyzes the historical context to the rise of Bitcoin, the economic properties that have allowed it to grow quickly, and its likely economic, political, and social implications. While Bitcoin is a new invention of the digital age, the problem it purports to solve is as old as human society itself: transferring value across time and space. Ammous takes the reader on an engaging journey through the history of technologies performing the functions of money, from primitive systems of trading limestones and seashells, to metals, coins, the gold standard, and modern government debt. Exploring what gave these technologies their monetary role, and how most lost it, provides the reader with a good idea of what makes for sound money, and sets the stage for an economic discussion of its consequences for individual and societal future-orientation, capital accumulation, trade, peace, culture, and art. Compellingly, Ammous shows that it is no coincidence that the loftiest achievements of humanity have come in societies enjoying the benefits of sound monetary regimes, nor is it coincidental that monetary collapse has usually accompanied civilizational collapse. With this background in place, the book moves on to explain the operation of Bitcoin in a functional and intuitive way. Bitcoin is a decentralized, distributed piece of software that converts electricity and processing power into indisputably accurate records, thus allowing its users to utilize the Internet to perform the traditional functions of money without having to rely on, or trust, any authorities or infrastructure in the physical world. Bitcoin is thus best understood as the first successfully implemented form of digital cash and digital hard money. With an automated and perfectly predictable monetary policy, and the ability to perform final settlement of large sums across the world in a matter of minutes, Bitcoin’s real competitive edge might just be as a store of value and network for final settlement of large payments—a digital form of gold with a built-in settlement infrastructure. Ammous’ firm grasp of the technological possibilities as well as the historical realities of monetary evolution provides for a fascinating exploration of the ramifications of voluntary free market money. As it challenges the most sacred of government monopolies, Bitcoin shifts the pendulum of sovereignty away from governments in favor of individuals, offering us the tantalizing possibility of a world where money is fully extricated from politics and unrestrained by borders. The final chapter of the book explores some of the most common questions surrounding Bitcoin: Is Bitcoin mining a waste of energy? Is Bitcoin for criminals? Who controls Bitcoin, and can they change it if they please? How can Bitcoin be killed? And what to make of all the thousands of Bitcoin knock-offs, and the many supposed applications of Bitcoin’s ‘blockchain technology’? The Bitcoin Standard is the essential resource for a clear understanding of the rise of the Internet’s decentralized, apolitical, free-market alternative to national central banks.
  • Votes: 25

    The Hobbit

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

    This lavish gift edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic features cover art, illustrations, and watercolor paintings by the artist Alan Lee. Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum. Written for J.R.R. Tolkien's own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.
  • Votes: 24

    The Valley of Amazement

    by Amy Tan

    Violet Minturn, a half-Chinese/half-American courtesan who deals in seduction and illusion in Shanghai, struggles to find her place in the world, while her mother, Lucia, tries to make sense of the choices she has made and the men who have shaped her. 750,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 24

    The Rational Male

    by Rollo Tomassi

  • Votes: 21

    The Power of One

    by Bryce Courtenay

  • Votes: 20

    So You've Been Publicly Shamed

    by Jon Ronson

    "From the author of The Psychopath Test and Lost at Sea, an exploration of shame, one of our world's most overlooked forces. Public shaming as a form of social control, such a big part of our lives it feels weird when there isn't anyone to be furious about. Whole careers are being ruined by one mistake. Our collective outrage at it has the force of a hurricane. Then we all quickly forget about it and move on to the next one, and it doesn't cross our minds to wonder if the shamed person is okay or in ruins. What's it doing to them? An examination of human nature and its flaws"--Publisher's website.
  • Votes: 20

    Bronze Age Mindset

    by Bronze Age Pervert

  • Votes: 20

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 19

    Can't Hurt Me

    by David Goggins

    For David Goggins, childhood was a nightmare - poverty, prejudice, and physical abuse colored his days and haunted his nights. But through self-discipline, mental toughness, and hard work, Goggins transformed himself from a depressed, overweight young man with no future into a U.S. Armed Forces icon and one of the world's top endurance athletes. The only man in history to complete elite training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller, he went on to set records in numerous endurance events, inspiring Outside magazine to name him The Fittest (Real) Man in America. In this curse-word-free edition of Can't Hurt Me, he shares his astonishing life story and reveals that most of us tap into only 40% of our capabilities. Goggins calls this The 40% Rule, and his story illuminates a path that anyone can follow to push past pain, demolish fear, and reach their full potential.
  • Votes: 19

    The 48 Laws of Power

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 18

    Conversations With God

    by Neale Donald Walsch

    Conversations with God takes its readers on an inspirational journey, teaching them how to conduct a dialogue with God and reach a better understanding of themselves, others and the world we all inhabit.
  • Votes: 17

    The Autobiography of Theodore Roosevelt

    by Theodore Roosevelt

    The autobiography of the 26th President of the United States.
  • Votes: 17

    Jurassic Park

    by Michael Crichton

  • Votes: 17

    Where the Red Fern Grows

    by Wilson Rawls

    A beloved classic that captures the powerful bond between man and man’s best friend. Billy has long dreamt of owning not one, but two, dogs. So when he’s finally able to save up enough money for two pups to call his own—Old Dan and Little Ann—he’s ecstatic. It doesn’t matter that times are tough; together they’ll roam the hills of the Ozarks. Soon Billy and his hounds become the finest hunting team in the valley. Stories of their great achievements spread throughout the region, and the combination of Old Dan’s brawn, Little Ann’s brains, and Billy’s sheer will seems unbeatable. But tragedy awaits these determined hunters—now friends—and Billy learns that hope can grow out of despair, and that the seeds of the future can come from the scars of the past. Praise for Where the Red Fern Grows A Top 100 Children’s Novel, School Library Journal's A Fuse #8 Production A Must-Read for Kids 9 to 14, NPR Winner of Multiple State Awards Over 7 million copies in print! “Very touching.” —The New York Times Book Review “One of the great classics of children’s literature . . . Any child who doesn’t get to read this beloved and powerfully emotional book has missed out on an important piece of childhood for the last 40-plus years.” —Common Sense Media “An exciting tale of love and adventure you’ll never forget.” —School Library Journal “A book of unadorned naturalness.” —Kirkus Reviews “Written with so much feeling and sentiment that adults as well as children are drawn [in] with a passion.” —Arizona Daily Star “It’s a story about a young boy and his two hunting dogs and . . . I can’t even go on without getting a little misty.” —The Huffington Post “We tear up just thinking about it.” —Time on the film adaptation
  • Votes: 17

    Human Action

    by Ludwig Von Mises

  • Votes: 17

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 17

    The Gulag Archipelago Volume 1

    by Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn

  • Votes: 16

    Father Seraphim Rose

    by Hieromonk Damascene

  • Votes: 16

    Jesus the Christ

    by James E. Talmage

    JESUS THE CHRISTA Study of the Messiah and His Mission according to Holy Scriptures both Ancient and Modern (BOOK IV)
  • Votes: 16

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

    A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners, Guy Montag, suddenly realizes their merit.
  • Votes: 16

    Siddhartha

    by Hermann Hesse

    Siddhartha is an allegorical novel by Hermann Hesse which deals with the spiritual journey of an Indian boy called Siddhartha during the time of the Buddha. The book was written in German, in a simple, yet powerful and lyrical style. It was first published in 1922, after Hesse had spent some time in India in the 1910s. The story revolves around a young man who leaves his home and family on a quest for the Truth. Embarking on a journey that takes him from the austerities of renunciation to the profligacy of wealth. That leads him through the range of human experiences from hunger and want, to passion, pleasure, pain, greed, yearning, boredom, love, despair and hope. A journey that leads finally to the river, where he gains peace and eventually wisdom. This is the story of Siddhartha as told by Nobel Laureate Hermann Hesse in his most influential work.
  • Votes: 16

    The Creature from Jekyll Island

    by G. Edward Griffin

    G. Edward Griffin is to be commended for this splendid work. At first glance The Creature from Jekyll Island is a huge book. While this may be daunting to some, once the book is actually started, it flows smoothly and reads quickly. There are so many fascinating tidbits of information here that the reader won't even be concerned about the size of the book. The title refers to the formation of the Federal Reserve System, which occurred at a secret meeting at Jekyll Island, Georgia in 1910. It was at this meeting, as Griffin relates, that the "Money Trust", composed of the richest and most powerful bankers in the world, along with a U.S. Senator, wrote the proposal to launch the Federal Reserve System (which Griffin calls a banking cartel) to control the financial system so that the bankers will always come out on top.
  • Votes: 15

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 15

    Meditations

    by Marcus Aurelius

    The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 14

    The Tao of Pooh & The Te of Piglet

    by Benjamin Hoff

  • Votes: 14

    Starship Troopers

    by Robert Anson Heinlein

  • Votes: 14

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 14

    Think and Grow Rich

    by Napoleon Hill

    An updated edition of the best-selling guide features anecdotes about such modern figures as Bill Gates, Dave Thomas, and Sir John Templeton, explaining how their examples can enable modern readers to pursue wealth and overcome personal stumbling blocks. Original. 30,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 13

    An Atheist's Values by Richard Robinson (1964-07-30)

    by Richard Robinson

    When Ernest Gellner was his early thirties, he took it upon himself to challenge the prevailing philosophical orthodoxy of the day, Linguistic Philosophy. Finding a powerful ally in Bertrand Russell, who provided the foreword for this book, Gellner embarked on the project that was to put him on the intellectual map. The first determined attempt to state the premises and operational rules of the movement, Words and Things remains philosophy's most devastating attack on a conventional wisdom to this day.
  • Votes: 12

    137 Creativity Wise Nuggets

    by Mick Macro

    Give Yourself An INSTANT Boost Of Creativity! Bestselling author Mick Macro is back again, bringing you 137 Creativity Wise Nuggets filled with little bits of wisdom. This book will inspire and motivate you, and it will give you all of the goods on what it takes to be more creative. Discover: - What it really takes to be creative. - How and why creative people act differently. - Creativity hacks and tricks to give you that immediate creative drive. - What to do differently right now to have a creative workflow. - Creativity facts and fables, truths and lies. - Steps to take immediately to have a more creative outlook on life. - and over 100 more... It's Like A Creativity GOLD MINE! Think of this less as a normal book, and more as a gold mine full of wise nuggets of creative knowledge that you can pick from, take notes about, highlight, save for later, and share with your friends and family forever. I know you're excited and possibly anxious to get more creative, so jump right in! I wrote this book with you in mind, and I know you are going to love it. Start reading this book right now and watch how creative you become.
  • Votes: 12

    Hitler's Willing Executioners

    by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen

    A revisionist study of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust reveals why ordinary Germans from all walks of life participated willingly in the extermination of the Jews. Reprint. 125,000 first printing. Tour.
  • Votes: 12

    The Verbally Abusive Relationship, Expanded Third Edition

    by Patricia Evans

    Discusses the potential damage of verbal abuse, how to identify a problem relationship, and how to change or leave the situation.
  • Votes: 12

    The Untethered Soul

    by Michael A. Singer

  • Votes: 11

    Seven Taoist Masters

    by Eva Wong

    History and legend are interwoven in this folk novel that both entertains and instructs. Written by an unknown author, Seven Taoist Masters is the story of six men and one woman who overcome tremendous hardships on the journey to self-mastery. These characters and their teacher, Wang Ch'ung-yang, are all historical figures who lived in the Southern Sung (1127–1279) and Yuan (1271–1368) dynasties. Wang is regarded as the greatest patriarch of the Complete Reality school, a highly purified branch of Taoism having a strong affinity with Zen Buddhism. The novel brings to life the essentials of Taoist philosophy and practice, both through the instructions offered by Wang—on topics such as the cultivation of mind and body, meditation techniques, and overcoming the obstacles to enlightenment—and through the experiences of the characters.
  • Votes: 11

    Notes from Underground

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Written in 1864, this classic novel recounts the apology and confession of a minor nineteenth-century official, an almost comical account of the man's separation from society and his descent "underground"
  • Votes: 11

    The Sovereign Individual

    by James Dale Davidson

    The authors identify both the likely disasters and the potential for prosperity inherent in the advent of the information age.
  • Votes: 11

    The Screwtape Letters

    by C. S. Lewis

    The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis is a classic masterpiece of religious satire that entertains readers with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to "Our Father Below." At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis's The Screwtape Letters is the most engaging account of temptation—and triumph over it—ever written.
  • Votes: 11

    Alcoholics Anonymous

    by Anonymous

  • Votes: 10

    The Cross and the Switchblade

    by David Wilkerson

    The dramatic and inspiring true story of a small town minister called to help inner city kids everyone else believed were beyond hope... David Wilkerson was just a young preacher in the Pennsylvania hills when he was stunned by a new calling from God: go to New York City to speak to seven young gang members on trial for murder. But something much greater was to come. Once in New York, David was inspired to stay for a lifetime of helping troubled teenagers get free of drugs and crime. With the word of God in his ears, he founded an inner-city ministry still known as the Teen Challenge to change their paths and alter thousands of lives forever.
  • Votes: 10

    The Tin Drum

    by Günter Grass

    To mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of this classic, a new translation of the Nobel Prize winner's story is offered, which includes a huge cast of intriguing characters, including Oskar Matzerath, the indomitable drummer; his family; Oskar's midget friends Bebra and Roswitha Raguna; and more. Reprint.
  • Votes: 10

    The Mind of God

    by Paul Davies

  • Votes: 10

    The Long Walk

    by Stephen King

    In this #1 national bestseller, “master storyteller” (Houston Chronicle) Stephen King, writing as Richard Bachman, tells the tale of the contestants of a grueling walking competition where there can only be one winner—the one that survives. In the near future, when America has become a police state, one hundred boys are selected to enter an annual contest where the winner will be awarded whatever he wants for the rest of his life. Among them is sixteen-year-old Ray Garraty, and he knows the rules—keep a steady walking pace of four miles per hour without stopping. Three warnings and you’re out—permanently. With an introduction by Stephen King on “The Importance of Being Bachman.”
  • Votes: 10

    Joshua

    by Kenneth Bow

    The job of succeeding the greatest law given in history would not be a coveted one. Moses was dead. Now Joshua, the 28th from Adam is given the task to finish what Moses had started. Joshua had two main assignments.
  • Votes: 10

    Hidden Order

    by David Friedman

    For readers who would like to learn economics for the fun of it, economics understood not as the study of the economy but as a tool for understanding human behavior: crime, marriage, politics, and much else."In David Friedman's hands, economics becomes a sprightly science. Friedman has the rare knack of introducting fundamental principles with humorous examples. . . . a dazzling array that runs the gamut from supermarkets to pirate ships. . . . A clear picture of how simple assumptions about individual preferences and human rationality can increase our understanding of ordinary market behavior and a wide range of social institutions from marriage, to crime, to voting."Richard A. Epstein, The University of Chicago Law School"This book written nearly a decade ago before economics became hot far surpasses its successors such as "Freakonomics." "Amazon reviewer"The book of the month is HIDDEN ORDER: The Economics of Everyday Life. One doesn't normally think of an economics book as light and pleasant reading, but David makes it seem so. If you have any interest in economics at all, you'll find this book both readable and fascinating; and I guarantee you'll learn something from it." Jerry Pournelle in Byte"Hidden Order helps us look at everyday experience from the perspective of basic economics. Readers will be surprised to learn how much economics explains about their own behavior as well as about that of others ..."James M. Buchanan, Nobel Laureate in Economics, 1986"The author is a talented teacher, and he moves effortlessly from the traffic jams and grocery stores to the efficient-market hypothesis, price theory, and backward-bending labor curves." -Deborah Stead in The New York Times"David Friedman's gift is making some of the more complicated concepts of economics simple. In _Hidden Order_, he does this with his trademark wit and ingenuity. The most esoteric yet essential aspects of modern economic thought - marginal utility, indifference curves, opportunity costs, Nash equilibria, rent-seeking, etc - all come to life in this modest paperback."(Amazon reviewer) "A surprisingly lucid and useful book, and about as appealing as economics gets." - Kirkus ReviewsBooknotes Interview: https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6_kYven-0c
  • Votes: 10

    Love is patient and kind. I Corinthians 13

    by Alison Langridge

  • Votes: 10

    Confessions of an Economic Hitman

    by John Perkins

  • Votes: 10

    The Everlasting Man

    by G. K. Chesterton

    Your Special Illustrated & Annotated edition includes: • Bibliography of G. K. Chesterton since 1980 – MLA 7th edition format for quick research! • 11 brand new line art Chisel DrawingsTM of Chesterton through his life by sequential artist Lucio Marcetti • Exclusive biography “The Boyhood Days of G.K. Chesterton” C.S. Lewis, author of the Chronicles of Narnia series, regarded Chesterton's humble defense of Christianity as having 'baptised' his intellect. "The best popular apologetic I know" - C.S. Lewis
  • Votes: 10

    Black Rednecks and White Liberals

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 10

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 9

    The Unseen Realm

    by Michael S. Heiser

    In The Unseen Realm, Dr. Michael Heiser examines the ancient context of Scripture, explaining how its supernatural worldview can help us grow in our understanding of God. He illuminates intriguing and amazing passages of the Bible that have been hiding in plain sight. You'll find yourself engaged in an enthusiastic pursuit of the truth, resulting in a new appreciation for God's Word. Why wasn't Eve surprised when the serpent spoke to her? How did descendants of the Nephilim survive the flood? Why did Jacob fuse Yahweh and his Angel together in his prayer? Who are the assembly of divine beings that God presides over? In what way do those beings participate in God's decisions? Why do Peter and Jude promote belief in imprisoned spirits? Why does Paul describe evil spirits in terms of geographical rulership? Who are the "glorious ones" that even angels dare not rebuke? After reading this book, you may never read your Bible the same way again. Endorsements "There is a world referred to in the Scripture that is quite unseen, but also quite present and active. Michael Heiser's The Unseen Realm seeks to unmask this world. Heiser shows how important it is to understand this world and appreciate how its contribution helps to make sense of Scripture. The book is clear and well done, treating many ideas and themes that often go unseen themselves. With this book, such themes will no longer be neglected, so read it and discover a new realm for reflection about what Scripture teaches." --Darrell L. Bock, Executive Director for Cultural Engagement, Senior Research Professor of New Testament Studies, Howard G. Hendricks Center for Christian Leadership and Cultural Engagement "'How was it possible that I had never seen that before?' Dr. Heiser's survey of the complex reality of the supernatural world as the Scriptures portray it covers a subject that is strangely sidestepped. No one is going to agree with everything in his book, but the subject deserves careful study, and so does this book." --John Goldingay, David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament, School of Theology, Fuller Theological Seminary "This is a 'big' book in the best sense of the term. It is big in its scope and in its depth of analysis. Michael Heiser is a scholar who knows Scripture intimately in its ancient cultural context. All--scholars, clergy, and laypeople--who read this profound and accessible book will grow in their understanding of both the Old and New Testaments, particularly as their eyes are opened to the Bible's 'unseen world.'" --Tremper Longman III, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College
  • Votes: 9

    Blood Meridian

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 9

    The Good Heart

    by His Holiness the Dalai Lama

    In this accessible book, His Holiness the Dalai Lama considers such well-known Gospel passages as the Sermon on the Mount, the Healing of the Sick and the Resurrection. He offers fresh perspectives on these familiar Christian sources of faith, and also considers such widespread concerns as inner transformation, meditation, ritual, and the ideas of reward and punishment, heaven and hell. His exploration of the similarities and differences between Buddhism and Christianity gives us a model of dialogue for the coming era of global spirituality, which will open the windows of understanding for the modern spiritual seeker of any faith.
  • Votes: 9

    The Power of Myth

    by Joseph Campbell

    The national bestseller, now available in a non-illustrated, standard format paperback edition The Power of Myth launched an extraordinary resurgence of interest in Joseph Campbell and his work. A preeminent scholar, writer, and teacher, he has had a profound influence on millions of people--including Star Wars creator George Lucas. To Campbell, mythology was the “song of the universe, the music of the spheres.” With Bill Moyers, one of America’s most prominent journalists, as his thoughtful and engaging interviewer, The Power of Myth touches on subjects from modern marriage to virgin births, from Jesus to John Lennon, offering a brilliant combination of intelligence and wit. This extraordinary book reveals how the themes and symbols of ancient narratives continue to bring meaning to birth, death, love, and war. From stories of the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece and Rome to traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity, a broad array of themes are considered that together identify the universality of human experience across time and culture. An impeccable match of interviewer and subject, a timeless distillation of Campbell’s work, The Power of Myth continues to exert a profound influence on our culture.
  • Votes: 9

    Man and His Symbols

    by Carl G. Jung

  • Votes: 9

    The Silmarillion

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 9

    The Little Prince

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    When a pilot finds himself alone and stranded with a broken-down plane, a little prince is his only companion living on a strange deserted planet. Full of wisdom, humour and delight, this book while intended for children is also a favourite of adults for its quirkiness and insight.
  • Votes: 9

    The Righteous Mind

    by Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.
  • Votes: 9

    Weapons of Mass Instruction

    by John Taylor Gatto

    The transformation of schooling from a twelve-year jail sentence to freedom to learn. John Taylor Gatto's Weapons of Mass Instruction , now available in paperback, focuses on mechanisms of traditional education which cripple imagination, discourage critical thinking, and create a false view of learning as a byproduct of rote-memorization drills. Gatto's earlier book, Dumbing Us Down , introduced the now-famous expression of the title into the common vernacular. Weapons of Mass Instruction adds another chilling metaphor to the brief against conventional schooling. Gatto demonstrates that the harm school inflicts is rational and deliberate. The real function of pedagogy, he argues, is to render the common population manageable. To that end, young people must be conditioned to rely upon experts, to remain divided from natural alliances and to accept disconnections from their own lived experiences. They must at all costs be discouraged from developing self-reliance and independence. Escaping this trap requires a strategy Gatto calls "open source learning" which imposes no artificial divisions between learning and life. Through this alternative approach our children can avoid being indoctrinated-only then can they achieve self-knowledge, good judgment, and courage.
  • Votes: 9

    A New Earth

    by Eckhart Tolle

    Awaken your life's purpose in 2019 with the help of A New Earth, the international bestseller. 'An otherworldly genius' Chris Evans' BBC Radio 2 Breakfast Show _________ Are you ready to put aside ego and be awakened? Right now the world is filled with angry, raging egos. But there is a better way and in A New Earth, Eckhart Tolle provides the spiritual framework for all of us to move beyond ourselves in order to make this world a better, more evolved place to live. Shattering modern ideas of ego and entitlement, self and society, Tolle lifts the veil of fear that has hung over us during this new millennium, and reveals a path to happiness and health that every reader can follow. Awaken your purpose, discover your potential, and change your life. 'A wake up call for the entire planet. A New Earth helps us to stop creating our own suffering and obsessing over the past and what the future might be and to put ourselves in the now' Oprah Winfrey
  • Votes: 9

    Illusions

    by Richard Bach

    In the cloud-washed airspace between the cornfields of Illinois and blue infinity, a man puts his faith in the propeller of his biplane. For disillusioned writer and itinerant barnstormer Richard Bach, belief is as real as a full tank of gas and sparks firing in the cylinders ... until he meets Donald Shimoda - former mechanic and self-described messiah who can make wrenches fly and Richard's imagination soar... In Illusions,the unforgettable follow-up to his phenomenal New York Times bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull,Richard Bach takes to the air to discover the ageless truths that give our souls wings- that people don't need airplanes to soar ... that even the darkest clouds have meaning once we lift ourselves above them ... and that messiahs can be found in the unlikeliest places - like hay fields, one-traffic-light midwestern towns, and most of all, deep within ourselves.
  • Votes: 9

    Mr. Playboy

    by Steven Watts

    The real Hugh Hefner-the extraordinary inside story of an American icon "Riveting... Watts packs in plenty of gasp-inducing passages."-Newark Star Ledger "Like it or not, Hugh Hefner has affected all of us, so I treasured learning about how and why in the sober biography."-Chicago Sun Times "This is a fun book. How could it not be? Watts aims to give a full account of the man, his magazine and their place in social history. Playboy is no longer the cultural force it used to be, but it made a stamp on society."-Associated Press "In Steven Watts' exhaustive, illuminating biography Mr. Playboy, Hefner's ideal for living -- marked by his allegiances to Tarzan, Freud, Pepsi-Cola and jazz -- proves to be a kind of gloss on the Protestant work ethic."-Los Angeles TimesGorgeous young women in revealing poses; extravagant mansion parties packed with celebrities; a hot-tub grotto, elegant smoking jackets, and round rotating beds; the hedonistic pursuit of uninhibited sex. Put these images together and a single name springs to mind-Hugh Hefner. From his spectacular launch of Playboy magazine and the dizzying expansion of his leisure empire to his recent television hit The Girls Next Door, the publisher has attracted public attention and controversy for decades. But how did a man who is at once socially astute and morally unconventional, part Bill Gates and part Casanova, also evolve into a figure at the forefront of cultural change?In Mr. Playboy, historian and biographer Steven Watts argues that, in the process of becoming fabulously wealthy and famous, Hefner has profoundly altered American life and values. Granted unprecedented access to the man and his enterprise, Watts traces Hef's life and career from his midwestern, Methodist upbringing and the first publication of Playboy in 1953 through the turbulent sixties, self-indulgent seventies, reactionary eighties, and traditionalist nineties, up to the present. He reveals that Hefner, from the beginning, believed he could overturn social norms and take America with him.This fascinating portrait illustrates four ways in which Hefner and Playboy stood at the center of several cultural upheavals that remade the postwar United States. The publisher played a crucial role in the sexual revolution that upended traditional notions of behavior and expectation regarding sex. He emerged as one of the most influential advocates of a rapidly developing consumer culture, flooding Playboy readers with images of material abundance and a leisurely lifestyle. He proved instrumental-with his influential magazine, syndicated television shows, fashionable nightclubs, swanky resorts, and movie and musical projects-in making popular culture into a dominant force in many people's lives. Ironically, Hefner also became a controversial force in the movement for women's rights. Although advocating women's sexual freedom and their liberation from traditional family constraints, the publisher became a whipping boy for feminists who viewed him as a prophet for a new kind of male domination.Throughout, Watts offers singular insights into the real man behind the flamboyant public persona. He shows Hefner's personal dichotomies-the pleasure seeker and the workaholic, the consort of countless Playmates and the genuine romantic, the family man and the Gatsby-like host of lavish parties at his Chicago and Los Angeles mansions who enjoys well-publicized affairs with numerous Playmates, the fan of life's simple pleasures who hobnobs with the Hollywood elite.Punctuated throughout with descriptions and anecdotes of life at the Playboy Mansions, Mr. Playboy tells the compelling and uniquely American story of how one person with a provocative idea, a finger on the pulse of popular opinion, and a passion for his work altered the course of modern history. Spans from Hefner's childhood to the launch of Playboy magazine and the expansion of the Playboy empire to the present Puts Hefner's life and work into the cultural context of American life from the mid-twentieth-century onwards Contains over 50 B/W and color photos, including an actual fold-out centerfold
  • Votes: 8

    Mistakes Were Made (but Not by Me) Third Edition

    by Carol Tavris

    A NEW EDITION UPDATED IN 2020 • Why is it so hard to say "I made a mistake" — and really believe it? When we make mistakes, cling to outdated attitudes, or mistreat other people, we must calm the cognitive dissonance that jars our feelings of self-worth. And so, unconsciously, we create fictions that absolve us of responsibility, restoring our belief that we are smart, moral, and right—a belief that often keeps us on a course that is dumb, immoral, and wrong. Backed by decades of research, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) offers a fascinating explanation of self-justification—how it works, the damage it can cause, and how we can overcome it. Extensively updated, this third edition has many recent and revealing examples, including the application of dissonance theory to divisive social issues such as the Black Lives Matter movement and he said/she said claims. It also features a new chapter that illuminates how cognitive dissonance is playing a role in the currently polarized political scene, changing the nation’s values and putting democracy itself at risk. “Every page sparkles with sharp insight and keen observation. Mistakes were made—but not in this book!” —Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness “A revelatory study of how lovers, lawyers, doctors, politicians—and all of us—pull the wool over our own eyes . . . Reading it, we recognize the behavior of our leaders, our loved ones, and—if we’re honest—ourselves, and some of the more perplexing mysteries of human nature begin to seem a little clearer.” —Francine Prose, O, The Oprah Magazine
  • Votes: 8

    21 Lessons for the 21st Century

    by Yuval Noah Harari

  • Votes: 8

    A Million Miles in a Thousand Years

    by Donald Miller

    After writing a successful memoir, Donald Miller's life stalled. During what should have been the height of his success, he found himself unwilling to get out of bed, avoiding responsibility, even questioning the meaning of life. But when two movie producers proposed turning his memoir into a movie, he found himself launched into a new story filled with risk, possibility, beauty, and meaning. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years chronicles Miller's rare opportunity to edit his life into a great story, to reinvent himself so nobody shrugs their shoulders when the credits roll. Through heart-wrenching honesty and hilarious self-inspection, Donald Miller takes readers through the life that emerges when it turns from boring reality into meaningful narrative. Miller goes from sleeping all day to riding his bike across America, from living in romantic daydreams to fearful encounters with love, from wasting his money to founding a nonprofit with a passionate cause. Guided by a host of outlandish but very real characters, Miller shows us how to get a second chance at life the first time around. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years is a rare celebration of the beauty of life.
  • Votes: 8

    Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters

    by Meg Meeker

    Drawing on her thirty years' experience practicing pediatric and adolescent medicine, teen health expert Dr. Meg Meeker explains why an active father figure is maybe the single most important factor in a young woman's development. In this invaluable guide, Meeker shows how a father can be both counsel and protector for his daughter as she grows into a spiritually and mentally strong young woman. From cradling his newborn to walking her down the aisle, a father must relish his paramount responsibility—guiding the course of his daughter’s life. Meeker reveals • how a man can become a "strong father" • how a father's guidance influences every part of a woman's life, from her self-respect to her perspective on drugs, alcohol, and sex • how to lay down ground rules that are respected without creating distance in your relationship with your daughter • why you need to be your daughter's hero • the mistakes most fathers make and their serious consequences • how to help daughters make their own good decisions and avoid disastrous mistakes • how a father's faith will influence his daughter's spiritual development • how to get through to you daughter, even during her toughest don't-talk-to-me years • true stories of daughters who were on the wrong path—and how their fathers helped to bring them back Learn how to grow, strengthen, or rebuild your relationship with your daughter to better both your life and hers in the bestselling Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters: 10 Secrets Every Father Should Know.
  • Votes: 8

    The Manipulated Man

    by Esther Vilar

  • Votes: 8

    The Science of God

    by Gerald L. Schroeder Ph.D.

    For the readers of The Language of God, another instant classic from "a sophisticated and original scholar" (Kirkus Reviews) that disputes the idea that science is contrary to religion. In The Science of God, distinguished physicist and Biblical scholar Gerald L. Schroeder demonstrates the surprising parallels between a variety of Biblical teachings and the findings of biochemists, paleontologists, astrophysicists, and quantum physicists. In a brilliant and wide-ranging discussion of key topics that have divided science and religion—free will, the development of the universe, the origin of life, and the origin of man—Schroeder argues that the latest science and a close reading of the Bible are not just compatible but interdependent. This timely reissue of The Science of God features a brand-new preface by Schroeder and a compelling appendix that addresses the highly publicized experiment in 2008 in which scientists attempted to re-create the chemical composition of the cosmos immediately after the Big Bang. It also details Schroeder’s lucid explanations of complex scientific and religious concepts, such as the theory of relativity, the passage of time, and the definitions of crucial Hebrew words in the Bible. Religious skeptics, Biblical literalists, scientists, students, and physicists alike will be riveted by Schroeder’s remarkable contribution to the raging debate between science and religion.
  • Votes: 8

    Outliers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 8

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.
  • Votes: 8

    The Law

    by Frederic Bastiat

  • Votes: 8

    American Marxism

    by Mark R. Levin

  • Votes: 8

    The Millionaire Next Door

    by Thomas J. Stanley

  • Votes: 8

    The Purpose Driven Life

    by Rick Warren

  • Votes: 7

    The Napping House

    by Audrey Wood

    Delightful cumulative rhyme leads up to the consequences of piling too many sleepy people and animals in a cozy bed. “Don Wood’s paintings endow Audrey’s familiar plot with beauty and newness, conveying atmosphere as well as illustrating the story.”--Publishers Weekly
  • Votes: 7

    The Nature of Personal Reality

    by Jane Roberts

    In this perennial bestseller, Seth challenges our assumptions about the nature of reality, and shows us how we create our personal reality through our conscious beliefs about ourselves, others, and the world. His message is clear: we are not at the mercy of the subconscious, or helpless before forces we cannot understand. “We are Gods couched in creaturehood,” Seth says, “We are given the ability to form our experience as our thoughts and feelings become actualized.” “Seth was one of my first metaphysical teachers. He remains a constant source of knowledge and inspiration in my life.” — Marianne Williamson “I would like to see the Seth books as required reading for anyone on their spiritual pathway. The amazing in-depth information in the Seth books is as relevant today as it was in the early ’70s when Jane Roberts first channeled this material.” — Louise Hay
  • Votes: 7

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 7

    The Last Lecture

    by Randy Pausch

    'A phenomenon' SUNDAY TIMES A lot of professors give talks titled 'The Last Lecture'. Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave, 'Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams', wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because time is all you have and you may find one day that you have less than you think). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living. In this book, Randy Pausch has combined the humour, inspiration, and intelligence that made his lecture such a phenomenon and given it an indelible form. It is a book that will be shared for generations to come.
  • Votes: 7

    Fingerprints of the Gods

    by Graham Hancock

  • Votes: 7

    People of the Lie

    by M. Scott Peck

  • Votes: 7

    Psycho-Cybernetics

    by Maxwell Maltz

    Previously published Wiltshire, 1967. Guide to personal health and success
  • Votes: 7

    Awareness

    by Anthony De Mello

  • Votes: 7

    The World

    by Richard Haass

  • Votes: 7

    Way of the Peaceful Warrior

    by Dan Millman

  • Votes: 7

    The Total Money Makeover

    by Dave Ramsey

  • Votes: 7

    The Shack

    by William P. Young

  • Votes: 6

    Drawdown

    In Drawdown, renowned environmentalist Paul Hawken has assembled a team of over 200 scholars, scientists, policymakers, business leaders and activists to illustrate the hundred most substantive solutions to combat climate change that together will not only slow down the growth of carbon emissions, but reverse them altogether. Put into action together, these solutions will mobilise society into taking the climate change conversation from problem definition to problem solving, from fear and apathy to collaboration and regeneration.
  • Votes: 6

    The Greatest Salesman in the World

    by Og Mandino

  • Votes: 6

    On the Shortness of Life

    by Seneca

  • Votes: 6

    The War of Art

    by Steven Pressfield

    "In this powerful, straight-from-the-hip examination of the internal obstacles to success, bestselling author Steven Pressfield shows readers how to identify, defeat, and unlock the inner barriers to creativity. The War of Art is an inspirational, funny, well-aimed kick in the pants guaranteed to galvanize every would-be artist, visionary, or entrepreneur." --from back cover.
  • Votes: 6

    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

    by Mark Manson

  • Votes: 6

    The Hiding Place

    by Corrie Ten Boom

  • Votes: 6

    A Course in Miracles

    by Foundation For Inner Peace

    Offers ecumenical meditations on love, perception, forgiveness, eternal life, and theoretical concepts in theology
  • Votes: 6

    The Power of Positive Thinking

    by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale

  • Votes: 6

    The Vision of the Anointed

    by Thomas Sowell

    Sowell presents a devastating critique of the mind-set behind the failed social policies of the past thirty years. Sowell sees what has happened during that time not as a series of isolated mistakes but as a logical consequence of a tainted vision whose defects have led to crises in education, crime, and family dynamics, and to other social pathologies. In this book, he describes how elites—the anointed—have replaced facts and rational thinking with rhetorical assertions, thereby altering the course of our social policy.
  • Votes: 5

    Antigone

    by Sophocles

    To make this quintessential Greek drama more accessible to the modern reader, this Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Edition? includes a glossary of difficult terms, a list of vocabulary words, and convenient sidebar notes. By providing these, it is our intention that readers will more fully enjoy the beauty, wisdom, and intent of the play.The curse placed on Oedipus lingers and haunts a younger generation in this new and brilliant translation of Sophocles? classic drama. The daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, Antigone is an unconventional heroine who pits her beliefs against the King of Thebes in a bloody test of wills that leaves few unharmed. Emotions fly as she challenges the king for the right to bury her own brother. Determined but doomed, Antigone shows her inner strength throughout the play. Antigone raises issues of law and morality that are just as relevant today as they were more than two thousand years ago. Whether this is your first reading or your twentieth, Antigone will move you as few pieces of literature can.
  • Votes: 5

    "This is a Great Book!"

    by Larry Swartz

    “This Is a Great Book!” champions the belief that having a wide range of “great” books to read is essential to students’ becoming readers — both inside the classroom, and beyond. Based on extensive research, this highly readable book explores a range of recommended titles that cover a spectrum of developmental stages, from early chapter books to young adult novels. The 101 literacy events outlined within include a wealth of practical strategies: more than fifty reproducible activities, assessment profiles, and inventories for easy classroom use. Committed to nurturing the love of reading, this passionate book invites readers to dig deeper by responding through writing, discussion, the arts, media, and more. Special attention is given to the world of leisure reading, where readers make choices based on their preferences and tastes as they build a lifelong interest in fiction that will enrich their lives.
  • Votes: 5

    Watership Down

    by Richard Adams

    WINNER of the Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Class Animated Program Now a Netflix animated miniseries starring James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, and Oscar and Grammy award-winner Sir Ben Kingsley. A worldwide bestseller for more than forty years, Watership Down is the compelling tale of a band of wild rabbits struggling to hold onto their place in the world—“a classic yarn of discovery and struggle” (The New York Times). Richard Adams’s Watership Down is a timeless classic and one of the most beloved novels of all time. Set in the Hampshire Downs in Southern England, an idyllic rural landscape, this stirring tale of “suspense, hot pursuit, and derring-do” (Chicago Tribune) follows a band of rabbits in flight from the incursion of man and the destruction of their home. Led by a stouthearted pair of brothers, they travel forth from their native Sandleford warren through harrowing trials to a mysterious promised land and a more perfect society. “A marvelous story of rebellion, exile, and survival” (Sunday Telegraph) this is an unforgettable literary classic for all ages.
  • Votes: 5

    Troublesome Minds (Star Trek

    by Dave Galanter

    A thrilling Star Trek novel starring Kirk, Spock, and the crew of the Enterprise. While exploring the unmapped frontier, the U.S.S. Enterprise responds to a distress call from an unknown ship. Captain James T. Kirk turns first contact into a threat of interstellar war—by saving the life of a man his own people abandoned. Berlis, colony leader of a telepathic race calling themselves the Isitri, claims not to know why those from his homeworld want him dead. Now Kirk must either find a way to wrench billions from the grip of one man, or be responsible for the destruction of two planets.
  • Votes: 5

    The Body Keeps the Score

    by Bessel A. Van der Kolk

    Originally published by Viking Penguin, 2014.
  • Votes: 5

    The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (African American)

    by Frederick Douglass

    "Life and Times of Frederick Douglass" is the third and last autobiography of Frederick Douglass. In this finial memoir Douglas gives more details about his life as a slave and his escape from slavery than he did in his two previous autobiographies. Frederick Douglass (1818 – 1895) was an African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writings. Contents: Author's Birth Removal From Grandmother's Troubles of Childhood A General Survey of the Slave Plantation A Slaveholder's Character A Child's Reasoning Luxuries at the Great House Characteristics of Overseers Change of Location Learning to Read Growing in Knowledge Religious Nature Awakened The Vicissitudes of Slave Life Experience in St. Michaels Covey, the Negro Breaker Another Pressure of the Tyrant's Vise The Last Flogging New Relations and Duties The Runaway Plot Escape From Slavery Life as a Freeman Introduced to the Abolitionists Recollections of Old Friends One Hundred Conventions Impressions Abroad Triumphs and Trials John Brown and Mrs. Stowe Increasing Demands of the Slave Power The Beginning of the End Secession and War Hope for the Nation Vast Changes Living and Learning Weighed in the Balance "Time Makes All Things Even" Incidents and Events "Honor to Whom Honor" Retrospection Later Life A Grand Occasion Doubts as to Garfield's Course Recorder of Deeds President Cleveland's Administration The Supreme Court Decision Defeat of James G. Blaine European Tour Continuation of European Tour The Campaign of 1888 Administration of President Harrison Minister to Haïti Continued Negotiations for the Môle St. Nicolas
  • Votes: 5

    Candide

    by Voltaire

  • Votes: 5

    The Stand

    by Stephen King

    A monumentally devastating plague leaves only a few survivors who, while experiencing dreams of a battle between good and evil, move toward an actual confrontation as they migrate to Boulder, Colorado.
  • Votes: 5

    Deep Nutrition

    by Catherine Shanahan M.D.

  • Votes: 5

    Bringers of the Dawn

    by Barbara Marciniak

    Compiled from more than four hundred hours of channeling by Barbara Marciniak, Bringers of the Dawn imparts to us the wisdom of the Pleiadians, a group of enlightened beings who have come to Earth to help us discover how to reach a new stage of evolution. Master storytellers and humorists, they advise us to become media free, to work in teams, and to eliminate the words "should" and "try" from our vocabularies. We learn how to go beyond fear, how the original human was a magnificent being with twelve strands of DNA and twelve chakra centers, and who our "gods" are. Startling, intense, intelligent, and controversial, these teachings offer essential reading for anyone questioning their existence on this planet and the direction of our collective conscious--and unconscious. By remembering that we are Family of Light, that we share an ancient ancestry with the universe around us, we become "bringers of the dawn," consciously creating a new reality, a new Earth.
  • Votes: 5

    The Richest Man In Babylon - Original Edition

    by George S Clason

    The Richest Man in Babylon, based on "Babylonian parables", has been hailed as the greatest of all inspirational works on the subject of thrift, financial planning, and personal wealth. In simple language, these fascinating and informative stories set you on a sure path to prosperity and its accompanying joys. A celebrated bestseller, it offers an understanding and a solution to your personal financial problem. Revealed inside are the secrets to acquiring money, keeping money, and making money earn more money. Gold Edition includes bonus material: The Magic Story by Frederick Van Dey. The Magic Story: My task is done. I have written the recipe for "success." If followed, it cannot fail. Wherein I may not be entirely comprehended, the plus-entity of whosoever reads will supply the deficiency; and upon that Better Self of mine, I place the burden of imparting to generations that are to come, the secret of this all-pervading good, - the secret of being what you have it within you to be. It is claimed that many who read or hear this story almost immediately begin to have good fortune - so it is worth a few minutes of your time to find out if it works for you?
  • Votes: 5

    Win Bigly

    by Scott Adams

  • Votes: 5

    The Hunt for Red October (A Jack Ryan Novel)

    by Tom Clancy

  • Votes: 5

    The Giver

    by Lois Lowry

    Celebrate Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world in this 25th Anniversary Edition of The Giver. Includes a new afterword from Lois Lowry, as well as her Newbery acceptance speech. The Giver, Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning novel, has become one of the most influential books of our time. Placed on countless reading lists and curricula, translated into more than forty languages, and made into a feature film, The Giver is a modern classic. Celebrate this beloved contribution to children's literature with the 25th Anniversary Edition. The haunting story of twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity, is as resonant today as when it was first published. Lois Lowry will include a new afterword as well as her Newbery acceptance speech in this beautifully rejacketed edition.
  • Votes: 5

    The Parasitic Mind

    by Gad Saad

  • Votes: 5

    The Scriptures

    by Institute for Scripture Research

  • Votes: 4

    Desolation Angels

    by Jack Kerouac

    Desolation Angels is the wild and soulful story of the legendary road trip that Jack Kerouac took before the publication of On the Road, told through the persona of Jack Duluoz and accompanied by his thinly-disguised Beat cohorts Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso and William Burroughs. As they hitch, hop freight trains, walk and talk their way across the world, from California to Mexico, London to Paris and on to opium-ridden Tangiers, Kerouac chronicles their poetry, partying, mountain vigils and spiritual contemplation with unsurpassable energy and humanity.
  • Votes: 4

    To Kill a Mocking Bird

    by Harper Lee

  • Votes: 4

    Cities of the Plain

    by Cormac McCarthy

    Volume Three of the Border Trilogy In Cormac McCarthy's Cities of the Plain, two men marked by the boyhood adventures of All the Pretty Horses and The Crossing now stand together, between their vivid pasts and uncertain futures, to confront a country changing beyond recognition. In the fall of 1952, John Grady Cole and Billy Parham are cowboys on a New Mexico ranch encroached upon from the north by the military. On the southern horizon are the mountains of Mexico, where one of the men is drawn again and again, in this story of friendships and passion, to a love as dangerous as it is inevitable.
  • Votes: 4

    But man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.

    by Growth Journals

    This Is A 120 Lined Pages Journal With A Custom Cover Made Particularly To Keep You Company On Your Journey , And To Help You Through Your Growth & Self Development Process. This Notebook Could Be Used For Anything You Want To Do With It, And We Highly Recommend It For The Following Usage: Reflection. Self-Accountability. Brainstorming. To Do List And Planning. Etc.. Click On Author Name For More Self - Help Material .
  • Votes: 4

    The Virtue of Selfishness

    by Ayn Rand

    A collection of essays that sets forth the moral principles of Objectivism, Ayn Rand's controversial, groundbreaking philosophy. Since their initial publication, Rand's fictional works—Anthem, The Fountainhead, and Atlas Shrugged—have had a major impact on the intellectual scene. The underlying theme of her famous novels is her philosophy, a new morality—the ethics of rational self-interest—that offers a robust challenge to altruist-collectivist thought. Known as Objectivism, her divisive philosophy holds human life—the life proper to a rational being—as the standard of moral values and regards altruism as incompatible with man's nature. In this series of essays, Rand asks why man needs morality in the first place, and arrives at an answer that redefines a new code of ethics based on the virtue of selfishness. More Than 1 Million Copies Sold!
  • Votes: 4

    Tears in the Darkness

    by Michael Norman

    Tears in the Darkness is an altogether new look at World War II that exposes the myths of war and shows the extent of suffering and loss on both sides. For the first four months of 1942, U.S., Filipino, and Japanese soldiers fought what was America's first major land battle of World War II, the battle for the tiny Philippine peninsula of Bataan. It ended with the surrender of 76,000 Filipinos and Americans, the single largest defeat in American military history. The defeat, though, was only the beginning, as Michael and Elizabeth M. Norman make dramatically clear in this powerfully original book. From then until the Japanese surrendered in August 1945, the prisoners of war suffered an ordeal of unparalleled cruelty and savagery: forty-one months of captivity, starvation rations, dehydration, hard labor, deadly disease, and torture—far from the machinations of General Douglas MacArthur. The Normans bring to the story remarkable feats of reportage and literary empathy. Their protagonist, Ben Steele, is a figure out of Hemingway: a young cowboy turned sketch artist from Montana who joined the army to see the world. Juxtaposed against Steele's story and the sobering tale of the Death March and its aftermath is the story of a number of Japanese soldiers.
  • Votes: 4

    The Bhagwat Gita

    by RR Varma

  • Votes: 4

    The Intimate Sex Lives of Famous People

    by Irving Wallace

    Presents intimate and revealing information about the sexual exploits of over two hundred famous individuals of the near and distant past.
  • Votes: 4

    The Spirit of the Liturgy

    by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger

    New Softcover Edition with Index! Considered by Ratzinger devotees as his greatest work on the Liturgy, this profound and beautifully written treatment of the "great prayer of the Church" will help readers rediscover the Liturgy in all its hidden spiritual wealth and transcendent grandeur as the very center of our Christian life. Among the many liturgical issues that he covers in this work, Cardinal Ratzinger discusses fundamental misunderstandings of the Second Vatican Council's intentions for liturgical renewal, especially the orientation of prayer at the Eucharistic sacrifice, the placement of the tabernacle, and the posture of kneeling. Other important topics he discusses include the following: the essence of worship; Jewish roots and new elements of the Christian Liturgy; the historic and cosmic dimensions of the Liturgy; the relationship of the Liturgy to time and space; art, music, and the Liturgy; active participation of all the faithful; gestures, posture, and vestments. "My purpose here is to assist this renewal of understanding of the Liturgy. Its basic intentions coincide with what Guardini wanted to achieve. The only difference is that I have had to translate what Guardini did at the end of the First World War, in a totally different historical situation, into the context of our present-day questions, hopes, and dangers. Like Guardini, I am not attempting to involve myself with scholarly discussion and research. I am simply offering an aid to the understanding of the faith and to the right way to give the faith its central form of expression in the Liturgy." - Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, from the preface
  • Votes: 4

    The Count of Monte Christo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas completed in 1844. It is one of the author's most popular works, along with The Three Musketeers. Like many of his novels, it is expanded from plot outlines suggested by his collaborating ghostwriter Auguste Maquet.The story takes place in France, Italy, and islands in the Mediterranean during the historical events of 1815-1839: the era of the Bourbon Restoration through the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. It begins just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile). The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book, an adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy, and forgiveness. It centres around a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune, and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty. In addition, it is a story that involves romance, loyalty, betrayal, and selfishness, shown throughout the story as characters slowly reveal their true inner nature.The book is considered a literary classic today. According to Luc Sante, "The Count of Monte Cristo has become a fixture of Western civilization's literature, as inescapable and immediately identifiable as Mickey Mouse, Noah's flood, and the story of Little Red Riding Hood.
  • Votes: 4

    Nasty People

    by Jay Carter

    Fourteen years since its first publication, the bestsellerNasty People has been revised and updated to cover the motivations of nasty people, how to avoid confrontation with a nasty boss, how to handle a nasty spouse, and much more, including: How to break the cycle of nastiness A new understanding of personality disorders and depression Narcissism, nasty behavior, and self-doubt Nasty people and self-validation The role adrenaline plays in nasty behavior and our responses to it. Everyone knows a person who has been hurt, betrayed, or degraded by nasty individuals or has experienced it themselves. In three books, Jay Carter, Psy. D., shows readers how to stop this cycle of overt and covert abuse, without resorting to nasty tactics. Now for the first time, this series is released together to cover all areas of dealing with difficult people. With straight-talking advice, real-life anecdotes, and psychology that makes sense, Carter explains how to handle and stop painful behavior that harms both the perpetrator and the victim.
  • Votes: 4

    Roots

    by Alex Haley

    WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION BY DAVID OLUSOGA Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award Tracing his ancestry through six generations - slaves and freedmen, farmers and blacksmiths, lawyers and architects - back to Africa, Alex Haley discovered a sixteen-year-old youth, Kunta Kinte. It was this young man, who had been torn from his homeland and in torment and anguish brought to the slave markets of the New World, who held the key to Haley's deep and distant past.
  • Votes: 4

    Your Body Believes Every Word You Say

    by Barbara Hoberman Levine

    The author's 15-year struggle with a then-inoperable brain tumor led to her discovery of the seedthoughts and core beliefs that link one's mind and body. In this book, Levine shows, via simple, nonmedical language and 53 self-help exercises, how one can use an illness as a vehicle for increased self-understanding and healing.
  • Votes: 4

    The Phantom Tollbooth

    by Norton Juster

    A journey through a land where Milo learns the importance of words and numbers provides a cure for his boredom.
  • Votes: 4

    The Captive Mind

    by Czeslaw Milosz

    The best known prose work by the winner of the 1980 Nobel Prize for Literature examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.
  • Votes: 4

    How to Lie with Statistics

    by Darrell Huff

    If you want to outsmart a crook, learn his tricks—Darrell Huff explains exactly how in the classic How to Lie with Statistics. From distorted graphs and biased samples to misleading averages, there are countless statistical dodges that lend cover to anyone with an ax to grind or a product to sell. With abundant examples and illustrations, Darrell Huff’s lively and engaging primer clarifies the basic principles of statistics and explains how they’re used to present information in honest and not-so-honest ways. Now even more indispensable in our data-driven world than it was when first published, How to Lie with Statistics is the book that generations of readers have relied on to keep from being fooled.
  • Votes: 4

    For Whom the Bell Tolls

    by Ernest Hemingway

    Ernest Hemingway's masterpiece on war, love, loyalty, and honor tells the story of Robert Jordan, an antifascist American fighting in the Spanish Civil War. In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from “the good fight” and one of the foremost classics of war literature. For Whom the Bell Tolls tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades, is attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain. In his portrayal of Jordan’s love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of a guerilla leader’s last stand, Hemingway creates a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author’s previous works, For Whom the Bell Tolls stands as one of the best war novels ever written.
  • Votes: 4

    Ishmael

    by Daniel Quinn

    An award-winning, compelling novel of spiritual adventure about a gorilla named Ishmael, who possesses immense wisdom, and the man who becomes his pupil, offers answers to the world's most pressing moral dilemmas. Reprint.
  • Votes: 4

    The New Testament

    by David Bentley Hart

  • Votes: 4

    The Teachings of Don Juan

    by Carlos Castaneda

  • Votes: 4

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

    The author uses the ancient Persian religious leader, Zarathustra (or Zoroaster) to voice his own views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the "Übermensch" or "superman."
  • Votes: 4

    A Man

    by Keiichiro Hirano

    A man follows another man's trail of lies in a compelling psychological story about the search for identity, by Japan's award-winning literary sensation Keiichiro Hirano in his first novel to be translated into English. Akira Kido is a divorce attorney whose own marriage is in danger of being destroyed by emotional disconnect. With a midlife crisis looming, Kido's life is upended by the reemergence of a former client, Rié Takemoto. She wants Kido to investigate a dead man--her recently deceased husband, Daisuké. Upon his death she discovered that he'd been living a lie. His name, his past, his entire identity belonged to someone else, a total stranger. The investigation draws Kido into two intriguing mysteries: finding out who Rié's husband really was and discovering more about the man he pretended to be. Soon, with each new revelation, Kido will come to share the obsession with--and the lure of--erasing one life to create a new one. In A Man, Keiichiro Hirano, winner of Japan's prestigious Yomiuri Prize for Literature, explores the search for identity, the ambiguity of memory, the legacies with which we live and die, and the reconciliation of who you hoped to be with who you've actually become.
  • Votes: 4

    God Is Not Great

    by Christopher Hitchens

  • Votes: 4

    Into the Wild

    by Jon Krakauer

  • Votes: 4

    The Case for Christ

    by Lee Strobel

    A Seasoned Journalist Chases Down the Biggest Story in History Is there credible evidence that Jesus of Nazareth really is the Son of God? Retracing his own spiritual journey from atheism to faith, Lee Strobel, former legal editor of the Chicago Tribune, cross-examines a dozen experts with doctorates from schools like Cambridge, Princeton, and Brandeis who are recognized authorities in their own fields. Strobel challenges them with questions like How reliable is the New Testament? Does evidence for Jesus exist outside the Bible? Is there any reason to believe the resurrection was an actual event? Strobel's tough, point-blank questions make this Gold Medallion-winning book read like a captivating, fast-paced novel. But it's not fiction. It's a riveting quest for the truth about history's most compelling figure. What will your verdict be in The Case for Christ? 'Lee Strobel probes with bulldog-like tenacity the evidence for the truth of biblical Christianity.' Bruce M. Metzger, Ph.D., Professor of New Testament, Emeritus, Princeton Theological Seminary 'Lee Strobel asks the questions a tough-minded skeptic would ask. His book is so good I read it out loud to my wife evenings after dinner. Every inquirer should have it.' Phillip E. Johnson, Law Professor, University of California at Berkeley
  • Votes: 4

    The Secret

    by Rhonda Byrne

  • Votes: 4

    The Road to Serfdom

    by Hayek

  • Votes: 4

    On the Road

    by Jack Kerouac

    Follows the counterculture escapades of members of the Beat generation as they seek pleasure and meaning while traveling coast to coast
  • Votes: 4

    Face

    by Justine Bateman

    Entertainment shows, magazines, websites, and other channels continuously report the latest sightings, heartbreaks, and triumphs of the famous to a seemingly insatiable public. Millions of people go to enormous lengths to achieve Fame. Fame is woven into our lives in ways that may have been unimaginable in years past. And yet, is Fame even real? Mining decades of experience, writer, director, producer, and actress Justine Bateman writes a visceral, intimate look at the experience of Fame.
  • Votes: 4

    Krav Maga

    by Boaz Aviram

    The complete beginner’s guide to Krav Maga An instructional book for athletes interested in this type of self-defense Updated edition that contains the basic rules and new tips to improve your form and prevent injury This training manual is ideal for anyone curious about Krav Maga. This noncompetitive self- defense technique began in the Israeli Defense Force (IDF). The guide’s author, Boaz Aviram, has been a member of the IDF for years. Krav Maga brings together skills and training from many martial arts, ranging from jiujitsu to judo to boxing. It shares with is students critical lessons in maintaining awareness and making each strike count in self-defense. In its instructional and updated edition, Krav Maga: Use Your Body as a Weapon teaches athletes about their own anatomy and muscles to help them avoid injury. Aviram provides concrete and reliable information on how to tackle your opponent int he more efficient and effective way. Some methods include: Paying attention to possible escape routes Using your opponent’s weakest areas to your advantage Using common objects at hand to fight with Preemptive counterattacks This book offers the basic philosophy and use of hand-to-hand training as it began, and the author meticulously describes the basis of each skill to help the reader and athlete understand it clearly. With more than 1,000 photos and 150 techniques, Krav Maga: Use Your Body as a a Weapon belongs on the bookshelf of everyone interested in this technique. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Sports Publishing imprint, is proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in sports—books about baseball, pro football, college football, pro and college basketball, hockey, or soccer, we have a book about your sport or your team. In addition to books on popular team sports, we also publish books for a wide variety of athletes and sports enthusiasts, including books on running, cycling, horseback riding, swimming, tennis, martial arts, golf, camping, hiking, aviation, boating, and so much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to publishing books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked by other publishers and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
  • Votes: 3

    Infinite Jest

    by David Foster Wallace

    A gargantuan, mind-altering comedy about the Pursuit of Happiness in America Set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring the most endearingly screwed-up family to come along in recent fiction, Infinite Jest explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to so dominate our lives; about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people; and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are. Equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, Infinite Jest bends every rule of fiction without sacrificing for a moment its own entertainment value. It is an exuberant, uniquely American exploration of the passions that make us human - and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do.
  • Votes: 3

    The Illustrated Man

    by Ray Bradbury

    Eighteen science fiction stories deal with love, madness, and death on Mars, Venus, and in space.
  • Votes: 3

    Skinny Legs and All

    by Tom Robbins

  • Votes: 3

    Confessions of an Ad Man

    by David Ogilvy

  • Votes: 3

    The Guns of August

    by Barbara W. Tuchman

    Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time The Proud Tower, the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Guns of August, and The Zimmerman Telegram comprise Barbara W. Tuchman’s classic histories of the First World War era In this landmark, Pulitzer Prize–winning account, renowned historian Barbara W. Tuchman re-creates the first month of World War I: thirty days in the summer of 1914 that determined the course of the conflict, the century, and ultimately our present world. Beginning with the funeral of Edward VII, Tuchman traces each step that led to the inevitable clash. And inevitable it was, with all sides plotting their war for a generation. Dizzyingly comprehensive and spectacularly portrayed with her famous talent for evoking the characters of the war’s key players, Tuchman’s magnum opus is a classic for the ages. Praise for The Guns of August “A brilliant piece of military history which proves up to the hilt the force of Winston Churchill’s statement that the first month of World War I was ‘a drama never surpassed.’”—Newsweek “More dramatic than fiction . . . a magnificent narrative—beautifully organized, elegantly phrased, skillfully paced and sustained.”—Chicago Tribune “A fine demonstration that with sufficient art rather specialized history can be raised to the level of literature.”—The New York Times “[The Guns of August] has a vitality that transcends its narrative virtues, which are considerable, and its feel for characterizations, which is excellent.”—The Wall Street Journal
  • Votes: 3

    The Franklin Scandal

    by Nick Bryant

    A chilling exposé of corporate corruption and government cover-ups, this account of a nationwide child-trafficking and pedophilia ring in the United States tells a sordid tale of corruption in high places. The scandal originally surfaced during an investigation into Omaha, Nebraska's failed Franklin Federal Credit Union and took the author beyond the Midwest and ultimately to Washington, DC. Implicating businessmen, senators, major media corporations, the CIA, and even the venerable Boys Town organization, this extensively researched report includes firsthand interviews with key witnesses and explores a controversy that has received scant media attention.
  • Votes: 3

    How to Argue and Win Every Time

    by Gerry Spence

    A noted attorney gives detailed instructions on winning arguments, emphasizing such points as learning to speak with the body, avoiding being blinding by brilliance, and recognizing the power of words as a weapon. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    Bonner Incident

    by Thomas A Watson

    Nelson, Michelle, and their family have made it to the farm, having narrowly avoided "detainment." Along with their circle of friends, they quickly set about reinforcing their home for the inevitable outbreak of the next civil war. While the corrupt American government hunts down free Americans, the family is caught in the line of fire. Forced to choose between fight and flight, the Patriots Reborn must risk everything to survive in a world filled with chaos. In this new world, no one is safe. Join Nelson, Michelle, Gerald, and the rest of their clan in the harrowing second installment of Forgotten Forbidden America: Patriots Reborn.
  • Votes: 3

    Ready Player One

    by Ernest Cline

    Immersing himself in a mid-21st-century technological virtual utopia to escape an ugly real world of famine, poverty and disease, Wade Watts joins an increasingly violent effort to solve a series of puzzles by the virtual world's super-wealthy creator, who has promised that the winner will be his heir. (This book was previously listed in Forecast.)
  • Votes: 3

    The Book that Made Your World

    by Vishal Mangalwadi

    Understand where we came from. Whether you're an avid student of the Bible or a skeptic of its relevance, The Book That Made Your World will transform your perception of its influence on virtually every facet of Western civilization. Indian philosopher Vishal Mangalwadi reveals the personal motivation that fueled his own study of the Bible and systematically illustrates how its precepts became the framework for societal structure throughout the last millennium. From politics and science, to academia and technology, the Bible's sacred copy became the key that unlocked the Western mind. Through Mangalwadi's wide-ranging and fascinating investigation, you'll discover: What triggered the West's passion for scientific, medical, and technological advancement How the biblical notion of human dignity informs the West's social structure and how it intersects with other worldviews How the Bible created a fertile ground for women to find social and economic empowerment How the Bible has uniquely equipped the West to cultivate compassion, human rights, prosperity, and strong families The role of the Bible in the transformation of education How the modern literary notion of a hero has been shaped by the Bible's archetypal protagonist Journey with Mangalwadi as he examines the origins of a civilization's greatness and the misguided beliefs that threaten to unravel its progress. Learn how the Bible transformed the social, political, and religious institutions that have sustained Western culture for the past millennium, and discover how secular corruption endangers the stability and longevity of Western civilization. Endorsements: “This is an extremely significant piece of work with huge global implications. Vishal brings a timely message.” (Ravi Zacharias, author, Walking from East to West and Beyond Opinion) “In polite society, the mere mention of the Bible often introduces a certain measure of anxiety. A serious discussion on the Bible can bring outright contempt. Therefore, it is most refreshing to encounter this engaging and informed assessment of the Bible’s profound impact on the modern world. Where Bloom laments the closing of the American mind, Mangalwadi brings a refreshing optimism.” (Stanley Mattson, founder and president, C. S. Lewis Foundation) “Vishal Mangalwadi recounts history in very broad strokes, always using his cross-cultural perspectives for highlighting the many benefits of biblical principles in shaping civilization.” (George Marsden, professor, University of Notre Dame; author, Fundamentalism and American Culture)
  • Votes: 3

    Dark Matter

    by Blake Crouch

    A mindbending, relentlessly surprising thriller from the author of the bestselling Wayward Pines trilogy. “Are you happy with your life?” Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason’s never met smiles down at him and says, “Welcome back, my friend.” In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor, but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable. Something impossible. Is it this world or the other that’s the dream? And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could’ve imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe. Dark Matter is a brilliantly plotted tale that is at once sweeping and intimate, mind-bendingly strange and profoundly human—a relentlessly surprising science-fiction thriller about choices, paths not taken, and how far we’ll go to claim the lives we dream of.
  • Votes: 3

    Cosmic Trigger I

    by Robert Anton Wilson

    The book that made it all happen! Wilson at his classic best. "Cosmic Trigger" deals with a process of deliberating induced brain change. Explore Sirius, Synchronicities, and Secret Societies; Crowley, Christ and Karma; Dope, Death and Divinity. And, of course, The Illuminati. Wilson has been called "One of the leading thinkers of the Modern Age." The critics rave!!
  • Votes: 3

    Warning to the West

    by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

    ‘Can one part of humanity learn from the bitter experience of another or can it not? Is it possible or impossible to warn someone of danger...to assess soberly the worldwide menace that threatens to swallow the whole world? I was swallowed myself. I have been in the dragon’s belly, in its red-hot innards. It was unable to digest me and threw me up. I have come to you as a witness to what it is like there, in the dragon’s belly’ During 1975 and 1976, Nobel Prize-winner Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn embarked on a series of speeches across America and Britain that would shock and scandalise both countries. His message: the West was veering towards moral and spiritual bankruptcy, and with it the world’s one hope against tyranny and totalitarianism. From Solzhenitsyn’s warnings about the allure of communism, to his rebuke that the West should not abandon its age-old concepts of ‘good’ and ‘evil’, the speeches collected in Warning to the West provide insight into Solzhenitsyn’s uncompromising moral vision. Read today, their message remains as powerfully urgent as when Solzhenitsyn first delivered them.
  • Votes: 3

    Antagonists in the Church

    by Kenneth C. Haugk

  • Votes: 3

    The Art of Happiness

    by Dalai Lama

  • Votes: 3

    School of Darkness

    by Bella V. Dodd

  • Votes: 3

    Anthem

    by Ayn Rand

    In a future world, only one man dares to think, strive, and love as an individual in the midst of a paralyzing collective humanity.
  • Votes: 3

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 3

    Know My Name

    by Chanel Miller

    THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING MEMOIR 'Incredibly moving and haunting' Roxane Gay 'I read this book cover to cover and it stunned me' Jia Tolentino 'Powerful, honest and necessary' Marian Keyes 'To girls everywhere, I am with you. On nights when you feel alone, I am with you. When people doubt you or dismiss you, I am with you. I fought every day for you. So never stop fighting, I believe you.' Chanel Miller's story changed our world forever. In 2016 Brock Turner was sentenced to just six months in jail after he was caught sexually assaulting her on Stanford's campus. His light sentencing, and Chanel's victim impact statement, which was read by eleven million people in four days, sparked international outrage and action. Know My Name is an intimate, profoundly moving memoir that exposes a patriarchal culture biased to protect perpetrators, a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable, and ultimately shines with the courage required to move through suffering and live a full and beautiful life. Entwining pain, resilience, and humour, this breath-taking memoir will stand as a modern classic. 'I could not put this phenomenal book down' Glennon Doyle, bestselling author of UNTAMED 'To read Know My Name inspires hope' Guardian 'A searing, beautiful book' Sunday Times 'Know My Name marks the debut of a gifted young writer. Miller's words are purpose. They are maps. And she is a treasure who has prevailed' New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Unintended Consequences

    by John Ross

    A rising by the pro-gun lobby brings the government to its knees. The story begins when Henry Bowman, a geologist in Iowa, fires on federal agents, thinking they are terrorists. The conflict escalates, agents and congressmen die, and to bring peace the president agrees to repeal anti-gun laws and pardon the rebels.
  • Votes: 3

    Adventures of Huckleberry Fin

    by Mark Twain

  • Votes: 3

    Many Lives, Many Masters

    by Brian L. Weiss

  • Votes: 3

    The Revolution

    by Ron Paul

    This Much Is True: You Have Been Lied To. The government is expanding. Taxes are increasing. More senseless wars are being planned. Inflation is ballooning. Our basic freedoms are disappearing. The Founding Fathers didn't want any of this. In fact, they said so quite clearly in the Constitution of the United States of America. Unfortunately, that beautiful, ingenious, and revolutionary document is being ignored more and more in Washington. If we are to enjoy peace, freedom, and prosperity once again, we absolutely must return to the principles upon which America was founded. But finally, there is hope . . . In THE REVOLUTION, Texas congressman and presidential candidate Ron Paul has exposed the core truths behind everything threatening America, from the real reasons behind the collapse of the dollar and the looming financial crisis, to terrorism and the loss of our precious civil liberties. In this book, Ron Paul provides answers to questions that few even dare to ask. Despite a media blackout, this septuagenarian physician-turned-congressman sparked a movement that has attracted a legion of young, dedicated, enthusiastic supporters . . . a phenomenon that has amazed veteran political observers and made more than one political rival envious. Candidates across America are already running as "Ron Paul Republicans." "Dr. Paul cured my apathy," says a popular campaign sign. THE REVOLUTION may cure yours as well.
  • Votes: 3

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    The tragic story of the friendship between two migrant workers, George and mentally retarded Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm
  • Votes: 3

    One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 3

    The Republic

    by Plato

  • Votes: 3

    Needful Things

    by Stephen King

    Set in the fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine Master storyteller Stephen King presents the classic #1 New York Times bestseller about a mysterious store than can sell you whatever you desire—but not without exacting a terrible price in return. The town of Castle Rock, Maine has seen its fair share of oddities over the years, but nothing is as peculiar as the little curio shop that’s just opened for business here. Its mysterious proprietor, Leland Gaunt, seems to have something for everyone out on display at Needful Things…interesting items that run the gamut from worthless to priceless. Nothing has a price tag in this place, but everything is certainly for sale. The heart’s desire for any resident of Castle Rock can easily be found among the curiosities…in exchange for a little money and—at the specific request of Leland Gaunt—a whole lot of menace against their fellow neighbors. Everyone in town seems willing to make a deal at Needful Things, but the devil is in the details. And no one takes heed of the little sign hanging on the wall: Caveat emptor. In other words, let the buyer beware…
  • Votes: 3

    Time Enough for Love

    by Robert A. Heinlein

    Time Enough for Love is the capstone and crowning achievement of Heinleins famous Future History series.
  • Votes: 3

    Outwitting the Devil

    by Napoleon Hill

    Originally written in 1938 but never published due to its controversial nature, an insightful guide reveals the seven principles of good that will allow anyone to triumph over the obstacles that must be faced in reaching personal goals.
  • Votes: 3

    The Urantia Book

    by Multiple Authors

    The Urantia Book provides a comprehensive background for understanding the physical, mindal, and spiritual structure of the universe--a universe that is spirit dominated and personality managed. This textbook, The Urantia Book Simplified, clarifies the meanings of The Urantia Book for beginning readers.
  • Votes: 3

    Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life

    by Wayne W. Dr. Dyer

    Dyer has reviewed hundreds of translations of the Tao Te Ching and presents 81 distinct essays on how to apply the ancient wisdom of Lao-tzu to today's modern world.
  • Votes: 3

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    by John Kennedy Toole

    'My favourite book of all time... it stays with you long after you have read it - for your whole life, in fact' Billy Connolly A monument to sloth, rant and contempt, a behemoth of fat, flatulence and furious suspicion of anything modern - this is Ignatius J. Reilly of New Orleans, noble crusader against a world of dunces. The ordinary folk of New Orleans seem to think he is unhinged. Ignatius ignores them, heaving his vast bulk through the city's fleshpots in a noble crusade against vice, modernity and ignorance. But his momma has a nasty surprise in store for him: Ignatius must get a job. Undaunted, he uses his new-found employment to further his mission - and now he has a pirate costume and a hot-dog cart to do it with... Never published during his lifetime, John Kennedy Toole's hilarious satire, A Confederacy of Dunces is a Don Quixote for the modern age, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes a foreword by Walker Percy. 'A pungent work of slapstick, satire and intellectual incongruities ... it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue' The New York Times
  • Votes: 3

    Flowers for Algernon

    by Daniel Keyes

    The Heinemann Plays series offers contemporary drama and classic plays in durable classroom editions. Many have large casts and an equal mix of boy and girl parts. This play is a dramatization of Daniel Keyes's story about a retarded adult who desperately wants to be able to read and write.
  • Votes: 3

    The Good Earth

    by Pearl S. Buck

  • Votes: 3

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 3

    Autobiography of a Yogi

    by Yogananda (Paramahansa)

  • Votes: 3

    Good Calories, Bad Calories

    by Gary Taubes

  • Votes: 3

    Liberty and Tyranny

    by Mark R. Levin

    Don’t miss syndicated radio host and author Mark Levin's #1 New York Times acclaimed and longtime bestselling manifesto for the conservative movement. When nationally syndicated radio host Mark R. Levin’s Liberty and Tyranny appeared in the early months of the Obama presidency, Americans responded by making his clarion call for a new era in conservatism a #1 New York Times bestseller for an astounding twelve weeks. As provocative, well-reasoned, robust, and informed as his on-air commentary, with his love of our country and the legacy of our Founding Fathers reflected on every page, Levin’s galvanizing narrative provides a philosophical, historical, and practical framework for revitalizing the conservative vision and ensuring the preservation of American society. In the face of the modern liberal assault on Constitution-based values, an attack that has resulted in a federal government that is a massive, unaccountable conglomerate, the time for reinforcing the intellectual and practical case for conservatism is now. In a series of powerful essays, Levin lays out how conservatives can counter the tyrannical liberal corrosion that has filtered into every timely issue affecting our daily lives, from the economy to health care, global warming to immigration, and more.
  • Votes: 3

    Tuesdays with Morrie

    by Mitch Albom

    Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague? Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it? For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Mitch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final 'class': lessons in how to live. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world. Praise for Tuesdays with Morrie: 'This is a true story that shines and leaves you forever warmed by its afterglow' Amy Tan 'A moving tribute to embracing life' Glasgow Herald 'An extraordinary contribution to the literature of death' Boston Globe 'A beautifully written book of great clarity and wisdom that lovingly captures the simplicity beyond life's complexities' M Scott Peck
  • Votes: 3

    Go Ask Alice (Anonymous Diaries)

    by Anonymous

    Three riveting, life-changing diaries of addiction and heartbreak in the tradition of Go Ask Alice are now available in one collectible boxed set. Lucy was a good girl, living a good life. One night, one party, changed everything. Ana was an athlete with a bright future. She only wanted to lose a few pounds. David had everything: family, friends, a girlfriend, an undefeated football team...and a secret that was destroying him. Read their devastating stories in their own words, in the diaries they left behind.
  • Votes: 3

    You Are the Placebo

    by Joe Dr. Dispenza

  • Votes: 3

    Be Here Now

    by Ram Dass

    This book is enhanced with content such as audio or video, resulting in a large file that may take longer to download than expected. The enhanced edition of Be Here Now includes: Two guided video meditations, 30 minutes in length * Twenty minute video retrospective of Ram Dass' spiritual journey *The first chapter of Ram Dass' new book, Be Love Now
  • Votes: 2

    Day of Reckoning

    by Patrick J. Buchanan

    America is coming apart at the seams. Forces foreign and domestic seek an end to U.S. sovereignty and independence. Before us looms the prospect of an America breaking up along the lines of race, ethnicity, class and culture. In Day of Reckoning, Pat Buchanan reveals the true existential crisis of the nation and shows how President Bush's post-9/11 conversion to an ideology of "democratism" led us to the precipice of strategic disaster abroad and savage division at home. Ideology, writes Buchanan, is a Golden Calf, a false god, a secular religion that seeks vainly, like Marxism, to create a paradise on earth. While free enterprise is good, the worship of a "free trade" that is destroying the dollar, de-industrializing America, and ending our economic independence, is cult madness. While America must stand for freedom and self-determination, the use of U.S. troops to police the planet or serve as advance guard of some "world democratic revolution" is, as Iraq shows, imperial folly that will bring ruin to the republic. While America should speak out for human rights, the idea that we get in Russia's face and hand out moral report cards to every nation on earth is moral arrogance. While we have benefited from immigration and the melting pot worked with millions of Europeans, the idea we can import endless millions of aliens, legal and illegal, from every culture, clime, creed, and continent on earth, and still remain a country, is absurd. To save America the first imperative is to remove from power the ideologues of both parties who have nearly killed our country. In his final chapter, Buchanan lays out ideas to prevent the end of America. He calls for a bottom-up review of all of America's Cold War commitments, a ten-point program to secure America's borders, ideas to halt the erosion of our national sovereignty and restore our manufacturing preeminence and economic independence, and a formula for finding the way to a cold peace in the culture wars. Buchanan offers a radical but necessary program, for neither party is addressing the real crisis of America -- whether we survive as one nation and people, or disintegrate into what Theodore Roosevelt called a "tangle of squabbling nationalities" and not a nation at all. IN THIS EYE-OPENING BOOK, PAT BUCHANAN REVEALS THE PERILOUS PATH OUR NATION HAS TAKEN: - Pax Americana -- the era of U.S. global dominance -- is over. - A struggle for world hegemony among the United States, China, a resurgent Russia and radical Islam has begun. - Torn apart by a culture war, America has begun to Balkanize and break down along class, cultural, ethnic, and racial lines. - Free trade is hollowing out U.S. industry, destroying the dollar, and plunging the country into permanent dependency and unpayable debt. - One of every six U.S. manufacturing jobs vanished under Bush. - The Third World invasion through Mexico is a graver threat to U.S. survival than anything happening in Afghanistan or Iraq. ...IS OUR DAY OF RECKONING JUST AHEAD?
  • Votes: 2

    In the case of good books , the point is not to see how many of them you can get through , but rather how many can get through to you

    by home arts

    You can go after the job you want—and get it! You can take the job you have—and improve it! You can take any situation—and make it work for you! Dale Carnegie’s rock-solid, time-tested advice has carried countless people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. One of the most groundbreaking and timeless bestsellers of all time, How to Win Friends & Influence People will teach you: -Six ways to make people like you -Twelve ways to win people to your way of thinking -Nine ways to change people without arousing resentment And much more! Achieve your maximum potential—a must-read for the twenty-first century with more than 15 million copies sold!
  • Votes: 2

    God Emperor of Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Book Four in the Magnificent Dune Chronicles--the Bestselling Science Fiction Adventure of All Time Millennia have passed on Arrakis, and the once-desert planet is green with life. Leto Atreides, the son of the world's savior, the Emperor Paul Muad'Dib, is still alive but far from human. To preserve humanity's future, he sacrificed his own by merging with a sandworm, granting him near immortality as God Emperor of Dune for the past thirty-five hundred years. Leto's rule is not a benevolent one. His transformation has made not only his appearance but his morality inhuman. A rebellion, led by Siona, a member of the Atreides family, has risen to oppose the despot's rule. But Siona is unaware that Leto's vision of a Golden Path for humanity requires her to fulfill a destiny she never wanted--or could possibly conceive....
  • Votes: 2

    Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

    by Frans de Waal

  • Votes: 2

    Power of Kabbalah

    by From the Teachings of Rav Berg

  • Votes: 2

    The Beginning of Infinity

    by David Deutsch

    A pioneer in the field of quantum computation explores the nature and progress of knowledge in the universe, arguing that humans are subject to the laws of physics but unlimited by what can be understood, controlled, and achieved.
  • Votes: 2

    Beyond Good & Evil

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

    Learn how technological disruption has scaled the business for good movement to a new achievable reality and discover how you can do well by doing good with your business too.
  • Votes: 2

    What to Expect When You're Expecting

    by Heidi Murkoff

    With 18.5 million copies in print, What to Expect When You're Expecting is read by 93% of women who read a pregnancy book and was named one of the 'Most Influential Books of the Last 25 Years' by USA Today. This cover-to-cover (including the cover!) new edition is filled with must-have information, advice, insight, and tips for a new generation of mums and dads. With What to Expect's trademark warmth, empathy, and humour, it answers every conceivable question expectant parents could have, including dozens of new ones based on the ever-changing pregnancy and birthing practices and choices they face. Advice for dads is fully integrated throughout the book. All medical coverage is completely updated, including the latest on prenatal screening and the safety of medications during pregnancy, as well as a brand-new section on postpartum birth control. Current lifestyle trends are incorporated, too: juice bars, raw diets, e-cigarettes, push presents, baby bump posting, the lowdown on omega-3 fatty acids, grass-fed and organic, health food fads, and GMOs. Plus expanded coverage of IVF pregnancy, multiple pregnancies, breastfeeding while pregnant, water and home births, and cesarean trends (including VBACs and 'gentle cesareans').
  • Votes: 2

    The Little Flowers of St. Francis of Assisi

    by Ungolino di Monte Santa Maria

    This is the extended and annotated edition including * an extensive biographical annotation about the author and his life The Little Flowers of St. Francis (Italian Fioretti di San Francesco) is a florilegium (excerpts of his body of work), divided into 53 short chapters, on the life of Saint Francis of Assisi which was composed at the end of the 14th century. The anonymous Italian text, almost certainly by a Tuscan author, is a version of the Latin Actus beati Francisci et sociorum eius, of which the earliest extant manuscript is one of 1390 AD. Luke Wadding ascribes the text to Fra. Ugolino da Santa Maria, whose name occurs three times in the Actus.
  • Votes: 2

    The Choice

    by Edith Eva Eger

    A powerful, moving memoir, and a practical guide to healing, written by Dr. Edie Eger, an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor help her treat patients suffering from traumatic stress disorders.
  • Votes: 2

    The Veldt (Tale Blazers

    by Ray D Bradbury

    Presents Bradbury's short story about a house whose advanced technology first pleases then increasingly terrifies its occupants, accompanied by questions and exercises about the text.
  • Votes: 2

    Physics of the Impossible

    by Michio Kaku

  • Votes: 2

    H Thomas Johnson / Relevance Lost The Rise and Fall of Management Accounting

    by H. Thomas Johnson and Robert S. Kaplan

    Traces the history of the role of management accounting in business and argues that present management accounting systems have become obsolescent.
  • Votes: 2

    Marabou Stork Nightmares

    by Irvine Welsh

    Roy Strang is engaged in a strange quest in a surrealist South Africa. His mission is to eradicate an evil predator-scavenger bird, the marabou stork, before it drives away the peace-loving flamingo from the picturesque Lake Torto. But behind this world lies another: the world of Roy's bizarre family, the Scottish housing scheme in which he grew up, his mundane job, a disastrous emigration to Africa, and his youthful life of brutality with a gang of soccer casuals. As one world crashes into the other, this potentially charming story of ornithological goodwill mutates into a filthy tale of violence, abuse and redemption.
  • Votes: 2

    Word Up

    by Dani Katz

    A vital tool for these über transformational times, Word Up: Little Languaging Hacks for Big Change (previously published as The New P. Handbook Vol. 1) is chock-full of simple communication tools and tweaks with massive evolutionary implications. Informed by the integrated understanding that language is the fundamental building block of our entire known reality, this guide offers visionary insight into the vibrational codes embedded within our words. The work sheds timely and relevant light upon the ways we unconsciously language our reality, while offering easy, accessible techniques to uplevel our communication patterns in service to a unified, abundant all of us, and a peaceful, thriving planet Earth.
  • Votes: 2

    The Breakthrough Experience

    by John F. Demartini

    This book is about breaking through the barriers that keep us from experiencing our true nature as light. It presents inspiring science and philosophy in a way that is completely accessible to anyone, to reveal and explore the universal laws and principles that underlie our very existence. Those principles are set forth in extraordinary but true stories of ordinary people having astonishing and moving life experiences, and they make the most profound concepts easily understood. Most important, it is an extremely real and practical manual for understanding why we live the way we do, and how to transform our lives into our highest vision. You will learn a formula to manifest your dreams, discover the secrets of opening your heart beyond anything you have imagined, find out how to increase love and appreciation for every aspect of your life, receive profound insights on how to create more fulfilling and caring relationships, reawaken your birthright as a true genius, transcend the fears and illusions surrounding the myth of death, and reconnect with your true mission and purpose on Earth. That is all true, but mainly, this book will deeply touch and inspire you with respect to your own greatness and potential—and the magnificence of every single human soul. This is not just a book, it is what the title implies—an Experience—and it is impossible to go through it without being moved, challenged, and changed. Welcome to . . . The Breakthrough Experience.
  • Votes: 2

    And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer

    by Fredrik Backman

    Grandpa and Ted do not have a lot in common and Ted has waited a longtime to be accepted by his father. It is Grandpa and Noah that has a bond: the love of mathematics. However the three must learn say good-bye. 0.
  • Votes: 2

    Journey to Ixtlan

    by Carlos Castaneda

    Originally drawn to Yaqui Indian spiritual leader don Juan Matus for his knowledge of psychotropic plants, bestselling author Carlos Castaneda immersed himself in the sorcerer’s magical world. Ten years after his first encounter with the shaman, Castaneda examines his field notes and comes to understand what don Juan knew all along—psychotropic plants are merely a means to understanding alternative realities that one cannot fully embrace on one’s own. Journey to Ixtlan introduces these clear new ideas—omitted from Castaneda’s classic volumes The Teachings of Don Juan and A Separate Reality—to the reader for the first time. Castaneda explores, as he comes to experience it himself, his own final voyage into the teachings of don Juan, and shares with us what it is like to truly "stop the world" and perceive reality on his own terms.
  • Votes: 2

    How To Win Friends and Influence People

    by Dale Carnegie

    Provides a new hardcover edition of the classic best-selling self-help book, which includes principles that can be applied to both business and life itself, in a book that focuses on how to best affectively communicate with people.
  • Votes: 2

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Bantam Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

  • Votes: 2

    The Odyssey

    by Homer

  • Votes: 2

    Honorable Mention (Honor Series)

    by Robert N. Macomber

    Robert Macomber's Honor series of naval fiction follows the life and career of Peter Wake in the U.S. Navy during the tumultuous years from 1863 to 1901. Honorable Mention is the third in the series. It's the fall of 1864. The age of sail is passing and Lt. Peter Wake finds himself again in Key West, but this time in command of a steamer, the U.S.S. Hunt. He quickly plunges into action as he chases a mystery ship during a tropical storm off Cuba, deals with a seductively dangerous woman during a mission in enemy territory ashore, confronts death to liberate an escaping slave ship, and comes face to face with the enemy's most powerful warship in Havana's harbor. Wake is no longer alone in this dangerous world. His wife Linda, hiding in a pro-Union camp on Useppa Island, gives him a future to look forward to as the war nears its end. But then in January 1866, as most Union soldiers are preparing to go home, a powerful ocean raider shows up in a remote corner of the Caribbean, and Wake finds that for some the war is not over yet. The first in the series, At the Edge of Honor, received the 2003 Patrick D. Smith Literary Award as Best Historical Novel of Florida, and the second, Point of Honor, was named the 2003 recipient the John Esten Cook Literary Award for Best Work in Southern Fiction. Next in series > > See all of the books in this series
  • Votes: 2

    Angela's Ashes

    by Frank McCourt

  • Votes: 2

    Digest of the Divine Law

    by Howard B. Rand

  • Votes: 2

    The Conquest of Happiness

    by Bertrand Russell

  • Votes: 2

    An American Dream

    by Norman Mailer

    In this wild battering ram of a novel, which was originally published to vast controversy in 1965, Norman Mailer creates a character who might be a fictional precursor of the philosopher-killer he would later profile in The Executioner’s Song. As Stephen Rojack, a decorated war hero and former congressman who murders his wife in a fashionable New York City high-rise, runs amok through the city in which he was once a privileged citizen, Mailer peels away the layers of our social norms to reveal a world of pure appetite and relentless cruelty. One part Nietzsche, one part de Sade, and one part Charlie Parker, An American Dream grabs the reader by the throat and refuses to let go. Praise for An American Dream “Perhaps the only serious New York novel since The Great Gatsby.”—Joan Didion, National Review “A devil’s encyclopedia of our secret visions and desires . . . the expression of a devastatingly alive and original creative mind.”—Life “A work of fierce concentration . . . perfectly, and often brilliantly, realistic [with] a pattern of remarkable imaginative coherence and intensity.”—Harper’s “At once violent, educated, and cool . . . This is our history as Hawthorne might have written it.”—Commentary Praise for Norman Mailer “[Norman Mailer] loomed over American letters longer and larger than any other writer of his generation.”—The New York Times “A writer of the greatest and most reckless talent.”—The New Yorker “Mailer is indispensable, an American treasure.”—The Washington Post “A devastatingly alive and original creative mind.”—Life “Mailer is fierce, courageous, and reckless and nearly everything he writes has sections of headlong brilliance.”—The New York Review of Books “The largest mind and imagination [in modern] American literature . . . Unlike just about every American writer since Henry James, Mailer has managed to grow and become richer in wisdom with each new book.”—Chicago Tribune “Mailer is a master of his craft. His language carries you through the story like a leaf on a stream.”—The Cincinnati Post
  • Votes: 2

    The Progressive Era

    by Murray N Rothbard

    The current relationship between the modern state and the economy has its roots in the Progressive Era. -- From the Introduction by Patrick Newman Progressivism brought the triumph of institutionalized racism, the disfranchising of blacks in the South, the cutting off of immigration, the building up of trade unions by the federal government into a tripartite big government, big business, big unions alliance, the glorifying of military virtues and conscription, and a drive for American expansion abroad. In short, the Progressive Era ushered the modern American politico-economic system into being. -- From the Preface by Murray N. Rothbard.
  • Votes: 2

    Foucault's Pendulum

    by Umberto Eco

  • Votes: 2

    Get People to Do What You Want

    by Maryann Karinch Gregory Hartley

    In business, school, romance, or your neighborhood, it is valuable to know what attracts people, what repels them, and what makes them tick. How do people see you? And how do you see others? In Get People to Do What You Want, you'll find the practical answers to these questions and in the process, discover how to win people over. You will gain an upper hand in your interaction with others that translates into higher starting salaries, greater productivity, and better relationships in which you are never the victim. You'll learn about: *One-on-one interaction. *Group dynamics. *The projection of leadership. *Instinctual trust and mistrust of others. *Other elements of human behavior that must be understood to win people over for more than a few moments. Get People to Do What You Want is the perfect, modern complement to Dale Carnegie's 1937 classic work on the topic. In fact, you might think of them as the Old and New Testaments of interpersonal skills. Interrogation is about getting people who do not like you (the enemy) to side with you long enough to get your desired outcome. It means motivating human behavior to create a bond that allows someone who may dislike you to feel obliged to cooperate with you. This book teaches you skills honed in years of interrogation and expanded by use in the business world. By combining these skills with your unique background, you will easily attract the people you want and get rid of the ones you don't.
  • Votes: 2

    Life at the Bottom

    by Theodore Dalrymple

    A searing account of life in the underclass and why it persists as it does, written by a British psychiatrist.
  • Votes: 2

    Usury in Christendom

    by Michael Hoffman

  • Votes: 2

    Band of Brothers

    by Stephen E. Ambrose

  • Votes: 2

    Dear Jillian - Vision Therapy Changed My Life Too

  • Votes: 2

    Getting Things Done

    by David Allen

  • Votes: 2

    Myths to Live By

    by Joseph Campbell

    Examines the myth-making process since primitive times to demonstrate the ways in which specific myths reflect human needs
  • Votes: 2

    Whoever Fights Monsters

    by Robert K. Ressler

    LEARN THE TRUE STORY OF ONE OF THE FBI PROFILERS WHO COINED THE PHRASE "SERIAL KILLER" Face-to-face with some of America's most terrifying killers, FBI veteran Robert K. Ressler learned how to identify the unknown monsters who walk among us -- and put them behind bars. In Whoever Fights Monsters, Ressler—the inspiration for the character Agent Bill Tench in David Fincher's hit TV show Mindhunter—shows how he was able to track down some of the country's most brutal murderers. Ressler, the FBI Agent and ex-Army CID colonel who advised Thomas Harris on The Silence of the Lambs, used the evidence at a crime scene to put together a psychological profile of the killers. From the victims they choose to the way they kill to the often grotesque souvenirs they take with them—Ressler unlocks the identities of these vicious killers. And with his discovery that serial killers share certain violent behaviors, Ressler goes behind prison walls to hear bizarre first-hand stories from countless convicted murderers, including Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy; Edmund Kemper; and Son of Sam. Getting inside the mind of a killer to understand how and why he kills is one of the FBI's most effective ways of helping police bring in killers who are still at large. Join Ressler as he takes you on the hunt for the world's most dangerous psychopaths in this terrifying journey you will not forget.
  • Votes: 2

    James and the Giant Peach

    by Roald Dahl

  • Votes: 2

    Eat To Win

    by Robert Haas MS

    The author of "Eat to Win" builds on the wisdom of his earlier work, offering a plan for permanent weight loss that is based on the control of the body's levels of glycogen.
  • Votes: 2

    Where the Wild Things Are

    by Maurice Sendak

    Max is sent to bed without supper and imagines sailing away to the land of Wild Things,where he is made king.
  • Votes: 2

    The Omnivore's Dilemma

    by Michael Pollan

    Pollan writes about the ecology of the food humans eat and why--what it is, in fact, that we are eating. Discussing industrial farming, organic food, and what it is like to hunt and gather food, this is a surprisingly honest and self-aware account of the evolution of the modern diet.
  • Votes: 2

    Sapiens

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    **THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLER** 'Interesting and provocative... It gives you a sense of how briefly we've been on this Earth' Barack Obama What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? Yuval Noah Harari challenges everything we know about being human in the perfect read for these unprecedented times. Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it: us. In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. 'I would recommend Sapiens to anyone who's interested in the history and future of our species' Bill Gates **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 2

    New Seeds of Contemplation

    by Thomas Merton

  • Votes: 2

    Never Split the Difference

    by VOSS/RAZ

    'A master of persuasion.' Forbes'This book blew my mind.' Adam Grant, bestselling author of OriginalsA former FBI hostage negotiator offers a new, field-tested approach to negotiating - effective in any situation. After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a kidnapping negotiator brought him face-to-face with bank robbers, gang leaders and terrorists. Never Split the Differencetakes you inside his world of high-stakes negotiations, revealing the nine key principles that helped Voss and his colleagues succeed when it mattered the most - when people?s lives were at stake. Rooted in the real-life experiences of an intelligence professional at the top of his game, Never Split the Differencewill give you the competitive edge in any discussion.'Filled with insights that apply to everyday negotiations.' Business Insider'A stupendous book.' The Week'It's rare that a book is so gripping and entertaining while still being actionable and applicable.' Inc.
  • Votes: 2

    Industrial Society and Its Future

    by Theodore John Kaczynski

    The Unabomber's Manifesto reprinted from the September 19, 1995, publication in The New York Times.
  • Votes: 2

    Bonhoeffer

  • Votes: 2

    Walden

    by Henry David Thoreau

  • Votes: 2

    A Separate Peace

    by John Knowles

    AS HEARD ON BBC RADIO 4 'A GOOD READ' 'A novel that made such a deep impression on me at sixteen that I can still conjure the atmosphere in my fifties: of yearning, infatuation mingled indistinguishably with envy, and remorse' Lionel Shriver An American coming-of-age tale during a period when the entire country was losing its innocence to the second world war. Set at a boys' boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.
  • Votes: 2

    Amusing Ourselves to Death

    by Neil Postman

    Examines the ways in which television has transformed public discourse--in politics, education, religion, science, and elsewhere--into a form of entertainment that undermines exposition, explanation and knowledge, in a special anniversary edition of the classic critique of the influence of the mass media on a democratic society. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    Free to Choose

    by Milton Friedman

  • Votes: 2

    The Anarchist Handbook

    by Michael Malice

  • Votes: 2

    Treasure Island (Signet Classics)

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Votes: 2

    The New Right

    by Michael Malice

    The definitive firsthand account of the movement that permanently broke the American political consensus. What do internet trolls, economic populists, white nationalists, techno-anarchists and Alex Jones have in common? Nothing, except for an unremitting hatred of evangelical progressivism and the so-called “Cathedral” from whence it pours forth. Contrary to the dissembling explanations from the corporate press, this movement did not emerge overnight—nor are its varied subgroups in any sense interchangeable with one another. As united by their opposition as they are divided by their goals, the members of the New Right are willfully suspicious of those in the mainstream who would seek to tell their story. Fortunately, author Michael Malice was there from the very inception, and in The New Right recounts their tale from the beginning. Malice provides an authoritative and unbiased portrait of the New Right as a movement of ideas—ideas that he traces to surprisingly diverse ideological roots. From the heterodox right wing of the 1940s to the Buchanan/Rothbard alliance of 1992 and all the way through to what he witnessed personally in Charlottesville, The New Right is a thorough firsthand accounting of the concepts, characters and chronology of this widely misunderstood sociopolitical phenomenon. Today’s fringe is tomorrow’s orthodoxy. As entertaining as it is informative, The New Right is required reading for every American across the spectrum who would like to learn more about the past, present and future of our divided political culture.
  • Votes: 2

    The Mastery of Love

    by Don Miguel Ruiz

  • Votes: 2

    The Raven

    by Edgar Allan Poe

  • Votes: 2

    Edgar Allan Poe

    by Edgar Allan Poe

    The Portable Edgar Allan Poe compiles Poe's greatest writings: tales of fantasy, terror, death, revenge, murder, and mystery, including "The Pit and the Pendulum," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Cask of Amontillado," "The Masque of the Red Death," and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," the world's first detective story. In addition, this volume offers letters, articles, criticism, visionary poetry, and a selection of random "opinions" on fancy and the imagination, music and poetry, intuition and sundry other topics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 2

    Awaken the Giant Within

    by Tony Robbins

  • Votes: 2

    The 5000 Year Leap

    by W. Cleon Skousen

    The Founding Fathers of the United States of America created the first free people in modern times. They wrote a new kind of Constitution which is now the oldest in existence. They built a new kind of commonwealth designed as a model for the whole human race. They believed it was thoroughly possible to create a new kind of civilization; giving freedom, equality, and justice to all. The Founders created a new cultural climate that gave wings to the human spirit. They built a free-enterprise culture to encourage industry and prosperity. They gave humanity the needed ingredients for a gigantic 5,000-year leap in which more progress has been made in the past 200 years than all of prior recorded human history. All of this came about because of 28 basic principles the Founders discovered, upon which all free nations must be built in order to succeed. This eBook includes the original index, footnotes, table of contents and page numbering from the printed format, and also new illustrations.
  • Votes: 2

    The Celestine Prophecy

    by James Redfield

  • Votes: 2

    The Gift of Fear

    by Gavin de Becker

    In this work, Gavin de Becker shows you how to spot even subtle signs of danger - before it's too late. Shattering the myth that most violent acts are unpredictable, de Becker offers specific ways to protect yourself and those you love, including ideas on how to act when approached by a stranger.
  • Votes: 2

    I Am David

    by Anne Holm

    Having escaped from the eastern European concentration camp where he has spent most of his life, twelve-year-old David struggles to cope with an entirely strange world as he flees northward to freedom in Denmark. Originally published as North to Freedom. An ALA Notable Book. Simultaneous.
  • Votes: 2

    Blink

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 2

    The Five People You Meet in Heaven

    by Mitch Albom

  • Votes: 2

    Extreme Ownership

    by Jocko Willink

    An updated edition of the blockbuster bestselling leadership book that took America and the world by storm, two U.S. Navy SEAL officers who led the most highly decorated special operations unit of the Iraq War demonstrate how to apply powerful leadership principles from the battlefield to business and life. Sent to the most violent battlefield in Iraq, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin’s SEAL task unit faced a seemingly impossible mission: help U.S. forces secure Ramadi, a city deemed “all but lost.” In gripping firsthand accounts of heroism, tragic loss, and hard-won victories in SEAL Team Three’s Task Unit Bruiser, they learned that leadership—at every level—is the most important factor in whether a team succeeds or fails. Willink and Babin returned home from deployment and instituted SEAL leadership training that helped forge the next generation of SEAL leaders. After departing the SEAL Teams, they launched Echelon Front, a company that teaches these same leadership principles to businesses and organizations. From promising startups to Fortune 500 companies, Babin and Willink have helped scores of clients across a broad range of industries build their own high-performance teams and dominate their battlefields. Now, detailing the mind-set and principles that enable SEAL units to accomplish the most difficult missions in combat, Extreme Ownership shows how to apply them to any team, family or organization. Each chapter focuses on a specific topic such as Cover and Move, Decentralized Command, and Leading Up the Chain, explaining what they are, why they are important, and how to implement them in any leadership environment. A compelling narrative with powerful instruction and direct application, Extreme Ownership revolutionizes business management and challenges leaders everywhere to fulfill their ultimate purpose: lead and win.
  • Votes: 2

    The Seat of the Soul

    by Gary Zukav

    The Seat of the Soul has sold millions of copies around the globe and is a No 1 bestseller. This fully updated edition contains celebratory prefaces by Oprah Winfrey and Maya Angelou, a new Foreword by the author, as well as an extensive study guide to help readers find deeper meaning and fulfilment in their lives. This iconic book encourages you to become the authority in your own life. It will change the way you see the world, interact with other people, and understand your own actions and motivations. In it, Gary Zukav takes you on a penetrating exploration of the new phase that humanity has entered: one where harmony, cooperation, sharing and reverence for life become more important than the ability to manipulate and control. Using his scientist’s eye and philosopher’s heart, Zukav shows us how to participate fully in this evolution, enlivening our everyday activities and all our relationships with meaning and purpose.
  • Votes: 2

    The True Believer

    by Eric Hoffer

    A part of Harper Perennial’s special “Resistance Library” highlighting classic works that illuminate the “Age of Trump”: A boldly packaged reissue of the classic examination of dangerous nationalist political movements. “Its theme is political fanaticism, with which it deals severely and brilliantly.” —New Yorker A stevedore on the San Francisco docks in the 1940s, Eric Hoffer wrote philosophical treatises in his spare time while living in the railroad yards. The True Believer—the first and most famous of his books—was made into a bestseller when President Eisenhower cited it during one of the earliest television press conferences. Called a “brilliant and original inquiry” and “a genuine contribution to our social thought” by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., this landmark in the field of social psychology is completely relevant and essential for understanding the world today as it delivers a visionary, highly provocative look into the mind of the fanatic and a penetrating study of how an individual becomes one.
  • Votes: 2

    The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

    by Thomas S. Kuhn

    A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.
  • Votes: 2

    None Dare Call It Conspiracy

    by Gary Allen

    NDCC is an admirable job of amassing information to prove that communism is socialism and socialism (a plot to enslave the world) is not a movement of the downtrodden but a scheme supported and directed by the wealthiest of people. If enough Americans read and act upon NDCC, they really can save the Republic from the conspirators-whose plans for the destruction of our country are galloping fast toward completion.
  • Votes: 2

    Well Said

    by Linda Grant

  • Votes: 2

    Prometheus Rising

    by Robert Anton Wilson

  • Votes: 2

    Science of Being

    by Eugene Fersen

    SCIENCE OF BEING (also known as The Seven Lessons) takes away the veil of mystery from everything it touches and presents to the world a simple, clear, and at the same time complete interpretation of the invisible Universal Forces and Powers and their visible operation in Nature and in the lives of human beings. It explains the Fundamentals of Existence. It unveils the origin of Man and adjusts his relation to his fellow beings and to the World in which he lives. It elucidates the different Laws which underlie and govern all Creation. It unearths the limitless treasures of qualities and powers which Man possesses at his very birth, and furthermore it sets forth simple and direct methods for putting into practical daily application those wonderful Forces and Laws.
  • Votes: 2

    Breaking The Habit of Being Yourself

    by Joe Dr. Dispenza

  • Votes: 2

    Codependent No More

    by Melody Beattie

    The healing touchstone of millions, this modern classic by one of America's best-loved and most inspirational authors holds the key to understanding codependency and to unlocking its stultifying hold on your life. Is someone else's problem your problem? If, like so many others, you've lost sight of your own life in the drama of tending to someone else's, you may be codependent--and you may find yourself in this book--Codependent No More.The healing touchstone of millions, this modern classic by one of America's best-loved and most inspirational authors holds the key to understanding codependency and to unlocking its stultifying hold on your life.With instructive life stories, personal reflections, exercises, and self-tests, Codependent No More is a simple, straightforward, readable map of the perplexing world of codependency--charting the path to freedom and a lifetime of healing, hope, and happiness.Melody Beattie is the author of Beyond Codependency, The Language of Letting Go, Stop Being Mean to Yourself, The Codependent No More Workbook and Playing It by Heart.
  • Votes: 2

    Kitchen Confidential

    by Anthony Bourdain

    A New York City chef who is also a novelist recounts his experiences in the restaurant business, and exposes abuses of power, sexual promiscuity, drug use, and other secrets of life behind kitchen doors.
  • Votes: 2

    Everything Is F*cked

    by Mark Manson

  • Votes: 2

    The 4-Hour Workweek

    by Timothy Ferriss

  • Votes: 2

    End The Fed

  • Votes: 2

    The Metamorphosis

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 2

    A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 2

    What to Say When You Talk to Your Self

    by Shad Helmstetter Ph.D

    "Powerful new techniques to program your potential for success"--Cover.
  • Votes: 2

    The Ragamuffin Gospel

    by Brennan Manning

    Are you bedraggled, beat-up, burnt-out? Most of us believe in God’s grace—in theory. But somehow we can’t seem to apply it in our daily lives. We continue to see Him as a small-minded bookkeeper, tallying our failures and successes on a score sheet. Yet God gives us His grace, willingly, no matter what we’ve done. We come to Him as ragamuffins—dirty, bedraggled, and beat-up. And when we sit at His feet, He smiles upon us, the chosen objects of His “furious love.” Brennan Manning’s now-classic meditation on grace and what it takes to access it—simple honesty—has changed thousands of lives. Now with a Ragamuffin’s thirty-day spiritual journey guide, it will change yours, too. Includes a 30-Day Spiritual Journey Guide! “Brennan Manning does a masterful job of blowing the dust off of shop-worn theology and allowing God’s grace to do what only God’s grace can do—amaze.” -Max Lucado, Bestselling author of The Gift for All People
  • Votes: 2

    The Fourth Turning

    by William Strauss

    NATIONAL BESTSELLER • “A startling vision of what the cycles of history predict for the future.”—USA Weekend William Strauss and Neil Howe will change the way you see the world—and your place in it. With blazing originality, The Fourth Turning illuminates the past, explains the present, and reimagines the future. Most remarkably, it offers an utterly persuasive prophecy about how America’s past will predict its future. Strauss and Howe base this vision on a provocative theory of American history. The authors look back five hundred years and uncover a distinct pattern: Modern history moves in cycles, each one lasting about the length of a long human life, each composed of four eras—or "turnings"—that last about twenty years and that always arrive in the same order. In The Fourth Turning, the authors illustrate these cycles using a brilliant analysis of the post-World War II period. First comes a High, a period of confident expansion as a new order takes root after the old has been swept away. Next comes an Awakening, a time of spiritual exploration and rebellion against the now-established order. Then comes an Unraveling, an increasingly troubled era in which individualism triumphs over crumbling institutions. Last comes a Crisis—the Fourth Turning—when society passes through a great and perilous gate in history. Together, the four turnings comprise history's seasonal rhythm of growth, maturation, entropy, and rebirth. The Fourth Turning offers bold predictions about how all of us can prepare, individually and collectively, for America’s next rendezvous with destiny.
  • Votes: 2

    Embraced

    by Lysa TerKeurst

    Embraced is the beautiful new devotional from Lysa TerKeurst, the president of Proverbs 31 Ministries and the New York Times bestselling author of Uninvited, The Best Yes, Unglued, and Made to Crave. Embraced features 100 devotions that will resonate with women in all stages of life by giving them a godly perspective on the issues they face each day. A real embrace indicates an intimate level of closeness. It’s not a high five or a casual handshake. The best kind of embrace is when someone we know deeply loves us flings their arms wide open and pulls us in close. Our hearts were made for this kind of love and security but for many of us, we know more about the pain of heartbreak and fear than the unconditional love for which we were created.In Embraced, Lysa shares her own struggles, doubts, and heartbreaks while pointing to the Ultimate Embrace: God opening His arms wide on Calvary through Jesus so that He could pull us close for all of eternity. Welcoming us into the safety and hope of His grace and His love. And because we have been fully embraced by Him, we can spend our lives held securely by Him and trust all of His ways. Through these 100 devotions, daily scriptures, and prayer prompts, readers will be equipped to: Begin to find freedom from the struggles that have held them hostage by learning new ways to experience God’s love and more authentic ways to trust Him. Surrender their deepest hurts by processing them in a godly way with Lysa, a friend who understands their pain. Hear the Lord speak intimately to their heart by learning how to seek His direction. Release the tension of wondering, If God is near why does He sometimes feel far away? by spending intentional, guided time with Him each day. With an exquisite cloth cover, highly designed interior, ribbon marker, and stained page edges, Embraced will be a treasured keepsake for you as well as a meaningful gift for those you love.
  • Votes: 2

    Mein Kampf

    by Adolf Hitler

  • Votes: 2

    Proof of Heaven

    by Eben Alexander

  • Votes: 2

    Healing Back Pain

    by John E. Sarno

    Dr. John E. Sarno is a medical pioneer whose program has helped thousands of thousands of people overcome their back conditions--without or drugs or dangerous surgery. Now, using his grounbreaking research into TMS (Tension Mytostis Syndrome), Dr. Sarno goes one step further: after identifyig stress and other psychological factors in back pain, he demonstrates how many of his patiens have gone on to heal themselves without exercise or other physical therapy. Find out: Why self-motivated and successful people are prone to TMS How anxiety and repressed anger trigger muscle spasms How people "train themselves' to experience back pain How you may get relief from back pain within two to six weeks by recognizing TMS and its causes With case histories and the results of in-depth mind-body research, Dr. Sarno describes how patients recognize the emotional roots of their TMS and sever the connections between mental and physical pain... and how, just by reading this book, you may start recovering from back pain today.
  • Votes: 2

    Relentless

    by Tim S. Grover

  • Votes: 2

    The Pearl

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 2

    The Source

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 2

    Hands Down

    by Mariana Zapata

  • Votes: 2

    A Prayer for Owen Meany

    by John Irving

    'A work of genius' Independent 'Marvellously funny . . . What better entertainment is there than a serious book which makes you laugh?' Spectator 'If you care about something you have to protect it. If you're lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it.' Eleven-year-old Owen Meany, playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire, hits a foul ball and kills his best friend's mother. Owen doesn't believe in accidents; he believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is both extraordinary and terrifying.
  • Votes: 2

    The Magic of Thinking Big

    by David J. Schwartz

    More than 6 million readers around the world have improved their lives by reading The Magic of Thinking Big. First published in 1959, David J Schwartz's classic teachings are as powerful today as they were then. Practical, empowering and hugely engaging, this book will not only inspire you, it will give you the tools to change your life for the better - starting from now. His step-by-step approach will show you how to: - Defeat disbelief and the negative power it creates - Make your mind produce positive thoughts - Plan a concrete success-building programme - Do more and do it better by turning on your creative power - Capitalise on the power of NOW Updated for the 21st century, this is your go-to guide to a better life, starting with the way you think.
  • Votes: 2

    Sophie's World

    by Jostein Gaarder

    A page-turning novel that is also an exploration of the great philosophical concepts of Western thought, Sophie's World has fired the imagination of readers all over the world, with more than twenty million copies in print. One day fourteen-year-old Sophie Amundsen comes home from school to find in her mailbox two notes, with one question on each: "Who are you?" and "Where does the world come from?" From that irresistible beginning, Sophie becomes obsessed with questions that take her far beyond what she knows of her Norwegian village. Through those letters, she enrolls in a kind of correspondence course, covering Socrates to Sartre, with a mysterious philosopher, while receiving letters addressed to another girl. Who is Hilde? And why does her mail keep turning up? To unravel this riddle, Sophie must use the philosophy she is learning--but the truth turns out to be far more complicated than she could have imagined.
  • Votes: 2

    Green Eggs and Ham

    by Dr.Seuss

  • Votes: 2

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    by Hunter S. Thompson

  • Votes: 2

    Intellectuals and Society

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 1

    Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander (Image Classic)

    by Thomas Merton

    In this series of notes, opinions, and reflections kept since 1956, Thomas Merton examines some of the most urgent moral issues of the modern era.
  • Votes: 1

    The Yearling (Aladdin Classics)

    by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

    RELIVE THE WONDER OF A CHILDHOOD FAVORITE THAT HAS BEEN CAPTURING THE HEARTS OF READERS FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY. An instant bestseller when it was released in 1938, this Pulitzer Prize winner has been read and loved by school-age children across the nation for more than fifty years. In this classic story of the Baxter family and their wild, hard, and satisfying life in remote central Florida, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings has written one of the great novels of our times. A rich and varied tale -- tender in its understanding of boyhood, crowded with the excitement of the backwoods hunt, with vivid descriptions of the primitive, beautiful hammock country, written with humor and earthy philosophy -- The Yearling is a novel for readers of all ages. Its glowing picture of a life refreshingly removed from modern patterns of living is universal in its revelation of simple courageous people and the beliefs they must live by. This edition, complete with a new introduction by author Ivan Doig, will be cherished for years to come and will make a welcome addition to any booklover's shelf.
  • Votes: 1

    The winner's edge

    by Denis Waitley

  • Votes: 1

    Flatland

    by Edwin A. Abbott

  • Votes: 1

    On Bullshit

    by Harry G. Frankfurt

    Presents a theory of bullshit, how it differs from lying, how those who engage in it change the rules of conversation, and how indulgence in bullshit can alter a person's ability to tell the truth.
  • Votes: 1

    Beyond Freedom and Dignity (Hackett Classics)

    by B. F. Skinner

    In this profound and profoundly controversial work, a landmark of 20th-century thought originally published in 1971, B. F. Skinner makes his definitive statement about humankind and society. Insisting that the problems of the world today can be solved only by dealing much more effectively with human behavior, Skinner argues that our traditional concepts of freedom and dignity must be sharply revised. They have played an important historical role in our struggle against many kinds of tyranny, he acknowledges, but they are now responsible for the futile defense of a presumed free and autonomous individual; they are perpetuating our use of punishment and blocking the development of more effective cultural practices. Basing his arguments on the massive results of the experimental analysis of behavior he pioneered, Skinner rejects traditional explanations of behavior in terms of states of mind, feelings, and other mental attributes in favor of explanations to be sought in the interaction between genetic endowment and personal history. He argues that instead of promoting freedom and dignity as personal attributes, we should direct our attention to the physical and social environments in which people live. It is the environment rather than humankind itself that must be changed if the traditional goals of the struggle for freedom and dignity are to be reached. Beyond Freedom and Dignity urges us to reexamine the ideals we have taken for granted and to consider the possibility of a radically behaviorist approach to human problems--one that has appeared to some incompatible with those ideals, but which envisions the building of a world in which humankind can attain its greatest possible achievements.
  • Votes: 1

    The Secret Knowledge

    by David Mamet

    David Mamet has been a controversial, defining force in nearly every creative endeavor-now he turns his attention to politics. In recent years, David Mamet realized that the so-called mainstream media outlets he relied on were irredeemably biased, peddling a hypocritical and deeply flawed worldview. In 2008 Mamet wrote a hugely controversial op-ed for the Village Voice, "Why I Am No Longer a 'Brain-Dead Liberal'", in which he methodically attacked liberal beliefs, eviscerating them as efficiently as he did Method acting in his bestselling book True and False. Now Mamet employs his trademark intellectual force and vigor to take on all the key political issues of our times, from religion to political correctness to global warming. The legendary playwright, author, director, and filmmaker pulls no punches in his art or in his politics. And as a former liberal who woke up, Mamet will win over an entirely new audience of others who have grown irate over America's current direction.
  • Votes: 1

    The Blind Watchmaker

    by Richard Dawkins

  • Votes: 1

    Fingerprint of God

    by Hugh Ross

    Hugh Ross tells the story of how the question of God's existence has been answered by both science and theology. In easy-to-read language, he pulls together a vast array of literature that presents powerful and convincing evidence of the existence of God. The latest research has sealed the case for divine creation and has revealed the identity of the Creator Himself!
  • Votes: 1

    Direct Truth

    by Kapil Gupta

    Prescriptions, how-to's, self-help, guru's, mental hacks, psychology, motivation, and the like, are things that are fundamentally unserious. They are things that move humans away from Truth. For they approach all matters from the standpoint of a "fix." The Truth is a path away from all fixes. And away from all chases. It is for the one who is Serious. It is for the one who is Sincere. This book is for but a handful of individuals in the world. Those with a rarest form of DNA. The DNA to arrive at the Direct Truth in all things. So that they may put an end to all chases. So that they may walk life's Final Mile. And come to possess the things that they have called by various other names.
  • Votes: 1

    Courage

    by Osho

  • Votes: 1

    Outlander

    by Diana Gabaldon

    THE FIRST NOVEL IN THE BESTSELLING OUTLANDER SERIES. As seen on Amazon Prime TV. What if your future was the past? 1946, and Claire Randall goes to the Scottish Highlands with her husband Frank. It’s a second honeymoon, a chance to learn how war has changed them and to re-establish their loving marriage. But one afternoon, Claire walks through a circle of standing stones and vanishes into 1743, where the first person she meets is a British army officer - her husband’s six-times great-grandfather. Unfortunately, Black Jack Randall is not the man his descendant is, and while trying to escape him, Claire falls into the hands of a gang of Scottish outlaws, and finds herself a Sassenach - an outlander - in danger from both Jacobites and Redcoats. Marooned amid danger, passion and violence, her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives. (Previously published as Cross Stitch)
  • Votes: 1

    The Slight Edge

    by Jeff Olson

    The Slight Edge is a way of thinking, a way of processing information that enables you to make the daily choices that will lead you to the success and happiness you desire. Learn why some people make dream after dream come true, while others just continue dreaming and spend their lives building dreams for someone else. It’s not just another self-help motivation tool of methods you must learn in order to travel the path to success. It shows you how to create powerful results from the simple daily activities of your life, by using tools that are already within you. In this 8th anniversary edition you’ll read not only the life-changing concepts of the original book, but also learn what author Jeff Olson discovered as he continued along the slight edge path: the Secret to Happiness and the Ripple Effect. This edition of The Slight Edge isn’t just the story, but also how the story continues to create life-altering dynamics—how a way of thinking, a way of processing information, can impact daily choices that will lead you to the success and happiness you desire. The Slight Edge is “the key” that will make all the other how-to books and self-help information that you read, watch and hear actually work.
  • Votes: 1

    Letters from the Earth

    by Mark Twain

    It comprises essays written during a difficult time in Twain's life (1904–1909), when he was deeply in debt and had recently lost his wife and one of his daughters. The content concerns morality and religion and strikes a tone that is sarcastic - Twain's own term throughout the book.
  • Votes: 1

    Nonviolent Communication

    by Marshall B. Rosenberg

    Clinical psychologist Marshall B. Rosenberg offers an enlightening look at how peaceful communication can create compassionate connections with family, friends, and other acquaintances.
  • Votes: 1

    On the Genealogy of Morals (Oxford World's Classics)

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

    On the Genealogy of Morals (1887) is a book about the history of ethics and about interpretation. Nietzsche rewrites the former as a history of cruelty, exposing the 4entral values of the Judaeo-Christian and liberal traditions - compassion, equality, justice - as the product of a brutal process of conditioning designed to domesticate the animal vitality of earlier cultures. The result is a book which raises profoundly disquieting issues about the violence of both ethics and interpretation. Nietzsche questions moral certainties by showing that religion and science have no claim to absolute truth, before turning on his own arguments in order to call their very presuppositions into question. The Genealogy is the most sustained of Nietzsche's later works and offers one of the fullest expressions of his characteristic concerns. This edition places his ideas within the cultural context of his own time and stresses the relevance of his work for a contemporary audience. - ;`Reason, seriousness, mastery over the emotions, the whole murky affair which goes by the name of thought, all the privileges and showpieces of man: what a high price has been paid for them! How much blood and horror is at the bottom of all "good things!"' On the Genealogy of Morals (1887) is a book about the history of ethics and about interpretation. Nietzsche rewrites the former as a history of cruelty, exposing the central values of the Judaeo-Christian and liberal traditions - compassion, equality, justice - as the product of a brutal process of conditioning designed to domesticate the animal vitality of earlier cultures. The result is a book which raises profoundly disquieting issues about the violence of both ethics and interpretation. Nietzsche questions moral certainties by showing that religion and science have no claim to absolute truth, before turning on his own arguments in order to call their very presuppositions into question. The Genealogy is the most sustained of Nietzsche's later works and offers one of the fullest expressions of his characteristic concerns. This edition places his ideas within the cultural context of his own time and stresses the relevance of his work for a contemporary audience. -
  • Votes: 1

    I preach the gospel to the ends of the earth by writing books. (Korean Edition)

    by Choi Kyung Sook

    “Pathbreaking. Approaches the transcultural and religious encounters of Korean and American women with a remarkable degree of sensitivity and nuance, as well as with judicious use of feminist and postcolonial theory. Its rich and diverse historical examples and illustrations are both engaging to read and meticulously documented.”—Namhee Lee, UCLA
  • Votes: 1

    The Well of Loneliness (Wordsworth Classics)

    by Radclyffe Hall

    The Well of Loneliness was banned for obscenity when published in 1928. It became an international bestseller, and for decades was the single most famous lesbian novel.
  • Votes: 1

    How to get a New Nature

    by The Penman Alongside-God

    If there is ONE thing in this life that we need to know, it is "HOW to get a NEW Nature". It is the ONLY secret that the Devil doesn't want YOU to know! This book is based upon the premise that a person has a Nature; a Mind; and a Body. The main focus of this book is 'HOW to get a NEW nature' which is considered by some to be misknown in both religion and psychology. This book is for ANYONE who is looking to better understand: Why we do the things we do; What is beneath our mind; Why we can ONLY change superficial things about ourselves; How to free ourselves of the very deep evil things that are inherent within our human nature. And, this book is for anyone who wants to know: HOW to become a better person for the sake of ALL those around them, and for their own sake; And for anyone who is afraid to die! ...Written in very simple language, by a non-academic, who goes by the pen name of "The Penman" [birth name: Richard J White]. The man who they said could NEVER be saved.
  • Votes: 1

    The End of Overeating

    by David A. Kessler

    Uncovers the influences that have conditioned people to overeat, explaining how combinations of fat, sugar, and sa
  • Votes: 1

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    by Mark Twain

  • Votes: 1

    Allen Carr's Easy Way to Stop Smoking

    by Allen Carr

    A new edition written specifically for the American market presents the author's popular method for quitting smoking, based on a factual understanding of the harm of cigarette addiction and practical advice on how to successfully break the habit.
  • Votes: 1

    Start Your Own Corporation

    by Garrett Sutton

    We live in a highly litigious world. As you live your life you must keep your guard up. As you grow your wealth you must protect it. For those who don’t predators await, and their attorneys will use every trick in the toolbox to get at - whether large or small-your unprotected assets. Start Your Own Corporation educates you on an action plan to protect your life’s gains. Corporate attorney and best selling author Garrett Sutton clearly explains the all too common risks of failing to protect yourself and the strategies for limiting your liability going forward. The information is timely, accessible and applicable to every citizen in every situation. Garrett Sutton has spent the last thirty years protecting clients’ assets and implementing corporate structures to limit liability. This significant experience shines through in a very readable book on the why to’s and how to’s for achieving asset protection. Start Your Own Corporation teaches how to select between corporations and LLCs and how to use Nevada and Wyoming entities to your maximum advantage. This non-technical and easy to understand book also educates on the importance of following corporate formalities, using business tax deductions and building business credit. Rich Dad Poor Dad author Robert Kiyosaki says, “Start Your Own Corporation is a must read for anyone with any assets to protect.”
  • Votes: 1

    The Right Side of History

    by Ben Shapiro

    Now a #1 New York Times Bestseller. Human beings have never had it better than we have it now in the West. So why are we on the verge of throwing it all away? In 2016, New York Times bestselling author Ben Shapiro spoke at the University of California–Berkeley. Hundreds of police officers were required to protect his speech. What was so frightening about Shapiro? He came to argue that Western civilization is in the midst of a crisis of purpose and ideas; that we have let grievances replace our sense of community and political expediency limit our individual rights; that we are teaching our kids that their emotions matter more than rational debate; and that the only meaning in life is arbitrary and subjective. As a society, we are forgetting that almost everything great that has ever happened in history happened because of people who believed in both Judeo-Christian values and in the Greek-born power of reason. In The Right Side of History, Shapiro sprints through more than 3,500 years, dozens of philosophers, and the thicket of modern politics to show how our freedoms are built upon the twin notions that every human being is made in God’s image and that human beings were created with reason capable of exploring God’s world. We can thank these values for the birth of science, the dream of progress, human rights, prosperity, peace, and artistic beauty. Jerusalem and Athens built America, ended slavery, defeated the Nazis and the Communists, lifted billions from poverty, and gave billions more spiritual purpose. Jerusalem and Athens built America, ended slavery, defeated the Nazis and the Communists, lifted billions from poverty, and gave billions more spiritual purpose. Yet we are in the process of abandoning Judeo-Christian values and Greek natural law, watching our civilization collapse into age-old tribalism, individualistic hedonism, and moral subjectivism. We believe we can satisfy ourselves with intersectionality, scientific materialism, progressive politics, authoritarian governance, or nationalistic solidarity. We can’t. The West is special, and in The Right Side of History, Ben Shapiro bravely explains how we have lost sight of the moral purpose that drives each of us to be better, the sacred duty to work together for the greater good,.
  • Votes: 1

    The Automatic Millionaire, Expanded and Updated

    by David Bach

  • Votes: 1

    The Revolt

    by Menachem Begin

  • Votes: 1

    The Mindbody Prescription

    by John E. Sarno M.D.

    The New York Times bestselling guide to a healthy and pain-free life. Musculoskeletal pain disorders have reached epidemic proportions in the United States, with most doctors failing to recognize their underlying cause. In this acclaimed volume, Dr. Sarno reveals how many painful conditions-including most neck and back pain, migraine, repetitive stress injuries, whiplash, and tendonitises-are rooted in repressed emotions, and shows how they can be successfully treated without drugs, physical measures, or surgery. "My life was filled with excruciating back and shoulder pain until I applied Dr. Sarno's principles, and in a matter of weeks my back pain disappeared. I never suffered a single symptom again...I owe Dr. Sarno my life." - Howard Stern
  • Votes: 1

    Fight or Feast

    by Joshua Vine

    In this eagerly awaited sequel to Game of Thorns, Joshua and Greg Vine have created a work of unsurpassed vision, power and imagination... Or maybe not, perhaps it's just more nonsense and severed penises.Fight or Feast: A Song of Tits and ProcrastinationTension is abundant throughout the known world. After slaying the Griffin King, Donald Greenleaf was able to bring peace to the kingdom of Amular, but this didn't bring peace to the nearby lands.The epic saga of Donald Greenleaf continues in the sequel to Game of Thorns. As the king of Amular and ruler of the realm, Donald faces new challenges more dangerous than ever as the nearby villages of Amular build their armies and prepare for battle to become the one true king of the realm. King Greenleaf will balance love and home-life as he battles such great creatures as the manticore and watches entertaining episodes of Madame Secretary on CBS.Whether you fear the rape of Bill Cosby, or yearn for it, Fight or Feast is the perfect book for you and your entire family. Just listen to what Barack Obama is not saying about Fight or Feast:"Fight or Feast embodies the fighting spirit of America!""My junk is so hard right now!""Whether you're Joe Biden, or just a well-wisher, I don't see how you could not enjoy Fight or Feast: A Song of Tits and Procrastination!""I don't know who you are, but you cannot jerk-off in the Oval Office!"WARNING: This book is highly offensive and is not recommended for children or small reptiles. To enjoy this book, you must have an expanded and evolved sense of humor. If you are expecting a serious book, or Game of Thrones, you will be disappointed. Please take the time to read the preview before you purchase this book.
  • Votes: 1

    Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself

    by David Lipsky

    Shares the author's travels with the late David Foster Wallace based on interviews from the 1996 "Infinite Jest" book tour, covering such topics as Wallace's literary process, struggles with fame, and battle with mental illness.
  • Votes: 1

    Simply Done, Well Done

    by Aaron McCargo

    Make filling, flavorful family meals with the first cookbook from the star of Food Network’s Big Daddy’s House! Winner of The Next Food Network Star Aaron McCargo shares his passion for big, bold flavors and fun family cooking with these simple, flavorful, down to earth recipes. Leaving out the fussy cooking techniques and hard-to-find ingredients, McCargo shows you how to create bold flavors and satisfying dishes like Spicy Beef Quesadillas, Jerk Chicken with Smoked Gouda Sandwiches, or Salisbury Steak Bundles. And if, somehow, friends and family have room left for dessert, they’ll love his Candybar Cookies and Tiramisu Cupcakes. Included are 120 recipes covering soups, salads, appetizers, side dishes, main courses, sandwiches, sauces, and desserts, with full-color photos throughout. When it’s time to cook for the family, Simply Done, Well Done will make sure that delicious is definitely on the menu.
  • Votes: 1

    Bartender'S Guide To Cocktails (Quick Study Home)

    by Inc. BarCharts

    Don't wait - grab a shot glass, fill it up and enjoy! A shooter (or shot) is a 1- to 4-ounce alcoholic beverage; it may consist of one type of alcohol or a cocktail of different alcohols, sometimes mixed with other beverages.
  • Votes: 1

    JPS TANAKH

    by The Jewish Publication Society

    This guide to the Jewish Bible explains what the Jewish Bible is, how it developed, its structure and differences between it and Christian Bibles. It also includes short histories of Bible translations and commentaries, a guide to characters and places, plus an introduction to Biblical poetry, storytelling, law and Bible study.
  • Votes: 1

    The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

    by Tom Wolfe

    Describes the escapades of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, a drug-saturated group of hippies who get in and out of trouble with the law.
  • Votes: 1

    Iron John

    by Robert Bly

  • Votes: 1

    Inner Engineering

    by Sadhguru

    "The founder of the Isha Foundation, an all-volunteer organization involved in large-scale humanitarian, educational, and environmental projects, Sadhguru is a thought leader on a epic scale. His mission is to improve the quality and experience of life, from the individual to the global. He has distilled a system of practices from the ancient yogic sciences that will deepen your perception and bring about a shift in the very way you experience your life, work, relationships, and the world you inhabit. It is a profound system of self-exploration and transformation, based on the radical premise that it is possible for a human being to evolve consciously. Unlike biological evolution, which happens without your conscious participation, spiritual evolution can happen consciously. All it takes is willingness."
  • Votes: 1

    BEHIND THE GREEN MASK

    by Rosa Koire

    If you've been wanting an interesting, clearly written, how-to-manual for identifying and fighting UN Agenda 21, here it is. Agenda 21--All the information you need to understand what is happening in your town, why it's happening, who is behind it, and what you can do to stop it. BEHIND THE GREEN MASK: U.N. Agenda 21 is 172 pages of truth. Part history, part current events, part hand-to-hand combat, and part blueprint for keeping your freedom, this is one book that you'll put to work immediately. Boots on the ground and all hands on deck is the order of the day. Awareness is the first step in the Resistance.
  • Votes: 1

    The Miracle of Fasting

    by Patricia Bragg

  • Votes: 1

    The God Delusion

    by Richard Dawkins

    Argues that belief in God is irrational, and describes examples of religion's negative influences on society throughout the centuries, such as war, bigotry, child abuse, and violence.
  • Votes: 1

    On Becoming Babywise

    by Robert Bucknam M.D.

    In his 29th year as a licensed pediatrician, Dr. Robert Bucknam along with co-author Gary Ezzo, demonstrate how order and stability are mutual allies of every newborn's metabolism and how parents can take advantage of these biological propensities.
  • Votes: 1

    Senatorial Privilege

    by Leo Damore

    About the alleged police cover-up of the fatal road accident involving Senator Edward Kennedy in 1969.
  • Votes: 1

    The Singularity Is Near

    by Ray Kurzweil

  • Votes: 1

    The Outsiders

    by William Thorndike

    It's time to redefine the CEO success story. Meet eight iconoclastic leaders who helmed firms where returns on average outperformed the S&P 500 by more than 20 times.
  • Votes: 1

    How Stella Got Her Groove Back

    by Terry McMillan

    How Stella Got Her Groove Back is full of Terry McMillan's signature humor, heart, and insight. More than a love story, it is ultimately a novel about how a woman saves her own life—and what she must risk to do it. Stella Payne is forty-two, divorced, a high-powered investment analyst, mother of eleven-year-old Quincy- and she does it all. In fact, if she doesn't do it, it doesn't get done, from Little League carpool duty to analyzing portfolios to folding the laundry and bringing home the bacon. She does it all well, too, if her chic house, personal trainer, BMW, and her loving son are any indication. So what if there's been no one to share her bed with lately, let alone rock her world? Stella doesn't mind it too much; she probably wouldn't have the energy for love—and all of love's nasty fallout—anyway. But when Stella takes a spur-of-the-moment vacation to Jamaica, her world gets rocked to the core—not just by the relaxing effects of the sun and sea and an island full of attractive men, but by one man in particular. He's tall, lean, soft-spoken, Jamaican, smells of citrus and the ocean—and is half her age. The tropics have cast their spell and Stella soon realizes she has come to a cataclysmic juncture: not only must she confront her hopes and fears about love, she must question all of her expectations, passions, and ideas about life and the way she has lived it.
  • Votes: 1

    The Golden Compass

    by Philip Pullman

    Accompanied by her daemon, Lyra Belacqua sets out to prevent her best friend and other kidnapped children from becoming the subject of gruesome experiments in the Far North.
  • Votes: 1

    Islands in the Stream

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 1

    POLIOMYELITIS

    by SANDRA W. MOSS

    POLIOMYELITIS: NEWARK 1916 THE GRIP OF FEAR is a study of the devastating "scourge" that struck the city of Newark a century ago. Most victims were infants and toddlers for whom there were no effective treatments, no vaccines, and no iron lungs. Per capita, Newark was the hardest hit of any American city, with 1,360 cases and 363 deaths. The book draws heavily on newspaper accounts, public health documents, and the accounts of physicians who faced the epidemic with uncertain knowledge and no effective treatment. Public health officials, as in all epidemics, desperately sought to limit the spread of disease and, in the process, risked creating a medical police state. Hundreds of survivors faced a lifetime of disability, giving poliomyelitis its particular power to terrify.
  • Votes: 1

    The Prince and the Pauper

    by Mark Twain

    When young Edward VI of England and Tom Canty, a poor boy who looks just like him, exchange places, each learns a valuable lesson about the other's very different station in life in sixteenth-century England. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    Great Expectations (Penguin Classics)

    by Charles Dickens

  • Votes: 1

    The Rhythm of Life

    by Matthew Kelly

    Counsels readers on how to transcend daily stresses to attain a deeper understanding of one's true purpose, discussing such strategies as identifying and attending to actual needs and making self-supporting commitments.
  • Votes: 1

    Imagine Heaven

    by John Burke

    It's obvious from the bookshelves and the big screen that heaven is on everyone's mind. All of us long to know what life after death will be like. Bestselling author John Burke is no exception. For decades, he has been studying accounts of people who have had near-death experiences (NDEs). While not every detail of individual NDEs correlate with Scripture, Burke shows how the common experiences shared by thousands of survivors clearly point to the God of the Bible and the exhilarating picture of heaven he promises. Imagine Heaven is an inspirational journey through the Bible's picture of heaven, colored in with the real-life stories of heaven's wonders. Burke compares gripping stories of NDEs to what Scripture says about our biggest questions of heaven: Will I be myself? Will I see friends and loved ones? What will it look like? What is God like? What will we do forever? What about children and pets? This book will propel readers into an experience that will forever change their view of the life to come and the way they live life today. It also tackles the tough questions of heavenly reward and hellish NDEs. Anyone interested in NDEs or longing to imagine heaven more clearly will enjoy this fascinating and hope-filled book.
  • Votes: 1

    Knowing God

    by J. I. Packer

  • Votes: 1

    The Biggest Secret

  • Votes: 1

    My Daily Bread

    by Father Anthony J. Paone S.J.

    Hear Christ speak to you like never before. My Daily Bread is a series of short, daily reflections on the spiritual life. Written with loving care by Father Anthony Paone, this devotional will strengthen your love for Christ and his teachings. Written as a dialogue with Christ himself, Father Paone leads the reader through the three ways of the spiritual life: Purification, Imitation, and Union. Arranged for daily reflection, this pocket-sized book is an indispensible guide to the spiritual life. My Daily Bread overflows with reflections and prayers specifically designed to help you grow in the spiritual life and overcome failings, including: • How to cultivate, recognize, and follow your conscience (p. 18) • A contemplation of the Four Last Things that will help keep our focus on the eternal (p.25) • The power of prayer as the first remedy to temptation (p. 99) • A detailed guide on how to conquer a host of bad habits (p. 153) • How to overcome our fear of suffering and instead embrace it as Christ embraced it (p. 203) • How to live for Christ daily through spiritual reading, prayer, overcoming distractions, and cultivating devotions • Achieving union with Christ through the Eucharist (p. 382) • And much more… Each daily reflection begins with Jesus speaking directly to you, kindly, patiently, and with great love. The next part of the reflection asks you to consider the truths presented in the words of Jesus. The final part consists of a prayer asking for God for the help to receive His wisdom and use it fruitfully in your life. With more than one million copies sold, My Daily Bread is a true Christian classic. It's simple, yet carefully crafted daily reflections have led thousands to a drastically improved interior life and a deeper love for Christ. A portion of the proceeds from every purchase of this Confraternity of the Precious Blood title go directly to The Sisters Adorers of the Precious Blood in Brooklyn, NY to support them in their vocation.
  • Votes: 1

    Dead Poets Society

    by N. H. Kleinbaum

    Todd Anderson and his friends at Welton Academy can hardly believe how different life is since their new English professor, the flamboyant John Keating, has challenged them to "make your lives extraordinary! Inspired by Keating, the boys resurrect the Dead Poets Society--a secret club where, free from the constraints and expectations of school and parents, they let their passions run wild. As Keating turns the boys on to the great words of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, they discover not only the beauty of language, but the importance of making each moment count. Can the club and the individuality it inspires survive the pressure from authorities determined to destroy their dreams? But the Dead Poets pledges soon realize that their newfound freedom can have tragic consequences. Can the club and the individuality it inspires survive the pressure from authorities determined to destroy their dreams?
  • Votes: 1

    Romans

    by Martyn Lloyd-Jones

  • Votes: 1

    You Can't Go Home Again

    by Thomas Wolfe

    Brad Smith, a “funny, poignant, evocative” (Dennis Lehane) crime novelist, debuts a new series set in upstate New York featuring jack-of-all trades, Virgil Cain, who must clear his name of two murders while on the run from the law in this spirited country noir. Mickey Dupree is one of the most successful criminal attorneys in upstate New York, having never lost a capital murder case. That is the upside of being Mickey. The downside: Mickey has a lot of enemies and one of them drives the shaft of a golf club through his heart, leaving him dead in a sand trap at his exclusive country club. The cops, led by a dim-witted detective named Joe Brady, focus their attentions on Virgil Cain. Just two weeks earlier Virgil told a crowded bar that “somebody ought to blow Mickey’s head off,” after the slippery lawyer earned an acquittal for Alan Comstock, the man accused of murdering Virgil’s wife. Comstock, a legendary record producer, gun nut, and certifiable lunatic, has returned to his estate, where he lives with his wife, the long suffering Jane. It appears to Virgil that the fix is in when Brady immediately throws him into jail with no questions asked. In order to set things right, Virgil escapes from jail, determined to find Mickey’s killer himself. Aside from a smart and sexy detective named Claire Marchand, everybody is convinced that Virgil is the culprit. When Alan Comstock is discovered with six slugs in his body the day after Virgil’s escape, his guilt is almost assured. Now it is up to Virgil to convince everyone of his innocence—by finding the killer before he winds up as the next victim.
  • Votes: 1

    The Real Crash

    by Peter D. Schiff

    Predicts a worse crash if key economic changes cannot be made, arguing that American consumer habits are at the heart of today's problems and recommends that the nation declare bankruptcy and rebuild broken systems from scratch.
  • Votes: 1

    The Gargoyle

    by Andrew Davidson

  • Votes: 1

    That Was Then, This Is Now

    by S. E. Hinton

    Another classic from the author of the internationally bestselling The Outsiders Continue celebrating 50 years of The Outsiders by reading this companion novel. That Was Then, This is Now is S. E. Hinton's moving portrait of the bond between best friends Bryon and Mark and the tensions that develop between them as they begin to grow up and grow apart. "A mature, disciplined novel which excites a response in the reader . . . Hard to forget."—The New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    The Talisman

    by Stephen King

    A chilling tale from two of the greatest storytellers of our time... Twelve-year-old Jack spends his days alone in a deserted coastal town, his father gone, his mother dying. Then he meets a stranger - and embarks on a terrifying journey. For Jack must find the Talisman, the only thing that can save his mother. His quest takes him into the menacing Territories, a parallel world where violence, surprise and the titanic struggle between good and evil reach across a mythic landscape.
  • Votes: 1

    The Plantagenets

    by Dan Jones

    Eight generations of the greatest and worst kings and queens that this country has ever seen – from the White Ship to the Lionheart, bad King John to the Black Prince and John of Gaunt – this is the dynasty that invented England as we still know it today – great history to appeal to readers of Ken Follet, Bernard Cornwell, Tom Holland
  • Votes: 1

    The Compound Effect

    by Darren Hardy

  • Votes: 1

    The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicle)

    by Patrick Rothfuss

  • Votes: 1

    The Undoing Project

    by Michael Lewis

    Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis's own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms. The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield--both had important careers in the Israeli military--and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn't remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter. This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind's view of its own mind.
  • Votes: 1

    The Genie in Your Genes

    by Dawson Church

    Your genes respond to your thoughts, emotions and beliefs. The way you use your mind shapes your brain, turning genes on and off in ways that can dramatically affect your health and wellbeing. In this best-selling, award-winning book, researcher Dawson Church reveals the exciting applications of the new science of Epigenetics (epi=above, i.e. control above the level of the gene) to healing. Citing hundreds of scientific studies, and telling the stories of dozens of people who have used his ideas for their own healing, he shows how you can apply these discoveries in your own life. He explains how electromagnetic energy flows in your body and affects your cells, and how the new fields of energy medicine and energy psychology can help cases that are beyond the reach of conventional medicine. He shows how your hormonal, neurological, connective tissue, and neutrotransmitter systems all work in harmony to conduct a coordinated flow of information throughout your body. As you take conscious control of the process, you produce a positive effect on your health, becoming an "epigenetic engineer" of your own wellbeing. Practical and scientific, this book has transformed the lives of tens of thousands of people. This new edition is updated with the latest research and clinical breakthroughs.
  • Votes: 1

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

    by Benjamin Franklin

    The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin was written by Benjamin Franklin from 1771 to 1790; however, Franklin himself appears to have called the work his Memoirs. Although it had a torturous publication history after Franklin's death, this work has become one of the most famous and influential examples of autobiography ever written.
  • Votes: 1

    Time, Labor, and Social Domination

    by Moishe Postone

    A thoughtful reinterpretation of Marx's mature socioeconomic theory.
  • Votes: 1

    Alexander Hamilton

    by Ron Chernow

  • Votes: 1

    White Fragility

    by Robin DiAngelo

    Explores counterproductive reactions white people have when discussing racism that serve to protect their positions and maintain racial inequality.
  • Votes: 1

    The Holiness of God

    by R. C. Sproul

  • Votes: 1

    Prison to Praise

    by Merlin R Carothers

    Includes an excerpt from Merlin Carothers' book Power in praise.
  • Votes: 1

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch (Cliffs Notes)

    by Franz G. Blaha

  • Votes: 1

    A Social History of Maoist China

    by Felix Wemheuer

    This new social history of Maoist China provides an accessible view of the complex and tumultuous period when China came under Communist rule.
  • Votes: 1

    Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain

    by Betty Edwards

    Helps the reader gain access to right-brain functions, which affect artistic and creative abilities, by teaching drawing through unusual exercises designed to increase visual skills. Simultaneous. Hardcover available. 35,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    The Problem of Pain

    by C. S. Lewis

    In The Problem of Pain, C.S. Lewis, one of the most renowned Christian authors and thinkers, examines a universally applicable question within the human condition: “If God is good and all-powerful, why does he allow his creatures to suffer pain?” With his signature wealth of compassion and insight, C.S. Lewis offers answers to these crucial questions and shares his hope and wisdom to help heal a world hungering for a true understanding of human nature.
  • Votes: 1

    Swiss Family Robinson (Illustrated Classic)

    by Johann David Wyss

    The Swiss Family Robinson is about the Robinson family comprising the father, mother and their four young sons who get shipwrecked on their way from Switzerland to New Guinea. Before long, the family is on shore and exploring a deserted island full of exotic animals, charming locations and hidden dangers. Cut off from the comforts and companionship of other humans, they use their familiarity with natural history to find the resources and build the tools to construct a canoe, weave cloth, irrigate a garden, tame animals and construct dwellings. Soon they become masters of their new environment, rising to its many challenges and using their ingenuity to avail themselves of its abundant resources. This adventurous tale of survival demonstrates how one can overcome odds through sheer grit and determination; optimism; boundless enthusiasm; perseverance; hard work and self-reliance.
  • Votes: 1

    The Forgotten Soldier

    by Guy Sajer

  • Votes: 1

    The Innovation Algorithm

    by Genrich Altshuller

    Genrich Altshuller's The Innovation Algorithm is a milestone in the development of the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). It is the result of more than 20 years of research and analysis. Here, Altshuller details ARIZ, TRIZ's problem solving algorythm that can produce innovation and creativity of the highest order. Saturated with profound thoughts, insights, and convincing examples, this book is regarded by many as Altshuller's magnum opus, his handbook for a creative and technological revolution. - Back cover.
  • Votes: 1

    Heaven and Hell

    by Emmanuel Swedenborg

  • Votes: 1

    Island of the Blue Dolphins

    by Scott O'Dell

  • Votes: 1

    Start with why

    by Simon Sinek

    Suggesting that successful businesspeople and companies share a common inspiration that motivates them to perform beyond standard levels, an anecdotal reference explains how to apply the author's principles of "why" to everything from working culture to product development. A first book.
  • Votes: 1

    Folks, This Ain't Normal

    by Joel Salatin

    From farmer Joel Salatin's point of view, life in the 21st century just ain't normal. In FOLKS, THIS AIN'T NORMAL, he discusses how far removed we are from the simple, sustainable joy that comes from living close to the land and the people we love. Salatin has many thoughts on what normal is and shares practical and philosophical ideas for changing our lives in small ways that have big impact. Salatin, hailed by the New York Times as "Virginia's most multifaceted agrarian since Thomas Jefferson [and] the high priest of the pasture" and profiled in the Academy Award nominated documentary Food, Inc. and the bestselling book The Omnivore's Dilemma, understands what food should be: Wholesome, seasonal, raised naturally, procured locally, prepared lovingly, and eaten with a profound reverence for the circle of life. And his message doesn't stop there. From child-rearing, to creating quality family time, to respecting the environment, Salatin writes with a wicked sense of humor and true storyteller's knack for the revealing anecdote. Salatin's crucial message and distinctive voice--practical, provocative, scientific, and down-home philosophical in equal measure--make FOLKS, THIS AIN'T NORMAL a must-read book.
  • Votes: 1

    To Have and Have Not

    by Ernest Hemingway

    To Have and Have Not is the dramatic, brutal story of Harry Morgan, an honest boat owner who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who swarm the region, and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair. In this harshly realistic, yet oddly tender and wise novel, Hemingway perceptively delineates the personal struggles of both the "haves" and the "have nots" and creates one of the most subtle and moving portraits of a love affair in his oeuvre. In turn funny and tragic, lively and poetic, remarkable in its emotional impact, To Have and Have Not takes literary high adventure to a new level. As the Times Literary Supplement observed, "Hemingway's gift for dialogue, for effective understatement, and for communicating such emotions the tough allow themselves, has never been more conspicuous."
  • Votes: 1

    The Wealthy Barber, Updated 3rd Edition

    by David Chilton

  • Votes: 1

    The Surrender Experiment

    by Michael A. Singer

    Shares stories from the author's pursuit of enlightenment, from his years as a hippie introvert and successes as a computer engineer through his work in humanitarian efforts, counseling readers on how to navigate confusing aspects in the spiritual journey.
  • Votes: 1

    Moral Calculations

    by Laszlo Mero

    What does game theory tell us about rational behavior? Is there such a thing as rational behavior, and if so, is it of any use to us? In this fascinating book, renowned Hungarian economist Laszlo Mero shows how game theory provides insight into such aspects of human psychology as altruism, competition, and politics, as well as its relevance to disparate fields such as physics and evolutionary biology. This ideal guide shows us how mathematics can illuminate the human condition.
  • Votes: 1

    The Art of the Deal

    by Noah Horowitz

  • Votes: 1

    Hatchet

    by Gary Paulsen

    Celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the Newbery Honor–winning survival novel Hatchet with a pocket-sized edition perfect for travelers to take along on their own adventures. This special anniversary edition includes a new introduction and commentary by author Gary Paulsen, pen-and-ink illustrations by Drew Willis, and a water resistant cover. Hatchet has also been nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson, haunted by his secret knowledge of his mother’s infidelity, is traveling by single-engine plane to visit his father for the first time since the divorce. When the plane crashes, killing the pilot, the sole survivor is Brian. He is alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but his clothing, a tattered windbreaker, and the hatchet his mother had given him as a present. At first consumed by despair and self-pity, Brian slowly learns survival skills—how to make a shelter for himself, how to hunt and fish and forage for food, how to make a fire—and even finds the courage to start over from scratch when a tornado ravages his campsite. When Brian is finally rescued after fifty-four days in the wild, he emerges from his ordeal with new patience and maturity, and a greater understanding of himself and his parents.
  • Votes: 1

    Lifespan

    by David A. Sinclair PhD

    A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A paradigm-shifting book from an acclaimed Harvard Medical School scientist and one of Time’s most influential people. It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable.” This eye-opening and provocative work takes us to the frontlines of research that is pushing the boundaries on our perceived scientific limitations, revealing incredible breakthroughs—many from Dr. David Sinclair’s own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, aging. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it. Recent experiments in genetic reprogramming suggest that in the near future we may not just be able to feel younger, but actually become younger. Through a page-turning narrative, Dr. Sinclair invites you into the process of scientific discovery and reveals the emerging technologies and simple lifestyle changes—such as intermittent fasting, cold exposure, exercising with the right intensity, and eating less meat—that have been shown to help us live younger and healthier for longer. At once a roadmap for taking charge of our own health destiny and a bold new vision for the future of humankind, Lifespan will forever change the way we think about why we age and what we can do about it.
  • Votes: 1

    The Sovereignty of God

    by Arthur W. Pink

  • Votes: 1

    Ojibwa Warrior

    by Dennis Banks

    Dennis Banks, an American Indian of the Ojibwa Tribe and a founder of the American Indian Movement, is one of the most influential Indian leaders of our time. In Ojibwa Warrior, written with acclaimed writer and photographer Richard Erdoes, Banks tells his own story for the first time and also traces the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The authors present an insider’s understanding of AIM protest events—the Trail of Broken Treaties march to Washington, D.C.; the resulting takeover of the BIA building; the riot at Custer, South Dakota; and the 1973 standoff at Wounded Knee. Enhancing the narrative are dramatic photographs, most taken by Richard Erdoes, depicting key people and events.
  • Votes: 1

    Democracy – The God That Failed

    by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

  • Votes: 1

    The Old Testament

    by Michael D. Coogan

  • Votes: 1

    The Ancient Secret of the Flower of Life, Vol. 1

    by Drunvalo Melchizedek

    Here, Drunvalo Melchizedek presents in text and graphics the first half of the Flower of Life workshop, illuminating the mysteries of how we came to be, why the world is the way it is and the subtle energies that allow our awareness to blossom into its true beauty. Sacred Geometry is the form beneath our being and points to a divine order in our reality.We can follow that order from the invisible atom to the infinite stars, finding ourselves at each step. The information here is one path, but between the lines and drawings lie the feminine gems of intuitive understanding. You may see them sparkle around some of these provocative ideas: Explore the miracle of our existence by meandering through the wonderland of geometry, science, ancient history and new discovery, seen through the widened vision of Drunvalo and the Flower of Life.
  • Votes: 1

    The Thomas Sowell Reader

    by Thomas Sowell

    A one-volume introduction to over three decades of the wide-ranging writings of one of America's most respected and cited authors These selections from the many writings of Thomas Sowell over a period of a half century cover social, economic, cultural, legal, educational, and political issues. The sources range from Dr. Sowell's letters, books, newspaper columns, and articles in both scholarly journals and popular magazines. The topics range from late-talking children to "tax cuts for the rich," baseball, race, war, the role of judges, medical care, and the rhetoric of politicians. These topics are dealt with by sometimes drawing on history, sometimes drawing on economics, and sometimes drawing on a sense of humor. The Thomas Sowell Reader includes essays on:* Social Issues* Economics* Political Issues* Legal Issues* Race and Ethnicity* Educational Issues* Biographical Sketches* Random Thoughts "My hope is that this large selection of my writings will reduce the likelihood that readers will misunderstand what I have said on many controversial issues over the years. Whether the reader will agree with all my conclusions is another question entirely. But disagreements can be productive, while misunderstandings seldom are." -- Thomas Sowell
  • Votes: 1

    How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization

    by Thomas E. Woods

    Written to highlight the Catholic Church's central role in shaping Western Civilization, this book shows how the Church gave birth to modern science, international law, the free market economy, and much, much more.
  • Votes: 1

    Buddhism for Mothers

    by Sarah Napthali

    Firmly grounded in the day-to-day reality of being a mother, The Complete Buddhism for Mothers gives personal and honest advice based on Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges of bringing up children.
  • Votes: 1

    This Terrible Sound

    by Peter Cozzens

    When North and South met among the desolate mountains of northwestern Georgia in 1863, they began one of the bloodiest and most decisive campaigns of the Civil War. The climactic Battle of Chickamauga lasted just two days, yet it was nearly as costly as Gettysburg, with casualties among the highest in the war. In this study of the campaign, the first to appear in over thirty years and the most comprehensive account ever written on Chickamauga, Peter Cozzens presents a vivid narrative about an engagement that was crucial to the outcome of the war in the West. Drawing upon a wealth of previously untapped sources, Cozzens offers startling new interpretations that challenge the conventional wisdom on key moments of the battle, such as Rosecrans's fateful order to General Wood and Thomas's historic defense of Horseshoe Ridge. Chickamauga was a battle of missed opportunities, stupendous tactical blunders, and savage fighting by the men in ranks. Cozzens writes movingly of both the heroism and suffering of the common soldiers and of the strengths and tragic flaws of their commanders. Enhanced by the detailed battle maps and original sketches by the noted artist Keith Rocco, this book will appeal to all Civil War enthusiasts and students of military history.
  • Votes: 1

    My Struggle:

    by Karl Ove Knausgaard

    An autobiographical novel focuses on a young man trying to make sense of his place in the disjointed world that surrounds him.
  • Votes: 1

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

    William Golding's Lord of the Flies is a dystopian classic: 'exciting, relevant and thought-provoking' (Stephen King). When a group of schoolboys are stranded on a desert island, what could go wrong? 'One of my favorite books - I read it every couple of years.' (Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games) A plane crashes on a desert island. The only survivors are a group of schoolboys. By day, they discover fantastic wildlife and dazzling beaches, learning to survive; at night, they are haunted by nightmares of a primitive beast. Orphaned by society, it isn't long before their innocent childhood games devolve into a savage, murderous hunt ... 'Stands out mightily in my memory ... Such a strong statement about the human heart.' (Patricia Cornwell) 'Terrifying and haunting.' (Kingsley Amis) 'Beautifully written, tragic and provocative.' (E. M. Forster) ONE OF THE BBC'S ICONIC 'NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD' What readers are saying: 'Every real human being should read this ... This is what we are.' 'It's brilliant, it's captivating, it's thought provoking and brutal and for some, its truly terrifying.' 'It can be read and re-read many times, and every time something new will appear.' 'There is a reason why this is studied at school ... Excellent read.' 'This is one of the few books I've read that I keep on my Kindle to read again.' 'I revisit this every few years and it's always fresh and impressive ... One of the best books I've ever read.'
  • Votes: 1

    Righteous Indignation

    by Andrew Breitbart

    "Brash, funny, fiery, and irreverent." -- Rush Limbaugh Known for his network of conservative websites that draws millions of readers everyday, Andrew Breitbart has one main goal: to make sure the "liberally biased" major news outlets in this country cover all aspects of a story fairly. Breitbart is convinced that too many national stories are slanted by the news media in an unfair way. In Righteous Indignations, Breitbart talks about how one needs to deal with the liberal news world head on. Along the way, he details his early years, working with Matt Drudge, the Huffington Post, and how Breitbart developed his unique style of launching key websites to help get the word out to conservatives all over. A rollicking and controversial read, Breitbart will certainly raise your blood pressure, one way or another.
  • Votes: 1

    Left to Tell

    by Immaculee Ilibagiza

    Presents the true story of a woman who endured the murder of her family as a result of genocide in Rwanda and turned to prayer for strength, love, and forgiveness.
  • Votes: 1

    The Knowledge of the Holy

    by A. W. Tozer

    The Knowledge of the Holy by A.W. Tozer illuminates God’s attributes—from wisdom, to grace, to mercy—and in doing so, attempts to restore the majesty and wonder of God in the hearts and minds of all Christians. It teaches us how we can rejuvenate our prayer life, meditate more reverently, understand God more deeply and experience God’s presence in our daily lives.
  • Votes: 1

    Bold

    by Peter H. Diamandis

  • Votes: 1

    A Brief History of Time

    by Stephen Hawking

    An anniversary edition of a now-classic survey of the origin and nature of the universe features a new introduction by the author and a new chapter on the possibility of time travel and "wormholes" in space
  • Votes: 1

    Health, Wealth, and Happiness

    by David W. Jones

    Be faithful in your giving and God will reward you financially. It's not always stated that blatantly but the promises of the Prosperity Gospel--or the name-it-and-claim-it gospel, the health-and-wealth gospel, the word of faith movement, or positive confession theology--are false. Yet its message permeates the preaching of well-known Christian leaders: Joyce Meyer, T. D. Jakes, Joel Osteen, Creflo Dollar, Kenneth and Gloria Copeland, and many more. The appeal of this teaching crosses racial, gender, denominational, and international boundaries. Why are otherwise faithful Christians so easily led astray? Because the Prosperity Gospel contains a grain of biblical truth, greatly distorted. For anyone who knows that Prosperity Gospel theology is wrong but has trouble articulating and refuting the finer points, this concise edition contains all the robust arguments of the hard-hitting original edition in a shorter, more accessible form.
  • Votes: 1

    Gates of Fire

    by Steven Pressfield

    Chronicles the battle of three hundred Spartan warriors against a huge force of Persian soldiers in 480 B.C. against the background of life in ancient Sparta and its extraordinary culture.
  • Votes: 1

    Stranger in a Strange Land

    by Robert A. Heinlein

  • Votes: 1

    Semper Fi

    by W. E. B. Griffin

    The New York Times bestselling author of the acclaimed Brotherhood of War saga brings to life the men of the Marine Corps in the first Novel of the Corps. From Shanghai to Wake Island, the Corps was America’s first line of defense as the winds of war exploded into the devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Now, this elite group of courageous, honorable men steel themselves for battle, prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice...
  • Votes: 1

    Philosophy of Science

    by J. A. Cover

    Both an anthology and an introductory textbook, Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues offers instructors and students a comprehensive anthology of fifty-two primary texts by leading philosophers in the field and provides extensive editorial commentary that places the readings in a wide philosophical context.
  • Votes: 1

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    by Anonymous

  • Votes: 1

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

    by Ken Kesey

    A Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of a counterculture classic, and the inspiration for the new Netflix original series Ratched, with a foreword by Chuck Palahniuk Boisterous, ribald, and ultimately shattering, Ken Kesey’s 1962 novel has left an indelible mark on the literature of our time. Now in a new deluxe edition with a foreword by Chuck Palahniuk and cover by Joe Sacco, here is the unforgettable story of a mental ward and its inhabitants, especially the tyrannical Big Nurse Ratched and Randle Patrick McMurphy, the brawling, fun-loving new inmate who resolves to oppose her. We see the struggle through the eyes of Chief Bromden, the seemingly mute half-Indian patient who witnesses and understands McMurphy’s heroic attempt to do battle with the powers that keep them all imprisoned. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • Votes: 1

    The Black Book of Communism

    by Jean-Louis Panné

    Collects and analyzes seventy years of communist crimes that offer details on Kim Sung's Korea, Vietnam under "Uncle Ho," and Cuba under Castro.
  • Votes: 1

    White Fang

    by Jack London

  • Votes: 1

    Holidays in Hell

    by P. J. O'Rourke

    Now available as an ebook, the original classic in which P.J. O'Rourke takes on the role of tour guide with hilarious results P.J. O'Rourke travels to hellholes around the globe in Holidays in Hell, looking for trouble, the truth, and a good time. After casually sight-seeing in war-torn Lebanon and being pepper-gassed in Korea, P.J. checks out the night life in communist Poland and spends the Christmas holidays in El Salvador. Taking a long look at Nicaragua, P.J. asks, "Is Nicaragua a Bulgaria with marimba bands or just a misunderstood Massachusetts with Cuban military advisors?"; has a close encounter with a Philippine army officer he describes as "powerful-looking in a short, compressed way, like an attack hamster"; and concludes, "Some people are worried about the difference between right and wrong. I'm worried about the difference between wrong and fun." 'The first few pages of this book made me laugh so much I dropped it on my month-old baby... Holidays in Hell is a splendid read.' Evening Standard
  • Votes: 1

    How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World

    by Harry Browne

  • Votes: 1

    Parting the Waters

    by Taylor Branch

  • Votes: 1

    Excuses Begone!

    by Wayne W. Dr. Dyer

    Examines the stories people invent that stop them from having energy, losing weight, and being happy, and offers a new paradigm for a life without excuses.
  • Votes: 1

    1776

    by David McCullough

  • Votes: 1

    Wild At Heart

    by John Eldredge

    John Eldredge revises and updates his best-selling, renowned Christian classic. God designed men to be dangerous, says John Eldredge. Simply look at the dreams and desires written in the heart of every boy: To be a hero, to be a warrior, to live a life of adventure and risk. Sadly, most men abandon those dreams and desires-aided by a Christianity that feels like nothing more than pressure to be a "nice guy." It is no wonder that many men avoid church, and those who go are often passive and bored to death. In this provocative book, Eldredge gives women a look inside the true heart of a man and gives men permission to be what God designed them to be-dangerous, passionate, alive, and free.
  • Votes: 1

    The Pain and the Great One

    by Judy Blume

    A six-year-old (The Pain) and his eight-year-old sister (The Great One) see each other as troublemakers and the best-loved in the family.
  • Votes: 1

    Emotional survival for law enforcement

    by Kevin M Gilmartin

    This book is designed to help law enforcement professionals overcome the internal assaults they experience both personally and organizationally over the course of their careers. These assaults can transform idealistic and committed officers into angry, cynical individuals, leading to significant problems in both their personal and professional lives.
  • Votes: 1

    Soul Contracts

    by Danielle MacKinnon

    In "Soul Contracts," intuitive coach and consultant Danielle MacKinnon helps you recognize and release the energetic barriers lodged deep in your soul, called soul contracts. Born out of despair, fear, pain, or anger, a soul contract is an unconscious promise that you've made with yourself in the past that is now hindering your ability to move forward in life. Through a five-step process, you can identify, master, and release these hidden blocks, and thus unlock your greatest potential.
  • Votes: 1

    Pulling Your Own Strings

    by Wayne W Dyer

  • Votes: 1

    Beach Music

    by Pat Conroy

    With the spectacular worldwide success of his unforgettable novel The Prince of Tides, Pat Conroy established himself as a major international writer. He is known for his anguished and painfully honest insights into families and the human heart. He now returns with Beach Music, a story which tells of a family haunted by dark memories that reach back into the unutterable terrors of the Holocaust. Jack McCall, an American living in Rome with his young daughter, is trying to find peace after the recent trauma of his wife's suicide. But his solitude is disturbed by the appearance of his sister-in-law, who begs him to return home, and of two school friends, who want his help in tracking down another classmate who went underground as a Vietman protester and never resurfaced. These requests launch Jack on a journey that encompasses the past and the present in both Europe and the American South: a quest that leads him to shocking and ultimately liberating truths.
  • Votes: 1

    Rise to Globalism

    by Stephen E. Ambrose

    Since it first appeared in 1971, Rise to Globalism has sold hundreds of thousands of copies. The ninth edition of this classic survey, now updated through the administration of George W. Bush, offers a concise and informative overview of the evolution of American foreign policy from 1938 to the present, focusing on such pivotal events as World War II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, and 9/11. Examining everything from the Iran-Contra scandal to the rise of international terrorism, the authors analyze-in light of the enormous global power of the United States-how American economic aggressiveness, racism, and fear of Communism have shaped the nation's evolving foreign policy.
  • Votes: 1

    The Carnivore Code

    by Paul Saladino MD

  • Votes: 1

    Federal Mafia

    by Irwin Schiff

  • Votes: 1

    Siddartha

    by Herman Hesse

  • Votes: 1

    Allies of Humanity Book One

    by Marshall Vian Summers

    ...Over twenty years ago, a group of individuals from several different worlds gathered at a discreet location in our solar system near earth for the purpose of observing the alien intervention that is occurring in our world. From their hidden vantage point, they were able to determine the identity, organization and intentions of those visiting our world and monitor the visitors' activities. This group of observers call themselves the "Allies of Humanity." This is their report.
  • Votes: 1

    Apocalypse Never

    by Michael Shellenberger

  • Votes: 1

    Swan Song

    by Robert McCammon

    New York Times Bestseller: A young girl’s visions offer the last hope in a postapocalyptic wasteland in this “grand and disturbing adventure” (Dean Koontz). A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick Swan is a nine-year-old Idaho girl following her struggling mother from one trailer park to the next when she receives visions of doom—something far wider than the narrow scope of her own beleaguered life. In a blinding flash, nuclear bombs annihilate civilization, leaving only a few buried survivors to crawl onto a scorched landscape that was once America. In Manhattan, a homeless woman stumbles from the sewers, guided by the prophecies of a mysterious amulet, and pursued by something wicked; on Idaho’s Blue Dome Mountain, an orphaned boy falls under the influence of depraved survivalists and discovers the value of a killer instinct; and amid the devastating dust storms on the Great Plains of Nebraska, Swan forms a heart-and-soul bond with an unlikely new companion. Soon they will cross paths. But only Swan knows that they must endure more than just a trek across an irradiated country of mutated animals, starvation, madmen, and wasteland warriors. Swan’s visions tell of a coming malevolent force. It’s a shape-shifting embodiment of the apocalypse, and of all that is evil and despairing. And it’s hell-bent on destroying the last hope of goodness and purity in the world. Swan is that hope. Now, she must fight not only for her own survival, but for that of all mankind. A winner of the Bram Stoker Award and a finalist for the World Fantasy Award, Swan Song has become a modern classic, called “a chilling vision that keeps you turning pages to the shocking end” by John Saul and “a long, satisfying look at hell and salvation” by Publishers Weekly.
  • Votes: 1

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his quixotic passion and obsession for the beautiful former debutante Daisy Buchanan. The Great Gatsby explores themes of decadence, idealism, resistance to change, social upheaval, and excess, creating a portrait of the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties that has been described as a cautionary tale regarding the American Dream. Set on the prosperous Long Island of 1922, The Great Gatsby provides a critical social history of America during the Roaring Twenties within its fictional narrative. That era, known for profound economic prosperity, the development of jazz music flapper culture, new technologies in communication (motion pictures, broadcast radio, recorded music) forging a genuine mass culture; and bootlegging, along with other criminal activity, is plausibly depicted in Fitzgerald's novel. Fitzgerald uses many of these societal developments of the 1920s that were to build Gatsby's stories from many of the simple details like automobiles to broader themes like Fitzgerald's discreet allusions to the organized crime culture which was the source of Gatsby's fortune. Fitzgerald depicts the garish society of the Roaring Twenties by placing the book's plotline within the historical context of the era.
  • Votes: 1

    The Peter Principle

    by Dr. Laurence J Peter

  • Votes: 1

    The Normal Christian Life

    by Watchman Nee

    The Normal Christian Life is Watchman Nee’s great Christian classic unfolding the central theme of “Christ our Life.” Starting from key passages in Romans, Nee reveals the secret of spiritual vitality that should be the normal experience of every Christian. His emphasis on the cross and resurrection of Jesus Christ contains fresh insights that have proven a blessing to many.
  • Votes: 1

    Scar Tissue

    by Anthony Kiedis

  • Votes: 1

    The River

    by Edward Hooper

    A British medical journalist offers a meticulously researched look at HIV and its potential source, discussing the history of this lethal epidemic, analyzing a number of theories concerning its origins, and investigating current scientific inquiries into HIV, AIDS, and the search for a cure. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    American Betrayal

    by Diana West

    In The Death of the Grown-Up, Diana West diagnosed the demise of Western civilization by looking at its chief symptom: our inability to become adults who render judgments of right and wrong. In American Betrayal, West digs deeper to discover the root of this malaise and uncovers a body of lies that Americans have been led to regard as the near-sacred history of World War II and its Cold War aftermath. Part real-life thriller, part national tragedy, American Betrayal lights up the massive, Moscow-directed penetration of America's most hallowed halls of power, revealing not just the familiar struggle between Communism and the Free World, but the hidden war between those wishing to conceal the truth and those trying to expose the increasingly official web of lies. American Betrayal is America's lost history, a chronicle that pits Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight David Eisenhower, and other American icons who shielded overlapping Communist conspiracies against the investigators, politicians, defectors, and others (including Senator Joseph McCarthy) who tried to tell the American people the truth. American Betrayal shatters the approved histories of an era that begins with FDR's first inauguration, when "happy days" are supposed to be here again, and ends when we "win" the Cold War. It is here, amid the rubble, where Diana West focuses on the World War II--Cold War deal with the devil in which America surrendered her principles in exchange for a series of Big Lies whose preservation soon became the basis of our leaders' own self-preservation. It was this moral surrender to deception and self-deception, West argues, that sent us down the long road to moral relativism, "political correctness," and other cultural ills that have left us unable to ask the hard questions: Does our silence on the crimes of Communism explain our silence on the totalitarianism of Islam? Is Uncle Sam once again betraying America? In American Betrayal, Diana West shakes the historical record to bring down a new understanding of our past, our present, and how we have become a nation unable to know truth from lies.
  • Votes: 1

    Crippled America

    by Donald J. Trump

    Donald Trump outlines how a crippled America could be restored to greatness. The book explores Trump's view on key issues including the economy, big CEO salaries and taxes, healthcare, education, national security, and social issues. Of particular interest is his vision for complete immigration reform, beginning with securing the borders and putting American workers first
  • Votes: 1

    Travels with Charley in Search of America

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 1

    How We Believe

    by Michael Shermer

    A new edition covering the latest scientific research on how the brain makes us believers or skeptics Recent polls report that 96 percent of Americans believe in God, and 73 percent believe that angels regularly visit Earth. Why is this? Why, despite the rise of science, technology, and secular education, are people turning to religion in greater numbers than ever before? Why do people believe in God at all? These provocative questions lie at the heart of How We Believe , an illuminating study of God, faith, and religion. Bestselling author Michael Shermer offers fresh and often startling insights into age-old questions, including how and why humans put their faith in a higher power, even in the face of scientific skepticism. Shermer has updated the book to explore the latest research and theories of psychiatrists, neuroscientists, epidemiologists, and philosophers, as well as the role of faith in our increasingly diverse modern world. Whether believers or nonbelievers, we are all driven by the need to understand the universe and our place in it. How We Believe is a brilliant scientific tour of this ancient and mysterious desire.
  • Votes: 1

    Dante's Inferno

    by Dante Alighieri

    Belonging in the immortal company of the works of Homer, Virgil, Milton, and Shakespeare, Dante Alighieri’s poetic masterpiece is a visionary journey that takes readers through the torment of Hell. The first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy is many things: a moving human drama, a supreme expression of the Middle Ages, a glorification of the ways of God, and a magnificent protest against the ways in which men have thwarted the divine plan. One of the few literary works that has enjoyed a fame both immediate and enduring, The Inferno remains powerful after seven centuries. It confronts the most universal values—good and evil, free will and predestination—while remaining intensely personal and ferociously political, for it was born out of the anguish of a man who saw human life blighted by the injustice and corruption of his times. Translated by John Ciardi With an Introduction by Archibald T. MacAllister and an Afterword by Edward M. Cifelli
  • Votes: 1

    The Helping Phriendly Book

    by Eevee Zorrita

  • Votes: 1

    Geronimo

    by Geronimo

    In this, one of Native American history's most extraordinary documents, a legendary warrior and shaman recounts the beliefs and customs of his people. Completely and utterly authentic, its captivating narrator is the most famous member of the Apache tribe: Geronimo. The spiritual and intellectual leader of the American Indians who defended their land from both Mexico and the United States for many years, Geronimo surrendered in 1886. Two decades later, while under arrest, he told his story through a native interpreter to S. M. Barrett, an Oklahoma school superintendent. Barrett explains in his introduction, "I wrote to President Roosevelt that here was an old Indian who had been held a prisoner of war for twenty years and had never been given a chance to tell his side of the story, and asked that Geronimo be granted permission to tell for publication, in his own way, the story of his life." This remarkable testament is the result. It begins with Geronimo's retelling of an Apache creation myth and his descriptions of his youth and family. He explains his military tactics as well as traditional practices, including hunting and religious rituals, and reflects upon his hope for the survival of his people and their culture.
  • Votes: 1

    Lateral Thinking

    by Edward De Bono

    THE classic work about improving creativity from world-renowned writer and philosopher Edward de Bono. In schools we are taught to meet problems head-on: what Edward de Bono calls 'vertical thinking'. This works well in simple situations - but we are at a loss when this approach fails. What then? Lateral thinking is all about freeing up your imagination. Through a series of special techniques, in groups or working alone, Edward de Bono shows how to stimulate the mind in new and exciting ways. Soon you will be looking at problems from a variety of angles and offering up solutions that are as ingenious as they are effective. You will become much more productive and a formidable thinker in your own right. 'If more bankers and traders had read Lateral Thinking and applied the ideas of Edward de Bono to their own narrow definitions of risk, reward and human expectations, I suspect we would be in much better shape than we are'Sir Richard Branson Edward de Bono invented the concept of lateral thinking. A world-renowned writer and philosopher, he is the leading authority in the field of creative thinking and the direct teaching of thinking as a skill. Dr de Bono has written more than 60 books, in 40 languages, with people now teaching his methods worldwide. He has chaired a special summit of Nobel Prize laureates, and been hailed as one of the 250 people who have contributed most to mankind. Dr de Bono's titles include classic bestsellers such as Six Thinking Hats, Lateral Thinking, I Am Right You Are Wrong, Teach Yourself How To Think, Teach Your Child How To Think, and Simplicity - all now re-issued by Penguin. www.edwdebono.com
  • Votes: 1

    Tragedy & Hope

    by Carroll Quigley

    What has tragedy been made to mean by dramatists, story-tellers, critics, philosophers, politicians, and journalists? This work shows the relevance of tragedy to the modern world, and extends beyond drama and literature into visual art and everyday experience.
  • Votes: 1

    The Phoenix Project

    by Gene Kim

    Bill has 90 days to fix a behind-schedule IT project, or his entire department will be outsourced. Fortunately, he has the help of a prospective board member, whose "Three Ways" philosophy might just save the day.
  • Votes: 1

    Breathe

    by Belisa Vranich

    Insomnia? Gone. Anxiety? Gone. All without medication. Unpleasant side effects from blood pressure pills? Gone. A cheap and effective way to combat cardiovascular disease, immune dysfunction, obesity, and GI disorders? Yes. Sounds too good to be true? Believe it. Contemporary science confirms what generations of healers have observed through centuries of practice: Breath awareness can turn on the body’s natural abilities to prevent and cure illness. The mental and physical stresses of modern life, such as anxiety, frustration, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, high blood pressure, digestive woes, and immune dysfunction can all be addressed through conscious control of your breath. In addition, it can increase energy, accelerate healing, improve cognitive skills, and enhance mental balance. Yet most of us stopped breathing in the anatomically “right” way, the way to take advantage of these benefits, when we were four or five years old. We now mostly breathe in a way that is anatomically incongruous and makes for more illness. Dr. Vranich shows readers how to turn back the tide of stress and illness, and improve the overall quality of their life through a daily breathing workout. In a fascinating, straightforward, jargon-free exploration of how our bodies were meant to breathe, Dr. Belisa Vranich delves into the ins and outs of proper breathing. By combining both anatomy and fitness with psychology and mindfulness, Dr. Vranich gives readers a way of solving health problems at the crux and healing themselves from the inside out. BREATHE is an easy-to-follow guide to breathing exercises that will increase energy, help lose weight, and make readers feel calmer and happier.
  • Votes: 1

    Raptureless

    by Jonathan Welton

  • Votes: 1

    The Electric Sky

    by Donald E. Scott

    A challenge to the myths of modern astronomy based on stunning and extensive evidence that it is electricity that powers the universe. Science for the expert written for the public.
  • Votes: 1

    Animals in Translation

    by Temple Grandin

    Temple Grandin's -- Animals in Translation Among its provocative ideas, the book: argues that language is not a requirement for consciousness -- and that animals do have consciousness applies the autism theory of "hyper-specificity" to animals, showing that animals and autistic people are so sensitive to detail that they "can't see the forest for the trees"--A talent as well as a "deficit" explores the "interpreter" in the normal human brain that filters out detail, leaving people blind to much of the reality that surrounds them -- a reality animals and autistic people see, sometimes all too clearly explains how animals have "superhuman" skills: animals have animal genius compares animals to autistic savants, declaring that animals may in fact be autistic savants, with special forms of genius that normal people do not possess and sometimes cannot even see examines how humans and animals use their emotions to think, to decide, and even to predict the future reveals the remarkable abilities of handicapped people and animals maintains that the single worst thing you can do to an animal is to make it feel afraid Temple Grandin is like no other author on the subject of animals because of her training and because of her autism: understanding animals is in her blood and in her bones.
  • Votes: 1

    Wealth, Poverty and Politics

    by Thomas Sowell

  • Votes: 1

    Your Own Perfect Medicine

    by Martha M. Christy

    An overview of the mainstream medical use of urine, which contains more than 200 nutrients, vitamins, hormones, minerals, antibodies, and amino acids.
  • Votes: 1

    The Once and Future King

    by Terence Hanbury White

    Describes King Arthur's life from his childhood to the coronation, creation of the Round Table, and search for the Holy Grail
  • Votes: 1

    The Power of a Praying® Parent

    by Stormie Omartian

    Offers insight and sample prayers for parents to recite on behalf of their children.
  • Votes: 1

    God Never Blinks

    by Regina Brett

    Already an internet phenomenon, these wise and insightful lessons by popular newspaper columnist and Pulitzer Prize finalist Regina Brett will make you see the possibilities in your life in a whole new way. When Regina Brett turned 50, she wrote a column on the 50 lessons life had taught her. She reflected on all she had learned through becoming a single parent, looking for love in all the wrong places, working on her relationship with God, battling cancer and making peace with a difficult childhood. It became one of the most popular columns ever published in the newspaper, and since then the 50 lessons have been emailed to hundreds of thousands of people. Brett now takes the 50 lessons and expounds on them in essays that are deeply personal. From "Don't take yourself too seriously-Nobody else does" to "Life isn't tied with a bow, but it's still a gift," these lessons will strike a chord with anyone who has ever gone through tough times--and haven't we all?
  • Votes: 1

    A Conflict of Visions

    by Thomas Sowell

    Controversies in politics arise from many sources, but the conflicts that endure for generations or centuries show a remarkably consistent pattern. In this classic work, Thomas Sowell analyzes this pattern. He describes the two competing visions that shape our debates about the nature of reason, justice, equality, and power: the "constrained" vision, which sees human nature as unchanging and selfish, and the "unconstrained" vision, in which human nature is malleable and perfectible. A Conflict of Visions offers a convincing case that ethical and policy disputes circle around the disparity between both outlooks.
  • Votes: 1

    Heart of Darkness

    by Joseph Conrad

  • Votes: 1

    The Science of Getting Rich

    by Wallace D. Wattles

    Everyone wants to be rich, but do you know that there is a SCIENCE OF GETTING RICH. This book explains in simple steps how you can first ready yourself to earn more, without hassles or worries. From the simplest question of who all can actually get rich, to the small steps taken – like developing a will power, showing gratitude, getting into the right business – have been explained in detail, in everyday terms. Read on, and find out the secret behind changing your life and the way your earn.
  • Votes: 1

    Fatal Vision

    by Joe McGinniss

    The electrifying true crime story of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, the handsome, Princeton-educated physician convicted of savagely slaying his young pregnant wife and two small children—murders he vehemently denies committing... Bestselling author Joe McGinniss chronicles every aspect of this horrifying and intricate crime and probes the life and psyche of the magnetic, all-American Jeffrey MacDonald—a golden boy who seemed destined to have it all. The result is a penetration to the heart of darkness that enshrouded one of the most complex criminal cases ever to capture the attention of the American public. It is a haunting, stunningly suspenseful work that no reader will be able to forget. Includes photographs and a Special Epilogue by the author OVER ONE MILLION COPIES SOLD
  • Votes: 1

    The Deep Rig

    by Patrick M Byrne

    Byrne is a libertarian who did not vote for Trump and has publicly criticized him: that said, he believes Election 2020 was rigged, and that should be objectionable to every person who believes, "just government derives its power from the consent of the governed." In this book he explains what caused him in August 2020 to study election fraud, and what really happened during the 2020 election. He describes how his team of "cyber-ninjas" unraveled it while they worked against the clock of Constitutional processes, all against the background of being a lifetime entrepreneur trying to interact with Washington, DC. This book takes you behind the headlines to backroom scenes that determined whether or not the fraud would be exposed in time, and paints a portrait of Washington that will leave the reader asking, "Is this the end of our constitutional republic?".
  • Votes: 1

    The Ethics of Liberty

    by Murray N. Rothbard

    The authoritative text on the libertarian political position In recent years, libertarian impulses have increasingly influenced national and economic debates, from welfare reform to efforts to curtail affirmative action. Murray N. Rothbard's classic The Ethics of Liberty stands as one of the most rigorous and philosophically sophisticated expositions of the libertarian political position. Rothbard’s unique argument roots the case for freedom in the concept of natural rights and applies it to a host of practical problems. And while his conclusions are radical—that a social order that strictly adheres to the rights of private property must exclude the institutionalized violence inherent in the state—Rothbard’s applications of libertarian principles prove surprisingly practical for a host of social dilemmas, solutions to which have eluded alternative traditions. The Ethics of Liberty authoritatively established the anarcho-capitalist economic system as the most viable and the only principled option for a social order based on freedom. This classic book’s radical insights are sure to inspire a new generation of readers.
  • Votes: 1

    Karma Sutra

    by Hingori

  • Votes: 1

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    by Bill Bryson

    The author of A Walk in the Woods traces the Big Bang through the rise of civilization, documenting his work with a host of the world's most advanced scientists and mathematicians to explain why things are the way they are. Reprint. 125,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    A Catskill Eagle (Spenser, Book 12)

    by Robert B. Parker

    Spenser and Hawk, in an uneasy undercover alliance with federal law-enforcement agents, search for Susan Silverman, who is somehow involved with the son of a man the government wants dead.
  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Love

    by Kathleen McGowan

    Once there was a gospel written in Christ's own hand: a treasure of almost unimaginable magnitude, referred to by the Cathars of medieval France as The Book of Love... Fresh from her successful search for the long-hidden scrolls written by Mary Magdelene, journalist Maureen Pascal now finds herself on the trail of the legendary lost gospel known as the Book of Love. But just as there were those who would stop at nothing to seize and suppress the Book of Love seven centuries ago, so there are those today who are equally determined that its radical message should never be revealed. In a race across Italy and France, new dangers await Maureen and her lover Sinclair as they begin to uncover secrets and shine new light on the hidden corners of Christianity. Combining expert research with dazzling plot twists, The Book of Love is sure to thrill readers as they follow Maureen's search for clues through some of the world's greatest art, architecture and history, until a potentially fatal encounter reveals the Book of Love to her -- and to us.
  • Votes: 1

    Everybody Poops!

    by Justine Avery

    Taking the taboo out of POO! Everybody poops-it's true! It's time to blow the door right off the bathroom, and shine a light on what happens on the loo. For the little ones just discovering the contents of their diapers and nappies, the bigger ones needing reassurance that their most mysterious bodily function is as natural as can be, and the biggest ones who still hold a fondness for toilet humor, Everybody Poops! is piled high with bold and audacious illustrations and the truth about who's doing the pooing: every body is doing it! Sure to insight giggling fits and all-ages laughter, Everybody Poops! exposes the least talked about fact we all have in common the world over and among all walks of life, benefiting the youngest of us by opening the discussion, promoting comfort with their bodies, and helping them feel included. Poo pride!
  • Votes: 1

    On the Death of My Son

    by Jasper Swain

    An account of the afterlife as given by a young man, who lost his life in a motorcycle accident, to his father. The text is aimed at those who have lost a loved one, and claims to give accounts of the workings of the Heavenly Realms.
  • Votes: 1

    One God Clapping

    by Alan Lew

    A rabbi describes his work in the area of using Zen meditation to enhance Jewish spirituality.
  • Votes: 1

    What Has Government Done to Our Money?

    by Murray N. Rothbard

    (Large Format Edition)
  • Votes: 1

    Where Is God When It Hurts?

    by Philip Yancey

  • Votes: 1

    Journey into the Whirlwind

    by Eugenia Ginzburg

    A woman’s true account of eighteen years as a Soviet prisoner: “Not even Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich matches it.”—The New York Times Book Review In the late 1930s, Eugenia Ginzburg was a wife and mother, a schoolteacher and writer, and a longtime loyal Communist Party member. But like millions of others during Stalin’s reign of terror, she was arrested—on trumped-up charges of being a Trotskyist terrorist counter-revolutionary—and sentenced to prison. With sharp detail and an indefatigable spirit, Ginzburg recounts her arrest and the eighteen harrowing years she endured in Soviet prisons and labor camps, including two in solitary confinement. Her memoir is “a compelling personal narrative of survival” (The New York Times Book Review)—and one of the most important documents of Stalin’s brutal regime. “Deeply significant…intensely personal and passionately felt.”—Time “Probably the best account that has ever been published of…the prison and camp empire of the Stalin era.”—Book World Translated by Paul Stevenson and Max Hayward
  • Votes: 1

    How to Eat Fried Worms (Scholastic Gold)

    by Thomas Rockwell

  • Votes: 1

    Business @ the Speed of Thought

    by Bill Gates

    Most companies have a sizeable investment in technology but are realising only 20% of its potential benefit. BUSINESS @ THE SPEED OF THOUGHT introduces the concept of the digital nervous system which unites all systems and processes under one common infrastructure, allowing companies to make quantum leaps in efficiency, growth and profit. Using detailed tours of Microsoft and other major corporations, Gates demonstrates how integrated technology can transform any business by energizing its three major elements: customer/partner relationships, employees and process, and offers practical suggestions on how this can be achieved.
  • Votes: 1

    A Drinking Life

    by Pete Hamill

  • Votes: 1

    How to Do the Work

    by Dr. Nicole LePera

  • Votes: 1

    David and Goliath

    by Malcolm Gladwell

  • Votes: 1

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

    by William James

  • Votes: 1

    Exodus

    by Leon Uris

    Examines the phenomenon of Exodus and its influence on post-World War II understandings of Israel's beginnings.
  • Votes: 1

    The Quest for Cosmic Justice

    by Thomas Sowell

    This book is about the great moral issues underlying many of the headline-making political controversies of our times. It is not a comforting book but a book about disturbing and dangerous trends. The Quest for Cosmic Justice shows how confused conceptions of justice end up promoting injustice, how confused conceptions of equality end up promoting inequality, and how the tyranny of social visions prevents many people from confronting the actual consequences of their own beliefs and policies. Those consequences include the steady and dangerous erosion of fundamental principles of freedom -- amounting to a quiet repeal of the American revolution. The Quest for Cosmic Justice is the summation of a lifetime of study and thought about where we as a society are headed -- and why we need to change course before we do irretrievable damage.
  • Votes: 1

    The Possessed

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    Demons is an anti-nihilistic novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It is the third of the four great novels written by Dostoyevsky after his return from Siberian exile, the others being Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Demons is a social and political satire, a psychological drama, and large scale tragedy.
  • Votes: 1

    Necessary Losses

    by Judith Viorst

    From grief and mourning to aging and relationships, poet and Redbook contributor Judith Viorst presents a thoughtful and researched study in this examination of love, loss, and letting go. Drawing on psychoanalysis, literature, and personal experience, Necessary Losses is a philosophy for understanding and accepting life’s inevitabilities. In Necessary Losses, Judith Viorst turns her considerable talents to a serious and far-reaching subject: how we grow and change through the losses that are a certain and necessary part of life. She argues persuasively that through the loss of our mothers’ protection, the loss of the impossible expectations we bring to relationships, the loss of our younger selves, and the loss of our loved ones through separation and death, we gain deeper perspective, true maturity, and fuller wisdom about life. She has written a book that is both life affirming and life changing.
  • Votes: 1

    The Naked Communist

    by W. Cleon Skousen

    A timely update to the phenomenal national bestseller.Soon after its quiet release during the height of the Red Scare in 1958, The Naked Communist: Exposing Communism and Restoring Freedom exploded in popularity, selling almost two million copies to date and finding its way into the libraries of the CIA, the FBI, the White House, and homes all across the United States. From the tragic falls of China, Korea, Russia, and the UN, to the fascinating histories of Alger Hiss, Whittaker Chambers, Elizabeth Bentley, and General MacArthur, The Naked Communist lays out the entire graphic story of communism, its past, present, and future.After searching unsuccessfully for a concise literature on the communist threat, W. Cleon Skousen saw the urgent need for a comprehensive book that could guide the American conversation. So he distilled his FBI experience, decades of research, and more than one hundred communist books and treatises into one clarifying, readable volume that became a touchstone of American values and earned praise from the likes of President Ronald Reagan, Glenn Beck, and Ben Carson. Lauded by one reviewer as "the most powerful book on communism since J. Edgar Hoover's Masters of Deceit," this text draws a detailed picture of the communist as he sees himself: stripped of propaganda and pretense. Readers gain a unique insight into the inner workings of communism-its appeal, its history, its basic and unchanging concepts, even its secret timetable of conquest. Among the many questions The Naked Communist answers are:* Who gave the United States' nuclear secrets to the Russians?* How did the FBI fight communism after it was forced underground in 1918?* Why did the West lose 600 million allies after World War II?* What really happened in Korea?* What is communism's great secret weapon?* What lies ahead?* What can I do to stop communism?* How can we fight communism without a major war?Now updated for 2017, this edition includes a chapter on the forty-five Communist Goals, detailing how forty-four of those goals have been achieved in the U.S. already, as well as a chapter on the making of The Naked Communist, shedding light on how this book has sold almost two million copies. As relevant now as it was sixty years ago, Skousen's groundbreaking work provides a renewed understanding of one of the greatest threats facing America today.
  • Votes: 1

    The New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding

    by Arnold Schwarzenegger

    From elite bodybuilding competitors to gymnasts, from golfers to fitness gurus, anyone who works out with weights must own this book -- a book that only Arnold Schwarzenegger could write, a book that has earned its reputation as "the bible of bodybuilding." Inside, Arnold covers the very latest advances in both weight training and bodybuilding competition, with new sections on diet and nutrition, sports psychology, the treatment and prevention of injuries, and methods of training, each illustrated with detailed photos of some of bodybuilding's newest stars. Plus, all the features that have made this book a classic are here: Arnold's tried-and-true tips for sculpting, strengthening, and defining each and every muscle to create the ultimate buff physique The most effective methods of strength training to stilt your needs, whether you're an amateur athlete or a pro bodybuilder preparing for a competition Comprehensive information on health, nutrition, and dietary supplements to help you build muscle, lose fat, and maintain optimum energy Expert advice on the prevention and treatment of sports-related injuries Strategies and tactics for competitive bodybuilders from selecting poses to handling publicity The fascinating history and growth of' bodybuilding as a sport, with a photographic "Bodybuilding Hall of Fame" And, of course, Arnold's individual brand of inspiration and motivation throughout Covering every level of expertise and experience, The New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding will help you achieve your personal best. With his unique perspective as a seven-time winner of the Mr. Olympia title and all international film star, Arnold shares his secrets to dedication, training, and commitment, and shows you how to take control of your body and realize your own potential for greatness.
  • Votes: 1

    The Happiness Hypothesis

    by Jonathan Haidt

  • Votes: 1

    The Noticer

    by Andy Andrews

    A New York Times Bestseller Your chance to regroup, take a breath, and begin your life again awaits in the simple wisdom and heartwarming story of a man named Jones. Orange Beach, Alabama, is a simple town filled with simple people. But like all humans on the planet, the good folks of Orange Beach have their share of problems—marriages teetering on the brink of divorce, young adults giving up on life, business people on the verge of bankruptcy, as well as the many other obstacles that life seems to dish out to the masses. Fortunately, when things look the darkest, a mysterious man named Jones has a miraculous way of showing up. Communicating what he calls “a little perspective,” he explains that he has been given a gift of noticing things that others miss. “Your time on this earth is a gift to be used wisely,” he says. “Don’t squander your words or your thoughts. Consider even the simplest action you take, for your lives matter beyond measure…and they matter forever.” The Noticer will provide you with: A better understanding of life’s challenges and proper perspective for tackling them. Practical yet powerful methods of motivation, encouragement, and resolve for those who have been dealt “the bad hand.” A fresh and insightful perspective on how people can change their view of the world, find strength, and move beyond their problems. The story of Jones continues in The Noticer Returns, available now and Just Jones, releasing September 8th, 2020.
  • Votes: 1

    The Holocaust Industry

    by Norman G. Finkelstein

    Argues that public emphasis on the Holocaust and on reparations serves more to enhance the status of Israel and Jewish elites elsewhere, and to distract attention from other abuses, than to preserve the memory of its victims.
  • Votes: 1

    The Release of the Spirit

    by Watchman Nee

    Surely this is the hour when the battleground is in the soul. While the Lord is seeking to work through the quickened spirit. Satan is seeking to work throught the natural, soulish life which has not been brought under control of the spriit.
  • Votes: 1

    Wuthering Heights

    by Emily Bronte

    The text of the novel is based on the first edition of 1847.
  • Votes: 1

    So Who Is John Galt, Anyway?

    by Robert Tracinski

    Ayn Rand's masterwork, Atlas Shrugged, is a rich and complex novel with an intricate plot in which dozens of moving parts mesh together and many minor themes are woven in amongst the novel's big philosophical issues. This is a guide to the literary, historical, and philosophical significance of Atlas Shrugged, offering deeper insights for those who are new to the novel as well as new observations for longtime fans. Find out, for example, the real-life parallels to characters and events in Atlas Shrugged; how the novel's plot seems to be opposite from that of Ayn Rand's previous bestseller, The Fountainhead; what Ayn Rand has in common with the epic poets Homer and Hesiod; how Atlas Shrugged is both a historical novel and futuristic work of science fiction; how Ayn Rand was a philosopher in the tradition of the Enlightenment; why Atlas Shrugged is not a political novel; why all an Ayn Rand hero really wants is love; and the question posed in the title: the key to the mysterious figure of John Galt and the meaning of one of the most famous questions in literature, "Who is John Galt?"
  • Votes: 1

    Redeeming Love

    by Francine Rivers

  • Votes: 1

    Status Anxiety

    by Alain De Botton

    Drawing from the fields of history, psychology, politics, and economics, a close up look at the anxieties we suffer associated with a pursuit of status explains how humans have sought to cope with their fears through philosophy, art, religion, and bohemia and offers thought-provoking suggestions on other ways to deal with the problem. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    The Final Quest

    by Rick Joyner

    What if a single revelation could change your destiny in a moment? In this riveting bestselling series, author Rick Joyner takes you on the supernatural journey that has captivated millions. This is more real than an allegory. The Final Quest Trilogy is a panoramic vision of the epic struggle between light and darkness, and your part in it. As the series unfolds, you can join in the great battle, encounter angels and demons, apostles and prophets, and the heavenly realm itself. This Trilogy is about the greatest adventure--to serve the greatest King and to stand for His truth with courage. This is not for the timid, but for the bold who care.
  • Votes: 1

    Art of Seduction

    by Robert Greene

  • Votes: 1

    Watch My Back

    by Geoff Thompson

    Watch My Back is the story of one man’s search for courage. Depressed, bullied, intimidated by life and indoctrinated to believe that this was his lot, Geoff Thompson, on the verge of a breakdown, decided to fight back. In a bid to confront his fears, he took a job as a bouncer in one of Britain’s roughest nightclubs. Over the next ten years, he was involved in hundreds of brutal and bloody fights that left two of his friends murdered and many more in prison; he turned himself into a fearsome fighting machine. Geoff reached the top of his trade and became addicted to violence. Then it all changed. After nearly being killed in a gang attack, and almost killing one of his attackers, he was forced to reassess his relationship with violence. After writing down his experiences, Geoff discovered a flair for writing. This is the story of an ordinary man who faced his fears and took himself from bedsit to best-seller but very nearly got killed on the way. Geoff Thompson is now the author of over thirty books, a stage play and a BAFTA winning short film.
  • Votes: 1

    The Shadows of Power

    by James Perloff

    Index and a list of members of Council on Foreign Relations included.
  • Votes: 1

    This is Good Stuff!

    by Rev. Thomas A. Walsh

  • Votes: 1

    The Selfish Gene

    by Richard Dawkins

    With a new epilogue to the 40th anniversary edition.
  • Votes: 1

    Message to the Blackman in America

    by Elijah Muhammad

    Originally published: Chicago: Muhammad Mosque of Islam No. 2., 1965.
  • Votes: 1

    Dream Gates & Astral Paths

    by Edgar Kerval

    A world-renowned authority on the history, uses, and power of dreaming, Robert Moss guides neophyte and experienced adventurers alike to open their own dreamgates. Through these gates await otherwise inaccessible realms of reality as well as soul remembering — the “recovering of knowledge that belonged to us before we came into this life experience.” Exercises, meditations, and the mesmerizing tales of fellow dream travelers outline Moss’s Active Dreaming technique, a kind of shamanic soul-flight that offers “frequent flyers” a passport between worlds. In this world beyond physical reality, Moss points to wellsprings of healing, creativity, and insight. As readers move into these different ways of seeing and knowing, they may also communicate with spiritual guides and departed loved ones in ways that transform their everyday lives.
  • Votes: 1

    The Millionaire Fastlane

    by MJ DeMarco

    Is the financial plan of mediocrity -- a dream-stealing, soul-sucking dogma known as "The Slowlane" your plan for creating wealth? You know how it goes; it sounds a lil something like this: "Go to school, get a good job, save 10% of your paycheck, buy a used car, cancel the movie channels, quit drinking expensive Starbucks mocha lattes, save and penny-pinch your life away, trust your life-savings to the stock market, and one day, when you are oh, say, 65 years old, you can retire rich." The mainstream financial gurus have sold you blindly down the river to a great financial gamble: You've been hoodwinked to believe that wealth can be created by recklessly trusting in the uncontrollable and unpredictable markets: the housing market, the stock market, and the job market. This impotent financial gamble dubiously promises wealth in a wheelchair -- sacrifice your adult life for a financial plan that reaps dividends in the twilight of life. Accept the Slowlane as your blueprint for wealth and your financial future will blow carelessly asunder on a sailboat of HOPE: HOPE you can find a job and keep it, HOPE the stock market doesn't tank, HOPE the economy rebounds, HOPE, HOPE, and HOPE. Do you really want HOPE to be the centerpiece for your family's financial plan? Drive the Slowlane road and you will find your life deteriorate into a miserable exhibition about what you cannot do, versus what you can. For those who don't want a lifetime subscription to "settle-for-less" and a slight chance of elderly riches, there is an alternative; an expressway to extraordinary wealth that can burn a trail to financial independence faster than any road out there. Why jobs, 401(k)s, mutual funds, and 40-years of mindless frugality will never make you rich young. Why most entrepreneurs fail and how to immediately put the odds in your favor. The real law of wealth: Leverage this and wealth has no choice but to be magnetized to you. The leading cause of poorness: Change this and you change everything. How the rich really get rich - and no, it has nothing to do with a paycheck or a 401K match. Why the guru's grand deity - compound interest - is an impotent wealth accelerator. Why the guru myth of "do what you love" will most likely keep you poor, not rich. And 250+ more poverty busting distinctions... Demand the Fastlane, an alternative road-to-wealth; one that actually ignites dreams and creates millionaires young, not old. Change lanes and find your explosive wealth accelerator. Hit the Fastlane, crack the code to wealth, and find out how to live rich for a lifetime.
  • Votes: 1

    ANAM CARA

    by JOHN O`DONOHUE

    John O'Donohue nos recuerda en este maravilloso libro, convertido ya en un clasico, la sabiduria, la poesia y la informacion sagrada que casi cualquier lugar nos ofrece, si tan solo aprendemos a detenernos un momento y escuchar. Combinando el folclore irlandes, la espiritualidad celta y la sabiduria perenne, O'Donohue nos presenta un libro delicioso y un companero perfecto para quien se sienta inclinado hacia el camino espiritual, teniendo al mismo tiempo que convivir con la prisa, el ruido y el estres de la vida moderna. Un verdadero amigo que nos ayudara a volver a aquello que nunca debimos haber olvidado, aquello que desde siempre esta en nuestro interior. "Anam Cara" significa "alma amiga".
  • Votes: 1

    I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell

    by Tucker Max

  • Votes: 1

    God Without Religion

    by Sankara Saranam

    Since Sankara Saranam's groundbreaking book God Without Religion was released 10 years ago, thousands have been enlightened by his teachings and revelations. Now, in this special 10-year anniversary edition, Sankara returns with new insights and a renewed message of spiritual guidance and inspiration. Disillusioned with organized religion, millions of people turn to secular humanism, neo-atheism, New Age thinking, Eastern religious practices, and mysticism while others retreat from spirituality altogether. A more satisfying and transformative option is to embark on a quest to discover what is real to you. Using time-tested tools of investigation into your own sense of self, you can examine your present beliefs, explore the nature of reality, and ultimately expand your identity and awareness. God Without Religion introduces this age-old approach to self-inquiry for today's readers. Step by step, it offers a bridge between organized religion and self-realization for anyone questioning traditional dogma or its legacy of divisiveness. It also assists in overcoming limitations and notions of exclusivity promoted by modern-day movements. Included are 17 universal techniques for developing a personal understanding of the underlying substance of existence and broadening your view of yourself, others, and all of life. This updated edition includes new details about Sankara's personal experiences with each technique. These highly relatable new passages will help you connect with each concept in a personal way, so that you can discover—or rediscover—your own spiritual path to clarity.
  • Votes: 1

    Dianetics

    by L. Ron Hubbard

  • Votes: 1

    In Cold Blood

    by Truman Capote

  • Votes: 1

    Assignment Russia

    by Marvin Kalb

    A chronicle of the year that changed Soviet Russia—and molded the future path of one of America's pre-eminent diplomatic correspondents 1956 was an extraordinary year in modern Russian history. It was called “the year of the thaw”—a time when Stalin’s dark legacy of dictatorship died in February only to be reborn later that December. This historic arc from rising hope to crushing despair opened with a speech by Nikita Khrushchev, then the unpredictable leader of the Soviet Union. He astounded everyone by denouncing the one figure who, up to that time, had been hailed as a “genius,” a wizard of communism—Josef Stalin himself. Now, suddenly, this once unassailable god was being portrayed as a “madman” whose idiosyncratic rule had seriously undermined communism and endangered the Soviet state. This amazing switch from hero to villain lifted a heavy overcoat of fear from the backs of ordinary Russians. It also quickly led to anti-communist uprisings in Eastern Europe, none more bloody and challenging than the one in Hungary, which Soviet troops crushed at year’s end. Marvin Kalb, then a young diplomatic attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, observed this tumultuous year that foretold the end of Soviet communism three decades later. Fluent in Russian, a doctoral candidate at Harvard, he went where few other foreigners would dare go, listening to Russian students secretly attack communism and threaten rebellion against the Soviet system, traveling from one end of a changing country to the other and, thanks to his diplomatic position, meeting and talking with Khrushchev, who playfully nicknamed him Peter the Great. In this, his fifteenth book, Kalb writes a fascinating eyewitness account of a superpower in upheaval and of a people yearning for an end to dictatorship.
  • Votes: 1

    A Day in the Life of a Poo, a Gnu, and You

    by Mike Barfield

    A day in the life of everything you can imagine - from an eyeball, a bogey, a heart and a burp, to a porcupine, a flamingo, a jellyfish, a rainbow, and, of course, a poo.
  • Votes: 1

    The Ra Material

    by Jim McCarty

  • Votes: 1

    Oh Dear!

    by Rod Campbell

    Rod Campbell, the creator of the preschool lift-the-flap classic Dear Zoo, has been a trusted name in early learning for over thirty-five years, and Oh Dear! has been a firm favourite with toddlers and parents alike since it was first published in 1983.Buster's staying with Grandma on the farm. But where will he find the eggs for breakfast? Not in the stable - oh dear! Young children will love lifting the flaps as they turn the pages and follow Buster around the farm. With bright, bold artwork, simple, catchy text and a whole host of favourite farm animals, Oh Dear! is a classic story to come back to again and again, and the thick board pages, chunky cased cover and sturdy flaps make it great for small hands.
  • Votes: 1

    Evidence That Demands a Verdict

    by Josh McDowell

    The modern apologetics classic that started it all is now completely revised and updated—because the truth of the Bible doesn’t change, but its critics do. With the original Evidence That Demands a Verdict, bestselling author Josh McDowell gave Christian readers the answers they needed to defend their faith against the harshest critics and skeptics. Since that time, Evidence has remained a trusted resource for believers young and old. Bringing historical documentation and the best modern scholarship to bear on the trustworthiness of the Bible and its teachings, this extensive volume has encouraged and strengthened millions. Now, with his son Sean McDowell, Josh McDowell has updated and expanded this classic resource for a new generation. This is a book that invites readers to bring their doubts and doesn’t shy away from the tough questions. Features Include: • Thoroughly revised and updated from the previous edition • Now co-authored by Josh McDowell and Sean McDowell • All-new chapters defending against the latest attacks from Christianity’s critics • Designed to be a go-to reference for even the toughest questions • Offers thoughtful responses to the Bible’s most difficult and extraordinary passages • Expansive defense of Christianity’s core truths, including the resurrection of Jesus Christ
  • Votes: 1

    Shoe Dog

    by Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.
  • Votes: 1

    A Gentle Introduction to Unqualified Reservations

    by Mencius Moldbug

    The new “bible” for NBDE Part I preparation! This is the only high-yield but comprehensive review of topics examined on the National Board Dental Exam (NBDE) Part I—written by dental students for dental students. It includes 200 black-and-white plus 8 pages of four-color images likely to be tested on the exam. Also includes information and advice about sitting for the exam itself.
  • Votes: 1

    The Lord of the Rings Illustrated Edition

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

  • Votes: 1

    Attack on Titan 1

    by Hajime Isayama

  • Votes: 1

    Zen in the Art of Archery

    by Eugen Herrigel

    A classic work on Eastern philosophy, Zen in the Art of Archery is a charming and deeply illuminating story of one man’s experience with Zen. Eugen Herrigel, a German professor of Philosophy in Tokyo, took up the study of archery as a step toward an understanding of Zen Buddhism. This book is the account of the six years he spent as a student of one of Japan’s great kyudo (archery) masters, and of how he gradually overcame his initial inhibitions and began to feel his way toward new truths and ways of seeing.
  • Votes: 1

    A Separate Reality

    by Carlos Castaneda

    Carlos continues his apprenticeship with Don Juan, and learns about such things as "stopping the world," "seeing," and "stalking"
  • Votes: 1

    The Ginger Tree

    by Oswald Wynd

    In 1903, a young Scotswoman named Mary Mackenzie sets sail for China to marry her betrothed, a military attachE in Peking. But soon after her arrival, Mary falls into an adulterous affair with a young Japanese nobleman, scandalizing the British community. Casting her out of the European community, her compatriots tear her away from her small daughter. A woman abandoned and alone, Mary learns to survive over forty tumultuous years in Asia, including two world wars and the cataclysmic Tokyo earthquake of 1923.
  • Votes: 1

    The Lost Gospel of Thomas

    by Theodore J. Nottingham

  • Votes: 1

    Manufacturing Consent

    by Edward S. Herman

    Examines the political role played by the media in shaping events, assesses the relationship between the media and the corporations that control and finance them, and discusses the fine distinctions between news and propaganda.
  • Votes: 1

    Through the Looking Glass (Illustrated Classics)

    by Lewis Carroll

    Through The Looking Glass is the sequel to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. It is based on his meeting with another Alice, Alice Raikes. Set some six months later than the earlier book, Alice again enters a fantastical world, this time by climbing through a mirror into the world that she can see beyond it. The book takes a look at the world of the mirror and the world beyond it. Reflections, distortions, and fantasy are major ingredients in this wonderful book, which brings together the worlds of the child and the adult. Sparkling characters are found in the narrative, ranging from Humpty Dumpty to the Red Queen to the Unicorn.The story opens on a snowy, wintry night, uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on.
  • Votes: 1

    Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

    This work will reveal why some people work less, earn more, pay less in taxes, and feel more financially secure than others.
  • Votes: 1

    The Doctor and the Soul

    by Viktor E Dr. Frankl

    Even in the degradation and misery of Dachau concentration camp, Viktor Frankl retained the belief that the most important freedom of all is the freedom to determine one's own spiritual well-being. He wrote the international bestseller Man's Search for Meaning as a result of that experience, while in The Doctor and the Soul, Dr Frankl revolutionised psychotherapy with his theory of Logotherapy. Viktor Frankl's work has been described as "the most important contributions in the field of psychotherapy since the days of Freud, Adler and Jung." In The Doctor and the Soul, Dr Frankl maintains that the individual's most important need is to find meaning in life and the frustration of this need results in neurosis, suffering and despair. A doctor's work lies in finding personal meaning in a patient's life, no matter how dismal the circumstances of the life.
  • Votes: 1

    Poor Charlie's Almanack

    by Charles T. Munger

  • Votes: 1

    Hunger

    by Roxane Gay

    'I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.' New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as "wildly undisciplined," Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties-including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life-and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen. Hunger is a deeply personal memoir from one of our finest writers, and tells a story that hasn't yet been told but needs to be.
  • Votes: 1

    An Evil Cradling

    by Brian Keenan

    Brian Keenan went to Beirut in 1985 for a change of scene from his native Belfast. He became headline news when he was kidnapped by fundamentalist Shi'ite militiamen and held in the suburbs of Beirut for the next four and a half years. For much of that time he was shut off from all news and contact with anyone other than his jailers and, later, his fellow hostages, amongst them John McCarthy.
  • Votes: 1

    The Rational Optimist

    by Matt Ridley

    For two hundred years the pessimists have dominated public discourse, insisting that things will soon be getting much worse. But in fact, life is getting better—and at an accelerating rate. Food availability, income, and life span are up; disease, child mortality, and violence are down all across the globe. Africa is following Asia out of poverty; the Internet, the mobile phone, and container shipping are enriching people's lives as never before. In his bold and bracing exploration into how human culture evolves positively through exchange and specialization, bestselling author Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why. An astute, refreshing, and revelatory work that covers the entire sweep of human history—from the Stone Age to the Internet—The Rational Optimist will change your way of thinking about the world for the better.
  • Votes: 1

    Journey of Souls

    by Michael Newton

  • Votes: 1

    Make It Stick

    by Peter C. Brown

  • Votes: 1

    Big Magic

    by Elizabeth Gilbert

  • Votes: 1

    Johnny Got His Gun

    by Dalton Trumbo

    The Searing Portrayal Of War That Has Stunned And Galvanized Generations Of Readers An immediate bestseller upon its original publication in 1939, Dalton Trumbo’s stark, profoundly troubling masterpiece about the horrors of World War I brilliantly crystallized the uncompromising brutality of war and became the most influential protest novel of the Vietnam era. Johnny Got His Gun is an undisputed classic of antiwar literature that’s as timely as ever. “A terrifying book, of an extraordinary emotional intensity.”--The Washington Post "Powerful. . . an eye-opener." --Michael Moore "Mr. Trumbo sets this story down almost without pause or punctuation and with a fury amounting to eloquence."--The New York Times "A book that can never be forgotten by anyone who reads it."--Saturday Review
  • Votes: 1

    Fight Club

    by Chuck Palahniuk

    Every weekend, in basements and parking lots across the country, young men with good white-collar jobs and absent fathers take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded for as long as they have to. Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything. Fight Club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter and dark, anarchic genius. And it's only the beginning of his plans for revenge on a world where cancer support groups have the corner on human warmth.
  • Votes: 1

    The Tao of Physics

    by Fritjof Capra

  • Votes: 1

    Embracing Your Potential

    by Terry Orlick

    Explains how to achieve excellence and balance in the public domain and in private life through thirty exercises that can help readers discover their essential needs and motives
  • Votes: 1

    Blockbusters

    by Anita Elberse

    What is behind the phenomenal success of entertainment businesses such as Warner Bros., Marvel Enterprises and Manchester United - along with such stars as Jay-Z and Lady Gaga? Which strategies give leaders in film, television, music, publishing, and sports an edge over their rivals? Anita Elberse, Harvard Business School's expert on the entertainment industry, has done pioneering research on the worlds of media and sports for more than a decade. Now, in this groundbreaking book, she explains a powerful truth about the fiercely competitive world of entertainment: building a business around blockbuster products - the movies, television shows, songs and books that are hugely expensive to produce and market - is the surest path to long-term success. Along the way, she reveals why entertainment executives often spend outrageous amounts of money in search of the next blockbuster, why superstars are paid unimaginable sums and how digital technologies are transforming the entertainment landscape. Full of inside stories emerging from her unprecedented access to some of the world's most successful entertainment brands, Blockbusters is destined to become required reading for anyone seeking to understand how the entertainment industry really works - and how to navigate today's high-stakes business world at large. 'Convincing . . . Elberse's Blockbusters builds on her already impressive academic résumé to create an accessible and entertaining book.' Financial Times
  • Votes: 1

    Mastering Algorithms with C

    by Kyle Loudon

    A comprehensive guide to understanding the language of C offers solutions for everyday programming tasks and provides all the necessary information to understand and use common programming techniques. Original. (Intermediate).
  • Votes: 1

    Good Morning, Holy Spirit

    by Benny Hinn

  • Votes: 1

    JFK and the Unspeakable

    by James W. Douglass

    SSuggests that John F. Kennedy was assassinated because military leaders feared his dedication to peace would result in the United States falling to Russia
  • Votes: 1

    The Gospel of Hip Hop

    by KRS-One

    The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument, the first book from the I Am Hip Hop, is the philosophical masterwork of KRS ONE. Set in the format of the Christian Bible, this 800-plus-page opus is a life-guide manual for members of Hip Hop Kulture that combines classic philosophy with faith and practical knowledge for a fascinating, in-depth exploration of Hip Hop as a life path. Known as “The Teacha,” KRS ONE developed his unique outlook as a homeless teen in Brooklyn, New York, engaging his philosophy of self-creation to become one of the most respected emcees in Hip Hop history. Respected as Hip Hop’s true steward, KRS ONE painstakingly details the development of the culture and the ways in which we, as “Hiphoppas,” can and should preserve its future. "The Teacha" also discusses the origination of Hip Hop Kulture and relays specific instances in history wherein one can discover the same spirit and ideas that are at the core of Hip Hop’s current manifestation. He explains Hip Hop down to the actual meaning and linguistic history of the words “hip” and “hop,” and describes the ways in which "Hiphoppas" can change their current circumstances to create a future that incorporates Health, Love, Awareness, and Wealth (H-LAW). Committed to fervently promoting self-reliance, dedicated study, peace, unity, and truth, The "Teacha" has drawn both criticism and worship from within and from outside of Hip Hop Kulture. In this beautifully written, inspiring book, KRS ONE shines the light of truth, from his own empirical research over a 14-year period, into the fascinating world of Hip Hop.
  • Votes: 1

    The Great Ideas Program - 10 Volume Set

    by Mortimer J.; Encyclopaedia Britannica Adler

    Presenting major points of view on nearly three thousand intellectual questions that have been discussed for thousands of years, a distinguished scholar includes an introduction explaining why twentieth-century accomplishments are best viewed through the context of history.
  • Votes: 1

    The Enchiridion

    by Epictetus

    A first-century Stoic, Epictetus argued that we will always be happy if we learn to desire that things should be exactly as they are. His Enchiridion distills his teachings to illuminate a way to a tranquil life.
  • Votes: 1

    The Shock Doctrine

    by Naomi Klein

  • Votes: 1

    The Prince

    by Niccolò Machiavelli

    The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli, is a 16th-century political treatise. The Prince is sometimes claimed to be one of the first works of modern philosophy, especially modern political philosophy, in which the effective truth is taken to be more important than any abstract ideal. It was also in direct conflict with the dominant Catholic and scholastic doctrines of the time concerning politics and ethics.The Prince has the general theme of accepting that the aims of princes-such as glory and survival-can justify the use of immoral means to achieve those ends.Although it is relatively short, the treatise is the most remembered of Machiavelli's works and the one most responsible for bringing the word "Machiavellian" into usage as a pejorative. It even contributed to the modern negative connotations of the words "politics" and "politician" in western countries. In terms of subject matter it overlaps with the much longer Discourses on Livy, which was written a few years later.Machiavelli emphasized the need for realism, as opposed to idealism. Along with this, he stresses the difference between human-beings and animals since "there are two ways of contending, one in accordance with the laws, the other by force; the first of which is proper to men, the second to beast". In The Prince he does not explain what he thinks the best ethical or political goals are, except the control of one's own fortune, as opposed to waiting to see what chance brings. Machiavelli took it for granted that would-be leaders naturally aim at glory or honor. He associated these goals with a need for "virtue" and "prudence" in a leader, and saw such virtues as essential to good politics and indeed the common good. That great men should develop and use their virtue and prudence was a traditional theme of advice to Christian princes. And that more virtue meant less reliance on chance was a classically influenced "humanist commonplace" in Machiavelli's time, as Fischer says, even if it was somewhat controversial. However, Machiavelli went far beyond other authors in his time, who in his opinion left things to fortune, and therefore to bad rulers, because of their Christian beliefs. He used the words "virtue" and "prudence" to refer to glory-seeking and spirited excellence of character, in strong contrast to the traditional Christian uses of those terms, but more keeping with the original pre-Christian Greek and Roman concepts from which they derived. He encouraged ambition and risk taking. So in another break with tradition, he treated not only stability, but also radical innovation, as possible aims of a prince in a political community. Managing major reforms can show off a Prince's virtue and give him glory. He clearly felt Italy needed major reform in his time, and this opinion of his time is widely shared.Machiavelli's descriptions in The Prince encourage leaders to attempt to control their fortune gloriously, to the extreme extent that some situations may call for a fresh "founding" (or re-founding) of the "modes and orders" that define a community, despite the danger and necessary evil and lawlessness of such a project. Founding a wholly new state, or even a new religion, using injustice and immorality has even been called the chief theme of The Prince. Machiavelli justifies this position by explaining how if "a prince did not win love he may escape hate" by personifying injustice and immorality; therefore, he will never loosen his grip since "fear is held by the apprehension of punishment" and never diminishes as time goes by. For a political theorist to do this in public was one of Machiavelli's clearest breaks not just with medieval scholasticism, but with the classical tradition of political philosophy, especially the favorite philosopher of Catholicism at the time, Aristotle. This is one of Machiavelli's most lasting influences upon modernity.
  • Votes: 1

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 1

    Battlefield of the Mind

    by Joyce Meyer

  • Votes: 1

    The Undiscovered Self

    by C. G. Jung

  • Votes: 1

    Jaws

    by Peter Benchley

    "Relentless terror." The Philadelphia Inquirer.The classic, blockbuster thriller of man-eating terror that inspired the Steven Spielberg movie and made millions of beachgoers afraid to go into the water. Experience the thrill of helpless horror again -- or for the first time!From the Paperback edition.
  • Votes: 1

    QED

    by Richard P. Feynman

  • Votes: 1

    The Dice Man

    by Luke Rhinehart

    Let the dice decide! This is the philosophy that changes the life of bored psychiatrist Luke Rhinehart - and in some ways changes the world as well. Because once you hand over your life to the dice, anything can happen. Entertaining, humorous, scary, shocking, subversive.
  • Votes: 1

    The Red Tent

    by Anita Diamant

    In The Red Tent Anita Diamant brings the fascinating biblical character of Dinah to vivid life. Her name is Dinah. In the Bible her fate is merely hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the verses of the Book of Genesis that recount the life of Jacob and his infamous dozen sons. Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is an extraordinary and engrossing tale of ancient womanhood and family honour. Told in Dinah's voice, it opens with the story of her mothers – the four wives of Jacob – each of whom embodies unique feminine traits, and concludes with Dinah's own startling and unforgettable story of betrayal, grief and love. Deeply affecting and intimate, The Red Tent combines outstandingly rich storytelling with an original insight into women's society in a fascinating period of early history and such is its warmth and candour, it is guaranteed to win the hearts and minds of women across the world. 'I genuinely fell into this rich and colourful world and Dinah and Leah have stayed with me as ancestors and sisters brought to life by Anita Diamant's imaginative novel' - Maureen Lipman. Adapted as a TV mini series starring Rebecca Ferguson and Minnie Driver.
  • Votes: 1

    Who Moved My Cheese

    by Spencer Johnson

    THE #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER WITH OVER 28 MILLION COPIES IN PRINT! A timeless business classic, Who Moved My Cheese? uses a simple parable to reveal profound truths about dealing with change so that you can enjoy less stress and more success in your work and in your life. It would be all so easy if you had a map to the Maze. If the same old routines worked. If they'd just stop moving "The Cheese." But things keep changing... Most people are fearful of change, both personal and professional, because they don't have any control over how or when it happens to them. Since change happens either to the individual or by the individual, Dr. Spencer Johnson, the coauthor of the multimillion bestseller The One Minute Manager, uses a deceptively simple story to show that when it comes to living in a rapidly changing world, what matters most is your attitude. Exploring a simple way to take the fear and anxiety out of managing the future, Who Moved My Cheese? can help you discover how to anticipate, acknowledge, and accept change in order to have a positive impact on your job, your relationships, and every aspect of your life.
  • Votes: 1

    Empire of the Summer Moon

    by S. C. Gwynne

  • Votes: 1

    Cities of the Red Night

    by William S. Burroughs

    An opium addict is lost in the jungle; young men wage war against an empire of mutants; a handsome young pirate faces his execution; and the world's population is infected with a radioactive epidemic. These stories are woven together in a single tale of mayhem and chaos. In the first novel of the trilogy continued in The Place of Dead Roads and The Western Lands, William Burroughs sharply satirizes modern society in a poetic and shocking story of sex, drugs, disease and adventure.
  • Votes: 1

    Rubber Balls and Liquor

    by Gilbert Gottfried

    Gilbert Gottfried on Rubber Balls and Liquor: Nobody ever reads this part of the book. Somebody at the publishing house explained to me that it's actually called jacket copy. It says in my contract that I have to write something over here in this tiny space, even though I don't think anyone will notice. In fact, I'll bet anything that you're not reading this part now. And if it turns out that you are . . . well, the guy in the bookstore is probably staring at you, saying, "Stop reading that book!" I guess there's a reason bookstores are going out of business, left and right. Cheap bastards like you think it's okay to stand in the aisles and read to your heart's content. So for the sake of bookstores everywhere, buy this book. I myself don't care. I only care about the poor working man. Oh, and the sanctity of the written word. I care about that, too. And in my case, those written words, of course, include dick and pussy.
  • Votes: 1

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    by Milan Kundera

    A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals—while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel “the unbearable lightness of being.” A major achievement from one of the world’s truly great writers, Milan Kundera’s magnificent novel of passion and politics, infidelity and ideas, encompasses the extremes of comedy and tragedy, illuminating all aspects of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    A Walk Across America

    by Peter Jenkins

  • Votes: 1

    In Search of Dracula

    by Radu Florescu

    Traces the history and folklore of vampires
  • Votes: 1

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 1

    The Bell Curve

    by Richard J. Herrnstein

  • Votes: 1

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 1

    Something of value

    by Robert Chester Ruark

  • Votes: 1

    Hillbilly Elegy

    by J. D. Vance

  • Votes: 1

    NOPE

    by Drew Sheneman

    A nurturing mama bird, a fearful baby, and a nest in a tall, tall tree. Ready, set, soar? Nope! Sweetly and humorously told, here is a sparkling debut about the joys that come from embracing new experiences, written and illustrated by nationally-syndicated cartoonist Drew Sheneman.
  • Votes: 1

    The Jungle

    by Upton Sinclair

    The author's famous tale of a Lithuanian family who emigrates to America and is destroyed by exploitation, crushing poverty, and economic despair.
  • Votes: 1

    Behold a Pale Horse

    by Milton William Cooper

  • Votes: 1

    The Spinoza Problem

    by Irvin D. Yalom

    A haunting portrait of Arthur Rosenberg, one of Nazism's chief architects, and his obsession with one of history's most influential Jewish thinkers In The Spinoza Problem, Irvin Yalom spins fact and fiction into an unforgettable psycho-philosophical drama. Yalom tells the story of the seventeenth-century thinker Baruch Spinoza, whose philosophy led to his own excommunication from the Jewish community, alongside that of the rise and fall of the Nazi ideologue Alfred Rosenberg, who two hundred years later during World War II ordered his task force to plunder Spinoza's ancient library in an effort to deal with the Nazis' "Spinoza Problem." Seamlessly alternating between Golden Age Amsterdam and Nazi Germany, Yalom investigates the inner lives of these two enigmatic men in a tale of influence and anxiety, the origins of good and evil, and the philosophy of freedom and the tyranny of terror.
  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Hope

    by Jane Goodall

    From world-renowned scientist Jane Goodall, as seen in the new National Geographic documentary Jane, comes a poignant memoir about her spiritual epiphany and an appeal for why everyone can find a reason for hope. Dr. Jane Goodall's revolutionary study of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe preserve forever altered the very, definition of humanity. Now, in a poignant and insightful memoir, Jane Goodall explores her extraordinary life and personal spiritual odyssey, with observations as profound as the knowledge she has brought back from the forest.
  • Votes: 1

    The Sports Gene

    by David J. Epstein

    A Sports Illustrated senior writer's controversial exploration of the genetic underpinnings of athletic success explores the roles of both biology and training, arguing that nature and training are equally necessary components of athletic achievement while considering such topics as race, gender and genetic testing.
  • Votes: 1

    For a New Liberty

    by Murray N Rothbard

  • Votes: 1

    Narcissus and Goldmund

    by Hermann Hesse

  • Votes: 1

    The Power of Your Subconscious Mind

    by Joseph Murphy

    The Power of Your Subconscious Mind will open a world of success, happiness, prosperity, and peace for you. It is one of the most brilliant and beloved spiritual self-help works of all time which can help you heal yourself, banish your fears, sleep better, enjoy better relationships and just feel happier. The techniques are simple and results come quickly. You can improve your relationships, your finances, your physical well-being. In this book, the author fuses his spiritual wisdom and scientific research to bring to light how the sub-conscious mind can be a major influence on our daily lives. Once you understand your subconscious mind, you can also control or get rid of the various phobias that you may have in turn opening a brand new world of positive energy.
  • Votes: 1

    How to Master the Art of Selling

    by Tom Hopkins

    A revised and updated edition of How to master the art of selling, which educates on how to succeed in sales, including new information on using the latest research techniques and using e-mail and online resources to generate deals more quickly and efficiently
  • Votes: 1

    The Two Cultures (Canto Classics)

    by C. P. Snow

    The importance of science and technology and future of education and research are just some of the subjects discussed here.
  • Votes: 1

    Ghost Rider

    by Neil Peart

  • Votes: 1

    The Use of Lateral Thinking

    by Edward De Bono

    THE classic work about improving creativity from world-renowned writer and philosopher Edward de Bono. In schools we are taught to meet problems head-on: what Edward de Bono calls 'vertical thinking'. This works well in simple situations - but we are at a loss when this approach fails. What then? Lateral thinking is all about freeing up your imagination. Through a series of special techniques, in groups or working alone, Edward de Bono shows how to stimulate the mind in new and exciting ways. Soon you will be looking at problems from a variety of angles and offering up solutions that are as ingenious as they are effective. You will become much more productive and a formidable thinker in your own right. 'If more bankers and traders had read Lateral Thinking and applied the ideas of Edward de Bono to their own narrow definitions of risk, reward and human expectations, I suspect we would be in much better shape than we are'Sir Richard Branson Edward de Bono invented the concept of lateral thinking. A world-renowned writer and philosopher, he is the leading authority in the field of creative thinking and the direct teaching of thinking as a skill. Dr de Bono has written more than 60 books, in 40 languages, with people now teaching his methods worldwide. He has chaired a special summit of Nobel Prize laureates, and been hailed as one of the 250 people who have contributed most to mankind. Dr de Bono's titles include classic bestsellers such as Six Thinking Hats, Lateral Thinking, I Am Right You Are Wrong, Teach Yourself How To Think, Teach Your Child How To Think, and Simplicity - all now re-issued by Penguin. www.edwdebono.com
  • Votes: 1

    The Alchemy of Finance

    by George Soros

    New chapter by Soros on the secrets to his success along with a new Preface and Introduction. New Foreword by renowned economist Paul Volcker "An extraordinary . . . inside look into the decision-making process of the most successful money manager of our time. Fantastic." —The Wall Street Journal George Soros is unquestionably one of the most powerful and profitable investors in the world today. Dubbed by BusinessWeek as "the Man who Moves Markets," Soros made a fortune competing with the British pound and remains active today in the global financial community. Now, in this special edition of the classic investment book, The Alchemy of Finance, Soros presents a theoretical and practical account of current financial trends and a new paradigm by which to understand the financial market today. This edition's expanded and revised Introduction details Soros's innovative investment practices along with his views of the world and world order. He also describes a new paradigm for the "theory of reflexivity" which underlies his unique investment strategies. Filled with expert advice and valuable business lessons, The Alchemy of Finance reveals the timeless principles of an investing legend. This special edition will feature a new chapter by Soros on the secrets of his success and a new Foreword by the Honorable Paul Volcker, former Chairman of the Federal Reserve. George Soros (New York, NY) is President of Soros Fund Management and Chief Investment Advisor to Quantum Fund N.V., a $12 billion international investment fund. Besides his numerous ventures in finance, Soros is also extremely active in the worlds of education, culture, and economic aid and development through his Open Society Fund and the Soros Foundation.
  • Votes: 1

    Full Disclosure

    by Stormy Daniels

    Instant New York Times bestseller "Standing up to bullies is my kind of thing." How did Stormy Daniels become the woman willing to take on a president? In this book, Stormy Daniels tells her whole story for the first time: what it's like to be a leading actress and director in the adult film business, the full truth about her journey from a rough childhood in Louisiana onto the national stage, and everything about her interaction with Donald Trump that led to the nondisclosure agreement and the behind-the-scenes attempts to intimidate her. Stormy is funny, sharp, warm, and impassioned by turns. Her story is a thoroughly American one, of a girl who loved reading and horses and who understood from a very young age what she wanted?and who also knew she'd have to get every step of the way there on her own. People can't stop talking about Stormy Daniels. And they won't be able to stop talking about her fresh, surprising, completely candid, nothing-held-back book.
  • Votes: 1

    A Leaf In The Bitter Wind

    by Ting-Xing Ye

    One of the best ways to understand history is through eye-witness accounts. Ting-Xing Ye’s riveting first book, A Leaf in the Bitter Wind, is a memoir of growing up in Maoist China. It was an astonishing coming of age through the turbulent years of the Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1974). In the wave of revolutionary fervour, peasants neglected their crops, exacerbating the widespread hunger. While Ting-Xing was a young girl in Shanghai, her father’s rubber factory was expropriated by the state, and he was demoted to a labourer. A botched operation left him paralyzed from the waist down, and his health deteriorated rapidly since a capitalist’s well-being was not a priority. He died soon after, and then Ting-Xing watched her mother’s struggle with poverty end in stomach cancer. By the time she was thirteen, Ting-Xing Ye was an orphan, entrusted with her brothers and sisters to her Great-Aunt, and on welfare. Still, the Red Guards punished the children for being born into the capitalist class. Schools were being closed; suicide was rampant; factories were abandoned for ideology; distrust of friends and neighbours flourished. Ting-Xing was sent to work on a distant northern prison farm at sixteen, and survived six years of backbreaking labour and severe conditions. She was mentally tortured for weeks until she agreed to sign a false statement accusing friends of anti-state activities. Somehow finding the time to teach herself English, often by listening to the radio, she finally made it to Beijing University in 1974 as the Revolution was on the wane — though the acquisition of knowledge was still frowned upon as a bourgeois desire and study was discouraged. Readers have been stunned and moved by this simply narrated personal account of a 1984-style ideology-gone-mad, where any behaviour deemed to be bourgeois was persecuted with the ferocity and illogic of a witch trial, and where a change in politics could switch right to wrong in a moment. The story of both a nation and an individual, the book spans a heady 35 years of Ye’s life in China, until her eventual defection to Canada in 1987 — and the wonderful beginning of a romance with Canadian author William Bell. The book was published in 1997. The 1990s saw the publication of several memoirs by Chinese now settled in North America. Ye’s was not the first, yet earned a distinguished place as one of the most powerful, and the only such memoir written from Canada. It is the inspiring story of a woman refusing to “drift with the stream” and fighting her way through an impossible, unjust system. This compelling, heart-wrenching story has been published in Germany, Japan, the US, UK and Australia, where it went straight to #1 on the bestseller list and has been reprinted several times; Dutch, French and Turkish editions will appear in 2001.
  • Votes: 1

    The Resolution for Men

    by Stephen Kendrick

    While Most Men Will Die With Deep Regrets, Others Will Resolve To Live For What Matters Most. The Resolution for Men is the inspiring book born out of the film Courageous, a film which presents a powerful story of strong male leadership and an emotionally charged wake-up call to fathers whose influence upon their children and society is immeasurable. The Resolution for Men follows to challenge men of all ages to become as bold and intentional about embracing their responsibilities as leaders of their homes, marriages, and children. Written by Stephen and Alex Kendrick, screenwriters of Courageous and authors of New York Times best seller The Love Dare (five million copies sold), The Resolution for Men strategically inspires men to reconcile with their past, re-engage in the present by taking full responsibility for their wives and children, and then move forward with a bold and clear resolution for the future. Written in partnership with the movie and Priscilla Shirer’s book, The Resolution for Women, it is designed to inspire a revolution.
  • Votes: 1

    Fundamentalism

    by Malise Ruthven

    Fundamentalism is seen as the major threat to world peace, a conclusion impossible to ignore since the events in New York on September 11 2001. This book investigates fundamentalism's historical, social, religious, political, and ideological roots, and tackles the polemic and stereotypes surrounding this complex phenomenon.
  • Votes: 1

    All Things Shining

    by Hubert Dreyfus

    Citing a divergence between Western-world perspectives on a meaningful life and the beliefs of other cultures and times, a guide for secular readers cites classic works of literature to illustrate how to achieve passionate, skillful engagement with others for a greater sense of purpose.
  • Votes: 1

    Sam Walton

    by Sam Walton

  • Votes: 1

    Maps of Meaning

    by Jordan B. Peterson

  • Votes: 1

    The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart

    by Holly Ringland

    Flowers, fire and fairy tales are the elements that will forever shape nine-year-old Alice Hart's life, in The Lost Flower's of Alice Hart, the international bestseller by Holly Ringland. Alice Hart lives in isolation by the sea, where her mother’s enchanting flowers and their hidden messages shelter her from the dark moods of her father. When tragedy changes her life irrevocably, nine-year-old Alice goes to live with the grandmother she never knew existed, on a native flower farm that gives refuge to women who, like Alice, are lost or broken. In the Victorian tradition, every flower has a meaning and, as she settles into her new life, Alice uses this language of flowers to say the things that are too hard to speak. As she grows older, though, family secrecy, a devastating betrayal and a man who’s not all he seems, combine to make Alice realise there are some stories that flowers alone cannot tell. If she is to have the freedom she craves, she must find the courage to possess the most powerful story she knows: her own.
  • Votes: 1

    Do You Realize?

    by Kevin Kuhn

    George is a middle-management, middle-class, middle-aged guy who hates his job and struggles to stay connected to his wife and teenage children. Most guys might end up with a steamy affair and a flashy car for their midlife crisis, but George gets a quirky, philosophical physics professor named Shiloh. Trapped with this mysterious misfit on his morning commuter train, George is dragged into awkward conversations about love, fear, music, and the meaning of life. Shiloh asks George to beta-test an app he wrote for the new Apple Watch--and with a free watch included, how could he say no? When tragedy strikes, throwing George out of his uncomfortable comfort zone, he learns that Shiloh's app lets him journey through alternate versions of his past. As challenges mount in his own reality, George must make a decision that will change him--and possibly the entire multiverse--forever.
  • Votes: 1

    Radical Honesty

    by Brad Blanton

    A psychotherapist and stress management expert argues that moralism and lying are the major sources of human stress and offers guidance in breaking those bonds to achieve self-fulfillment
  • Votes: 1

    Man of Steel and Velvet

    by Aubrey Andelin

    Discusses the nature of masculinity and explains the teachings of Christianity on the proper role of the man in marriage and family life
  • Votes: 1

    First, Break All the Rules

    by Jim Harter

    "[A] summary of Gallup studies accumulated in the mid-to-late 1990s ... initiated by the lifetime work of the late Dr. Donald O. Clifton ... the father of strengths-based psychology"--Page 3.
  • Votes: 1

    Hold On to Your Kids

    by Gordon Neufeld

    ‘Maté’s book will make you examine your behaviour in a new light’ Guardian ‘bold, wise and deeply moral. [Maté] is a healer to be cherished’ Naomi Klein, author of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine Children take their lead from their friends: being ‘cool’ matters more than anything else. Shaping values, identity and codes of behaviour, peer groups are often far more influential than parents. But this situation is far from natural, and it can be dangerous – it undermines family cohesion, interferes with healthy development, and fosters a hostile and sexualized youth culture. Children end up becoming conformist, anxious and alienated. In Hold on to Your Kids, acclaimed physician and bestselling author Gabor Maté joins forces with Gordon Neufeld, a psychologist with a reputation for penetrating to the heart of complex parenting. Together they pinpoint the causes of this breakdown and offer practical advice on how to ‘reattach’ to sons and daughters, establish the hierarchy at home, make children feel safe and understood, and earn back your children's loyalty and love. This updated edition also addresses the unprecedented parenting challenges posed by the rise of digital devices and social media. By helping to reawaken our instincts, Maté and Neufeld empower parents to be what nature intended: a true source of contact, security and warmth for their children.
  • Votes: 1

    Chicken Little Little Classics

    by Phidal Publishing

    Disney&'s new movie Chicken Little is retold in this Little Golden Book that is destined to become an instant classic! Young readers will delight in the story of a young chick who goes from being a little laughing stock to Mr. Big!
  • Votes: 1

    Mindset

    by Carol S. Dweck

    Reveals how established attitudes affect all aspects of one's life, explains the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, and stresses the need to be open to change in order to achieve fulfillment and success.
  • Votes: 1

    The Hermetic Tradition

    by Julius Evola

    This important survey of alchemical symbols and doctrines sets forth the mysterious worldview and teachings of the practitioners of the "royal art." One of the leading exponents of the Hermetic tradition, Julius Evola demonstrates the singularity of subject matter that lies behind the words of all adepts in all ages, showing how alchemy--often misunderstood as primitive chemistry or a mere template for the Jungian process of "individuation"--is nothing less than a universal secret science of human and natural transformation. First published in 1931 in Italian. This is the first English translation. Draws from a host of sources in the Western esoteric tradition--works on theurgy, magic, and gnosticism from neoplatonic, Arab, and medieval sources.
  • Votes: 1

    The Ravenmaster's Secret

    by Elvira Woodruff

    Forrest lives at the Tower of London prison, where his father tends the Tower ravens and guards inmates. When the daughter of a Scottish spy arrives, she and Forrest become friends. But when she is slated for execution, Forrest must make some painful choices.
  • Votes: 1

    Blindsight

  • Votes: 1

    Freedom from the Known

    by Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • Votes: 1

    The Universe Next Door

    by James W. Sire

    For more than thirty years, The Universe Next Door has set the standard for a clear, readable introduction to worldviews. In this new fifth edition James Sire offers additional student-friendly features to his concise, easily understood introductions to theism, deism, naturalism, Marxism, nihilism, existentialism, Eastern monism, New Age philosophy and postmodernism. Included in this expanded format are a new chapter on Islam and informative sidebars throughout.The book continues to build on Sire's refined definition of worldviews from the fourth edition and includes other updates as well, keeping this standard text fresh and useful. In a world of ever-increasing diversity, The Universe Next Door offers a unique resource for understanding the variety of worldviews that compete with Christianity for the allegiance of minds and hearts. The Universe Next Door has been translated into over a dozen languages and has been used as a text at over one hundred colleges and universities in courses ranging from apologetics and world religions to history and English literature. Sire's Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a Concept provides a useful companion volume for those desiring a more in-depth discussion of the nature of a worldview.
  • Votes: 1

    One Hundred Years of Solitude

    by Gabriel García Márquez

    The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.
  • Votes: 1

    Les Miserables

    by Victor Hugo

    Trying to forget his past and live an honest life, ex-convict Jean Valjean risks his freedom to take care of a motherless young girl during a period of political unrest in Paris.
  • Votes: 1

    The Mating Mind

    by Geoffrey Miller

    Drawing on the latest research in evolutionary biology, a groundbreaking study of the link between evolution and human sexuality argues that the development of the human brain can be linked to the need to attract and win sexual partners. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Applied Economics

    by Thomas Sowell

    This revised edition of Applied Economics is about fifty percent larger than the first edition. It now includes a chapter on the economics of immigration and new sections of other chapters on such topics as the “creative” financing of home-buying that led to the current “subprime” mortgage crisis, the economics of organ transplants, and the political and economic incentives that lead to money earmarked for highways being diverted to mass transit and to a general neglect of infrastructure. On these and other topics, its examples are drawn from around the world. Much material in the first edition has been updated and supplemented. The revised and enlarged edition of Applied Economics retains the easy readability of the first edition, even for people with no prior knowledge of economics.
  • Votes: 1

    Sex For Dummies

    by Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer

    Try new sexual positions The bestselling guide to a rewarding sex life and a deeper relationship Looking for the straight facts on sex? In this friendly, authoritative guide, renowned sex therapist Dr. Ruth gives you the latest on everything from oral sex and popular positions to new methods of birth control. She also debunks sex myths and covers new therapies to manage low libido, overcome sexual dysfunction, and enhance pleasure. Praise for Dr. Ruth and Sex For Dummies "Her energy level is higher than that of a charged particle." –People Magazine "Dr. Ruth writes the way she talks – enthusiastically, nonjudgmentally, and informatively. . . ." –Booklist "Her name and the distinctive thrill of her voice have become inextricably linked with the subject of sex." –New York Times Discover how to Enjoy the first time Enhance foreplay and afterplay with your partner Avoid STDs and have safer sex Discuss sex with your kids Navigate cybersex
  • Votes: 1

    The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell

    by Aldous Huxley

  • Votes: 1

    Treasure in Clay

    by Fulton J. Sheen

    Treasure in Clay provides a lifetime’s worth of wisdom from one of the most beloved and influential figures in twentieth-century Catholicism. Completed shortly before his death in 1979, Treasure in Clay is the autobiography of Fulton J. Sheen, the preeminent teacher, preacher, and pastor of American Catholicism. Called “the Great Communicator” by Billy Graham and “a prophet of the times” by Pope Pius XII, Sheen was the voice of American Catholicism for nearly fifty years. In addition to his prolific writings, Sheen dominated the airwaves, first in radio, and later television, with his signature program “Life is Worth Living,” drawing an average of 30 million viewers a week in the 1950s. Sheen had the ears of everyone from presidents to the common men, women, and children in the pews, and his uplifting message of faith, hope, and love shaped generations of Catholics. Here in Sheen’s own words are reflections from his childhood, his years in seminary, his academic career, his media stardom, his pastoral work, his extensive travels, and much more. Readers already familiar with Sheen and as well as those coming to him for the first time will find a fascinating glimpse into the Catholic world Sheen inhabited, and will find inspiration in Sheen’s heartfelt recollections. Treasure in Clay is a classic book and a lasting testament to a life that was worth living.
  • Votes: 1

    When Bad Things Happen to Good People

    by Harold S. Kushner

  • Votes: 1

    Touching Spirit Bear (Spirit Bear, 1)

    by Ben Mikaelsen

    Within Cole Matthews lie anger, rage and hate. Cole has been stealing and fighting for years. This time he caught Alex Driscal in the, parking lot and smashed his head against the sidewalk. Now, Alex may have permanent brain damage'and Cole is in the Biggest trouble of his life. Cole is offered Circle Justice: a system based on Native American traditions that attempts to provide healing for the criminal offender, the victim and the, community. With prison as his only alternative, Cole plays along. He says he wants to repent, but in his heart Cole blames his alcoholic mom his, abusive dad, wimpy Alex -- everyone but himself -- for his situation. Cole receives a one-year banishment to a remote Alaskan island. There, he is mauled by Mysterious white bear of Native American legend. Hideously injured, Cole waits for his death His thoughts shift from from Anger to humility. To survive, he must stop blaming others and take responsibility for his life. Rescuers arrive to save Cole's but it is the attack of the Spirit Bear that may save his soul. Ben Mikaelsen paints a vivid picture of a juvenile offender, examining the roots without absolving solving him of responsibility for his actions, and questioning a society in which angry people make victims of their peers and communities. Touching Spirit Bear is a poignant testimonial to the power of a pain that can destroy, or lead to healing
  • Votes: 1

    As I Lay Dying

    by William Faulkner

  • Votes: 1

    This Present Darkness

    by Frank E. Peretti

    A prayerful pastor and a skeptical reporter compare notes and find themselves fighting a plot to subjugate the human race. A gripping look into the invisible spiritual warfare around us and the power of prayer.
  • Votes: 1

    The Woman in the Dunes

    by Kobo Abe

    In a remote seaside village, Niki Jumpei, a teacher and amateur entomologist, is held captive with a young woman at the bottom of a vast sand pit where they are pressed into shovelling off the ever-advancing sand dunes that threaten the village.
  • Votes: 1

    Abduction

    by John E. Mack

    A Harvard psychiatrist, the author of A Prince of Our Disorder, presents accounts of alien abduction taken from the more than sixty cases he has investigated and examines the implications for our identity as a species.
  • Votes: 1

    The Science of Fear

    We are the safest humans who ever lived - the statistics prove it. And yet the media tells a different story with its warnings and scare stories. How is it possible that anxiety has become the stuff of daily life? In this ground-breaking, compulsively readable book, Dan Gardner shows how our flawed strategies for perceiving risk influence our lives, often with unforeseen and sometimes-tragic consequences. He throws light on our paranoia about everything from paedophiles to terrorism and reveals how the most significant threats are actually the mundane risks to which we pay little attention. Speaking to psychologists and scientists, as well as looking at the influence of the media and politicians, Gardner uncovers one of the central puzzles of our time: why are the safest people in history living in a culture of fear?
  • Votes: 1

    Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus

    by John Gray

  • Votes: 1

    Behave

    by Robert M. Sapolsky

  • Votes: 1

    The Peacegiver

    by James L. Ferrell

  • Votes: 1

    Feeling Good

    by David D. Burns

    The good news is that anxiety, guilt, pessimism, procrastination, low self-esteem, and other ′black holes′ of depression can be cured without drugs. In Feeling Good, eminent psychiatrist David D. Burns, M.D. outlines the remarkable, scientifically proven techniques that will immediately lift your spirits and help you develop a positive outlook on life. Now, in this updated edition, Dr Burns adds an all-new Consumer′s Guide To Antidepressant Drugs, as well as a new introduction to help answer your questions about the many options available for treating depression. Recognise what causes your mood swings. Nip negative feelings in the bud. Deal with guilt. Handle hostility and criticism. Overcome addiction to love and approval. Build self-esteem. Feel good everyday.