Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 54

    Production-Ready Microservices

    by Susan J. Fowler

    Recent practice in distributed systems has shifted from building and maintaining monolithic applications to breaking monoliths into microservices, but the standardization and best practices for microservice architecture and interaction between microservices remain largely undefined. After breaking apart a monolithic application or building up microservices from scratch, many engineers are left wondering “now what”? In Production-Ready Microservices, author Susan Fowler looks at lessons learned from driving high production-readiness standards across over a thousand microservices. She discusses standards that apply to every microservice, and shares strategies for bringing microservices to a production-ready state. A production-ready microservice, she argues, is one that is stable, reliable, fault-tolerant, scalable, performant, monitored, prepared for any catastrophe, and documented and understood.
  • Votes: 38

    Product Strategy for High Technology Companies

    by Michael E. McGrath

  • Votes: 26

    Target Costing and Value Engineering (Strategies in Confrontational Cost Management)

    by Robin Cooper

  • Votes: 17

    Accelerate

    by Nicole Forsgren PhD

    Does technology actually matter? And how can we apply technology to drive business value?For years, we¿ve been told that the performance of software delivery teams doesn¿t matter¿that it can¿t provide a competitive advantage to our companies. Through four years of groundbreaking research, Dr. Nicole Forsgren, Jez Humble, and Gene Kim set out to find a way to measure software delivery performance¿and what drives it¿using rigorous statistical methods. This book presents both the findings and the science behind that research.Readers will discover how to measure the performance of their teams, and what capabilities they should invest in to drive higher performance.
  • Votes: 16

    How to Speak Tech

    by Vinay Trivedi

  • Votes: 15

    The Phoenix Project

    by Gene Kim

    Bill has 90 days to fix a behind-schedule IT project, or his entire department will be outsourced. Fortunately, he has the help of a prospective board member, whose "Three Ways" philosophy might just save the day.
  • Votes: 14

    The DevOps Handbook

    by Gene Kim

  • Votes: 13

    Move Fast

    by Jeff Meyerson

  • Votes: 13

    Swipe to Unlock

    by Neel Mehta

  • Votes: 12

    The Unicorn Project

    by Gene Kim

    The Phoenix Project wowed over a half-million readers. Now comes the Wall Street Journal Bestselling The Unicorn Project! “The Unicorn Project is amazing, and I loved it 100 times more than The Phoenix Project…”—FERNANDO CORNAGO, Senior Director Platform Engineering, Adidas “Gene Kim does a masterful job of showing how … the efforts of many create lasting business advantages for all.”—DR. STEVEN SPEAR, author of The High-Velocity Edge, Sr. Lecturer at MIT, and principal of HVE LLC. “The Unicorn Project is so clever, so good, so crazy enlightening!”––CORNELIA DAVIS, Vice President Of Technology at Pivotal Software, Inc., Author of Cloud Native Patterns This highly anticipated follow-up to the bestselling title The Phoenix Project takes another look at Parts Unlimited, this time from the perspective of software development. In The Unicorn Project, we follow Maxine, a senior lead developer and architect, as she is exiled to the Phoenix Project, to the horror of her friends and colleagues, as punishment for contributing to a payroll outage. She tries to survive in what feels like a heartless and uncaring bureaucracy and to work within a system where no one can get anything done without endless committees, paperwork, and approvals. One day, she is approached by a ragtag bunch of misfits who say they want to overthrow the existing order, to liberate developers, to bring joy back to technology work, and to enable the business to win in a time of digital disruption. To her surprise, she finds herself drawn ever further into this movement, eventually becoming one of the leaders of the Rebellion, which puts her in the crosshairs of some familiar and very dangerous enemies. The Age of Software is here, and another mass extinction event looms—this is a story about rebel developers and business leaders working together, racing against time to innovate, survive, and thrive in a time of unprecedented uncertainty...and opportunity. “The Unicorn Project provides insanely useful insights on how to improve your technology business.”—DOMINICA DEGRANDIS, author of Making Work Visible and Director of Digital Transformation at Tasktop ——— “My goal in writing The Unicorn Project was to explore and reveal the necessary but invisible structures required to make developers (and all engineers) productive, and reveal the devastating effects of technical debt and complexity. I hope this book can create common ground for technology and business leaders to leave the past behind, and co-create a better future together.”—Gene Kim, November 2019
  • Votes: 9

    The Principles of Product Development Flow

    by Donald G. Reinertsen

    This is the first book that comprehensively describes the underlying principles that create flow in product development processes. It covers 175 principles organized into eight major areas. It is of interest to managers and technical professionals responsible for product development processes.
  • Votes: 7

    Working with Coders

    by Patrick Gleeson

  • Votes: 6

    Domain-driven Design

    by Eric Evans

    Describes ways to incorporate domain modeling into software development.
  • Votes: 6

    High Output Management

    by Andrew S. Grove

    The president of Silicon Valley's Intel Corporation sets forth the three basic ideas of his management philosophy and details numerous specific techniques to increase productivity in the manager's work and that of his colleagues and subordinates
  • Votes: 6

    Mythical Man-Month, The

    by Frederick Brooks Jr.

    The orderly Sweet-Williams are dismayed at their son's fondness for the messy pastime of gardening.
  • Votes: 5

    Inspired

    by Marty Cagan

  • Votes: 4

    Quality Improvement

    by Anita Finkelman

  • Votes: 4

    Project to Product

    by Mik Kersten

  • Votes: 3

    Working Backwards

    by Colin Bryar

    Working Backwards is an insider's breakdown of Amazon's approach to culture, leadership, and best practices from Colin Bryar and Bill Carr, two long-time, top-level Amazon executives...
  • Votes: 3

    An Elegant Puzzle

    by Will Larson

    There's a saying that people don't leave companies, they leave managers. Management is a key part of any organization, yet the discipline is often self-taught and unstructured. Getting to the good solutions of complex management challenges can make the difference between fulfillment and frustration for teams, and, ultimately, the success or failure of companies.Will Larson's An Elegant Puzzle orients around the particular challenges of engineering management--from sizing teams to technical debt to succession planning--and provides a path to the good solutions. Drawing from his experience at Digg, Uber, and Stripe, Will Larson has developed a thoughtful approach to engineering management that leaders of all levels at companies of all sizes can apply. An Elegant Puzzle balances structured principles and human-centric thinking to help any leader create more effective and rewarding organizations for engineers to thrive in.
  • Votes: 3

    Creative Selection

    by Ken Kocienda

    * WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER * An insider's account of Apple's creative process during the golden years of Steve Jobs. Hundreds of millions of people use Apple products every day; several thousand work on Apple's campus in Cupertino, California; but only a handful sit at the drawing board. Creative Selection recounts the life of one of the few who worked behind the scenes, a highly-respected software engineer who worked in the final years of the Steve Jobs era—the Golden Age of Apple. Ken Kocienda offers an inside look at Apple’s creative process. For fifteen years, he was on the ground floor of the company as a specialist, directly responsible for experimenting with novel user interface concepts and writing powerful, easy-to-use software for products including the iPhone, the iPad, and the Safari web browser. His stories explain the symbiotic relationship between software and product development for those who have never dreamed of programming a computer, and reveal what it was like to work on the cutting edge of technology at one of the world's most admired companies. Kocienda shares moments of struggle and success, crisis and collaboration, illuminating each with lessons learned over his Apple career. He introduces the essential elements of innovation—inspiration, collaboration, craft, diligence, decisiveness, taste, and empathy—and uses these as a lens through which to understand productive work culture. An insider's tale of creativity and innovation at Apple, Creative Selection shows readers how a small group of people developed an evolutionary design model, and how they used this methodology to make groundbreaking and intuitive software which countless millions use every day.
  • Votes: 2

    Impactful Software

    by Jan Bosch

  • Votes: 2

    Escaping the Build Trap

    by Melissa Perri

    "To stay competitive in today's market, organizations need to adopt a culture of customer-centric practices that focus on outcomes rather than outputs. In this book, Melissa Perri explains how laying the foundation for great product management can help companies solve real customer problems while achieving business goals. By understanding how to communicate and collaborate within a company structure, you can create a product culture that benefits both the business and the customer. You'll learn product management principles that can be applied to any organization, big or small"--Page 4 of cover.
  • Votes: 2

    Lean Enterprise

    by Jez Humble

  • Votes: 2

    Ask Your Developer

    by Jeff Lawson

    Jeff Lawson, software developer turned CEO of Twilio, shares a new approach for winning in the digital era: unleash the creativity and productivity of the 25 million most important workers in the digital economy, software developers. From banking and retail to insurance and finance, every industry is turning digital, and every company needs the best software to win the hearts and minds of customers. The landscape has shifted from the classic build vs. buy question, to one of build vs. die. Companies have to get this right to survive. But how do they make this transition? Software developers are sought after, highly paid, and desperately needed to compete in the modern, digital economy. Yet most companies treat them like digital factory workers without really understanding what software developers are able to contribute. Lawson argues that developers are the creative workforce who can solve major business problems and create hit products for customers--not just grind through rote tasks. Lawson talks to executives, developers at startups, and founders who code to learn how forward-thinking companies embrace this approach. From Google and Amazon, to one-person online software companies--companies that bring software developers in as partners are winning. Adopting the Ask Your Developer mindset enables companies to take advantage of an underutilized asset, unleash tremendous untapped creativity and brainpower inside their software teams, recruit and retain the best talent, and integrate developers into everyday decisions. For developers, this mindset can help you show up and be viewed as a full, talented, creative professional - not a code monkey. How to compete in the digital economy? In short: Ask Your Developer.
  • Votes: 2

    Your Code as a Crime Scene

    by Adam Tornhill

  • Votes: 2

    How did you learn to do that?

    by Angeza Mohammed

  • Votes: 2

    API Fundamentals

    by Pallavi Agarwal

  • Votes: 1

    Beautiful Code

    by Andy Oram

    How do the experts solve difficult problems in software development? In this unique and insightful book, leading computer scientists offer case studies that reveal how they found unusual, carefully designed solutions to high-profile projects. You will be able to look over the shoulder of major coding and design experts to see problems through their eyes. This is not simply another design patterns book, or another software engineering treatise on the right and wrong way to do things. The authors think aloud as they work through their project's architecture, the tradeoffs made in its construction, and when it was important to break rules. This book contains 33 chapters contributed by Brian Kernighan, KarlFogel, Jon Bentley, Tim Bray, Elliotte Rusty Harold, Michael Feathers,Alberto Savoia, Charles Petzold, Douglas Crockford, Henry S. Warren,Jr., Ashish Gulhati, Lincoln Stein, Jim Kent, Jack Dongarra and PiotrLuszczek, Adam Kolawa, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Diomidis Spinellis, AndrewKuchling, Travis E. Oliphant, Ronald Mak, Rogerio Atem de Carvalho andRafael Monnerat, Bryan Cantrill, Jeff Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat, SimonPeyton Jones, Kent Dybvig, William Otte and Douglas C. Schmidt, AndrewPatzer, Andreas Zeller, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Arun Mehta, TV Raman,Laura Wingerd and Christopher Seiwald, and Brian Hayes. Beautiful Code is an opportunity for master coders to tell their story. All author royalties will be donated to Amnesty International.
  • Votes: 1

    Toyota Kata

    by Mike Rother

  • Votes: 1

    Software Engineering at Google

    by Titus Winters

    The approach to and understanding of software engineering at Google is unlike any other company. With this book, you'll get a candid and insightful look at how software is constructed and maintained by some of the world's leading practitioners. Titus Winters, Tom Manshreck, and Hyrum K. Wright, software engineers and a technical writer at Google, reframe how software engineering is practiced and taught: from an emphasis on programming to an emphasis on software engineering, which roughly translates to programming over time. You'll learn: Fundamental differences between software engineering and programming How an organization effectively manages a living codebase and efficiently responds to inevitable change Why culture (and recognizing it) is important, and how processes, practices, and tools come into play.