Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 79

    A Gentleman in Moscow

    by Amor Towles

    The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series "The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate." --The Wall Street Journal He can't leave his hotel. You won't want to. From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility--a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count's endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.
  • Votes: 75

    Be

    by Jessica Zweig

  • Votes: 56

    The Chatter

    by T. R. Hamby

  • Votes: 47

    The Fires of Treason

    by Michele Quirke

    Princess Elizabeth has always idolized and supported her older brother, but when Greg is accused of treason and banished, her loyalty to him is tested in ways she never could've imagined. As she leaves her luxurious lifestyle behind to join him in exile, she must learn to cope with the everyday struggles of the working class, all while keeping her true identity a secret. Facing new hardships and the looming threat of execution, Elizabeth will need to toughen up if she has any chance of surviving outside the palace walls.Prince Gregory spent his entire life trying to prove himself worthy of the crown until his banishment releases him of all the pressures and obligations that have chained him down. Although he has no intention of raising an army to defend his birthright, he soon learns that not everyone is content to let him walk away from the throne. With his sister's safety and well-being to consider, Gregory must make a decision that will change both their lives forever.
  • Votes: 37

    Notebook Mysteries Decisions and Possibilities

    by Kimberly Mullins

  • Votes: 37

    Storm of Emotions

    by Tabitha Womack

  • Votes: 37

    Untitled

    by Lunden D Stubbs

  • Votes: 37

    Finding Love on Cobble Wynd

    by Anne Hutchins

  • Votes: 25

    The Pillars of the Earth

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 22

    I Recommend

    by James D. Ployhar

  • Votes: 20

    Outlander

    by Diana Gabaldon

    THE FIRST NOVEL IN THE BESTSELLING OUTLANDER SERIES. As seen on Amazon Prime TV. What if your future was the past? 1946, and Claire Randall goes to the Scottish Highlands with her husband Frank. It’s a second honeymoon, a chance to learn how war has changed them and to re-establish their loving marriage. But one afternoon, Claire walks through a circle of standing stones and vanishes into 1743, where the first person she meets is a British army officer - her husband’s six-times great-grandfather. Unfortunately, Black Jack Randall is not the man his descendant is, and while trying to escape him, Claire falls into the hands of a gang of Scottish outlaws, and finds herself a Sassenach - an outlander - in danger from both Jacobites and Redcoats. Marooned amid danger, passion and violence, her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives. (Previously published as Cross Stitch)
  • Votes: 19

    The Boy from the Snow

    by Maria Johnson

  • Votes: 14

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

  • Votes: 12

    Bad Blood

    by John Carreyrou

    The Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year A New York Times Notable Book A Washington Post Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, San Francisco Chronicle, Time, Esquire, Fortune, Marie Claire, GQ, Mental Floss, Science Friday, Bloomberg, Popular Mechanics, BookRiot, The Seattle Times, The Oregonian, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the next Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with its breakthrough device, which performed the whole range of laboratory tests from a single drop of blood. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.5 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. Erroneous results put patients in danger, leading to misdiagnoses and unnecessary treatments. All the while, Holmes and her partner, Sunny Balwani, worked to silence anyone who voiced misgivings--from journalists to their own employees. Rigorously reported and fearlessly written, Bad Blood is a gripping story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron--a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • Votes: 11

    Shogun

    by James Clavell

  • Votes: 11

    Lonesome Dove

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 10

    The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek

    by Kim Michele Richardson

  • Votes: 9

    A Consuming Love

    by Kelly Miller

  • Votes: 9

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 8

    Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

    by Lisa See

  • Votes: 7

    The Red Tent

    by Anita Diamant

    In The Red Tent Anita Diamant brings the fascinating biblical character of Dinah to vivid life. Her name is Dinah. In the Bible her fate is merely hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the verses of the Book of Genesis that recount the life of Jacob and his infamous dozen sons. Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is an extraordinary and engrossing tale of ancient womanhood and family honour. Told in Dinah's voice, it opens with the story of her mothers – the four wives of Jacob – each of whom embodies unique feminine traits, and concludes with Dinah's own startling and unforgettable story of betrayal, grief and love. Deeply affecting and intimate, The Red Tent combines outstandingly rich storytelling with an original insight into women's society in a fascinating period of early history and such is its warmth and candour, it is guaranteed to win the hearts and minds of women across the world. 'I genuinely fell into this rich and colourful world and Dinah and Leah have stayed with me as ancestors and sisters brought to life by Anita Diamant's imaginative novel' - Maureen Lipman. Adapted as a TV mini series starring Rebecca Ferguson and Minnie Driver.
  • Votes: 7

    The Tale of Murasaki

    by Liza Dalby

  • Votes: 7

    The Good Earth

    by Pearl S. Buck

  • Votes: 7

    The Devil in the White City

    by Erik Larson

    An account of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 relates the stories of two men who shaped the history of the event--architect Daniel H. Burnham, who coordinated its construction, and serial killer Herman Mudgett.
  • Votes: 7

    The Lost City of Z

    by David Grann

  • Votes: 7

    Bring Up the Bodies

    by Hilary Mantel

    WINNER OF THE 2012 MAN BOOKER PRIZE The sequel to Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel's 2009 Man Booker Prize winner and New York Times bestseller, Bring Up the Bodies delves into the heart of Tudor history with the downfall of Anne Boleyn. Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down. Over three terrifying weeks, Anne is ensnared in a web of conspiracy, while the demure Jane Seymour stands waiting her turn for the poisoned wedding ring. But Anne and her powerful family will not yield without a ferocious struggle. Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies follows the dramatic trial of the queen and her suitors for adultery and treason. To defeat the Boleyns, Cromwell must ally with his natural enemies, the papist aristocracy. What price will he pay for Anne's head? Bring Up the Bodies is one of The New York Times' 10 Best Books of 2012, one of Publishers Weekly's Top 10 Best Books of 2012 and one of The Washington Post's 10 Best Books of 2012
  • Votes: 7

    Time and Again

    by Jack Finney

  • Votes: 6

    Mr. Darcy's Perfect Match

    by Kelly Miller

  • Votes: 6

    Pride and Prejudice

    by Jane Austen

  • Votes: 5

    The Giver of Stars

    by Jojo Moyes

  • Votes: 5

    Beneath a Scarlet Sky

    by Mark Sullivan

    Soon to be a major television event from Pascal Pictures, starring Tom Holland. Based on the true story of a forgotten hero, the USA Today and #1 Amazon Charts bestseller Beneath a Scarlet Sky is the triumphant, epic tale of one young man's incredible courage and resilience during one of history's darkest hours. Pino Lella wants nothing to do with the war or the Nazis. He's a normal Italian teenager--obsessed with music, food, and girls--but his days of innocence are numbered. When his family home in Milan is destroyed by Allied bombs, Pino joins an underground railroad helping Jews escape over the Alps, and falls for Anna, a beautiful widow six years his senior. In an attempt to protect him, Pino's parents force him to enlist as a German soldier--a move they think will keep him out of combat. But after Pino is injured, he is recruited at the tender age of eighteen to become the personal driver for Adolf Hitler's left hand in Italy, General Hans Leyers, one of the Third Reich's most mysterious and powerful commanders. Now, with the opportunity to spy for the Allies inside the German High Command, Pino endures the horrors of the war and the Nazi occupation by fighting in secret, his courage bolstered by his love for Anna and for the life he dreams they will one day share. Fans of All the Light We Cannot See, The Nightingale, and Unbroken will enjoy this riveting saga of history, suspense, and love.
  • Votes: 5

    Little Big Man

    by Thomas Berger

  • Votes: 5

    Dreaming Your Dream

    by Starwing

  • Votes: 5

    Fingersmith

    by Sarah Waters

  • Votes: 5

    Mine

    by Delilah S. Dawson

  • Votes: 5

    The Four Winds

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 4

    The Personal Librarian

    by Marie Benedict

  • Votes: 4

    Where Seagulls Fly (2013 Edition)

    by Edwin Page

  • Votes: 4

    Cold Mountain

    by Charles Frazier

  • Votes: 4

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 3

    The Viking On Stamford Bridge

    by Brent Jordan

  • Votes: 3

    The Chanel Sisters

    by Judithe Little

  • Votes: 3

    The Fate of Lenn (The Gift-Knight Trilogy)

    by Dylan Madeley

  • Votes: 3

    Centennial

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 3

    A Sultan in Palermo

    by Tariq Ali

  • Votes: 3

    To Serve Them All my Days

    by R. f. delderfield

  • Votes: 3

    Simply Stunning Woven Quilts

    by Anna Faustino

  • Votes: 3

    Tangle of Choices

    by Eve Koguce

  • Votes: 3

    Judith und Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

  • Votes: 3

    Alias Grace

    by Margaret Atwood

    In Alias Grace, the bestselling author of The Handmaid's Tale takes readers into the life of one of the most notorious women of the nineteenth century—recently adapted into a 6-part Netflix original mini-series by director Mary Harron and writer/actress Sarah Polley. It's 1843, and Grace Marks has been convicted for her involvement in the vicious murders of her employer and his housekeeper and mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no memory of the murders. An up-and-coming expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness is engaged by a group of reformers and spiritualists who seek a pardon for Grace. He listens to her story while bringing her closer and closer to the day she cannot remember. What will he find in attempting to unlock her memories? Captivating and disturbing, Alias Grace showcases bestselling, Booker Prize-winning author Margaret Atwood at the peak of her powers.
  • Votes: 3

    The Lost Apothecary

    by Sarah Penner

  • Votes: 3

    The Terror

    by Dan Simmons

    'A brilliant, massive combination of history and supernatural horror' STEPHEN KING It was the most advanced scientific enterprise ever mounted and Sir John Franklin's 1845 expedition in search of the fabled North-West Passage had every expectation of triumph. But for almost two years his ships HMS Terror and Erebus have been trapped in the Arctic ice. Supplies of fuel and food are running low. Scurvy, starvation and even madness begin to take their toll. And yet the real threat isn't from the constantly shifting, alien landscape, the flesh-numbing temperatures or being crushed by the unyielding, frozen ocean. No, the real threat is far more terrifying. Because there is something out there in the frigid darkness. It stalks the ships and snatches men. It is a nameless thing and it has become the expedition's nemesis . . . Based on actual events, this is the astonishing novel that inspired the chilling AMC Original TV series.
  • Votes: 3

    The Shadow

    by James Patterson

  • Votes: 3

    The Winds of War

    by Herman Wouk

  • Votes: 3

    Claudius the God

    by Robert Graves

  • Votes: 2

    The Alchemy Thief

    by R.A. Denny

  • Votes: 2

    Brilliant

    by David Warren

  • Votes: 2

    The Coffee Trader

    by David Liss

    In seventeenth-century Amsterdam, Miguel Lienzo, a Portuguese-Jewish trader desperate to recover his lost fortune, enters into a partnership with seductive Geertruid Damhuis to introduce coffee to the city, and confronts a ruthless adversary.
  • Votes: 2

    Assault of the Mountain Man

    by William W. Johnstone

  • Votes: 2

    Illiterate Literary Man

    by Thomas Hock

  • Votes: 2

    You're Welcome

    by A.J. Arentz

  • Votes: 2

    Trust Me on This

    by Jennifer Crusie

  • Votes: 2

    The King's Sword

    by Rebekah Simmers

  • Votes: 2

    It Is What It Is, Because It Never Was, And What Never Was, Can Never Be

    by Ronnell Beaty

  • Votes: 2

    Pull of the Stars

    by Emma Donoghue

  • Votes: 2

    Blackbird House

    by Alice Hoffman

  • Votes: 2

    Murder at Ford's Theatre (Capital Crimes)

    by Margaret Truman

  • Votes: 2

    Seconded

    by Icon Group International

  • Votes: 2

    The Remains of the Day

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity
  • Votes: 2

    The Widow of the South

    by Robert Hicks

  • Votes: 2

    Just One Damned Thing After Another

    by Jodi Taylor

    The first book in the bestselling Chronicles of St Mary's series which follows a group of tea-soaked disaster magnets as they hurtle their way around History. If you love Jasper Fforde or Ben Aaronovitch, you won't be able to resist Jodi Taylor. Time Travel meets History in this explosive bestselling adventure series. 'So tell me, Dr Maxwell, if the whole of History lay before you ... where would you go? What would you like to witness?' When Madeleine Maxwell is recruited by the St Mary's Institute of Historical Research, she discovers the historians there don't just study the past - they revisit it. But one wrong move and History will fight back - to the death. And she soon discovers it's not just History she's fighting... Readers love Jodi Taylor: 'Once in a while, I discover an author who changes everything... Jodi Taylor and her protagonista Madeleine "Max" Maxwell have seduced me' 'A great mix of British proper-ness and humour with a large dollop of historical fun' 'Addictive. I wish St Mary's was real and I was a part of it' 'Jodi Taylor has an imagination that gets me completely hooked' 'A tour de force'
  • Votes: 2

    Pulpland

    by Clyde Wrenn

  • Votes: 2

    Star of the Sea

    by Joseph O'Connor

    In the middle of the Atlantic Ocean during the summer of 1847, a boatload of Irish refugees heading for the promise of America is stalked by a killer in their ranks who seems bent on some kind of revenge, in a historical thriller by the author of Cowboys & Indians and The Salesman. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 2

    The Singing Sands

    by Josephine Tey

  • Votes: 2

    Trust Me

    by Sheryl Browne

  • Votes: 2

    Summer of '77

    by Robert Fear

  • Votes: 2

    Sinfonietta

    by Leos Janacek

  • Votes: 2

    Silence Of The Girls

    by Pat Barker

    She offers nuanced, complex portraits of characters and stories familiar from mythology, which, seen from Briseis's perspective, are rife with newfound revelations. Barker's latest builds on her decades-long study of war and its impact on individual lives--and it is nothing short of magnificent"--.
  • Votes: 2

    But of course they were Irish

    by Evelyn Sinclair. Tierney

  • Votes: 2

    A Pillar of Iron

    by Taylor Caldwell

  • Votes: 2

    Winter in Madrid

    by C. J. Sansom

  • Votes: 2

    Green Dolphin Street

    by Elizabeth Goudge

  • Votes: 2

    The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet

    by David Mitchell

    Dispatched to the influential Japanese port of Dejima in 1799, ambitious clerk Jacob de Zoet resolves to earn enough money to deserve his wealthy fiancâee, an effort that is challenged by his relationship with the midwife daughter of a samurai.
  • Votes: 2

    The Rose Code

    by Kate Quinn

  • Votes: 2

    Shanna

    by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

  • Votes: 2

    Good to Great

    by Jim Collins

  • Votes: 2

    A Discovery of Witches

    by Deborah E. Harkness

  • Votes: 2

    The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    by Heather Morris

    The five million copy bestseller and one of the bestselling books of the 21st Century. Chosen for the Richard and Judy Bookclub. I tattooed a number on her arm. She tattooed her name on my heart. In 1942, Lale Sokolov arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight. And he was determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure this woman, Gita, did, too. So begins one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz. Don't miss Heather Morris's next book, Stories of Hope. Coming September 2020. ----- 'Extraordinary - moving, confronting and uplifting . . . I recommend it unreservedly' Greame Simsion 'A moving and ultimately uplifting story of love, loyalties and friendship amidst the horrors of war . . . It's a triumph.' Jill Mansell 'A sincere . . . moving attempt to speak the unspeakable' Sunday Times
  • Votes: 1

    Hester and the Battle of Bannockburn

    by Mr Robert William Jackson Sr

  • Votes: 1

    All My Love, From the Trenches

    by Reilly Vore

  • Votes: 1

    The Brothers Karamazov

    by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt.
  • Votes: 1

    Ghosts of Cannock Chase

    by Lee Brickley

  • Votes: 1

    Jackdaws

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    T.N.T. What Really Happened

    by Gareth Leggett

  • Votes: 1

    Crimson Time

    by Emily VanderBent

  • Votes: 1

    Spellbound

    by Allie Therin

  • Votes: 1

    Hard Magic

    by Larry Correia

  • Votes: 1

    Autobiography of a Yogi

    by Yogananda (Paramahansa)

  • Votes: 1

    Breaking The Foals

    by Maximilian Hawker

  • Votes: 1

    The Headless Horseman (Step-Into-Reading, Step 3)

    by Natalie Standiford

  • Votes: 1

    The right stuff

    by Tom Wolfe

    A narrative of the early days of the U.S. space program and the people who made it happen, including Chuck Yeager, Pete Conrad, Gus Grissom, and John Glenn.
  • Votes: 1

    Two Roads To Freedom

    by Chris Ward

  • Votes: 1

    The Patriots' Legacy

    by Apurva Bhuta

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Days of America?

    by Shane Warren

  • Votes: 1

    Caravaggio

    by Ken Mora

  • Votes: 1

    A Single Thread

    by Tracy Chevalier

  • Votes: 1

    Expand your horizons

    by Magdalena Knappe

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Miriam

    by Louis Zambrana

    The concept of resistance has always been central to the reception of Hegel's philosophy. The prevalent image of Hegel's system, which continues to influence the scholarship to this day, is that of an absolutist, monist metaphysics which overcomes all resistance, sublating or assimilating all differences into a single organic 'Whole'. For that reason, the reception of Hegel has always been marked by the question of how to resist Hegel: how to think that which remains outside of or other to the totalizing system of dialectics. In recent years the work of scholars such as Catherine Malabou, Slavoj Žižek, Rebecca Comay and Frank Ruda has brought considerable nuance to this debate. A new reading of Hegel has emerged which challenges the idea that there is no place for difference, otherness or resistance in Hegel, both by refusing to reduce Hegel's complex philosophy to a straightforward systematic narrative and by highlighting particular moments within Hegel's philosophy which seem to counteract the traditional understanding of dialectics. This book brings together established and new voices in this field in order to show that the notion of resistance is central to this revaluation of Hegel.
  • Votes: 1

    Ashes in the Wind

    by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

  • Votes: 1

    Storm and Silence (Storm and Silence Saga)

    by Robert Thier

  • Votes: 1

    Warbound

    by Larry Correia

  • Votes: 1

    The Dutch House

    by Ann Patchett

  • Votes: 1

    Jigsaw Beginnings (Jigsaw Series Book 1)

    by David Gordon

  • Votes: 1

    Karanja Run

    by Gordon Smith

  • Votes: 1

    The King Must Die

    by Mary Renault

  • Votes: 1

    Merchants of Milan

    by Edale Lane

  • Votes: 1

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 1

    The Timepiece and the Girl Who Went Astray

    by O.R. Simmonds

  • Votes: 1

    Bushwhacked!

    by David Belisle

  • Votes: 1

    The Evening and the Morning

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Days of Night

    by Graham Moore

  • Votes: 1

    No But I Saw The Movie

    by Peter De Vries

  • Votes: 1

    Master and Commander

    by Patrick O'Brian

    Introduces Captain Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, in the age of the Napoleonic wars.
  • Votes: 1

    Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    WINNER OF THE 2020 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION - THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED AN POST BOOK AWARDS IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 'Richly sensuous... something special' The Sunday Times 'A thing of shimmering wonder' David Mitchell TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART. On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home? Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week. Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.
  • Votes: 1

    Rules of Civility

    by Amor Towles

  • Votes: 1

    Gates of Fire

    by Steven Pressfield

    Chronicles the battle of three hundred Spartan warriors against a huge force of Persian soldiers in 480 B.C. against the background of life in ancient Sparta and its extraordinary culture.
  • Votes: 1

    The Captains

    by W. E. B. Griffin

  • Votes: 1

    The Killer Angels

    by Michael Shaara

    It is the third summer of the war, June 1863, and Robert Lee's Confederate Army slips across the Potomac to draw out the Union Army. Lee's army is 70,000 strong and has won nearly every battle it has fought. The Union Army is 80,000 strong and accustomed to defeat and retreat. Thus begins the Battle of Gettysburg, the four most bloody and courageous days of America's history. Two armies fight for two goals - one for freedom, the other for a way of life. This is a classic, Pulitzer Prize-Winning, historical novel set during the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Votes: 1

    Tanamera

    by Noel Barber

  • Votes: 1

    YOUR GUIDE TO HAPPINESS

    by Kronos Roar

  • Votes: 1

    Beowulf

    by Seamus Heaney

    Composed towards the end of the first millennium, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf is one of the great Northern epics and a classic of European literature. In his new translation, Seamus Heaney has produced a work which is both true, line by line, to the original poem, and an expression, in its language and music, of something fundamental to his own creative gift. The poem is about encountering the monstrous, defeating it, and then having to live on, physically and psychically exposed, in that exhausted aftermath. It is not hard to draw parallels between this story and the history of the twentieth century, nor can Heaney's Beowulf fail to be read partly in the light of his Northern Irish upbringing. But it also transcends such considerations, telling us psychological and spiritual truths that are permanent and liberating.
  • Votes: 1

    The Ugly Duchess

    by Eloisa James

  • Votes: 1

    Life in Hyderabad

    by Queeny Yalangi

  • Votes: 1

    To Reap a Whirlwind

    by Barbara Lieberman

  • Votes: 1

    A Land Remembered

    by Patrick D. Smith

  • Votes: 1

    Gunnedah Hero

    by Clancy Tucker

  • Votes: 1

    The Bone Garden

    by Tess Gerritsen

  • Votes: 1

    Twin Time

    by Christopher Werby

  • Votes: 1

    The Green Mile

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    The Women of Chateau Lafayette

    by Stephanie Dray

  • Votes: 1

    The Triple Agent

    by Joby Warrick

  • Votes: 1

    A Fine Balance

    by Rohinton Mistry

  • Votes: 1

    To Miss The Stars

    by Barbara Lieberman

  • Votes: 1

    The Dictionary of Lost Words

    by Pip Williams

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Azrael

    by James Buffin

  • Votes: 1

    Awake

    by Angelo Dilullo

  • Votes: 1

    The Tournament

    by Matthew Reilly

  • Votes: 1

    The Orchardist

    by Amanda Coplin

  • Votes: 1

    A Place of Greater Safety

    by Hilary Mantel

  • Votes: 1

    Daughters of Sparta

    by Claire Heywood

  • Votes: 1

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 1

    Ordinary Grace

    by William Kent Krueger

  • Votes: 1

    A Reliable Wife

    by Robert Goolrick

  • Votes: 1

    Key Words With Peter And Jane Box Set

    by Ladybird

  • Votes: 1

    After Mrs Hamilton

    by Clare Ashton

  • Votes: 1

    The Lord Poet

    by Megan Franks

  • Votes: 1

    The Treasure of Ravenwood

    by Barbara Lieberman

  • Votes: 1

    Helen of Troy

    by Margaret George

  • Votes: 1

    Message on the Wind (McEwen Series)

    by Barbara Lieberman

  • Votes: 1

    Count Belisarius

    by Robert Graves

  • Votes: 1

    Vivian Conroy

  • Votes: 1

    A Passage to India

    by E.M. Forster

    In a scathing indictment of British imperialism, Forster's once controversial novel portrays two Englishwomen who experience misunderstanding and cultural conflict after they travel to India
  • Votes: 1

    Labyrinth (Languedoc Trilogy Book 1)

    by Kate Mosse

  • Votes: 1

    The Gate to Women's Country

    by Sheri S. Tepper

  • Votes: 1

    War and Peace (Vintage Classics)

    by Leo Tolstoy

    Presents a new translation of the classic reflecting the life and times of Russian society during the Napoleonic Wars, in a book accompanied by an index of historical figures, textual annotation, a chapter summary, and an introduction.
  • Votes: 1

    The Engineer's Wife

    by Tracey Enerson Wood

  • Votes: 1

    The Alice Network

    by Kate Quinn

  • Votes: 1

    The Big Sky

    by A. B. Guthrie Jr.

  • Votes: 1

    A Farewell to Arms

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 1

    Róisín Campbell

    by Joseph P. Garland

  • Votes: 1

    The City of Brass

    by S. A Chakraborty

  • Votes: 1

    The Apprenticeship of Nigel Blackthorn (The Apprentice Series)

    by Frank Kelso

  • Votes: 1

    The Bear and the Nightingale

    by Katherine Arden

    Katherine Arden’s bestselling debut novel spins an irresistible spell as it announces the arrival of a singular talent with a gorgeous voice. “A beautiful deep-winter story, full of magic and monsters and the sharp edges of growing up.”—Naomi Novik, bestselling author of Uprooted Winter lasts most of the year at the edge of the Russian wilderness, and in the long nights, Vasilisa and her siblings love to gather by the fire to listen to their nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, Vasya loves the story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon. Wise Russians fear him, for he claims unwary souls, and they honor the spirits that protect their homes from evil. Then Vasya’s widowed father brings home a new wife from Moscow. Fiercely devout, Vasya’s stepmother forbids her family from honoring their household spirits, but Vasya fears what this may bring. And indeed, misfortune begins to stalk the village. But Vasya’s stepmother only grows harsher, determined to remake the village to her liking and to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for marriage or a convent. As the village’s defenses weaken and evil from the forest creeps nearer, Vasilisa must call upon dangerous gifts she has long concealed—to protect her family from a threat sprung to life from her nurse’s most frightening tales. Praise for The Bear and the Nightingale “Arden’s debut novel has the cadence of a beautiful fairy tale but is darker and more lyrical.”—The Washington Post “Vasya [is] a clever, stalwart girl determined to forge her own path in a time when women had few choices.”—The Christian Science Monitor “Stunning . . . will enchant readers from the first page. . . . with an irresistible heroine who wants only to be free of the bonds placed on her gender and claim her own fate.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Utterly bewitching . . . a lush narrative . . . an immersive, earthy story of folk magic, faith, and hubris, peopled with vivid, dynamic characters, particularly clever, brave Vasya, who outsmarts men and demons alike to save her family.”—Booklist (starred review) “An extraordinary retelling of a very old tale . . . The Bear and the Nightingale is a wonderfully layered novel of family and the harsh wonders of deep winter magic.”—Robin Hobb
  • Votes: 1

    Memoirs of a Geisha

    by Arthur Golden

  • Votes: 1

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 1

    Meeting Egypt

    by Keiana Champagne

  • Votes: 1

    The Welsh Girl

    by Peter Ho Davies

  • Votes: 1

    Suzan Lauder

  • Votes: 1

    A Brief History of Time

    by Stephen Hawking

    An anniversary edition of a now-classic survey of the origin and nature of the universe features a new introduction by the author and a new chapter on the possibility of time travel and "wormholes" in space
  • Votes: 1

    The Good Lord Bird

    by James McBride

  • Votes: 1

    The Man on the Spectrum's Journey

    by Ken H Daniels

  • Votes: 1

    The Game of Kings

    by Dorothy Dunnett

  • Votes: 1

    A revolutionary boy

    by Jarrett Goodman

  • Votes: 1

    Wolf of Wessex

    by Matthew Harffy

  • Votes: 1

    Naked Came the Manatee

    by Carl Hiaasen

  • Votes: 1

    The Historian

    by Elizabeth Kostova

  • Votes: 1

    Things Fall Apart

    by Chinua Achebe

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele
  • Votes: 1

    The Underground Man (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)

    by Ross Macdonald

  • Votes: 1

    Washington Black

    by Esi Edugyan

    - TOP TEN BOOK OF THE YEAR: New York Times, Washington Post, TIME, Entertainment Weekly, Slate - ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: Boston Globe, NPR, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, The Economist, Bustle - WINNER OF THE SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE - FINALIST FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE, THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE, THE ROGERS WRITERS' TRUST PRIZE "Enthralling" --Boston Globe "Extraordinary" --Seattle Times "A rip-roaring tale" --Washington Post A dazzling adventure story about a boy who rises from the ashes of slavery to become a free man of the world. George Washington Black, or "Wash," an eleven-year-old field slave on a Barbados sugar plantation, is terrified to be chosen by his master's brother as his manservant. To his surprise, the eccentric Christopher Wilde turns out to be a naturalist, explorer, inventor, and abolitionist. Soon Wash is initiated into a world where a flying machine can carry a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning--and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human. But when a man is killed and a bounty is placed on Wash's head, Christopher and Wash must abandon everything. What follows is their flight along the eastern coast of America, and, finally, to a remote outpost in the Arctic. What brings Christopher and Wash together will tear them apart, propelling Wash even further across the globe in search of his true self. From the blistering cane fields of the Caribbean to the frozen Far North, from the earliest aquariums of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black tells a story of self-invention and betrayal, of love and redemption, of a world destroyed and made whole again, and asks the question, What is true freedom?
  • Votes: 1

    Imperium

    by Francis Parker Yockey

  • Votes: 1

    The Autobiography of Henry VIII

    by Margaret George

  • Votes: 1

    Proceed, Sergeant Lamb

    by Robert Graves

  • Votes: 1

    Utopia Avenue

    by David Mitchell

  • Votes: 1

    The Silver Chalice

    by Thomas B. Costain

  • Votes: 1

    The Great Alone

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 1

    Killing Kennedy

    by Bill O'Reilly

  • Votes: 1

    The Dice Man

    by Luke Rhinehart

    Let the dice decide! This is the philosophy that changes the life of bored psychiatrist Luke Rhinehart - and in some ways changes the world as well. Because once you hand over your life to the dice, anything can happen. Entertaining, humorous, scary, shocking, subversive.
  • Votes: 1

    The Unexpected Adventures of Thomas Hardwick

    by David Tyler

  • Votes: 1

    Ingenious Pain

    by Andrew Miller

  • Votes: 1

    World Without End

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    Red Queen (Red Queen, 1)

    by Victoria Aveyard

  • Votes: 1

    The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

    by Junot Díaz

    Winner of: The Pulitzer Prize The National Book Critics Circle Award The Anisfield-Wolf Book Award The Jon Sargent, Sr. First Novel Prize A Time Magazine #1 Fiction Book of the Year One of the best books of 2007 according to: The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, New York Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, People, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, Salon, Baltimore City Paper, The Christian Science Monitor, Booklist, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, New York Public Library, and many more... Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fukú—a curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—in the name of love.
  • Votes: 1

    Unclean Hands

    by Henry Rakowski

  • Votes: 1

    The Far Pavilions

    by M. M. Kaye

    One of the BBC's '100 Novels that Shaped the World' The Far Pavilions is the story of an English man - Ashton Pelham-Martyn - brought up as a Hindu. It is the story of his passionate, but dangerous love for Juli, an Indian princess. It is the story of divided loyalties, of friendship that endures till death, of high adventure and of the clash between East and West. To the burning plains and snow-capped mountains of this great, humming continent, M.M. Kaye brings her exceptional gifts of storytelling and meticulous historical accuracy, plus her insight into the human heart. 'Magnificent' Evening Standard 'A long, romantic adventure story of the highest calibre ... wildly exciting' Daily Telegraph
  • Votes: 1

    The Covenant

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 1

    A Reindeer King

    by R.R. LUCY

  • Votes: 1

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
  • Votes: 1

    The Jungle

    by Upton Sinclair

    The author's famous tale of a Lithuanian family who emigrates to America and is destroyed by exploitation, crushing poverty, and economic despair.
  • Votes: 1

    I Capture The Castle

    by Dodie Smith

    'I write this sitting in the kitchen sink' is the first line of this timeless, witty and enchanting novel about growing up. Cassandra Mortmain lives with her bohemian and impoverished family in a crumbling castle in the middle of nowhere. Her journal records her life with her beautiful, bored sister, Rose, her fadingly glamorous stepmother, Topaz, her little brother Thomas and her eccentric novelist father who suffers from a financially crippling writer's block. However, all their lives are turned upside down when the American heirs to the castle arrive and Cassandra finds herself falling in love for the first time.
  • Votes: 1

    The Name of the Rose

    by Umberto Eco

  • Votes: 1

    The Invisible Bridge (Vintage Contemporaries)

    by Julie Orringer

  • Votes: 1

    The Sword of David

    by Charles Lichtman