Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 69

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 48

    Meditations

    by Marcus Aurelius

    The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 42

    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

  • Votes: 22

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 16

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 13

    Childhood's End

    by Arthur C. Clarke

  • Votes: 12

    Big Magic

    by Elizabeth Gilbert

  • Votes: 12

    The Memory Police

    by Yoko Ogawa

    Shortlisted for the International Booker Prize 2020, an enthralling Orwellian novel about the terrors of state surveillance from one of Japan's greatest writers. 'Beautiful... Haunting' Sunday Times 'A dreamlike story of dystopia' Jia Tolentino __________ Hat, ribbon, bird rose. To the people on the island, a disappeared thing no longer has any meaning. It can be burned in the garden, thrown in the river or handed over to the Memory Police. Soon enough, the island forgets it ever existed. When a young novelist discovers that her editor is in danger of being taken away by the Memory Police, she desperately wants to save him. For some reason, he doesn't forget, and it's becoming increasingly difficult for him to hide his memories. Who knows what will vanish next? __________ Finalist for the National Book Award 2019 Longlisted for the Translated Book Award 2020 New York Times 100 Notable Books of the Year 'This timeless fable of control and loss feels more timely than ever' Guardian, Books of the Year 'Echoes the themes of George Orwell's 1984, but it has a voice and power all its own' Time 'A novel that makes us see differently... A masterpiece' Madeleine Thien
  • Votes: 12

    Human Acts

    by Han Kang

    Gwangju, South Korea, 1980. In the wake of a viciously suppressed student uprising, a boy searches for his friend's corpse, a consciousness searches for its abandoned body, and a brutalised country searches for a voice. In a sequence of interconnected chapters the victims and the bereaved encounter censorship, denial, forgiveness and the echoing agony of the original trauma. Human Acts is a universal book, utterly modern and profoundly timeless. Already a controversial bestseller and award-winning book in Korea, it confirms Han Kang as a writer of immense importance.
  • Votes: 12

    The Willpower Instinct

    by Kelly McGonigal

    Based on Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal's wildly popular course "The Science of Willpower," The Willpower Instinct is the first book to explain the science of self-control and how it can be harnessed to improve our health, happiness, and productivity. Informed by the latest research and combining cutting-edge insights from psychology, economics, neuroscience, and medicine, The Willpower Instinct explains exactly what willpower is, how it works, and why it matters. For example, readers will learn: • Willpower is a mind-body response, not a virtue. It is a biological function that can be improved through mindfulness, exercise, nutrition, and sleep. • Willpower is not an unlimited resource. Too much self-control can actually be bad for your health. • Temptation and stress hijack the brain's systems of self-control, but the brain can be trained for greater willpower • Guilt and shame over your setbacks lead to giving in again, but self-forgiveness and self-compassion boost self-control. • Giving up control is sometimes the only way to gain self-control. • Willpower failures are contagious—you can catch the desire to overspend or overeat from your friends­­—but you can also catch self-control from the right role models. In the groundbreaking tradition of Getting Things Done, The Willpower Instinct combines life-changing prescriptive advice and complementary exercises to help readers with goals ranging from losing weight to more patient parenting, less procrastination, better health, and greater productivity at work.
  • Votes: 12

    Gone Girl

    by Gillian Flynn

  • Votes: 12

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 11

    The Book of Five Rings

    by Miyamoto Musashi

    "When the undefeated samurai Miyamoto Musashi retreated to a cave in 1643 and wrote The Book of Five Rings, a manifesto on swordsmanship, strategy, and winning for his students and generations of samurai to come, he created one of the most perceptive and incisive texts on strategic thinking ever to come from Asia.Musashi gives timeless advice on defeating an adversary, throwing an opponent off-guard, creating confusion, and other techniques for overpowering an assailant that will resonate with both martial artists and everyone else interested in skillfully dealing with conflict. For Musashi, the way of the martial arts was a mastery of the mind rather than simply technical prowess-and it is this path to mastery that is the core teaching in The Book of Five Rings."
  • Votes: 10

    Fahrenheit 451

    by Ray Bradbury

  • Votes: 9

    Starship Troopers

    by Robert Anson Heinlein

  • Votes: 9

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 8

    Candide

    by Voltaire

  • Votes: 8

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    by Philip K. Dick

    World War Terminus had left the Earth devastated. Through its ruins, bounty hunter Rick Deckard stalked, in search of the renegade replicants who were his prey. When he wasn't 'retiring' them with his laser weapon, he dreamed of owning a live animal - the ultimate status symbol in a world all but bereft of animal life. Then Rick got his chance: the assignment to kill six Nexus-6 targets, for a huge reward. But in Deckard's world things were never that simple, and his assignment quickly turned into a nightmare kaleidoscope of subterfuge and deceit - and the threat of death for the hunter rather than the hunted ...
  • Votes: 8

    The Death of Ivan Ilych

    by Lev Tolstoy

    One of the most exquisitely constructed novellas by the author of War and Peace is presented alongside The Devil, a further work exploring the powerful and destructive nature of obsession The judge Ivan Ilyich Golovin has spent his life in the pursuit of wealth and status, devoting himself obsessively to work and often neglecting his family in the process. When, after a small accident, he fails to make the expected recovery, it gradually becomes clear that he is soon to die. Ivan Ilyich then starts to question the futility and barrenness of his previous existence, realizing to his horror, as he grapples with the meaning of life and death, that he is totally alone.
  • Votes: 7

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

    by Oscar Wilde

  • Votes: 7

    The Power of Now

    by Eckhart Tolle

    The author shares the secret of his own self-realization and the philosophy for living in the present he has developed.
  • Votes: 7

    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 7

    The Little Prince

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    When a pilot finds himself alone and stranded with a broken-down plane, a little prince is his only companion living on a strange deserted planet. Full of wisdom, humour and delight, this book while intended for children is also a favourite of adults for its quirkiness and insight.
  • Votes: 7

    The Player of Games (Culture, 2)

    by Iain M. Banks

  • Votes: 6

    Collected Fictions

    by Jorge Luis Borges

  • Votes: 6

    Anthem

    by Ayn Rand

    In a future world, only one man dares to think, strive, and love as an individual in the midst of a paralyzing collective humanity.
  • Votes: 5

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 5

    Anatomy of the State

    by Murray Rothbard

  • Votes: 5

    Heart of Darkness

    by Joseph Conrad

  • Votes: 5

    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

    The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.
  • Votes: 5

    The Four Agreements

    by Miguel Ruiz (Jr.)

    Identifies four self-limiting beliefs that impede one's experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.
  • Votes: 4

    Free Will

    by Barry Linetsky

  • Votes: 4

    Illusions

    by Richard Bach

    In the cloud-washed airspace between the cornfields of Illinois and blue infinity, a man puts his faith in the propeller of his biplane. For disillusioned writer and itinerant barnstormer Richard Bach, belief is as real as a full tank of gas and sparks firing in the cylinders ... until he meets Donald Shimoda - former mechanic and self-described messiah who can make wrenches fly and Richard's imagination soar... In Illusions,the unforgettable follow-up to his phenomenal New York Times bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull,Richard Bach takes to the air to discover the ageless truths that give our souls wings- that people don't need airplanes to soar ... that even the darkest clouds have meaning once we lift ourselves above them ... and that messiahs can be found in the unlikeliest places - like hay fields, one-traffic-light midwestern towns, and most of all, deep within ourselves.
  • Votes: 4

    The Trial

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 4

    The Great Gatsby

    by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Votes: 4

    The Undiscovered Self

    by C. G. Jung

  • Votes: 4

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Bantam Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

  • Votes: 4

    Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

  • Votes: 4

    Lord of the Flies

    by William Golding

    William Golding's Lord of the Flies is a dystopian classic: 'exciting, relevant and thought-provoking' (Stephen King). When a group of schoolboys are stranded on a desert island, what could go wrong? 'One of my favorite books - I read it every couple of years.' (Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games) A plane crashes on a desert island. The only survivors are a group of schoolboys. By day, they discover fantastic wildlife and dazzling beaches, learning to survive; at night, they are haunted by nightmares of a primitive beast. Orphaned by society, it isn't long before their innocent childhood games devolve into a savage, murderous hunt ... 'Stands out mightily in my memory ... Such a strong statement about the human heart.' (Patricia Cornwell) 'Terrifying and haunting.' (Kingsley Amis) 'Beautifully written, tragic and provocative.' (E. M. Forster) ONE OF THE BBC'S ICONIC 'NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD' What readers are saying: 'Every real human being should read this ... This is what we are.' 'It's brilliant, it's captivating, it's thought provoking and brutal and for some, its truly terrifying.' 'It can be read and re-read many times, and every time something new will appear.' 'There is a reason why this is studied at school ... Excellent read.' 'This is one of the few books I've read that I keep on my Kindle to read again.' 'I revisit this every few years and it's always fresh and impressive ... One of the best books I've ever read.'
  • Votes: 4

    1984

    by George Orwell

    Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities
  • Votes: 3

    The Complete Making of Indiana Jones

    by J.W. Rinzler

    An in-depth guide to the making of all four Indiana Jones movies includes interviews with the cast and crew, insider anecdotes, transcripts of meetings, photographs, and production art.
  • Votes: 3

    Lucifer's Court

    by Otto Rahn

    Rahn’s personal diary from his travels as occult investigator for the Third Reich • First English translation of the author’s journeys in search of a Nordic equivalent to Mt. Sinai • Explains why Lucifer the Light Bringer, god of the heretics, is a positive figure Otto Rahn’s lifelong search for the Grail brought him to the attention of the SS leader Himmler, who shared his esoteric interests. Induced by Himmler to become the chief investigator of the occult for the Nazis, Rahn traveled throughout Europe--from Spain to Iceland--in the mid 1930s pursuing leads to the Grail and other mysteries. Lucifer’s Court is the travel diary he kept while searching for “the ghosts of the pagans and heretics who were [his] ancestors.” It was during this time that Rahn grasped the positive role Lucifer plays in these forbidden religions as the bearer of true illumination, similar to Apollo and other sun gods in pagan worship. This journey was also one of self-discovery for Rahn. He found such a faithful echo of his own innermost beliefs in the lives of the heretics of the past that he eventually called himself a Cathar and nurtured ambitions of restoring that faith, which had been cruelly destroyed in the fires of the Inquisition. His journeys on assignment for the Reich--including researching an alleged entrance to Hollow Earth in Iceland and searching for the true mission of Lucifer in the caves of southern France that served as refuge for the Cathars during the Inquisition--also led to his disenchantment with his employers and his mysterious death in the mountains after his break with the Nazis.
  • Votes: 3

    The Ministry for the Future

    by Kim Stanley Robinson

    "From legendary science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson comes a vision of climate change unlike any ever imagined. Kim Stanley Robinson is one of contemporary science fiction's most acclaimed writers, and with this new novel, he once again turns his eye to themes of climate change, technology, politics, and the human behaviors that drive these forces. But his setting is not a desolate, post-apocalyptic world--rather, he imagines a more hopeful future, one where humanity has managed to overcome our challenges and thrive. It is a novel both immediate and impactful, perfect for his many fans and for readers who crave powerful and thought-provoking sci-fi stories"--
  • Votes: 3

    Little Black Classics Box Set (Penguin Little Black Classics)

    by Various

    A stunning collection of all 80 exquisite Little Black Classics from Penguin This spectacular box set of the 80 books in the Little Black Classics series showcases the many wonderful and varied writers in Penguin Black Classics. From India to Greece, Denmark to Iran, the United States to Britain, this assortment of books will transport readers back in time to the furthest corners of the globe. With a choice of fiction, poetry, essays and maxims, by the likes of Chekhov, Balzac, Ovid, Austen, Sappho and Dante, it won''t be difficult to find a book to suit your mood. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of the Penguin Classics list - from drama to poetry, from fiction to history, with books taken from around the world and across numerous centuries. The Little Black Classics Box Set includes: � The Atheist''s Mass (Honor� de Balzac) � The Beautifull Cassandra (Jane Austen) � The Communist Manifesto (Fredrich Engels and Karl Marx) � Cruel Alexis (Virgil) � The Dhammapada (Anon) � The Dolphins, the Whales and the Gudgeon (Aesop) � The Eve of St Agnes (John Keats) � The Fall of Icarus (Ovid) � The Figure in the Carpet (Henry James) � The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows (Rudyard Kipling) � Gooseberries (Anton Chekhov) � The Great Fire of London (Samuel Pepys) � The Great Winglebury Duel (Charles Dickens) � How a Ghastly Story Was Brought to Light by a Common or Garden Butcher''s Dog (Johann Peter Hebel) � How Much Land Does A Man Need? (Leo Tolstoy) � How To Use Your Enemies (Baltasar Graci�n) � How We Weep and Laugh at the Same Thing (Michel de Montaigne) � I Hate and I Love (Catullus) � Il Duro (D. H. Lawrence) � It was snowing butterflies (Charles Darwin) � Jason and Medea (Apollonius of Rhodes) � Kasyan from the Beautiful Mountains (Ivan Turgenev) � Leonardo da Vinci (Giorgio Vasari) � The Life of a Stupid Man (Ryunosuke Akutagawa) � Lips Too Chilled (Matsuo Basho) � Lord Arthur Savile''s Crime (Oscar Wilde) � The Madness of Cambyses (Herodotus � The Maldive Shark (Herman Melville) � The Meek One (Fyodor Dostoyevsky � Mrs Rosie and the Priest (Giovanni Boccaccio) � My Dearest Father (Wolfgang Mozart) � The Night is Darkening Round Me (Emily Bront�) � The nightingales are drunk (Hafez) � The Nose (Nikolay Gogol) � Olalla (Robert Louis Stevenson) � The Old Man in the Moon (Shen Fu), Miss Brill (Katherine Mansfield) � The Old Nure''s Story (Elizabeth Gaskell) � On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts (Thomas De Quincey) � On the Beach at Night Alone (Walt Whitman) � The Reckoning (Edith Wharton) � Remember, Body... (C. P. Cavafy) � The Robber Bridegroom (Brothers Grimm) � The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-tongue (Anon) � Sindbad the Sailor � Sketchy, Doubtful, Incomplete Jottings (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe) � Socrates'' Defence (Plato) � Speaking of Siva (Anon) � The Steel Flea (Nikolai Leskov) � The Tell-Tale Heart (Edgar Allan Poe) � The Terrors of the Night (Thomas Nashe) � The Tinder Box (Hans Christian Andersen) � Three Tang Dynasty Poets (Wang Wei) � Trimalchio''s Feast (Petronius) � To-morrow (Joseph Conrad), Of Street Piemen (Henry Mayhew) � Traffic (John Ruskin) � Travels in the Land of Serpents and Pearls (Marco Polo) � The Voyage of Sir Francis Drake Around the Whole Globe (Richard Hakluyt) � The Wife of Bath (Geoffrey Chaucer) � The Woman Much Missed (Thomas Hardy) � The Yellow Wall-paper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman) � Wailing Ghosts (Pu Songling) � Well, they are gone, and here must I remain (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
  • Votes: 3

    The WASP FACTORY

    by Iain Banks

    The polarizing literary debut by Scottish author Ian Banks, The Wasp Factory is the bizarre, imaginative, disturbing, and darkly comic look into the mind of a child psychopath. Meet Frank Cauldhame. Just sixteen, and unconventional to say the least: Two years after I killed Blyth I murdered my young brother Paul, for quite different and more fundamental reasons than I'd disposed of Blyth, and then a year after that I did for my young cousin Esmerelda, more or less on a whim. That's my score to date. Three. I haven't killed anybody for years, and don't intend to ever again. It was just a stage I was going through.
  • Votes: 3

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    by Hunter S. Thompson

  • Votes: 3

    Economics in One Lesson

    by Henry Hazlitt

    With over a million copies sold, Economics in One Lesson is an essential guide to the basics of economic theory. A fundamental influence on modern libertarianism, Hazlitt defends capitalism and the free market from economic myths that persist to this day. Considered among the leading economic thinkers of the “Austrian School,” which includes Carl Menger, Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich (F.A.) Hayek, and others, Henry Hazlitt (1894-1993), was a libertarian philosopher, an economist, and a journalist. He was the founding vice-president of the Foundation for Economic Education and an early editor of The Freeman magazine, an influential libertarian publication. Hazlitt wrote Economics in One Lesson, his seminal work, in 1946. Concise and instructive, it is also deceptively prescient and far-reaching in its efforts to dissemble economic fallacies that are so prevalent they have almost become a new orthodoxy. Economic commentators across the political spectrum have credited Hazlitt with foreseeing the collapse of the global economy which occurred more than 50 years after the initial publication of Economics in One Lesson. Hazlitt’s focus on non-governmental solutions, strong — and strongly reasoned — anti-deficit position, and general emphasis on free markets, economic liberty of individuals, and the dangers of government intervention make Economics in One Lesson every bit as relevant and valuable today as it has been since publication.
  • Votes: 3

    Demian

    by Hermann Hesse

    The stories Hesse tells appeal to young people, because they keep faith with the powerful emotions of adolescence, which most adults forget or outgrow. As a young middle class boy Emil Sinclair has trouble knowing what is or what should be. Throughout this novel he is constantly seeking validation as well as mentorship. As Emil struggles a childhood friend begins to mentor him and is said to be his daimon. In ancient greek daimon is is a person's deity or guiding spirit. In his story Emil's parents are a symbol of safety and fallback as his friend helps lead him to self realization.
  • Votes: 3

    Project Hail Mary

    by Andy Weir

  • Votes: 3

    The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect

    by Roger Williams

    In a time not far from our own, Lawrence sets out simply to build an artifical intelligence that can pass as human, and finds himself instead with one that can pass as a god. Taking the Three Laws of Robotics literally, Prime Intellect makes every human immortal and provides instantly for every stated human desire. Caroline finds no meaning in this life of purposeless ease, and forgets her emptiness only in moments of violent and profane exhibitionism. At turns shocking and humorous, "Prime Intellect" looks unflinchingly at extremes of human behavior that might emerge when all limits are removed. An international Internet phenomenon, "Prime Intellect" has been downloaded more than 10,000 times since its free release in January 2003. It has been read and discussed in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Slovenia, South Africa, and other countries. This Lulu edition is your chance to own "Prime Intellect" in conventional book form.
  • Votes: 3

    Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy)

    by William Gibson

    They set a Slamhound on Turner's trail in New Delhi, slotted it to his pheromones and the colour of his hair. When the Maas Biolabs and Hosaka zaibatsus fight it out for world domination, computer cowboys like Turner and Count Zero are just foot soldiers in the great game: useful but ultimately expendable. When Turner wakes up in Mexico - in a new body with a beautiful woman beside him - his corporate masters let him recuperate for a while, then reactivate his memory for a mission even more dangerous than the one that nearly killed him: the head designer from Maas Biolabs says he wants to defect to Hosaka, and it's Turner's job to deliver him safely. Count Zero is a rustbelt data-hustler totally unprepared for what comes his way when the designer's defection triggers war in cyberspace. With voodoo gods in the Net and angels in the software, he can only hope that the megacorps and the super-rich have their virtual hands too full to notice the amateur hacker with the black market kit trying desperately to stay alive . . .
  • Votes: 3

    The Law

    by Frederic Bastiat

  • Votes: 3

    The Prince

    by Niccolò Machiavelli

    There have been many political philosophies published throughout the time of literate man, but few have made such an impact in so few words as Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince. This eminently quotable treatise on the nature of rulers is unsettling in that it does not merely discuss the specific political geography of 16th century Europe, a world comprised of kings and nobles who ruled absolutely; it has endured for nearly 500 years because it is an all-encompassing understanding of men in power, and the common traits, motives and struggles which have characterized leaders from Roman emperors to modern-day presidents.
  • Votes: 3

    The Prophet

    by Kahlil Gibran

  • Votes: 3

    Think Again

    by Adam Grant

  • Votes: 3

    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

    by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    One of the most chilling novels ever written about the oppression of totalitarian regimes--and the first to open Western eyes to the terrors of Stalin's prison camps, this book allowed Solzhenitsyn, who later became Russia's conscience in exile, to challenge the brutal might of the Soviet Union.
  • Votes: 3

    Gospel of John

    by Tyndale

    John's Gospel is one of the most powerful books of the New Testament. This 10-pack of The Gospel of John NLT is perfect for evangelism and giving away. This low-cost edition, presented in the New Living Translation, communicates God's message of love and hope in three ways: by underlining the verses affirming the deity of Jesus Christ, by italicizing the verses on God's forgiveness and eternal life, and by setting verses that point the way toward Christian living in boldface type.
  • Votes: 3

    The Pearl

    by John Steinbeck

  • Votes: 3

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 3

    The Forever War

    by Joe Haldeman

  • Votes: 2

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 2

    The Sentinel

    by Lee Child

    The edge-of-your-seat, heart-in-mouth new Jack Reacher thriller for 2021 - his 25th adventure. No one's bigger than Jack Reacher. Jack Reacher gets off the bus in a sleepy no-name town outside Nashville, Tennessee. He plans to grab a cup of coffee and move right along. Not going to happen. The town has been shut down by a cyber attack. At the centre of it all, whether he likes it or not, is Rusty Rutherford. He's an average IT guy, but he knows more than he thinks. As the bad guys move in on Rusty, Reacher moves in on them . . . And now Rusty knows he's protected, he's never going to leave the big man's side. Reacher might just have to stick around and find out what the hell's gone wrong . . . and then put it right, like only he can. *** 'Jack Reacher is today's James Bond, a thriller hero we can't get enough of.' Ken Follett 'If you haven't read any Jack Reacher, you have a treat in store . . . a hitchhiker without a phone, a one-man force for good.' - The Times 'A contemporary version of the knight in shining armour . . . Reacher is a mythic figure.' Literary Review 'Jack Reacher is a wonderfully epic hero; tough, taciturn, yet vulnerable... Irresistible.' People 'Jack Reacher has long since earned his prominent place in the pantheon of cool, smart-talking American heroes.' New York Times
  • Votes: 2

    The Interpretation of Financial Statements

    by Benjamin Graham

    "All investors, from beginners to old hands, should gain from the use of this guide, as I have." From the Introduction by Michael F. Price, president, Franklin Mutual Advisors, Inc. Benjamin Graham has been called the most important investment thinker of the twentieth century. As a master investor, pioneering stock analyst, and mentor to investment superstars, he has no peer. The volume you hold in your hands is Graham's timeless guide to interpreting and understanding financial statements. It has long been out of print, but now joins Graham's other masterpieces, The Intelligent Investor and Security Analysis, as the three priceless keys to understanding Graham and value investing. The advice he offers in this book is as useful and prescient today as it was sixty years ago. As he writes in the preface, "if you have precise information as to a company's present financial position and its past earnings record, you are better equipped to gauge its future possibilities. And this is the essential function and value of security analysis." Written just three years after his landmark Security Analysis, The Interpretation of Financial Statements gets to the heart of the master's ideas on value investing in astonishingly few pages. Readers will learn to analyze a company's balance sheets and income statements and arrive at a true understanding of its financial position and earnings record. Graham provides simple tests any reader can apply to determine the financial health and well-being of any company. This volume is an exact text replica of the first edition of The Interpretation of Financial Statements, published by Harper & Brothers in 1937. Graham's original language has been restored, and readers can be assured that every idea and technique presented here appears exactly as Graham intended. Highly practical and accessible, it is an essential guide for all business people--and makes the perfect companion volume to Graham's investment masterpiece The Intelligent Investor.
  • Votes: 2

    A Brief History of Everything

    by Ken Wilber

    Utilizing a question and answer format, the philosopher and spiritual teacher discusses multiculturalism, political correctness, spiritual enlightenment, gender wars, modern liberation movements, and the course of evolution. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    IT'S ALL IN YOUR HEAD

    by Russ

    An inspirational book by self-made musical superstar, Russ, reminding you that it starts with YOU, to believe in yourself, and to get out of your own way. Twenty-six-year-old rapper, songwriter, and producer Russ walks his own path, at his own pace. By doing so, he proved that he didn't need a major label to surpass over a billion streams on Spotify/Apple Music, get on Forbes' 2019 "30 Under 30," make the Forbes' "30 Under 30 Cash Kings" at number 20 for most earned, sell out arenas across the U.S. and around the globe, and become one of the most popular and engaged rappers right now. His method was simple: love and believe in yourself absolutely and work hard no matter what. In this memoir, Russ inspires readers to walk to their individual rhythms and beat their biggest obstacles: themselves. With chapters named after his most powerful and popular songs, It's All in Your Head will reflect on the lessons he's learned from his career, family, and relationships. He'll push readers to bet on themselves, take those leaps of faith, and recognize struggles as opportunities. With illustrations throughout consistent with the brand Russ has built and his fan base loves, It's All in Your Head will give readers an inside-look at the man and the motivation behind the music. A lover of books like The Alchemist and The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Russ delivers a short, potent, inspirational, raw, and honest book that gives readers a way to find self-belief and unlock their potential. Fans already rely on Russ as an inspiration of confidence; now, he is taking it to the next level with this book, which will contain lyrics from his music and visuals that reflect his inimitable style. Russ utilizes his relentless passion and supreme confidence in his own talents to manifest his dreams and has been doing that since well before he was ever famous. In his first book, Russ gives readers the tools to do the same whether they want to succeed in music, in romance, or simply in life. In the vein of mega bestsellers like Unf*ck Yourself and The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, Russ's memoir levels with his readers: there are no shortcuts to success.
  • Votes: 2

    Food of the Gods

    by Terence McKenna

    "Terrence McKenna's research on man's ancient relationship with chemicals opens a doorway to the devine, and perhaps a solution for saving our troubled world"--Back cover.
  • Votes: 2

    Slouching Towards Bethlehem

    by Joan Didion

    Beautifully repackaged as part of the Picador Modern Classics Series, this special edition is small enough to fit in your pocket and bold enough to stand out on your bookshelf. Celebrated, iconic, and indispensable, Joan Didion’s first work of nonfiction, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, is considered a watershed moment in American writing. First published in 1968, the collection was critically praised as one of the “best prose written in this country.” More than perhaps any other book, this collection by one of the most distinctive prose stylists of our era captures the unique time and place of Joan Didion’s focus, exploring subjects such as John Wayne and Howard Hughes, growing up in California and the nature of good and evil in a Death Valley motel room, and, especially, the essence of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, the heart of the counterculture. As Joyce Carol Oates remarked: “[Didion] has been an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time, a memorable voice, partly eulogistic, partly despairing; always in control.”
  • Votes: 2

    Zorba the Greek

    by Nikos Kazantzakis

  • Votes: 2

    A Clockwork Orange

    by Anthony Burgess

  • Votes: 2

    Speak for Yourself

    by Lana Wood Johnson

    Girl meets boy. Girl likes boy.Girl gets friend to help win boy.Friend ends up with crush on boy... Skylar's got ambitious #goals. And if she wants them to come true, she has to get to work now. (At least she thinks so...) Step one in her epic plan is showing everyone that her latest app is brilliant. To do that, she's going to use it to win State at the Scholastic Exposition, the nerdiest academic competition around.First, she'll need a team, and Skylar's not always so good with people. But she'll do whatever it takes to put one together ... even if it means playing Cupid for her teammates Joey and Zane, at Joey's request. When things get off to an awkward start for them, Skylar finds herself stepping in to help Joey. Anything to keep her on the team. Only, Skylar seems to be making everything more complicated. Especially when she realizes she might be falling for Zane, which was not a #goal. Can Skylar figure out her feelings, prove her app's potential to the world, and win State without losing her friends--or is her path to greatness over before it begins?
  • Votes: 2

    H is for Hawk

    by Helen Macdonald

    An award-winning best-seller from the UK recounts how the author, an experienced falconer grieving the sudden death of her father, endeavored to train for the first time a dangerous goshawk predator as part of her personal recovery.
  • Votes: 2

    The Library of Babel

    by Jorge Luis Borges

  • Votes: 2

    Theaetetus (Hackett Classics)

    by Plato

    M J Levett's elegant translation of Theaetetus, first published in 1928, is here revised by Myles Burnyeat to reflect contemporary standards of accuracy while retainingn the style, imagery, and idiomatic speech for which the Levett translation is unparalleled. Bernard Williams's concise introduction illuminates the powerful argument of this complex dialogue and illustrates its connections to contemporary metaphysical and epistemological concerns.
  • Votes: 2

    Death with Interruptions

    by José Saramago

    While Death sits in her apartment wondering what would happen if she became human and fell in love, no one dies, raising concerns among a population confronting the harsh realities of eternal life.
  • Votes: 2

    The Catcher in the Rye

    by J.D. Salinger

    The "brilliant, funny, meaningful novel" (The New Yorker) that established J. D. Salinger as a leading voice in American literature--and that has instilled in millions of readers around the world a lifelong love of books. "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.
  • Votes: 2

    Beloved

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 2

    The Left Hand of Darkness

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 2

    A Room of One's Own

    by Virginia Woolf

  • Votes: 2

    Survivors of the Holocaust

    by Kath Shackleton

    Based on a series of a BAFTA-nominated animated documentaries, the artwork in Survivors of the Holocaust has been reinvented to bring together six different real-life survivors' account of the Holocaust. Every word rings with truth, whether it describes the bleak fear of arriving at Auschwitz or the sheer terror of Kristallnacht, and is complemented by dazzling, clever artwork. This unique children's graphic novel aims to bring the survivors' stories to a new audience. It is an important, timely reminder of the horrors that can be inflicted on innocent people and a reflection of the Holocaust's legacy today. It has been longlisted for the prestigous School and Library Association Information Books Awards, 2017. The Holocaust is an important part of the history curriculum at Key Stage 3 and this book is pitched perfectly for 9-12 year olds.
  • Votes: 2

    Zero Fail

    by Carol Leonnig

    "Carol Leonnig has been covering the Secret Service for The Washington Post for most of the last decade, bringing to light the gaffes and scandals that plague the agency today--from a toxic work culture to outdated equipment and training to the deep resentment among the ranks with the agency's leadership. But the Secret Service wasn't always so troubled. The Secret Service was born in 1865, in the wake of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, but its story begins in earnest in 1963, with the death of John F. Kennedy. Shocked into reform by their failure to protect the president on that fateful day, this once-sleepy agency was rapidly transformed into a proud, elite unit that would finally redeem themselves in 1981 by valiantly thwarting an assassination attempt against Ronald Reagan. But this reputation for courage and efficiency would not last forever. By Barack Obama's presidency, the Secret Service was becoming notorious for break-ins at the White House, an armed gunman firing at the building while agents stood by, a massive prostitution scandal in Cartagena, and many other dangerous lapses. To expose the these shortcomings, Leonnig interviewed countless current and former agents who risked their careers to speak out about an agency that's broken and in desperate need of a reform"--
  • Votes: 2

    Flatland

    by Edwin A. Abbott

  • Votes: 2

    Siddartha

    by Herman Hesse

  • Votes: 2

    The Untethered Soul

    by Michael A. Singer

  • Votes: 2

    Siddhartha

    by Hermann Hesse

    Siddhartha is an allegorical novel by Hermann Hesse which deals with the spiritual journey of an Indian boy called Siddhartha during the time of the Buddha. The book was written in German, in a simple, yet powerful and lyrical style. It was first published in 1922, after Hesse had spent some time in India in the 1910s. The story revolves around a young man who leaves his home and family on a quest for the Truth. Embarking on a journey that takes him from the austerities of renunciation to the profligacy of wealth. That leads him through the range of human experiences from hunger and want, to passion, pleasure, pain, greed, yearning, boredom, love, despair and hope. A journey that leads finally to the river, where he gains peace and eventually wisdom. This is the story of Siddhartha as told by Nobel Laureate Hermann Hesse in his most influential work.
  • Votes: 2

    Crime and Punishment

    by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  • Votes: 2

    Chinua Achebe

    by Chinua Achebe

  • Votes: 2

    The lessons of history

    by Will Durant

    2 distinguished historians express their evaluation of the nature of the human experience and what may be learned from it
  • Votes: 2

    Ham on Rye

    by Charles Bukowski

    In what is widely hailed as the best of his many novels, Charles Bukowski details the long, lonely years of his own hardscrabble youth in the raw voice of alter ego Henry Chinaski. From a harrowingly cheerless childhood in Germany through acne-riddled high school years and his adolescent discoveries of alcohol, women, and the Los Angeles Public Library's collection of D. H. Lawrence, Ham on Rye offers a crude, brutal, and savagely funny portrait of an outcast's coming-of-age during the desperate days of the Great Depression.
  • Votes: 2

    The Stars

    by H. A. Rey

    A simple guide to the location and recognition of stars and constellations presents the constellations in shapes that correspond sensibly to their names. Simultaneous.
  • Votes: 2

    Of Mice and Men

    by John Steinbeck

    The tragic story of the friendship between two migrant workers, George and mentally retarded Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm
  • Votes: 2

    Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

    by Shunryu Suzuki

  • Votes: 2

    Things Fall Apart

    by Chinua Achebe

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele
  • Votes: 2

    Ask the Dust

    by John Fante

  • Votes: 2

    Common Sense

    by Thomas Paine

  • Votes: 2

    The Confession

    by John Grisham

    _______________________________________ An innocent man is days from execution. Only a guilty man can save him. Travis Boyette is a murderer. In 1998, in the small East Texas city of Sloan, he abducted, raped, and strangled a popular high-school cheerleader. He buried her body where it would never be found, then watched and waited as police and prosecutors arrested Donte Drumm, a black local football star with no connection to the crime. Tried, convicted and sentenced, Drumm was sent to death row. Nine years later, Donte Drumm is four days from execution. Over 400 miles away in Kansas, Travis also faecs death, suffering from an inoperable brain tumour. At long last, he decides to do what's right. After years of silence, he is ready to confess. But the law doesn't want to hear it. As far as they're concerned, they've got their man. So how can a guilty man convince lawyers, judges and politicians that the man they're about to execute is innocent? _______________________________________ ‘A master at the art of deft characterisation and the skilful delivery of hair-raising crescendos' – Irish Independent 'John Grisham is the master of legal fiction' – Jodi Picoult 'The best thriller writer alive' – Ken Follett ‘John Grisham has perfected the art of cooking up convincing, fast-paced thrillers’ – Telegraph ‘Grisham is a superb, instinctive storyteller’ – The Times ‘Grisham's storytelling genius reminds us that when it comes to legal drama, the master is in a league of his own.’ – Daily Record ‘Masterful – when Grisham gets in the courtroom he lets rip, drawing scenes so real they're not just alive, they're pulsating’ – Mirror ‘A giant of the thriller genre’ – TimeOut
  • Votes: 2

    Black Elk Speaks

    by John G. Neihardt

    Reveals the life of Lakota healer Nicholas Black Elk as he led his tribe's battle against white settlers who threatened their homes and buffalo herds, and describes the victories and tragedies at Little Bighorn and Wounded Knee. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    Freedom from the Known

    by Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • Votes: 1

    Awareness

    by Anthony De Mello

  • Votes: 1

    Shadow Divers

    by Robert Kurson

  • Votes: 1

    Foundation

    by Isaac Asimov

    A band of psychologists, under the leadership of psychohistorian Hari Seldon, plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire and to preserve the accumulated knowledge of humankind. Reader's Guide available. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    Satantango

    by László Krasznahorkai

    Translated by George Szirtes From the winner of the Man Booker International Prize In the darkening embers of a Communist utopia, life in a desolate Hungarian town has come to a virtual standstill. Flies buzz, spiders weave, water drips and animals root desultorily in the barnyard of a collective farm. But when the charismatic Irimias - long-thought dead - returns, the villagers fall under his spell. Irimias sets about swindling the villagers out of a fortune that might allow them to escape the emptiness and futility of their existence. He soon attains a messianic aura as he plays on the fears of the townsfolk and a series of increasingly brutal events unfold.
  • Votes: 1

    Zero to One

    by Blake Masters

    WHAT VALUABLE COMPANY IS NOBODY BUILDING? The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. If you are copying these guys, you aren’t learning from them. It’s easier to copy a model than to make something new: doing what we already know how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. Every new creation goes from 0 to 1. This book is about how to get there. ‘Peter Thiel has built multiple breakthrough companies, and Zero to One shows how.’ ELON MUSK, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla ‘This book delivers completely new and refreshing ideas on how to create value in the world.’ MARK ZUCKERBERG, CEO of Facebook ‘When a risk taker writes a book, read it. In the case of Peter Thiel, read it twice. Or, to be safe, three times. This is a classic.’ NASSIM NICHOLAS TALEB, author of The Black Swan
  • Votes: 1

    The Unplugged Alpha

    by Richard Cooper

  • Votes: 1

    Wise Blood

    by Flannery O'Connor

    Wise Blood, Flannery O'Connor's first novel, is the story of Hazel Motes who, released from the armed services, returns to the evangelical Deep South. There he begins a private battle against the religiosity of the community and in particular against Asa Hawkes, the 'blind' preacher, and his degenerate fifteen-year-old daughter. In desperation Hazel founds his own religion, 'The Church without Christ', and this extraordinary narrative moves towards its savage and macabre resolution. 'A literary talent that has about it the uniqueness of greatness.' Sunday Telegraph 'No other major American writer of our century has constructed a fictional world so energetically and forthrightly charged by religious investigation.' The New Yorker 'A genius.' New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    Death; An Inside Story

    by SADHGURU

  • Votes: 1

    Letter to a Christian Nation

    by Sam Harris

    "A hard-hitting polemic against religious fundamentalism" - Foreword by Richard Dawkins 'Thousands of people have written to tell me that I am wrong not to believe in God. The most hostile of these communications have come from Christians. This is ironic, as Christians generally imagine that no faith imparts the virtues of love and forgiveness more effectively than their own. The truth is that many who claim to be transformed by Christ's love are deeply, even murderously, intolerant of criticism. While we may want to ascribe this to human nature, it is clear that such hatred draws considerable support from the Bible. How do I know this? The most disturbed of my correspondents always cite chapter and verse.' So begins Letter to a Christian Nation, Sam Harris's hard-hitting rebuttal of religious fundamentalism and blind belief. With deceptively simple arguments, he demolishes the myths on which Christianity was built, challenges believers to open their eyes to the contradictions of their faith and warns us of the dangers of America's ever increasing unification of Church and State. Sam Harris is the author of the New York Times bestseller The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason and winner of the 2005 PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Non-fiction. He is a graduate in philosophy from Stanford University and is now completing a doctorate in neuroscience. He lives in New York. www.samharris.org
  • Votes: 1

    Brief

    by Joseph McCormack

    Introducing his B.R.I.E.F. approach, the founder and CEO of Sheffield Marketing Partners, which specializes in message and narrative development, helps readers simplify and clarify complex communication to become a lean communicator.
  • Votes: 1

    ( ) - Vishuddhi Marga

    by : (Tripitacharya Bhikshu Dharmarakshit)

  • Votes: 1

    Distant Star

    by Roberto Bolano

    Alberto Ruiz-Tagle was once the quiet, unknowable, unpromising member of Chile’s young poetry scene. But the military coup of 1973 sees Alberto reborn as Chile’s leading celebrity poet, Carlos Wieder. Known for his daring sky poems, penned in smoke high above the cities, Weider’s dazzling trajectory is a cause for astonishment and speculation amongst his old poetry friends. Where did this talent suddenly spring from? And, how is it connected to the disappearance of the beautiful Garmendia twins? Told from across the years in exile in Europe, the narrator’s attempts to trace the fate of his old circle will lead him to one last confrontation with the brutality of their generation. Elegant, pocket-sized paperbacks, VINTAGE Editions celebrate the audacity and ambition of the written word, transporting readers to wherever in the world literary innovation may be found.
  • Votes: 1

    The Ending of Time

    by Jiddu Krishnamurti

  • Votes: 1

    The Greatest Salesman in the World

    by Og Mandino

    The runaway bestseller with more than four million copies in print! You too can change your life with the priceless wisdom of ten ancient scrolls handed down for thousands of years. “Every sales manager should read The Greatest Salesman in the World. It is a book to keep at the bedside, or on the living room table—a book to dip into as needed, to browse in now and then, to enjoy in small stimulating portions. It is a book for the hours and for the years, a book to turn to over and over again, as to a friend, a book of moral, spiritual and ethical guidance, an unfailing source of comfort and inspiration.”—Lester J. Bradshaw, Jr., Former Dean, Dale Carnegie Institute of Effective Speaking & Human Relations “I have read almost every book that has ever been written on salesmanship, but I think Og Mandino has captured all of them in The Greatest Salesman in the World. No one who follows these principles will ever fail as a salesman, and no one will ever be truly great without them; but, the author has done more than present the principles—he has woven them into the fabric of one of the most fascinating stories I have ever read.”—Paul J. Meyer, President of Success Motivation Institute, Inc. “I was overwhelmed by The Greatest Salesman in the World. It is, without doubt, the greatest and the most touching story I have ever read. It is so good that there are two musts that I would attach to it: First, you must not lay it down until you have finished it; and secondly, every individual who sells anything, and that includes us all, must read it.”—Robert B. Hensley, President, Life Insurance Co. of Kentucky
  • Votes: 1

    Billy Budd

    by Herman Melville

    Herman Melville's final masterpiece, found unpublished on his desk at his death. "Billy Budd, Sailor" would emerge, after its publication in 1924, as one of Melville's best-loved books--and one of his most open, with its discussion of homosexualty. In it, Melville returns to the sea to tell the story of Billy, a cheerful, hard working, and handsome young sailor, conscripted to work against his will on another ship, where he soon finds himself persecuted by Claggart, the paranoid master-at-arms. As things escalate beyond the naive Billy's control, tragedy looms on the horizon like Melville's great white whale, and the story become Melville's final, sublime plunge into the classic tussle between civilization and chaos, between oppression and freedom, as well as the book in which he discusses homosexuality most openly. One of the major works of American literature.
  • Votes: 1

    Gates of Fire

    by Steven Pressfield

    Chronicles the battle of three hundred Spartan warriors against a huge force of Persian soldiers in 480 B.C. against the background of life in ancient Sparta and its extraordinary culture.
  • Votes: 1

    The Rock of Tanios by Amin Maalouf (1994-10-03)

  • Votes: 1

    Contact

    by Carl Sagan

    Pulitzer Prize-winning author and astronomer Carl Sagan imagines the greatest adventure of all—the discovery of an advanced civilization in the depths of space. In December of 1999, a multinational team journeys out to the stars, to the most awesome encounter in human history. Who—or what—is out there? In Cosmos, Carl Sagan explained the universe. In Contact, he predicts its future—and our own.
  • Votes: 1

    Solaris

    by Stanislaw Lem

  • Votes: 1

    The Dip

    by Seth Godin

    The author of Permission Marketing and Purple Cow shares insights into knowing when to support or fight corporate systems, explaining how to recognize and drop defunct practices to protect profits, job security, and professional satisfaction.
  • Votes: 1

    The Selfish Gene

    by Richard Dawkins

    With a new epilogue to the 40th anniversary edition.
  • Votes: 1

    The Origin of Species

    by Charles Darwin

    States the evidence for a theory of evolution, explains how evolution takes place, and discusses instinct, hybridism, fossils, distribution and classification.
  • Votes: 1

    The Good Soldier Schweik

    by Jaroslav Hasek

    Translates the iconoclastic Czech's classic satire depicting the adventures of a soldier during the First World War
  • Votes: 1

    Life of Pi

    by Yann Martel

    MORE THAN SEVEN MILLION COPIES SOLD The beloved and bestselling novel and winner of the Booker Prize, Life of Pi. New York Times Bestseller * Los Angeles Times Bestseller * Washington Post Bestseller * San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller * Chicago Tribune Bestseller "A story to make you believe in the soul-sustaining power of fiction."—Los Angeles Times Book Review After the sinking of a cargo ship, a solitary lifeboat remains bobbing on the wild blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen-year-old boy named Pi, a hyena, a wounded zebra, an orangutan—and a 450-pound royal bengal tiger. The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary and beloved works of fiction in recent years. Universally acclaimed upon publication, Life of Pi is a modern classic.
  • Votes: 1

    Guidelines for the Leader and the Commander

    by Gen. Bruce C. Clarke

    Featured on The Jocko Podcast “The finest little handbook on leadership and training ever written.” --Col. David Hackworth, author of the bestseller About Face Guidelines for the Leader and the Commander is an enduring classic. Written by the Army’s premier trainer of the twentieth century, this is a wide-ranging collection of principles and maxims to guide the building, training, and leading of any organization, with a focus on the individuals who make up that organization. Clarke intended the book to enlighten and instruct leaders, and those who aspire to leadership, in every profession and every walk of life. Thoughtful as well as concrete, pithy and often conversational, Clarke’s book resonates today.
  • Votes: 1

    The Pigeon

    by Patrick Sskind

    The Pigeon by Patrick Süskind is dark and haunting tale from the author of the bestselling Perfume - now available in ebook for the first time Set in Paris and attracting comparisons with Franz Kafka and Edgar Allan Poe, The Pigeon tells the story of a day in the meticulously ordered life of bank security guard Jonathan Noel. Noel who has been hiding from life since his wife left him for her Tunisian lover - when he opens his front door on a day he believes will be just like any other, he encounters not the desired empty hallway but an unwelcome, diabolical intruder . . . This tense, disturbing follow-up to the bestselling Perfume is a modern classic novella from the much-acclaimed Patrick Süskind
  • Votes: 1

    House of Leaves

    by Mark Z. Danielewski

  • Votes: 1

    Understanding Media

    by Marshall McLuhan

    McLuhan's view of a media-sculpted society of the future.
  • Votes: 1

    The Scientific Outlook (Routledge Classics)

    by Bertrand Russell

    According to Bertrand Russell, science is knowledge; that which seeks general laws connecting a number of particular facts. It is, he argues, far superior to art, where much of the knowledge is intangible and assumed. In The Scientific Outlook,Russell delivers one of his most important works, exploring the nature and scope of scientific knowledge, the increased power over nature that science affords and the changes in the lives of human beings that result from new forms of science. Insightful and accessible, this impressive work sees Russell at his very best.
  • Votes: 1

    Flow My Tears The Policeman Said

    by Philip K. Dick

    Jason Taverner has a glittering TV career, millions of fans, great wealth and something close to eternal youth. He is one of a handful of brilliant, beautiful people, the product of top-secret government experiments forty years earlier. But suddenly, all records of him vanish. He becomes a man with no identity, in a police state where everyone us closely monitored. Can he ever be rich and famous again? Or was that life just an illusion?
  • Votes: 1

    Shop Class as Soulcraft

    by Matthew B. Crawford

  • Votes: 1

    Absinthe Jack

    by Simon Webb

    Aesthete, decadent poet, misogynist and violent drunk, Ernest Dowson has been long-listed as a Jack the Ripper suspect for nearly twenty years. Simon Webb's new book takes a fresh look at the evidence, and examines the possibility that Dowson's consumption of epic quantities of absinthe may have turned him from a woman-hating brawler into the terror of Whitechapel.
  • Votes: 1

    Gun Machine

    by Warren Ellis

    The bestselling thriller from "a seriously good writer with a seriously wicked imagination" (New York Times Book Review). After a shootout claims the life of his partner in a condemned tenement building on Pearl Street, Detective John Tallow unwittingly stumbles across an apartment stacked high with guns. When examined, each weapon leads to a different, previously unsolved murder. Confronted with the sudden emergence of hundreds of unsolved homicides, Tallow discovers that he's walked into a veritable deal with the devil. An unholy bargain that has made possible the rise of some of Manhattan's most prominent captains of industry. A hunter who performs his deadly acts as a sacrifice to the old gods of Manhattan and who may, quite simply, be the most prolific murderer in New York City's history.
  • Votes: 1

    The Ends Game

    by Marco Bertini

    "An innovative rethinking of our current market system where people pay for products. In the future, we will pay for the results a company can deliver. This book explains how we will reach that future"--
  • Votes: 1

    Gimple The Fool

    by Issac Bashevis Singer

    Isaac Bashevis Singer's first collection of stories, Gimpel the Fool, is a landmark work that has attracted international acclaim since it was first published in 1957. In Saul Bellow's masterly translation, the title story follows the exploits of Gimpel, an ingenuous baker who is universally deceived but who declines to retaliate against his tormentors. Gimpel and the protagonists of the other stories in this volume all inhabit the distinctive pre-World War II ghettos of Poland and, beyond that, the larger world created by Singer's unforgettable prose.
  • Votes: 1

    The Giver

    by Lois Lowry

    Celebrate Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world in this 25th Anniversary Edition of The Giver. Includes a new afterword from Lois Lowry, as well as her Newbery acceptance speech. The Giver, Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning novel, has become one of the most influential books of our time. Placed on countless reading lists and curricula, translated into more than forty languages, and made into a feature film, The Giver is a modern classic. Celebrate this beloved contribution to children's literature with the 25th Anniversary Edition. The haunting story of twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity, is as resonant today as when it was first published. Lois Lowry will include a new afterword as well as her Newbery acceptance speech in this beautifully rejacketed edition.
  • Votes: 1

    Seven Brief Lessons on Physics

    by Carlo Rovelli

    CARLO ROVELLI'S NEW BOOK, HELGOLAND, IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER THE PHENOMENAL BESTSELLER 'Honestly I cannot recommend it too strongly... one of the fastest selling science titles of all time because it is so clear' Jeremy Vine, BBC Radio 2 'There's a book I've been carrying around like a small Bible, Seven Brief Lessons on Physics' - Benedict Cumberbatch Everything you need to know about modern physics, the universe and your place in the world in seven enlightening lessons These seven short lessons guide us, with simplicity and clarity, through the scientific revolution that shook physics in the twentieth century and still continues to shake us today. In this beautiful and mind-bending introduction to modern physics, Carlo Rovelli explains Einstein's theory of general relativity, quantum mechanics, black holes, the complex architecture of the universe, elementary particles, gravity, and the nature of the mind. In under eighty pages, readers will understand the most transformative scientific discoveries of the twentieth century and what they mean for us. Not since Richard Feynman's celebrated best-seller Six Easy Pieces has physics been so vividly, intelligently and entertainingly revealed.
  • Votes: 1

    The Illustrated Man

    by Ray Bradbury

    Eighteen science fiction stories deal with love, madness, and death on Mars, Venus, and in space.
  • Votes: 1

    The Obstacle Is the Way

    by Ryan Holiday

  • Votes: 1

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    by Milan Kundera

    A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals—while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel “the unbearable lightness of being.” A major achievement from one of the world’s truly great writers, Milan Kundera’s magnificent novel of passion and politics, infidelity and ideas, encompasses the extremes of comedy and tragedy, illuminating all aspects of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    Virtual Light (Bridge Trilogy)

    by William Gibson

    Virtual Light - a gripping techno-thriller from William Gibson, bestselling author of Neuromancer San Francisco, the nearish future: Ex-cop Berry Rydell's lost one job he didn't much like and landed another he likes even less. Some sunglasses - actually high-end kit involving Virtual Reality and super-sensitive data - were stolen from a courier, and a man named Warbaby's been charged with retrieving them. Warbaby needs a driver and Rydell is the perfect fit. But when the courier is killed and Warbaby gets to work - giving Rydell a taste of what's expected and exactly what's at stake - he has second thoughts. Especially when he comes face to face with Chevette, stealer of sunglasses, who'll land an ex-cop in a heap of trouble . . . 'Audacious, witty and passionate. A wonderful read' Observer 'A stunner . . . a terrifically stylish burst of kick-butt imagination' Entertainment Weekly 'Studded with crackling insights into the relationship between technology, culture and morality, Virtual Lightdoesn't miss its stride for a nanosecond' Time Out William Gibson's first novel Neuromancer sold more than six million copies worldwide. Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive completed his first trilogy. He has since written six further novels, moving gradually away from science fiction and futuristic work, instead writing about the strange contemporary world we inhabit. His most recent novels include Patter Recognition, Spook Country and Zero History, his non-fiction collection. Distrust That Particular Flavor, compiles assorted writings and journalism from across his career.
  • Votes: 1

    The Humans

    by Matt Haig

  • Votes: 1

    Prometheus Rising

    by Robert Anton Wilson

  • Votes: 1

    Le Petit Prince (French Language Edition)

    by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    An unmissable collection of eight unconventional and captivating short stories for young and adult learners. "I love Olly's work - and you will too!" - Barbara Oakley, PhD, Author of New York Times bestseller A Mind for Numbers Short Stories in French for Beginners has been written especially for students from beginner to intermediate level, designed to give a sense of achievement, and most importantly - enjoyment! Mapped to A2-B1 on the Common European Framework of Reference, these eight captivating stories will both entertain you, and give you a feeling of progress when reading. What does this book give you? · Eight stories in a variety of exciting genres, from science fiction and crime to history and thriller - making reading fun, while you learn a wide range of new vocabulary · Controlled language at your level, including the 1000 most frequent words, to help you progress confidently · Authentic spoken dialogues, to help you learn conversational expressions and improve your speaking ability · Pleasure! It's much easier to learn a new language when you're having fun, and research shows that if you're enjoying reading in a foreign language, you won't experience the usual feelings of frustration - 'It's too hard!' 'I don't understand!' · Accessible grammar so you learn new structures naturally, in a stress-free way Carefully curated to make learning a new language easy, these stories include key features that will support and consolidate your progress, including · A glossary for bolded words in each text · Full plot summary · A bilingual word list · Comprehension questions after each chapter. As a result, you will be able to focus on enjoying reading, delighting in your improved range of vocabulary and grasp of the language, without ever feeling overwhelmed or frustrated. From science fiction to fantasy, to crime and thrillers, Short Stories in French for Beginners will make learning French easy and enjoyable.
  • Votes: 1

    Love in the Time of Cholera

    by Gabriel Garc-a M-rquez

    Set on the Caribbean coast of South America, this love story brings together Fermina Daza, her distinguished husband, and a man who has secretly loved her for more than fifty years.
  • Votes: 1

    Jitterbug Perfume

    by Tom Robbins

  • Votes: 1

    Confessions of a Mask

    by Yukio Mishima

    The story of a Japanese boy's development towards a homosexual identity during and after the Second World War. In narrating his progress from an isolated childhood through adolescence to manhood, he exposes his inner life, full of repressed homosexual desires and preoccupations with sadomasochism and death. The enduring power of the novel is in part owing to its themes of fantasy, despair, and alienation, its eloquent voice and its autobiographical nature - the equally enduring fascination with the life and character of one of Japan's most turbulent artists.
  • Votes: 1

    This Is Water

    by David Foster Wallace

    In this rare peak into the personal life of the author of numerous bestselling novels, gain an understanding of David Foster Wallace and how he became the man that he was. Only once did David Foster Wallace give a public talk on his views on life, during a commencement address given in 2005 at Kenyon College. The speech is reprinted for the first time in book form in This is Water. How does one keep from going through their comfortable, prosperous adult life unconsciously? How do we get ourselves out of the foreground of our thoughts and achieve compassion? The speech captures Wallace's electric intellect as well as his grace in attention to others. After his death, it became a treasured piece of writing reprinted in The Wall Street Journal and the London Times, commented on endlessly in blogs, and emailed from friend to friend. Writing with his one-of-a-kind blend of causal humor, exacting intellect, and practical philosophy, David Foster Wallace probes the challenges of daily living and offers advice that renews us with every reading.
  • Votes: 1

    Ecclesiastes

    by Courtney Joseph

  • Votes: 1

    Talking to Strangers

    by Malcolm Gladwell

    THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 'Compelling, haunting, tragic stories . . . resonate long after you put the book down' James McConnachie, Sunday Times Book of the Year The routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy. The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon. The false conviction of Amanda Knox. Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie, read a face or judge a stranger's motives? Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature, where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous consequences.
  • Votes: 1

    The Hobbit

    by J.R.R. Tolkien

    This lavish gift edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic features cover art, illustrations, and watercolor paintings by the artist Alan Lee. Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum. Written for J.R.R. Tolkien's own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.
  • Votes: 1

    Cat's Cradle

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 1

    Norwegian Wood

    by Haruki Murakami

  • Votes: 1

    The Fall

    by Albert Camus

  • Votes: 1

    The Rebel

    by Albert Camus

    The Rebel is Camus's 'attempt to understand the time I live in' and a brilliant essay on the nature of human revolt. Published in 1951, it makes a daring critique of communism - how it had gone wrong behind the Iron Curtain and the resulting totalitarian regimes. It questions two events held sacred by the left wing - the French Revolution of 1789 and the Russian Revolution of 1917 - that had resulted, he believed, in terrorism as a political instrument. In this towering intellectual document, Camus argues that hope for the future lies in revolt, which unlike revolution is a spontaneous response to injustice and a chance to achieve change without giving up collective and intellectual freedom.
  • Votes: 1

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 1

    World War Z

    by Max Brooks

    An account of the decade-long conflict between humankind and hordes of the predatory undead is told from the perspective of dozens of survivors who describe in their own words the epic human battle for survival.
  • Votes: 1

    The Liars' Club

    by Mary Karr

    The author, a poet, recounts her difficult childhood growing up in a Texas oil town
  • Votes: 1

    Star Wars

    by Charles Soule

  • Votes: 1

    Seveneves

    by Neal Stephenson

  • Votes: 1

    Notes of a Native Son

    by James Baldwin

    'The story of the negro in America is the story of America ... it is not a very pretty story' James Baldwin's breakthrough essay collection made him the voice of his generation. Ranging over Harlem in the 1940s, movies, novels, his preacher father and his experiences of Paris, they capture the complexity of black life at the dawn of the civil rights movement with effervescent wit and prophetic wisdom. 'A classic ... In a divided America, James Baldwin's fiery critiques reverberate anew' Washington Post 'Edgy and provocative, entertainingly satirical' Robert McCrum, Guardian 'Cemented his reputation as a cultural seer ... Notes of a Native Son endures as his defining work, and his greatest' Time
  • Votes: 1

    Endurance

    by Alfred Lansing

  • Votes: 1

    DMT Deities, Myth & Tryptamines (Ancient Cosmological Gods & Where In The World We Find Them)

    by RN Vooght

    It's extremely easy to consider our modern society the apex of sophisticated technological evolution. We're somewhat arrogantly striving to conquer outer space with almost zero knowledge of the inner realms of our own spiritual existence. But, what if we're not 'the greatest' after all? The Bible's first 3 days of creation in the book of Genesis are at verses 5, 8 and 13. 5, 8 and 13 are also part of the Fibonacci sequence, and the height of the Great Pyramid of Giza once stood at 5813 inches. A circle with a radius of 5813 inches, we find, has a circumference of 36,524 inches and there are 365.24 days in a solar year. But when can countless coincidences and correlations be considered as credible and scientifically viable connections?The Ancient Egyptian sun god Amun is symbolically associated with both the sign of the pyramid and the ram, and is also synonymous with Amon, Amen, Jesus, Osiris and Zeus. Amun however, is also acknowledged as Ammon; 'Ammon's horn' being another name for the Hippocampus proper in the human brain which is responsible for the creation of higher brain functions such as memory recall. Along with the eyes, lungs, cerebrospinal fluid, the pineal gland, and neocortex, Ammon's ram-like horn holds the potential to biosynthesise DMT - a highly hallucinogenic chemical compound which may one day be considered a catalyst or indeed key to regulating perceived levels of interdimensional realities.Deities, Myth & Tryptamines uncovers a rich tapestry of archaic appreciation for a biomechanically correct blueprint of the human brain and beyond. The very fabric of this global tradition has been systematically inserted into the zeitgeist of generations of interconnected religions and hidden in plain sight.Ancient art transcends language, and there are many arte-facts to consider...
  • Votes: 1

    The Last Question

    by Isaac Asimov

    Gathers together previously published stories from one of the masters of science fiction
  • Votes: 1

    Black Sun

    by Edward Abbey

    Now in a Harper Perennial Modern Classics edition, the timeless novel that chronicles a reckless romance in the wilderness, from Edward Abbey, one of America’s foremost defenders of the natural environment. Black Sun is a bittersweet love story involving an iconoclastic forest ranger and a freckle-faced “American princess” half his age. Like Lady Chatterley’s lover, he initiates her into the rites of sex and the stark, secret harmonies of his wilderness kingdom. She, in turn, awakens in him the pleasure of love. Then she mysteriously disappears, plunging him into desolation. Black Sun is a singular novel in Abbey’s repertoire, a romantic story of a solitary man’s passion for the outdoors and for a woman who is his wilderness muse. “Like most honest novels, Black Sun is partly autobiographical, mostly invention, and entirely true. The voice that speaks in this book is the passionate voice of the forest,” Abbey writes, “the madness of desire, and the joy of love, and the anguish of final loss.”
  • Votes: 1

    The Scapegoat

    by René Girard

    The scapegoat becomes the Lamb of God; "the foolish genesis of blood-stained idols and the false gods of superstition, politics, and ideologiesare revealed.
  • Votes: 1

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    All Quiet on the Western Front

    by Erich Maria Remarque

  • Votes: 1

    Hell Yeah or No what's worth doing

    by Derek Sivrsa

    Hell Yeah or No what's worth doing Managing our time efficiently is something most of us have struggled with at some point during our personal or professional lives and so in this video I'm going to reveal the 10 principles and ideas I use to manage time as effectively as I can in my daily life.
  • Votes: 1

    Genesis

    by Guido Tonelli

  • Votes: 1

    Silent Spring

    by Rachel Carson

  • Votes: 1

    Metamorphosis

    by Franz Kafka

  • Votes: 1

    Secret History of the Mongols

    by Paul Kahn

    This adaptation of what is recognized today as the oldest Mongolian text (written two decades after Chingis Khan's death) tells the Mongols' own version of the origin of their nation, the life of C
  • Votes: 1

    The Infinities

    by John Banville

    The Godley family gather at their sick father's bedside in rural Ireland and what follows takes place over one hot midsummer's day as the family's strained relations are tested.
  • Votes: 1

    Desolation Angels

    by Jack Kerouac

    Desolation Angels is the wild and soulful story of the legendary road trip that Jack Kerouac took before the publication of On the Road, told through the persona of Jack Duluoz and accompanied by his thinly-disguised Beat cohorts Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso and William Burroughs. As they hitch, hop freight trains, walk and talk their way across the world, from California to Mexico, London to Paris and on to opium-ridden Tangiers, Kerouac chronicles their poetry, partying, mountain vigils and spiritual contemplation with unsurpassable energy and humanity.
  • Votes: 1

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown

  • Votes: 1

    Mind Over Machine

    by Hubert Dreyfus

  • Votes: 1

    What Has Government Done to Our Money?

    by Murray N. Rothbard

    (Large Format Edition)
  • Votes: 1

    The Plague

    by Albert Camus

    The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    For Your Consideration

    by Larissa Zageris

    This illustrated collection of humorous essays and fun extras makes the case for one of our most iconic celebrities, from Bill and Ted to John Wick. For an actor who’s been in so many mega-hits and equally mega misses, it can be tough to track Keanu Reeves's accomplishments. But true fans know that Keanu is so much more than his Bill and Ted persona, both onscreen and off. During his long career—over 30 years, though you wouldn’t know it from his immortal looks—he has constantly subverted Hollywood stereotypes and expectations. He's the type to start his own publishing company, reread Hamlet, write a grown-up children’s book, photobomb people’s weddings, eat lunch alone in the park while looking very sad, and give away his salary to the film crew. For Your Consideration: Keanu Reeves examines the ways in which Keanu strives to be kind and excellent in work and in life. The authors also explore various Internet conspiracies about his age, help you identify which Sad Keanu meme you are, give you the Keanu and Winona Ryder fanfic your heart desires, and much, much more.
  • Votes: 1

    The Baron in the Trees

    by Italo Calvino

  • Votes: 1

    Synchronicity

    by Allan Combs

    Carl Jung coined the term "synchronicity" to describe meaningful coincidences that conventional notions of time and causality cannot explain. Working with the great quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli, Jung sought to reveal these coincidences as phenomena that involve mind and matter, science and spirit, thus providing rational explanations for parapsychological events like telepathy, precognition, and intuition. Synchronicity examines the work of Jung and Pauli, as well as noted scientists Werner Heisenberg and David Bohm; identifies the phenomena in ancient and modern mythologies, particularly the Greek legend of Hermes the Trickster; and illustrates it with engaging anecdotes from everyday life and literature.
  • Votes: 1

    American Psycho

    by Bret Easton Ellis

  • Votes: 1

    Range

    by David Epstein

    Many experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. Epstein examined the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists, and discovered that in most fields-- especially those that are complex and unpredictable-- generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists juggle many interests rather than focusing on one-- but they're also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can't see. -- adapted from jacket
  • Votes: 1

    The Gulag Archipelago Volume 1

    by Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn

  • Votes: 1

    Mona Lisa Overdrive

    by William Gibson

    The last of the Sprawl trilogy: the AIs of Neuromancer have suffered a traumatized, cataclysmic coming to self-awareness and now haunt cyberspace as voodoo powers.
  • Votes: 1

    Fingerprints of the Gods

    by Graham Hancock

  • Votes: 1

    A Brief History of Neoliberalism

    by David Harvey

    Neoliberalism - the doctrine that market exchange is an ethic in itself, capable of acting as a guide for all human action - has become dominant in both thought and practice throughout much of the world since 1970 or so. Its spread has depended upon a reconstitution of state powers such that privatization, finance, and market processes are emphasized. State interventions in the economy are minimized, while the obligations of the state to provide for the welfare of its citizens are diminished. David Harvey, author of 'The New Imperialism' and 'The Condition of Postmodernity', here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from and how it proliferated on the world stage. While Thatcher and Reagan are often cited as primary authors of this neoliberal turn, Harvey shows how a complex of forces, from Chile to China and from New York City to Mexico City, have also played their part. In addition he explores the continuities and contrasts between neoliberalism of the Clinton sort and the recent turn towards neoconservative imperialism of George W. Bush. Finally, through critical engagement with this history, Harvey constructs a framework not only for analyzing the political and economic dangers that now surround us, but also for assessing the prospects for the more socially just alternatives being advocated by many oppositional movements.
  • Votes: 1

    The Denial of Death

    by Ernest Becker

  • Votes: 1

    Tinkers

    by Paul Harding

  • Votes: 1

    Night over Day over Night

    by Paul Watkins

  • Votes: 1

    The Kybalion

    by Three Initiates

  • Votes: 1

    Mycelium Running

    by Paul Stamets

    Mycelium Running is a manual for the mycological rescue of the planet. That’s right: growing more mushrooms may be the best thing we can do to save the environment, and in this groundbreaking text from mushroom expert Paul Stamets, you’ll find out how. The basic science goes like this: Microscopic cells called “mycelium”--the fruit of which are mushrooms--recycle carbon, nitrogen, and other essential elements as they break down plant and animal debris in the creation of rich new soil. What Stamets has discovered is that we can capitalize on mycelium’s digestive power and target it to decompose toxic wastes and pollutants (mycoremediation), catch and reduce silt from streambeds and pathogens from agricultural watersheds (mycofiltration), control insect populations (mycopesticides), and generally enhance the health of our forests and gardens (mycoforestry and myco-gardening). In this comprehensive guide, you’ll find chapters detailing each of these four exciting branches of what Stamets has coined “mycorestoration,” as well as chapters on the medicinal and nutritional properties of mushrooms, inoculation methods, log and stump culture, and species selection for various environmental purposes. Heavily referenced and beautifully illustrated, this book is destined to be a classic reference for bemushroomed generations to come.
  • Votes: 1

    The War of Art

    by Steven Pressfield

    "In this powerful, straight-from-the-hip examination of the internal obstacles to success, bestselling author Steven Pressfield shows readers how to identify, defeat, and unlock the inner barriers to creativity. The War of Art is an inspirational, funny, well-aimed kick in the pants guaranteed to galvanize every would-be artist, visionary, or entrepreneur." --from back cover.
  • Votes: 1

    The Choice

    by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

  • Votes: 1

    Don Quixote

    by Miguel de Cervantes

    Presents the classic Spanish tale of chivalry and abiding optimism, depicting the exploits of a knight who attempts to bring justice and truth to the world
  • Votes: 1

    Theories of A Wise Man

    by Vontarius Falls

    Recipes ... Stain Removal ... First-Aid Basics ... Car Care,..Sewin'Tips ... House Cleaning ... Laundry ... Shopping... Recycling ... Lawn andGarden ... Leftovers ... Computers ... Home Repair ... Breaking BadHabits ... Stretching Closet Space ... Camping ... Entertaining ... KitchenShortcuts ... Grooming ... Ironing Without Ironing ... FoodStorage ... Choosing Fruits and Vegetables ... Wardrobe Hints ... andingenious new uses for Pantyhose and Bleach Bottles! Nationally Syndicated Newspaper Columnist,HELOISE takes thefrustration and drudgery out of modern homecare with over 2,000helpful time- and money-saving
  • Votes: 1

    The Tao of Physics

    by Fritjof Capra

  • Votes: 1

    One Billion Years to the End of the World

    by Arkady Strugatsky

    'A beautiful book' Ursula K. Le Guin This mordantly funny and provocative tale from Soviet Russia's leading science fiction writers is the story of astrophysicist Dmitri Malianov. As he reaches a major breakthrough, he finds himself plagued by interruptions, from a mysterious crate of vodka to a glamorous woman on his doorstep. Is the Universe trying to tell him something? 'On putting down one of their books, you feel a cold breeze still lifting the hairs on the back of your neck' The New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    The Unprejudiced Palate

    by Angelo M. Pellegrini

    First issued in 1948, when soulless minute steaks and quick casseroles were becoming the norm, The Unprejudiced Palate inspired a seismic culinary shift in how America eats. Written by a food-loving immigrant from Tuscany, this memoir-cum-cookbook articulates the Italian American vision of the good life: a backyard garden, a well-cooked meal shared with family and friends, and a passion for ingredients and cooking that nourish the body and the soul.
  • Votes: 1

    Turning Pro

    by Steven Pressfield

    The follow-up to his bestseller The War of Art, Turning Pro navigates the passage from the amateur life to a professional practice. "You don't need to take a course or buy a product. All you have to do is change your mind." --Steven Pressfield TURNING PRO IS FREE, BUT IT'S NOT EASY. When we turn pro, we give up a life that we may have become extremely comfortable with. We give up a self that we have come to identify with and to call our own. TURNING PRO IS FREE, BUT IT DEMANDS SACRIFICE. The passage from amateur to professional is often achieved via an interior odyssey whose trials are survived only at great cost, emotionally, psychologically and spiritually. We pass through a membrane when we turn pro. It's messy and it's scary. We tread in blood when we turn pro. WHAT WE GET WHEN WE TURN PRO. What we get when we turn pro is we find our power. We find our will and our voice and we find our self-respect. We become who we always were but had, until then, been afraid to embrace and live out.
  • Votes: 1

    Johnny Got His Gun

    by Dalton Trumbo

    The Searing Portrayal Of War That Has Stunned And Galvanized Generations Of Readers An immediate bestseller upon its original publication in 1939, Dalton Trumbo’s stark, profoundly troubling masterpiece about the horrors of World War I brilliantly crystallized the uncompromising brutality of war and became the most influential protest novel of the Vietnam era. Johnny Got His Gun is an undisputed classic of antiwar literature that’s as timely as ever. “A terrifying book, of an extraordinary emotional intensity.”--The Washington Post "Powerful. . . an eye-opener." --Michael Moore "Mr. Trumbo sets this story down almost without pause or punctuation and with a fury amounting to eloquence."--The New York Times "A book that can never be forgotten by anyone who reads it."--Saturday Review
  • Votes: 1

    Cold Skin

    by Albert Sanchez Pinol

    'A troubling, hammering and glorious novel' DAVID MITCHELL On the edge of the Antarctic Circle, in the years after World War One, a steamship approaches a desolate island. On board is a young man on his way to assume the post of weather observer, to live in solitude for a year at the end of the earth. But on shore he finds no trace of the man whom he has been sent to replace, just a deranged castaway who has witnessed a horror he refuses to name. The rest is woods, a deserted cabin, rocks, silence and the surrounding sea. Then night begins to fall . . .
  • Votes: 1

    Letters to a Young Poet

    by Rainer Maria Rilke

  • Votes: 1

    The Gambler

    by William C. Rempel

  • Votes: 1

    The Sisters Brothers

    by Patrick deWitt

    Now a major film starring Jaoquin Phoenix, John C. Reilly, Jake Gyllenhal and Riz Ahmed. Shortlisted for the 2011 Man Booker Prize, deWitt's dazzlingly original second novel is a darkly funny, offbeat western about a reluctant assassin and his murderous brother. Hermann Kermit Warm is going to die. Across 1000 miles of Oregon desert his assassins, the notorious Eli and Charlies Sisters, ride - fighting, shooting, and drinking their way to Sacramento. But their prey isn't an easy mark, the road is long and bloody, and somewhere along the path Eli begins to question what he does for a living - and whom he does it for. The Sisters Brothers pays homage to the classic Western, transforming it into an unforgettable ribald tour de force. Filled with a remarkable cast of losers, cheaters, and ne'er-do-wells from all stripes of life-and told by a complex and compelling narrator, it is a violent, lustful odyssey through the underworld of the 1850s frontier that beautifully captures the humor, melancholy, and grit of the Old West and two brothers bound by blood, violence, and love.
  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Mormon

    by Joseph Smith

    Just as a growing interest in millennialism at the turn of this century has rejuvenated religious debate and questions concerning the fate of the world, so did Mormonism develop from millennial enthusiasm early in the nineteenth century. Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism, and a provocative, even controversial figure in history, declared that he had been given the authority to restore the true church in the latter days. The primary source of Smith's latter-day revelation is The Book of Mormon, and to fully understand his role as the founder of the Mormon faith, one must also understand The Book of Mormon and how it came to be. Unfortunately, the literature about Joseph Smith and The Book of Mormon is permeated with contradiction and controversy. In the first edition of this impressive work, David Persuitte provided a significant amount of revealing biographical information about Smith that resolved many of the controversies concerning his character. He also presented an extensive comparative analysis positing that the probable conceptual source for The Book of Mormon was a book entitled View of the Hebrews; or the Tribes of Israel in America, which was written by an early New England minister named Ethan Smith. Now in an expanded and revised second edition incorporating many new findings relating to the origin of The Book of Mormon, Mr. Persuitte’s book continues to shed much new light on the path Joseph Smith took toward founding the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
  • Votes: 1

    Three Day Road

    by Joseph Boyden

    The stories of an American Indian sniper caught up in the Great War and of his aunt, one of the last Cree Indians to live off the land, are intertwined in a mesmerising journey as they travel home over three days This beautiful, haunting novel begins as Niska is reunited with her nephew, Xavier, after he returns from the horrors of the First World War. As she slowly paddles her canoe on the 3-day journey to take him home, travelling through the stark but stunning landscape of Northern Canada, their respective stories emerge. Niska is the last Cree Indian woman living off the land in Canada. She recalls her memories of growing up among her kinsfolk, of trying to remain true to her ancestors and traditions in a rapidly changing world. Xavier joined the war reluctantly at the urging of his only friend, Elijah - a Cree boy raised in the reservation schools. Elijah and Xavier honed their hunting skills as snipers in the horrors of the trenches and the wastes of No-man's land. But as the war continues, they react in very different ways to the never-ending carnage around them. Niska realises that in the aftermath of war, Xavier's very soul is dying - but will the three day journey home be enough to help him find hope again?
  • Votes: 1

    The Second Machine Age

    by Erik Brynjolfsson

    A pair of technology experts describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity.
  • Votes: 1

    A New Earth

    by Eckhart Tolle

    Awaken your life's purpose in 2019 with the help of A New Earth, the international bestseller. 'An otherworldly genius' Chris Evans' BBC Radio 2 Breakfast Show _________ Are you ready to put aside ego and be awakened? Right now the world is filled with angry, raging egos. But there is a better way and in A New Earth, Eckhart Tolle provides the spiritual framework for all of us to move beyond ourselves in order to make this world a better, more evolved place to live. Shattering modern ideas of ego and entitlement, self and society, Tolle lifts the veil of fear that has hung over us during this new millennium, and reveals a path to happiness and health that every reader can follow. Awaken your purpose, discover your potential, and change your life. 'A wake up call for the entire planet. A New Earth helps us to stop creating our own suffering and obsessing over the past and what the future might be and to put ourselves in the now' Oprah Winfrey
  • Votes: 1

    Fight Club

    by Chuck Palahniuk

    Every weekend, in basements and parking lots across the country, young men with good white-collar jobs and absent fathers take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded for as long as they have to. Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything. Fight Club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter and dark, anarchic genius. And it's only the beginning of his plans for revenge on a world where cancer support groups have the corner on human warmth.
  • Votes: 1

    New Seeds of Contemplation

    by Thomas Merton

  • Votes: 1

    As a Man Thinketh

    by James Allen

  • Votes: 1

    Factfulness

    by Hans Rosling

    “One of the most important books I’ve ever read—an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world.” – Bill Gates “Hans Rosling tells thestory of ‘the secret silent miracle of human progress’ as only he can. But Factfulness does much more than that. It also explains why progress is so often secret and silent and teaches readershow to see it clearly.” —Melinda Gates Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends—what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school—we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers. In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspective—from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse). Our problem is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases. It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future. --- “This book is my last battle in my life-long mission to fight devastating ignorance...Previously I armed myself with huge data sets, eye-opening software, an energetic learning style and a Swedish bayonet for sword-swallowing. It wasn’t enough. But I hope this book will be.” Hans Rosling, February 2017.
  • Votes: 1

    The True Believer

  • Votes: 1

    Exhalation

    by Ted Chiang

    From an award-winning science fiction writer (whose short story "The Story of Your Life" was the basis for the Academy Award-nominated movie Arrival), the long-awaited new collection of stunningly original, humane, and already celebrated short stories This much-anticipated second collection of stories is signature Ted Chiang, full of revelatory ideas and deeply sympathetic characters. In "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate," a portal through time forces a fabric seller in ancient Baghdad to grapple with past mistakes and the temptation of second chances. In the epistolary "Exhalation," an alien scientist makes a shocking discovery with ramifications not just for his own people, but for all of reality. And in "The Lifecycle of Software Objects," a woman cares for an artificial intelligence over twenty years, elevating a faddish digital pet into what might be a true living being. Also included are two brand-new stories: "Omphalos" and "Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom." In this fantastical and elegant collection, Ted Chiang wrestles with the oldest questions on earth--What is the nature of the universe? What does it mean to be human?--and ones that no one else has even imagined. And, each in its own way, the stories prove that complex and thoughtful science fiction can rise to new heights of beauty, meaning, and compassion.
  • Votes: 1

    Bailey's Cafe

    by Gloria Naylor

    A “moving and memorable” novel about a cafe where everyone has a story to tell from the award-winning author of The Women of Brewster Place (The Boston Globe). In post–World War II Brooklyn, on a quiet backstreet, there’s a little place that draws people from all over—not for the food, and definitely not for the coffee. An in-between place that’s only there when you need it, Bailey’s Cafe is a crossroads where patrons stay for a while before making a choice: Move on or check out? In this novel, National Book Award–winning author Gloria Naylor’s expertly crafted characters experience a journey full of beauty and heartbreak. Touching on gender, race, and the African American experience, Bailey’s Cafe is “a sublime achievement” about the resilience of the human spirit (People).
  • Votes: 1

    "What Do You Care What Other People Think?"

    by Richard P. Feynman

  • Votes: 1

    Old Man's War

    by John Scalzi

    John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday. First he visited his wife’s grave. Then he joined the army. The good news is that humanity finally made it into interstellar space. The bad news is that planets fit to live on are scarce—and alien races willing to fight us for them are common. So: we fight. To defend Earth, and to stake our own claim to planetary real estate. Far from Earth, the war has been going on for decades: brutal, bloody, unyielding. Earth itself is a backwater. The bulk of humanity’s resources are in the hands of the Colonial Defense Force. Everybody knows that when you reach retirement age, you can join the CDF. They don’t want young people; they want people who carry the knowledge and skills of decades of living. You’ll be taken off Earth and never allowed to return. You’ll serve two years at the front. And if you survive, you’ll be given a generous homestead stake of your own, on one of our hard-won colony planets. John Perry is taking that deal. He has only the vaguest idea what to expect. Because the actual fight, light-years from home, is far, far harder than he can imagine—and what he will become is far stranger. "Solid . . . [Scalzi] sidesteps most of the clichés of military science fiction, delivers fast-paced scenes of combat and pays attention to the science underpinning his premise." —San Francisco Chronicle "Scalzi's imagined interstellar arena is coherently and compellingly delineated . . . His speculative elements are top-notch. His combat scenes are blood-roiling. His dialogue is suitably snappy and profane. And the moral and philosophical issues he raises . . . insert useful ethical burrs under the military saddle of the story." —Paul Di Filippo, The Washington Post "Thought-provoking!" —Entertainment Weekly "Smartly conceived and thoroughly entertaining, Old Man’s War is a splendid novel." –Cleveland Plain Dealer "When humanity reaches the stars, it discovers that it must defend its claim to new planets against alien races with similar expansionist tendencies. To ensure the expertise of its soldiers, Earth creates the Colonial Defense Force, an army of men and women otherwise classified as senior citizens, who give up their lives on Earth for an uncertain and perilous future among the stars. Scalzi's first novel presents a new approach to military sf, boasting an unusual cast of senior citizens as heroes. A good choice for most libraries." —Library Journal "Though a lot of SF writers are more or less efficiently continuing the tradition of Robert A. Heinlein, Scalzi’s astonishingly proficient first novel reads like an original work by the late grand master . . . This virtuoso debut pays tribute to SF’s past while showing that well-worn tropes still can have real zip when they’re approached with ingenuity." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Gripping and surpassingly original. It's Starship Troopers without the lectures. It's The Forever War with better sex. It's funny, it's sad, and it's true." —Cory Doctorow "John Scalzi is a fresh and appealing new voice, and Old Man's War is classic SF seen from a modern perspective—a fast-paced tour of a daunting, hostile universe." —Robert Charles Wilson "I enjoyed Old Man's War immensely. A space war story with fast action, vivid characters, moral complexity and cool speculative physics, set in a future you almost want to live into, and a universe you sincerely hope you don't live in already." —Ken MacLeod
  • Votes: 1

    Productivity Is For Robots

    by Corey McComb

    If you've ever felt overwhelmed or discouraged by what it means to be "productive" in the new world, Productivity Is For Robots provides a roadmap for unlearning the "hustle and grind dogma" that leads to stress and burnout. Filled with lessons from history's greatest artists, entrepreneurs, and visionaries, the book weaves together stories to show readers how to reach new levels of human connection, creativity, and flow. From Ernest Hemingway to James Cameron, Theodore Roosevelt to Salvador Dali, J.K. Rowling to Steve Martin, the book explores how dozens of creators have produced meaningful work--not by being robotic in work ethic, but by embracing the tools of human nature. With chapters on developing intuition, cultivating self-awareness, and tapping into creative flow--Productivity Is For Robots is a call to reclaim what it means to be human in the new world. McComb argues that, "productivity without purpose is an arrow without a target," and that by ditching the "productivity protocols" in which we've been indoctrinated, we can reconnect with what matters, overcome creative blocks, and yes--be more productive than ever. Whether you're in a creative rut, burnt out from endless chasing, or trapped in a Groundhog Day of mediocrity, the principles in this book will help you thrive. It's time to double down on what sets us apart from technology. It's time to confirm once and for all: I'm not a robot
  • Votes: 1

    Jonathan Livingston Seagull

    by Richard Bach

    Because he spends so much time perfecting his flying form instead of concentrating on getting food, a seagull is ostracized by the rest of the flock.
  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Loving

    by Erich Fromm

    The landmark bestseller that changed the way we think about love: “Every line is packed with common sense, compassion, and realism” (Fortune). The Art of Loving is a rich and detailed guide to love—an achievement reached through maturity, practice, concentration, and courage. In the decades since the book’s release, its words and lessons continue to resonate. Erich Fromm, a celebrated psychoanalyst and social psychologist, clearly and sincerely encourages the development of our capacity for and understanding of love in all of its facets. He discusses the familiar yet misunderstood romantic love, the all-encompassing brotherly love, spiritual love, and many more. A challenge to traditional Western notions of love, The Art of Loving is a modern classic about taking care of ourselves through relationships with others by the New York Times–bestselling author of To Have or To Be? and Escape from Freedom. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erich Fromm including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.
  • Votes: 1

    The Hundred Brothers

    by Donald Antrim

    Ninety-nine brothers (one couldn't make it) gather in their decaying ancestral mansion.There's Rob, Bob, Tom, Paul, Ralph, and Noah; Nick, Dennis, Bertram, Russell, and Virgil. The doctor, the documentary filmmaker, and the sculptor in burning steal; the eldest, the youngest, and the celebrated "perfect" brother, Benedict. Bound by blood and a common streak of insanity, they have come together to feast, carouse, abuse each other and seek and inter, once and for all, the long-lost, cremated remains of their domineering father.
  • Votes: 1

    On the Shortness of Life

    by Seneca

  • Votes: 1

    On Pain by Ernst J?nger (2008-11-01)

    Frustrated Democracy in Post-Soviet Azerbaijan follows a newly independent oil-rich former Soviet republic as it adopts a Western model of democratic government and then turns toward corrupt authoritarianism. Audrey L. Altstadt begins with the Nagorno-Karabagh War (1988–1994) which triggered Azerbaijani nationalism and set the stage for the development of a democratic movement. Initially successful, this government soon succumbed to a coup. Western oil companies arrived and money flowed in—a quantity Altstadt calls "almost unimaginable"—causing the regime to resort to repression to maintain its power. Despite Azerbaijan's long tradition of secularism, political Islam emerged as an attractive alternative for those frustrated with the stifled democratic opposition and the lack of critique of the West's continued political interference. Altstadt's work draws on instances of censorship in the Azerbaijani press, research by embedded experts and nongovernmental and international organizations, and interviews with diplomats and businesspeople. The book is an essential companion to her earlier works, The Azerbaijani Turks: Power and Identity Under Russian Rule and The Politics of Culture in Soviet Azerbaijan, 1920–1940.
  • Votes: 1

    Notes of a Dirty Old Man

    by Charles Bukowski

    A compilation of Charles Bukowski's underground articles from his column "Notes of a Dirty Old Man" appears here in book form. Bukowski's reasoning for self-describing himself as a 'dirty old man' rings true in this book. "People come to my door—too many of them really—and knock to tell me Notes of a Dirty Old Man turns them on. A bum off the road brings in a gypsy and his wife and we talk . . . . drink half the night. A long distance operator from Newburgh, N.Y. sends me money. She wants me to give up drinking beer and to eat well. I hear from a madman who calls himself 'King Arthur' and lives on Vine Street in Hollywood and wants to help me write my column. A doctor comes to my door: 'I read your column and think I can help you. I used to be a psychiatrist.' I send him away . . ." "Bukowski writes like a latter-day Celine, a wise fool talking straight from the gut about the futility and beauty of life . . ." —Publishers Weekly "These disjointed stories gives us a glimpse into the brilliant and highly disturbed mind of a man who will drink anything, hump anything and say anything without the slightest tinge of embarassment, shame or remorse. It's actually pretty hard not to like the guy after reading a few of these semi-ranting short stories." —Greg Davidson, curiculummag.com Charles Bukowski was born in Andernach, Germany on August 16, 1920, the only child of an American soldier and a German mother. Bukowski published his first story when he was twenty-four and began writing poetry at the age of thirty-five. His first book of poetry was published in 1959; he went on to publish more than forty-five books of poetry and prose, including Pulp (Black Sparrow, 1994), Screams from the Balcony: Selected Letters 1960-1970 (1993), and The Last Night of the Earth Poems (1992). Other Bukowski books published by City Lights Publishers include More Notes of a Dirty Old Man, The Most Beautiful Woman in Town, Tales of Ordinary Madness, Portions from a Wine-Stained Notebook, and Absence of the Hero. He died of leukemia in San Pedro on March 9, 1994.
  • Votes: 1

    Death of a Salesman (Penguin Plays)

    by Arthur Miller

    Arthur Miller's extraordinary masterpiece, Death of a Salesman changed the course of modern theatre, and has lost none of its power as an examination of American life and consumerism, published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'A man is not an orange. You can't eat the fruit and throw the peel away' Willy Loman is on his last legs. Failing at his job, dismayed at his the failure of his sons, Biff and Happy, to live up to his expectations, and tortured by his jealousy at the success and happiness of his neighbour Charley and his son Bernard, Willy spirals into a well of regret, reminiscence, and A scathing indictment of the ultimate failure of the American dream, and the empty pursuit of wealth and success, is a harrowing journey. In creating Willy Loman, his destructively insecure anti-hero, Miller defined his aim as being 'to set forth what happens when a man does not have a grip on the forces of life'. Arthur Miller (1915-2005), American dramatist, was born in New York City. In 1938 Miller won awards for his comedy The Grass Still Grows. His major achievement was Death of a Salesman, which won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 1949 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award. The Crucible was aimed at the widespread congressional investigation of subversive activities in the US; the drama won the 1953 Tony Award. Miller's autobiography, Timebends: A Life was published in 1987. If you enjoyed Death of a Salesman, you might like Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.
  • Votes: 1

    Four Quartets

    by T. S. Eliot

    The last major verse written by Nobel laureate T. S. Eliot, considered by Eliot himself to be his finest work Four Quartets is a rich composition that expands the spiritual vision introduced in “The Waste Land.” Here, in four linked poems (“Burnt Norton,” “East Coker,” “The Dry Salvages,” and “Little Gidding”), spiritual, philosophical, and personal themes emerge through symbolic allusions and literary and religious references from both Eastern and Western thought. It is the culminating achievement by a man considered the greatest poet of the twentieth century and one of the seminal figures in the evolution of modernism.
  • Votes: 1

    Start with why

    by Simon Sinek

    Suggesting that successful businesspeople and companies share a common inspiration that motivates them to perform beyond standard levels, an anecdotal reference explains how to apply the author's principles of "why" to everything from working culture to product development. A first book.
  • Votes: 1

    The Upanishads, 2nd Edition

    by Eknath Easwaran

  • Votes: 1

    Being Peace

    by Thich Nhat Hanh

    In this classic collection of lectures, Buddhist monk, scholar, poet and peace activist Thich Nhat Hanh shows us that suffering is not enough; for in order to achieve peace, we must be peace. Quite simply, if we are not happy, if we are not peaceful, we cannot share peace and happiness with others. Therefore, Thich Nhat Hanh explains how, if we are to change the world, we must begin with ourselves and awaken the loving potential of our own Buddhist natures. We must learn to smile at the wonders that surround us every day, for if we cannot smile, the world will not have peace.
  • Votes: 1

    The New Inquisition

    by Robert Anton Wilson

  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Travel

    by Alain De Botton

    THE SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER 'Honest, funny and dripping with witty aphorisms. Extremely entertaining and enlightening [...] all the way to journey's end' Herald One of our greatest voices in modern philosophy, author of The Course of Love, The Consolations of Philosophy, Religion for Atheists and The School of Life, presents a travel guide with a difference - an exploration of why we travel, and what we learn along the way... Few activities seem to promise as much happiness as going travelling: taking off for somewhere else, somewhere far from home, a place with more interesting weather, customs and landscapes. But although we are inundated with advice on where to travel to, we seldom ask why we go and how we might become more fulfilled by doing so. With the help of a selection of writers, artists and thinkers - including Flaubert, Edward Hopper, Wordsworth and Van Gogh - Alain de Botton provides invaluable insights into everything from holiday romance to hotel minibars, airports to sightseeing. The perfect antidote to those guides that tell us what to do when we get there, The Art of Travel tries to explain why we really went in the first place - and helpfully suggest how we might be happier on our journeys. 'Delightful, profound, entertaining. I doubt if de Botton has written a dull sentence in his life' Jan Morris 'An elegant and subtle work, unlike any other. Beguiling' Colin Thubron, The Times
  • Votes: 1

    The Wave

    by Todd Strasser

  • Votes: 1

    Franny and Zooey

    by J. D. Salinger

  • Votes: 1

    The Lathe Of Heaven

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

    'Her worlds have a magic sheen . . . She moulds them into dimensions we can only just sense. She is unique. She is legend' THE TIMES 'Le Guin is a writer of phenomenal power' OBSERVER George Orr is a mild and unremarkable man who finds the world a less than pleasant place to live: seven billion people jostle for living space and food. But George dreams dreams which do in fact change reality - and he has no means of controlling this extraordinary power. Psychiatrist Dr William Haber offers to help. At first sceptical of George's powers, he comes to astonished belief. When he allows ambition to get the better of ethics, George finds himself caught up in a situation of alarming peril.
  • Votes: 1

    The Bear That Wasn't (Dover Children's Classics)

    by Frank Tashlin

    A hibernating bear awakens to find himself smack dab in the middle of a sprawling industrial complex where people think he's just a silly man who wears a fur coat. 46 illustrations.
  • Votes: 1

    Who Goes There?

    by John W. Jr. Campbell

    "Elimination" is the story of the effect of a gadget on the human character of the inventor. The other stories are based on the premise "What if a man invented a time-viewer which? ..." "Who Goes There" is the story of an alien, a non-mechanical gadget, who provokes a special mood-reaction in the reader.
  • Votes: 1

    So Long, See You Tomorrow

    by William Maxwell

    Discover this extraordinary and beautiful novel from one of America's greatest novelists. In rural Illinois two tenant farmers share much, finally too much, until jealously leads to murder and suicide. A tenuous friendship between lonely teenagers - the narrator, whose mother has died young, and Cletus Smith, the troubled witness to his parent's misery - is shattered. After the murder and upheavals that follow, the boys never speak again. Fifty years on, the narrator attempts a reconstruction of those devastating events and the atonement of a lifetime's regret. **One of the BBC’s 100 Novels That Shaped Our World**
  • Votes: 1

    Black Like Me

    by John Howard Griffin

  • Votes: 1

    Pudd'nhead Wilson

    by Mark Twain

    This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Classic includes a glossary and reader's notes to help the modern reader appreciate Twain's perspective on the human race.UNLEASHING THE ACERBIC WIT for which he was already famous, Mark Twain released Pudd'nhead Wilson in 1894 to a public not quite prepared for the American satirist's dark attack on lingering racism following the Civil War and the failure of Reconstruction. The stories of twin Italian circus performers, a beautiful slave, and a lawyer whose wry observations earn him the reputation of the village idiot converge in the fictional town of Dawson's Landing, Missouri, where the newly discovered use of fingerprints helps to expose the hypocrisy of late-Victorian morality and solve a murder.Each chapter begins with a quotation from Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar, and these Franklin-like aphorisms propel the story forward. As Twain himself said, "There ain't any weather in it, and there ain't any scenery-the story is stripped for flight!"And, once it takes off, there's no pausing until the last ironic twist is revealed. If you're already a fan of Mark Twain, you'll love Pudd'nhead Wilson. If you're not a fan, this book will make you one.
  • Votes: 1

    The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

    by Robin Sharma

    An internationally bestselling fable about a spiritual journey, littered with powerful life lessons that teach us how to abandon consumerism in order to embrace destiny, live life to the full and discover joy.
  • Votes: 1

    2010

    by Arthur C. Clarke

    "To the spaceship Discovery, floating in the silent depths of space since Dave Bowman passed through the alien 'Star Gate', comes Heywood Floyd on a mission of recovery. What he finds near Jupiter is beyond the imaginings of any mere human." [Source : 4e de couv.].
  • Votes: 1

    The Three-Body Problem

    by Cixin Liu

    The Three-Body Problem is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple award winning phenomenon from China's most beloved science fiction author, Liu Cixin. Set against the backdrop of China's Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilization on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them take over a world seen as corrupt, or to fight against the invasion. The result is a science fiction masterpiece of enormous scope and vision.
  • Votes: 1

    This Is It

    by Daria Peoples-Riley

    Daria Peoples-Riley’s debut picture book is a celebration of individuality, self-expression, and dance. Fans of Misty Copeland’s Firebird and Matt de la Peña’s Last Stop on Market Street will want to read it over and over again. When a young dancer is nervous about her upcoming auditions, her shadow springs to life and leads her on a joyous exploration of their city. Soon enough, the young girl finds confidence in her skills, her body, and her ability to shine. With an energetic, rhythmic text that begs to be read aloud and striking, exuberant artwork, This Is It is a love story to originality and the simple joy of movement. The future is in your footsteps. Freedom is in your feet. Put one foot in front of the other, and greet your destiny.
  • Votes: 1

    The Good Earth

    by Pearl S. Buck

  • Votes: 1

    The Case for a Job Guarantee

    by Pavlina R. Tcherneva

    One of the most enduring ideas in economics is that unemployment is both unavoidable and necessary for the smooth functioning of the economy. This assumption has provided cover for the devastating social and economic costs of job insecurity. It is also false. In this book, leading expert Pavlina R. Tcherneva challenges us to imagine a world where the phantom of unemployment is banished and anyone who seeks decent, living-wage work can find it - guaranteed. This is the aim of the Job Guarantee proposal: to provide a voluntary employment opportunity in public service to anyone who needs it. Tcherneva enumerates the many advantages of the Job Guarantee over the status quo and proposes a blueprint for its implementation within the wider context of the need for a Green New Deal. This compact primer is the ultimate guide to the benefits of one of the most transformative public policies being discussed today. It is essential reading for all citizens and activists who are passionate about social justice and building a fairer economy.
  • Votes: 1

    And There Was Light

    by Jacques Lusseyran

  • Votes: 1

    QED

    by Richard P. Feynman

  • Votes: 1

    Faust

    by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    "Parts One and Two published separately ... in 1992 and 1998."--Title page verso.
  • Votes: 1

    White Noise

    by Don DeLillo

    A brilliant satire of mass culture and the numbing effects of technology, White Noise tells the story of Jack Gladney, a teacher of Hitler studies at a liberal arts college in Middle America. Jack and his fourth wife, Babette, bound by their love, fear of death, and four ultramodern offspring, navigate the rocky passages of family life to the background babble of brand-name consumerism. Then a lethal black chemical cloud, unleashed by an industrial accident, floats over there lives, an "airborne toxic event" that is a more urgent and visible version of the white noise engulfing the Gladneys—the radio transmissions, sirens, microwaves, and TV murmurings that constitute the music of American magic and dread.
  • Votes: 1

    Virus of the Mind

    by Richard Brodie

    Provides an overview of memes--or ideas or beliefs that leap from one person to another--and looks especially at the dangers that could arise from this phenomenon, which is growing at an accelerated pace. Reissue.
  • Votes: 1

    The Moon and Sixpence

    by W. Somerset Maugham

    Charles Strickland, a conventional stockbroker, abandons his wife and children for Paris and Tahiti, to live his life as a painter. Whilst his betrayal of family, duty and honour gives him the freedom to achieve greatness, his decision leads to an obsessi
  • Votes: 1

    Why Fish Don't Exist

    by Lulu Miller

  • Votes: 1

    The Power of the Powerless

    by Vaclav Havel

    Václav Havel’s remarkable and rousing essay on the tyranny of apathy, with a new introduction by Timothy Snyder Cowed by life under Communist Party rule, a greengrocer hangs a placard in their shop window: Workers of the world, unite! Is it a sign of the grocer’s unerring ideology? Or a symbol of the lies we perform to protect ourselves? Written in 1978, Václav Havel’s meditation on political dissent – the rituals of its suppression, and the sparks that re-ignite it – would prove the guiding manifesto for uniting Solidarity movements across the Soviet Union. A portrait of activism in the face of falsehood and intimidation, The Power of the Powerless remains a rousing call against the allure of apathy. 'Havel’s diagnosis of political pathologies has a special resonance in the age of Trump' Pankaj Mishra
  • Votes: 1

    Winesburg, Ohio

    by Sherwood Anderson

    This carefully crafted ebook: "Winesburg, Ohio (A Group of Tales of Ohio Small-Town Life)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This ebook is a series of loosely linked short stories set in the fictional town of Winesburg, mostly written from late 1915 to early 1916. The stories are held together by George Willard, a resident to whom the community confide their personal stories and struggles. The townspeople are withdrawn and emotionally repressed and attempt in telling their stories to gain some sense of meaning and dignity in an otherwise desperate life. The work has received high critical acclaim and is considered one of the great American works of the 20th century. Sherwood Anderson (1876 – 1941) was an American novelist and short story writer, known for subjective and self-revealing works. Anderson published several short story collections, novels, memoirs, books of essays, and a book of poetry. He may be most influential for his effect on the next generation of young writers, as he inspired William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Thomas Wolfe.
  • Votes: 1

    Fly Away Peter

    by David Malouf

    For three very different people brought together by their love for birds, life on the Queensland coast in 1914 is the timeless and idyllic world of sandpipers, ibises and kingfishers. In another hemisphere civilization rushes headlong into a brutal conflict. Life there is lived from moment to moment. Inevitably, the two young men - sanctuary owner and employee - are drawn to the war, and into the mud and horror of the trenches of Armentieres. Alone on the beach, their friend Imogen, the middle-aged wildlife photographer, must acknowledge for all three of them that the past cannot be held.
  • Votes: 1

    Diary Of A Genius

    by Salvador Dalí

  • Votes: 1

    Book Of Tobit

    by Unknown Author

    The current pharmacy doctorate curriculum is rigorous. Pharmacists must adopt a mantra of life long learning. There is another educational process four students at Butler University investigated during their final year of school: what do pharmacists learn about themselves and their profession after pharmacy school? In this book, students gave pharmacy leaders in academia, clinical practice, community practice, executive management, and government a simple assignment: write a letter to yourself from present day to yourself at graduation from pharmacy school discussing the major lessons you learned after pharmacy school about yourself and your profession. The project also provided students the opportunity to learn lessons of their own through their project journey in compiling this book.
  • Votes: 1

    Zen Guitar

    by Philip Toshio Sudo

    Unleash the song of your soul with Zen Guitar, a contemplative handbook that draws on ancient Eastern wisdom and applies it to music and performance. Each of us carries a song inside us, the song that makes us human. Zen Guitar provides the key to unlocking this song—a series of life lessons presented through the metaphor of music. Philip Sudo offers his own experiences with music to enable us to rediscover the harmony in each of our lives and open ourselves to Zen awareness uniquely suited to the Western Mind. Through fifty-eight lessons that provide focus and a guide, the reader is led through to Zen awareness. This harmony is further illuminated through quotes from sources ranging from Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix to Miles Davis. From those who have never strummed a guitar to the more experienced, Zen Guitar shows how the path of music offers fulfillment in all aspects of life—a winning idea and an instant classic.
  • Votes: 1

    The Republic

    by Plato

  • Votes: 1

    Invisible Cities

    by Italo Calvino

    “Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.” — from Invisible Cities In a garden sit the aged Kublai Khan and the young Marco Polo — Mongol emperor and Venetian traveler. Kublai Khan has sensed the end of his empire coming soon. Marco Polo diverts his host with stories of the cities he has seen in his travels around the empire: cities and memory, cities and desire, cities and designs, cities and the dead, cities and the sky, trading cities, hidden cities. As Marco Polo unspools his tales, the emperor detects these fantastic places are more than they appear. “Invisible Cities changed the way we read and what is possible in the balance between poetry and prose . . . The book I would choose as pillow and plate, alone on a desert island.” — Jeanette Winterson
  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Hearing Heartbeats

    by Jan-Philipp Sendker

  • Votes: 1

    The Orphan Master's Son

    by Adam Johnson

    The son of an influential father who runs an orphan work camp, Pak Jun Do rises to prominence using instinctive talents and eventually becomes a professional kidnapper and romantic rival to Kim Jong Il.
  • Votes: 1

    Recursion

    by Blake Crouch

    A breath-taking exploration of memory and what it means to be human, Recursion is the follow-up novel to the smash-hit thriller, Dark Matter, by Blake Crouch. What if someone could rewrite your entire life?'My son has been erased.' Those are the last words the woman tells Barry Sutton, before she leaps from the Manhattan rooftop. Deeply unnerved, Barry begins to investigate her death, only to learn that this wasn't an isolated case. All across the country, people are waking up to lives different than the ones they fell asleep to. Are they suffering from False Memory Syndrome, a mysterious, new disease that afflicts people with vivid memories of a life they never lived? Or is something far more sinister behind the fracturing of reality all around him?Miles away, neuroscientist Helena Smith is developing a technology that allows us to preserve our most intense memories, and relive them. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent.Barry's search for the truth leads him on an impossible, astonishing journey, as he discovers that Helena's work has yielded a terrifying gift - the ability not just to preserve memories, but to remake them . . . at the risk of destroying what it means to be human.
  • Votes: 1

    Spook Country (Blue Ant)

    by William Gibson

    Spook Country - a gripping spy thriller by William Gibson, bestselling author of Neuromancer What happens when old spies come out to play one last game? In New York a young Cuban called Tito is passing iPods to a mysterious old man. Such activities do not go unnoticed, however, in these early days of the War on Terror and across the city an ex-military man named Brown is tracking Tito's movements. Meanwhile in LA, journalist Hollis Henry is on the trail of Bobby Chombo, who appears to know too much about military systems for his own good. With Bobby missing and the trail cold, Hollis digs deeper and is drawn into the final moves of a chilling game played out by men with old scores to settle . . . 'A cool, sophisticated thriller' Financial Times 'Among our most fascinating novelists ... unmissable' Daily Telegraph 'I'd call the book brilliant and original if only I were certain I understood it' Literary Review 'Superb, brilliant. A compulsive and deeply intelligent literary thriller' New Statesman 'A neat, up-to-the-minute spy thriller' Metro William Gibson is a prophet and a satirist, a black comedian and an outstanding architect of cool. Readers of Neal Stephenson, Ray Bradbury and Iain M. Banks will love this book. Spook Country is the second novel in the Blue Ant trilogy - read Pattern Recognition and Zero History for more. William Gibson's first novel Neuromancer sold more than six million copies worldwide. Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive completed his first trilogy. He has since written six further novels, moving gradually away from science fiction and futuristic work, instead writing about the strange contemporary world we inhabit. His most recent novels include Patter Recognition, Spook Country and Zero History, his non-fiction collection. Distrust That Particular Flavor, compiles assorted writings and journalism from across his career.
  • Votes: 1

    The Way Things Are

    by Lama Ole Nydahl

    This seminal work offers the liberating and powerful methods of Diamond Way Buddhism for readers seeking to incorporate Buddhist practice into their daily lives.
  • Votes: 1

    The Code Book

    by Simon Singh

    "As gripping as a good thriller." --The Washington Post Unpack the science of secrecy and discover the methods behind cryptography--the encoding and decoding of information--in this clear and easy-to-understand young adult adaptation of the national bestseller that's perfect for this age of WikiLeaks, the Sony hack, and other events that reveal the extent to which our technology is never quite as secure as we want to believe. Coders and codebreakers alike will be fascinated by history's most mesmerizing stories of intrigue and cunning--from Julius Caesar and his Caeser cipher to the Allies' use of the Enigma machine to decode German messages during World War II. Accessible, compelling, and timely, The Code Book is sure to make readers see the past--and the future--in a whole new way. "Singh's power of explaining complex ideas is as dazzling as ever." --The Guardian
  • Votes: 1

    Jed McKenna's Theory of Everything

    by Jed McKenna

    We are programmed from birth to believe that our existence is an unsolvable riddle, but if we make an honest effort, then we discover that mystery itself is the riddle. Not just what is the big mystery, but why is there any mystery at all? And what if there isn't? What if the Mysterium Tremendum is just an internal belief without any external counterpart? What if the answers to life's biggest questions are simple and obvious, and hidden in plain sight? If you're interested in striking through the mask, then you'll be relieved to know that there is a theory of everything that makes perfect sense, that doesn't rely on the religious or scientific chicanery, and that you can understand easily and directly. And if you're familiar with Jed McKenna and the Enlightenment Trilogy, then you know it's not just a theory.
  • Votes: 1

    The Water Margin

    by Shi Naian

    Based upon the historical bandit Song Jiang and his companions, this Chinese equivalent of the English classic Robin Hood and His Merry Men is an epic tale of rebellion against tyranny and has been thrilling and inspiring readers for hundreds of years. This edition of the classic J. H. Jackson translation features a new preface and introduction by Edwin Lowe, which gives the history of the book and puts the story into perspective for modern readers. First translated into English by Pearl S. Buck in 1933 as All Men Are Brothers, the original edition of the J.H. Jackson translation appeared under the title The Water Margin in 1937. In this updated edition, Edwin Lowe addresses many of the shortcomings found in the original J.H. Jackson translation, and replaces the original grit and flavor of Shuihui Zhuan found in Chinese versions, including the sexual seduction, explicit descriptions of brutality and barbarity, and the profane voices of the thieving, scheming, drinking, fighting, pimping lower classes of Song Dynasty China. Similarly, the Chinese deities, Bodhisattvas, gods and demons have reclaimed their true names, as has the lecherous, over-sexed and ill-fated Ximen Qing. All of which was sanitized out when first published in 1937. While Chinese in origin, the themes of The Water Margin are universal enough that it has served as a source of inspiration for numerous movies, television shows and video games up to the present day.
  • Votes: 1

    The Knight in Rusty Armor

    by Robert Fisher

  • Votes: 1

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

    A cloth bag containing eight copies of the title.