Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 22

    The Fires of Treason

    by Michele Quirke

  • Votes: 17

    The Dark

    by Jeremy Robinson

  • Votes: 16

    GOD OF NOTHING

    by Shane Scott

  • Votes: 10

    The Ghost Beside Me

    by Lee Hall

  • Votes: 10

    Holly and the Nobodies

    by Ben Pienaar

  • Votes: 10

    The Gouge

    by M H David

  • Votes: 10

    The Missed Kiss

    by Nicola Lowe

  • Votes: 10

    Paper Castles

    by B. Fox

  • Votes: 10

    More than you can Chew

    by Morton R Leader

  • Votes: 10

    Nevada Noir

    by David Arrowsmith

  • Votes: 9

    The Scars Of Gaia

    by R.P. Lauer

  • Votes: 9

    To Catch A Feather

    by R. A. Hutchins

  • Votes: 9

    A Consuming Love

    by Kelly Miller

  • Votes: 6

    Close My Eyes

    by Beverley Harvey

  • Votes: 5

    Think Again

    by Adam Grant

  • Votes: 4

    TWO sons TOO many

    by Aidan McNally

  • Votes: 4

    Accusing Mr. Darcy

    by Kelly Miller

  • Votes: 3

    The Ethereal Road

    by Stefan Tomasi

  • Votes: 3

    Sabrina Oyinloye

  • Votes: 2

    Somebody's Daughter

    by Ashley C. Ford

    “Sure to be one of the best memoirs of 2021.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review “So clear, sharp, and smooth that the reader sees, in vivid focus, Ford’s complicated childhood, brilliant mind, and golden heart. Ford is a writer for the ages, and Somebody’s Daughter will be a book of the year.” —Glennon Doyle, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Untamed “Ford’s wrenchingly brilliant memoir is truly a classic in the making. The writing is so richly observed and so suffused with love and yearning that I kept forgetting to breathe while reading it.” —John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author One of the most prominent voices of her generation debuts with an extraordinarily powerful memoir: the story of a childhood defined by the looming absence of her incarcerated father. Through poverty, adolescence, and a fraught relationship with her mother, Ashley Ford wishes she could turn to her father for hope and encouragement. There are just a few problems: he’s in prison, and she doesn’t know what he did to end up there. She doesn’t know how to deal with the incessant worries that keep her up at night, or how to handle the changes in her body that draw unwanted attention from men. In her search for unconditional love, Ashley begins dating a boy her mother hates. When the relationship turns sour, he assaults her. Still reeling from the rape, which she keeps secret from her family, Ashley desperately searches for meaning in the chaos. Then, her grandmother reveals the truth about her father’s incarceration . . . and Ashley’s entire world is turned upside down. Somebody’s Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor, Black girl in Indiana with a family fragmented by incarceration, exploring how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she embarks on a powerful journey to find the threads between who she is and what she was born into, and the complicated familial love that often binds them.
  • Votes: 2

    Eye of the Portal

    by J.A. Whelan

  • Votes: 2

    Dear Cancer, F.U.

    by Celeste Reynolds

  • Votes: 2

    The Many Personalities of Me

    by Miss Yael Gottesman

  • Votes: 1

    Falling

    by T. J. Newman

  • Votes: 1

    PRODUCE POETRY OR DIE.

    by Narada Voux Sanders

  • Votes: 1

    Micahel's Wing

    by Sakari Lacross

  • Votes: 1

    The Grimy & the Greedy

    by Meaghan Curley

  • Votes: 1

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut

  • Votes: 1

    Young Again

    by Gretchen Johnson

  • Votes: 1

    The Spirit of a Rising Sun

    by K. R. Galindez

  • Votes: 1

    No Child of Mine

    by Olga Gibbs

  • Votes: 1

    UNYIELDING FLAME

    by Sabrina Oyinloye

  • Votes: 1

    Randall Krzak

  • Votes: 1

    Dancing on the Edge of Moonlight

    by Leandra Simone

  • Votes: 1

    Crucible of Fear

    by D.W. Whitlock

  • Votes: 1

    Tales From the Apocalypse

    by Greg Kendall

  • Votes: 1

    I Am Not Who You Think I Am

    by Eric Rickstad

  • Votes: 1

    The adventures of brotherhood

    by James Ray II

  • Votes: 1

    The Lost History of the Capitol

    by Edward P. Moser

  • Votes: 1

    The Recurring Mortality of Declan Darby

    by Chris Cavanagh

  • Votes: 1

    Chaos Reigns

    by Jarryd Smith

  • Votes: 1

    The Dark Side of Glory

    by Raven Kamali

  • Votes: 1

    Demons Behind Doors

    by Viola Ramkissoon

    There are certain doors one must not open if they desire to be free from the oppression of evil spirits. Demons Behind Doors identifies and discusses these doors, reveals the nature, intentions and strategies of evil spirits, shows how these entities cause spiritual, mental and physical harm to their victims and explains how a person can become and remain free from all curses and the oppression of all evil spirits. In this book you will: * Learn all about evil spirits so you can stay protected from them and win in a fight against them. Their intentions, abilities and strategies will be explained. * Find out the lies of Satan, his hosts and other evil spirits and learn all the ways in which human beings allow themselves to become oppressed and possessed by these insidious beings. * Be able to tell if demons are responsible for a person's suffering or not. * Know how to effectively deliver yourself and your loved ones from demons, spiritually cleanse your property and remain free from all forms of spiritual oppression (demonic possession, demonic interference, evil spirits in the property or land, witchcraft and curses). Prayers are included.
  • Votes: 1

    Time and Again

    by Jack Finney

  • Votes: 1

    Dead Girls Don't Lie

    by Jennifer Shaw Wolf

  • Votes: 1

    Connor's Gambit

    by Z Gottlieb

    Want to be a better writer? Perfect your process. For example, do you fear the blank page? You may be skipping the essential early phases of writing. Do you generate swarms of ideas but never publish anything? You need strategies to focus and persist to the finish. When you learn to work with your brain instead of against it, you'll get more done and have more fun. Master the inner game of writing The Writer's Process combines proven practices of successful authors with cognitive science research about how our minds work. You'll learn: How to invite creativity and flow into the writing process Why separating the writing process into different steps makes you more productive How to overcome writer's block, negative feedback, and distractions How to make time for writing in a busy, interrupt-driven lifeIt's filled with ideas that you can put into practice immediately. The Writer's Process is a 2017 Readers' Favorite Gold Medal Winner and a Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Silver Award winner.
  • Votes: 1

    The Visionary

    by J.C. Gemmell

    At the beginning of February 2060, Mount Erebus erupted, the first of a chain of Antarctic volcanoes that forever changed Earth’s future. Within days, sea levels began to rise, until sixty metres of water claimed coastlines worldwide. Twelve-year-old Xin-yi and her mother fled their home, surviving amongst a community of rice farmers. A year later, a chance conversation with international census officials prepared her for a new life. Now fourteen, Xin-yi commences her training as a visionary. It is her task to imagine a new Earth, rising above the drowning waters. Thousands of young people strive to design a world in which the displaced millions can live, and engineer a solution that will take a millennium to populate. But Xin-yi’s challenges are more personal: coming to terms with the loss of her brother and unexpected feelings toward a friend. She has to choose between working to benefit humanity and her internal conflict with love. Set over three decades after the 2060 flood, The Visionary combines dystopian, future and science fiction, and introduces J.C. Gemmell’s Tion series.
  • Votes: 1

    Time After Time

    by Mary Margaret

  • Votes: 1

    The Story About a Croatian Detective

    by Diana M.

  • Votes: 1

    Trusting the Currents

    by Lynnda Pollio

  • Votes: 1

    Somebody's Watching You

    by Robin D'Amato

  • Votes: 1

    Summer of '77

    by Robert Fear

  • Votes: 1

    wrōtèvthé. (the art of rhyme.)

    by Narada Voux Sanders

  • Votes: 1

    The Haunted Cabin And The Vampire Masquerade and Unforgettable Birthday Short Stories

    by Amy E Stark

  • Votes: 1

    The OMFG

    by Jules Counts

  • Votes: 1

    Tionsphere

    by J.C. Gemmell

  • Votes: 1

    Overcomer

    by Victor J Clark

  • Votes: 1

    Eve

    by Wm. Paul Young

  • Votes: 1

    Blood Bank

    by Cassie Alford

  • Votes: 1

    The Shadow

    by James Patterson

  • Votes: 1

    The Signs Are Coming

    by Neil A. King

  • Votes: 1

    The Empress of Fay

    by E. E. Snead

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Miriam

    by Louis Zambrana

    The concept of resistance has always been central to the reception of Hegel's philosophy. The prevalent image of Hegel's system, which continues to influence the scholarship to this day, is that of an absolutist, monist metaphysics which overcomes all resistance, sublating or assimilating all differences into a single organic 'Whole'. For that reason, the reception of Hegel has always been marked by the question of how to resist Hegel: how to think that which remains outside of or other to the totalizing system of dialectics. In recent years the work of scholars such as Catherine Malabou, Slavoj Žižek, Rebecca Comay and Frank Ruda has brought considerable nuance to this debate. A new reading of Hegel has emerged which challenges the idea that there is no place for difference, otherness or resistance in Hegel, both by refusing to reduce Hegel's complex philosophy to a straightforward systematic narrative and by highlighting particular moments within Hegel's philosophy which seem to counteract the traditional understanding of dialectics. This book brings together established and new voices in this field in order to show that the notion of resistance is central to this revaluation of Hegel.
  • Votes: 1

    Try It! You Might Like It

    by Mrs. Lindsey Brooker

  • Votes: 1

    The Sister

    by Louise Jensen

  • Votes: 1

    The Resurrectionist

    by Michael Gesellchen

  • Votes: 1

    On the Edge (The Grange Complex)

    by Joanna Mazurkiewicz

  • Votes: 1

    What's a Girl to Do?

    by Janet Folger

  • Votes: 1

    Muppy and Mindy

    by Helen Turgeot

  • Votes: 1

    The Invisible Library (The Invisible Library Novel Book 1)

    by Genevieve Cogman

  • Votes: 1

    Blood Bonds

    by Maia Graves

  • Votes: 1

    Masquerade in Chaos

    by M J Hutto

  • Votes: 1

    ONE HAND ON THE SINK

    by Ken McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Earthlings

    by Sayaka Murata

  • Votes: 1

    My Little Black Distress

    by Simon Warwick Beresford

  • Votes: 1

    The Spy House

    by M.F. Kelleher

  • Votes: 1

    Heartthrob

    by Estalyn

  • Votes: 1

    THEM AGAINST US

    by TIETEANNA M. STEELE-RODDY

  • Votes: 1

    A Lie Don't Care

    by JC Anderson

  • Votes: 1

    Oceana the Futa Mermaid (Alpha Futas of the Sea Book 1)

    by Liliah Raye

  • Votes: 1

    The Depths

    by Jonathan Rottenberg

    Nearly every depressed person is assured by doctors, well-meaning friends and family, the media, and ubiquitous advertisements that the underlying problem is a chemical imbalance. Such a simple defect should be fixable, yet despite all of the resources that have been devoted to finding a pharmacological solution, depression remains stubbornly widespread. Why are we losing this fight? In this humane and illuminating challenge to defect models of depression, psychologist Jonathan Rottenberg argues that depression is a particularly severe outgrowth of our natural capacity for emotion. In other words, it is a low mood gone haywire. Drawing on recent developments in the science of mood-and his own harrowing depressive experience as a young adult-Rottenberg explains depression in evolutionary terms, showing how its dark pull arises from adaptations that evolved to help our ancestors ensure their survival. Moods, high and low, evolved to compel us to more efficiently pursue rewards. While this worked for our ancestors, our modern environment-in which daily survival is no longer a sole focus-makes it all too easy for low mood to slide into severe, long-lasting depression. Weaving together experimental and epidemiological research, clinical observations, and the voices of individuals who have struggled with depression, The Depths offers a bold new account of why depression endures-and makes a strong case for de-stigmatizing this increasingly common condition. In so doing, Rottenberg offers hope in the form of his own and other patients' recovery, and points the way towards new paths for treatment.