Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 101

    Let My People Go Surfing

    by Yvon Chouinard

    As a child, Yvon Chouinard moved to Southern California with little English and less money. Today his company, Patagonia, earns more than $600 million a year and is a beacon and benchmark for sustainable capitalism. This is the amazing story of a young man who found escape by scaling the world's highest peaks, of an innovator who used his father's blacksmith tools to fashion equipment that changed climbing forever, and of the entrepreneur who brought doing good and having a blast into the heart of a business.
  • Votes: 42

    The Fish That Ate the Whale

    by Rich Cohen

    The author of Sweet and Low presents a historical profile of Samuel Zemurray that traces his rise from a penniless youth to one of the world's wealthiest and most powerful men, offering insight into his capitalist talents and the ways in which his life reflected the best and worst of American business dealings.
  • Votes: 24

    Creativity, Inc.

    by Ed Catmull

  • Votes: 22

    Junk to Gold

    by Willis Johnson

    Junk to Gold is about one man's journey from humble beginnings to unimaginable success. Willis Johnson, the founder of Copart [CPRT], offers up a personal and inspirational account of this journey to the top including lessons he learned from love, war and building a global, multi-billion dollar business. Even at the pinnacle of success, Willis remained grounded in his family-first values. His stories will inspire and provoke the entrepreneur in everyone to start building their dream.
  • Votes: 21

    Hidden Champions

    by Hermann Simon

  • Votes: 20

    The Intel Trinity

    by Michael S. Malone

    The definitive history of the Intel Corporation—the essential company of the digital age—told through the lives of its three preeminent figures: Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Intel has often been hailed as the most important company in the world, and with good reason: While technology companies come and go, Intel remains, more than four decades after its inception, a defining company of the global digital economy. The legendary inventor of the microprocessor—the single most significant product in the modern world—Intel today builds the tiny "engines" that power almost every intelligent electronic device on the planet. But the true story of Intel is the human story of the three geniuses behind it. In The Intel Trinity, Michael S. Malone takes an unflinching look at the strengths and weaknesses each member of the trio has brought to Intel, and how, without the perfect balance, the company would never have reached its current level of success. Robert Noyce, the most respected high- tech figure of his generation, brought credibility (and money) to the company's founding; Gordon Moore made Intel the world's technological leader; and Andy Grove relentlessly drove the company to ever-higher levels of success and competitiveness. Without any one of these figures, Intel would never have achieved its historic success; with them, Intel made possible the personal computer, the Internet, telecommunications, and the personal electronics revolution. Based on unprecedented access to corporate archives, The Intel Trinity reveals the fascinating stories behind the company's ubiquitous products and the unique business practices—including a willingness to commit to new ideas, an initiative to make bold investments in lean times, and a devotion to upholding Gordon Moore's namesake law—that led Intel to consistent success unheard of elsewhere in the tech world. The Intel Trinity is not just the story of Intel's legendary past; it is also an analysis of the formidable challenges that lie ahead as the company struggles to maintain its dominance, its culture, and its legacy.
  • Votes: 19

    Private Empire

    by Steve Coll

    Steve Coll's Private Empire is winner of the FT/GOLDMAN SACHS BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2012. In this prize-winning book, the author of Ghost Wars and The Bin Ladens investigates the notoriously mysterious ExxonMobil Corporation and the secrets of the oil industry In many of the nations where it operates, ExxonMobil has a greater sway than that of the US embassy, its annual revenues are larger than the total economic activity in most countries and in Washington it spends more on lobbying than any other corporation. Yet despite its outsized influence, it is to outsiders a black box. Private Empire begins with the Exxon Valdez accident in 1989 and closes with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Steve Coll's narrative spans the globe, taking readers to Moscow, impoverished African capitals, Indonesia and elsewhere as ExxonMobil carries out its activities against a backdrop of blackmail threats, kidnapping, civil wars, and high-stakes struggles at the Kremlin. In the US, Coll goes inside ExxonMobil's ruthless Washington lobbying offices and its corporate headquarters in Irving, Texas, where top executives oversee a bizarre corporate culture of discipline and secrecy. Private Empire is the masterful result of Steve Coll's indefatigable reporting, from the halls of Congress to the oil-laden swamps of the Niger Delta; previously classified U.S. documents; heretofore unexamined court records; and many other sources.
  • Votes: 19

    The First Tycoon

    by T.J. Stiles

    NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD In this groundbreaking biography, T.J. Stiles tells the dramatic story of Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt, the combative man and American icon who, through his genius and force of will, did more than perhaps any other individual to create modern capitalism. Meticulously researched and elegantly written, The First Tycoon describes an improbable life, from Vanderbilt’s humble birth during the presidency of George Washington to his death as one of the richest men in American history. In between we see how the Commodore helped to launch the transportation revolution, propel the Gold Rush, reshape Manhattan, and invent the modern corporation. Epic in its scope and success, the life of Vanderbilt is also the story of the rise of America itself.
  • Votes: 18

    The House of Rothschild

    by Niall Ferguson

    From the bestselling author of The Ascent of Money and The Square and the Tower In his rich and nuanced portrait of the remarkable, elusive Rothschild family, Oxford scholar and bestselling author Niall Ferguson uncovers the secrets behind the family's phenomenal economic success. He reveals for the first time the details of the family's vast political network, which gave it access to and influence over many of the greatest statesmen of the age. And he tells a family saga, tracing the importance of unity and the profound role of Judaism in the lives of a dynasty that rose from the confines of the Frankfurt ghetto and later used its influence to assist oppressed Jews throughout Europe. A definitive work of impeccable scholarship with a thoroughly engaging narrative, The House of Rothschild is a biography of the rarest kind, in which mysterious and fascinating historical figures finally spring to life.
  • Votes: 18

    Atlas Shrugged

    by Ayn Rand

    The decisions of a few industrial leaders shake the roots of capitalism and reawaken one man's awareness of himself as an heroic being. Reissue.
  • Votes: 15

    Sons of Wichita

  • Votes: 15

    Barbarians at the Gate

    by Bryan Burrough

  • Votes: 12

    Den of Thieves

    by James B. Stewart

    A #1 bestseller from coast to coast, Den of Thieves tells the full story of the insider-trading scandal that nearly destroyed Wall Street, the men who pulled it off, and the chase that finally brought them to justice. Pulitzer Prize–winner James B. Stewart shows for the first time how four of the eighties’ biggest names on Wall Street—Michael Milken, Ivan Boesky, Martin Siegel, and Dennis Levine —created the greatest insider-trading ring in financial history and almost walked away with billions, until a team of downtrodden detectives triumphed over some of America’s most expensive lawyers to bring this powerful quartet to justice. Based on secret grand jury transcripts, interviews, and actual trading records, and containing explosive new revelations about Michael Milken and Ivan Boesky written especially for this paperback edition, Den of Thieves weaves all the facts into an unforgettable narrative—a portrait of human nature, big business, and crime of unparalleled proportions.
  • Votes: 12

    Cable Cowboy

    by Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.
  • Votes: 11

    Dethroning the King

    by Julie MacIntosh

    How the King of Beers collapsed without a fight and what it means for America's place in the post-Recession world How did InBev, a Belgian company controlled by Brazilians, take over one of America's most beloved brands with scarcely a whimper of opposition? Chalk it up to perfect timing—and some unexpected help from powerful members of the Busch dynasty, the very family that had run the company for more than a century. In Dethroning the King, Julie MacIntosh, the award-winning financial journalist who led coverage of the takeover for the Financial Times, details how the drama that unfolded at Anheuser-Busch in 2008 went largely unreported as the world tumbled into a global economic crisis second only to the Great Depression. Today, as the dust settles, questions are being asked about how the "King of Beers" was so easily captured by a foreign corporation, and whether the company's fall mirrors America's dwindling financial and political dominance as a nation. Discusses how the takeover of Anheuser-Busch will be seen as a defining moment in U.S. business history Reveals the critical missteps taken by the Busch family and the Anheuser-Busch board Argues that Anheuser-Busch had a chance to save itself from InBev's clutches, but infighting and dysfunctionality behind the scenes forced it to capitulate From America's heartland to the European continent to Brazil, Dethroning the King is the ultimate corporate caper and a fascinating case study that's both wide reaching and profound.
  • Votes: 11

    The Box

    by Marc Levinson

    In April 1956, a refitted oil tanker carried fifty-eight shipping containers from Newark to Houston. From that modest beginning, container shipping developed into a huge industry that made the boom in global trade possible. The Box tells the dramatic story of the container's creation, the decade of struggle before it was widely adopted, and the sweeping economic consequences of the sharp fall in transportation costs that containerization brought about. But the container didn't just happen. Its adoption required huge sums of money, both from private investors and from ports that aspired to be on the leading edge of a new technology. It required years of high-stakes bargaining with two of the titans of organized labor, Harry Bridges and Teddy Gleason, as well as delicate negotiations on standards that made it possible for almost any container to travel on any truck or train or ship. Ultimately, it took McLean's success in supplying U.S. forces in Vietnam to persuade the world of the container's potential. Drawing on previously neglected sources, economist Marc Levinson shows how the container transformed economic geography, devastating traditional ports such as New York and London and fueling the growth of previously obscure ones, such as Oakland. By making shipping so cheap that industry could locate factories far from its customers, the container paved the way for Asia to become the world's workshop and brought consumers a previously unimaginable variety of low-cost products from around the globe. Published in hardcover on the fiftieth anniversary of the first container voyage, this is the first comprehensive history of the shipping container. Now with a new chapter, The Box tells the dramatic story of how the drive and imagination of an iconoclastic entrepreneur turned containerization from an impractical idea into a phenomenon that transformed economic geography, slashed transportation costs, and made the boom in global trade possible.
  • Votes: 7

    A Rare Breed

    by Daniel S. Levine

    BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., named by Forbes magazine as one of the world¿s ten most innovative companies, is a world leader in developing therapies to treat rare orphan genetic diseases. A Rare Breed recounts the first 20 years of its history, the struggles it faced in developing drugs for diseases that represented markets most pharmaceutical companies saw as too small to pursue, and how it grew into a global enterprise valued at more than $16 billion. It follows the researchers, patients, and executives who played a role in taking novel ideas forward and how they overcame scientific, regulatory, and financial challenges to bring breakthrough therapies to children who needed them.
  • Votes: 7

    Going Down Tobacco Road

    by Gene Hoots

  • Votes: 7

    The House of Morgan

    by Ron Chernow

  • Votes: 6

    The Innovation Stack

    by Jim McKelvey

    From the cofounder of Square, an inspiring and entertaining account of what it means to be a true entrepreneur and what it takes to build a resilient, world-changing company In 2009, a St. Louis glassblowing artist and recovering computer scientist named Jim McKelvey lost a sale because he couldn't accept American Express cards. Frustrated by the high costs and difficulty of accepting credit card payments, McKelvey joined his friend Jack Dorsey (the cofounder of Twitter) to launch Square, a startup that would enable small merchants to accept credit card payments on their mobile phones. With no expertise or experience in the world of payments, they approached the problem of credit cards with a new perspective, questioning the industry's assumptions, experimenting and innovating their way through early challenges, and achieving widespread adoption from merchants small and large. But just as Square was taking off, Amazon launched a similar product, marketed it aggressively, and undercut Square on price. For most ordinary startups, this would have spelled the end. Instead, less than a year later, Amazon was in retreat and soon discontinued its service. How did Square beat the most dangerous company on the planet? Was it just luck? These questions motivated McKelvey to study what Square had done differently from all the other companies Amazon had killed. He eventually found the key: a strategy he calls the Innovation Stack. McKelvey's fascinating and humorous stories of Square's early days are blended with historical examples of other world-changing companies built on the Innovation Stack to reveal a pattern of ground-breaking, competition-proof entrepreneurship that is rare but repeatable. The Innovation Stack is a thrilling business narrative that's much bigger than the story of Square. It is an irreverent first-person look inside the world of entrepreneurship, and a call to action for all of us to find the entrepreneur within ourselves and identify and fix unsolved problems--one crazy idea at a time.
  • Votes: 6

    Plain Talk

    by Ken Iverson

    A renowned business leader who remains CEO of the steel industry giant he created shares his ideas and observations on how to grow a world-class organization and the principles behind his very successful management style.
  • Votes: 5

    Fordlandia

    by Greg Grandin

  • Votes: 5

    The Prize

    by Daniel Yergin

    The Prize recounts the panoramic history of oil -- and the struggle for wealth power that has always surrounded oil. This struggle has shaken the world economy, dictated the outcome of wars, and transformed the destiny of men and nations. The Prize is as much a history of the twentieth century as of the oil industry itself. The canvas of this history is enormous -- from the drilling of the first well in Pennsylvania through two great world wars to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and Operation Desert Storm. The cast extends from wildcatters and rogues to oil tycoons, and from Winston Churchill and Ibn Saud to George Bush and Saddam Hussein. The definitive work on the subject of oil and a major contribution to understanding our century, The Prize is a book of extraordinary breadth, riveting excitement -- and great importance.
  • Votes: 5

    American Icon

    by Bryce G. Hoffman

  • Votes: 4

    Scores

    by Michael D. Blutrich

    A gay man who created New York's most notorious den of heterosexuality . . . an anxious, anything-but-hardboiled lawyer who became one of the most successful undercover mob informants in history. . . . In this hilarious and fascinating account, Michael Blutrich takes you inside star-studded 1990s New York, mafia sit-downs, and the witness protection program. Meet Michael D. Blutrich, founder of Scores, the hottest strip club in New York history. A resourceful lawyer at one of the city's most respected firms, Blutrich fell into the skin trade almost by accident, but it was his legal savvy that made Scores the first club in Manhattan to feature lap dances and enabled him to neatly sidestep a law requiring dancers to wear pasties by instead covering their nipples with latex paint. Soon Scores, the club Howard Stern called "like being in a candy shop," was a home away from home for everyone from sports superstars and Oscar-winning actors to pop singers and political notables alike. The catch? The club was smack dab in John Gotti's territory, and the mafia wanted a piece of the action. The Gambino family doesn't take no for an answer . . . and neither, as it turns out, does the FBI. In his memoir, Blutrich recounts in detail how his beloved club became a hub for the mafia, and how he found himself caught up in an FBI investigation, sorely struggling to juggle roles of business owner and undercover spy. As his life spiraled out of control, Blutrich would face the loss of almost everything dear to him. But whether marching a line of topless strippers as human exhibits into a trial to save the club's liquor license or wearing wires to meetings with armed gangsters, he never lost his sense of humor or his nerve. In Scores, Blutrich finally tells all—from triumph to betrayal—in his own funny, self-deprecating voice.
  • Votes: 4

    Where the Suckers Moon

    by Randall Rothenberg

    The former advertising columnist for the New York Times provides a close-up look at the advertising industry, following Subaru of America as the company selects a new ad agency and tracing the history of American advertising. 25,000 first printing. Tour.
  • Votes: 4

    The Anarchy

    by William Dalrymple

    From the bestselling author of Return of a King, the story of how the East India Company took over large swaths of Asia, and the devastating results of the corporation running a country. In August 1765, the East India Company defeated the young Mughal emperor and set up, in his place, a government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a private army. The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional company and became something much more unusual: an international corporation transformed into an aggressive colonial power. Over the course of the next 47 years, the company's reach grew until almost all of India south of Delhi was effectively ruled from a boardroom in the city of London. The Anarchy tells one of history's most remarkable stories: how the Mughal Empire-which dominated world trade and manufacturing and possessed almost unlimited resources-fell apart and was replaced by a multinational corporation based thousands of miles overseas, and answerable to shareholders, most of whom had never even seen India and no idea about the country whose wealth was providing their dividends. Using previously untapped sources, Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before and provides a portrait of the devastating results from the abuse of corporate power.
  • Votes: 4

    The First Conglomerate

    by D. C. Bissell

    Japanese Fashion examines the entire sweep of Japanese clothing history, from the sophisticated fashion systems of late-Edo period kimonos to the present day, providing possible theories of how Japan made this fashion journey and linking current theories of fashion to the Japanese example. The book is unique in that it provides the first full history of the last 200 years of Japanese clothing. It is also the first book to include Asian fashion as part of global fashion as well as fashion theory. It adds a hitherto absent continuity to the understanding of historical and current fashion in Japan, and is pioneering in offering possible theories to account for that entire history. By providing an analysis of how that entire history changes our understanding of the way fashion works, this book will be an essential text for all students of fashion and design.
  • Votes: 4

    My Father's Business

    by Cal Turner Jr.

  • Votes: 4

    The Gambler

    by William C. Rempel

  • Votes: 4

    The Man Who Made It Snow

    by Max Mermelstein

    A personal account of the Medellin cocaine cartel and its U.S. operations is offered by an American insider who, from 1978 to 1985, was the Columbian cartel's "Miami connection"
  • Votes: 4

    Zero to One

    by Peter A. Thiel

    The billionaire Silicon Valley entrepreneur behind such companies as PayPal and Facebook outlines an innovative theory and formula for building the companies of the future by creating and monopolizing new markets instead of competing in old ones. 200,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 4

    The Goodyear Story

    by Richard Korman

    Richard Korman has written a fascinating biography of an inventor, Charles Goodyear, harnessing a new technology that also provides a panoramic view of America at the onset of its industrial revolution. Drawing on newly discovered archival records, Korman tells a suspenseful story of scientific experimentation and legal struggle in creating a portrait of an eminent American whose eccentricity anticipates the trials of new economy pioneers of today.
  • Votes: 4

    Made in Japan

    by Victionary

    For many, Made in Japan is synonymous with quality the perfect marriage of aesthetic appeal and functionality. The intentions of the designer can be found in the slightest detail, but none are overworked, preferring spare elegance to busy excess. Mixing traditional art and philosophy with contemporary design to create a material and visual culture that blends seamlessly into their lives at home. With this strong national identity and focus on design, it is no wonder their creative output is admired and imitated throughout the world. Made in Japan highlights more than 40 creatives from different fields who exemplify this design character through their work in graphic design and branding, illustration, packaging, fashion, product and spatial design.
  • Votes: 4

    Setting the Table

    by Danny Meyer

    A landmark, bestselling business book and a fascinating behind-the-scenes history of the creation of Danny's most famous eating establishments, Setting the Table is a treasure trove of valuable, innovative insights applicable to any business or organization.
  • Votes: 4

    Hard Drive

    by James Wallace

    Chronicles the career of "Chairman Bill" Gates, the computer whiz kid who commands the powerful Microsoft computer software empire.
  • Votes: 3

    Inside Money

    by Zachary Karabell

    A sweeping history of the legendary private investment firm Brown Brothers Harriman, exploring its central role in the story of American wealth and its rise to global power. Conspiracy theories have always swirled around Brown Brothers Harriman, and not without reason. Throughout the 19th century, when America was convulsed by a devastating financial panic essentially every twenty years, Brown Brothers quietly went from strength to strength, propping up the US financial system at crucial moments and catalyzing successive booms, from the cotton trade and the steam ship to the railroad, while managing to avoid unwelcome attention that plagued some of its competitors. By the turn of the 20th century, Brown Brothers was unquestionably at the heart of what was meant by an American Establishment. As America's reach extended beyond its shores, Brown Brothers worked hand in glove with the State Department, notably in Nicaragua in the early 20th century, where the firm essentially took over the country's economy. To the Brown family, the virtue of their dealings was a given; their form of muscular Protestantism, forged on the playing fields of Groton and Yale, was the acme of civilization, and it was their duty to import that civilization to the world. When, during the Great Depression, Brown Brothers ensured their strength by merging with Averell Harriman's investment bank to form Brown Brothers Harriman, the die was cast for the role the firm would play on the global stage during World War 2 and thereafter. The core leadership cadre, including Robert Lovett, Harriman, and Prescott Bush, were all Skull and Bones men from Yale, which is to say they accepted it as their birthright to lead. The architecture of the postwar global economy, like the architecture of the Nicaraguan economy in a previous era, was erected according to the assumptions of Brown Brothers Harriman when it came to American power. In Inside Money, acclaimed historian, commentator and long-time investor Zachary Karabell offers the first full and frank look inside this institution against the backdrop of American history. Blessed with complete access to the company's archives, as well as a thrilling understanding of the larger forces at play, Karabell has created an x-ray of American power -- financial, political, cultural - as its evolved from 1818 to the present. Unlike so many of its competitors, Brown Brothers Harriman remains to this day a private partnership, quietly forgoing the heady speculative upsides of the past 30 years but also avoiding any role in the devastating downsides. From their founding at the dawn of the 19th century to their current incarnation in the early 21st, the firm and its partners understood the need to be prepared for the worst and ready to seize the opportunities that a changing world presents, skills never more imperative than in our pandemic age. They embraced capitalism and gain, but they also shunned its excesses. Brown Brothers is no longer in the command capsule of the American economy, but in many respects, arguably, that is to its credit. If its partners cleaved to any one adage over the generations, it is that a relentless pursuit of more can destroy more than it creates.
  • Votes: 3

    The Big Score

    by Michael S. Malone

    Harrison Allen and Bahari Johnson have loved each other since they were kids. They both get accepted into Duke University, their plan was to marry shortly after college, but Harrison enters into the NBA draft after a year at Duke, leaving Bahari behind. While playing in the NBA Harrison meets Chutney, a struggling model. Will Harrison fall for the beautiful Chutney or will his love for Bahari keep him faithful? Or will Chutney take the lead in this love triangle? This book is a fictional tale of betrayal, lust, the loss of innocence and young love.
  • Votes: 3

    The Man Who Solved the Market

    by Gregory Zuckerman

    Jim Simons is the greatest moneymaker in modern financial history. His record bests those of legendary investors, including Warren Buffett, George Soros and Ray Dalio. Yet Simons and his strategies are shrouded in mystery. The financial industry has long craved a look inside Simons's secretive hedge fund, Renaissance Technologies and veteran Wall Street Journal reporter Gregory Zuckerman delivers the goods. After a legendary career as a mathematician and a stint breaking Soviet codes, Simons set out to conquer financial markets with a radical approach. Simons hired physicists, mathematicians and computer scientists - most of whom knew little about finance - to amass piles of data and build algorithms hunting for the deeply hidden patterns in global markets. Experts scoffed, but Simons and his colleagues became some of the richest in the world, their strategy of creating mathematical models and crunching data embraced by almost every industry. Simons and his team used their wealth to upend the worlds of politics, philanthropy and science. They weren't prepared for the backlash. In this fast-paced narrative, Zuckerman examines how Simons launched a quantitative revolution on Wall Street, and reveals the impact that Simons, the quiet billionaire king of the quants, has had on worlds well beyond finance.
  • Votes: 3

    Eboys

    by Randall E. Stross

    Looking carefully at these "icons" of the 1990s, the author uses his unprecedented access to the venture capitalists behind Benchmark to reveal the surprising world behind the ultimate investment gamble.
  • Votes: 3

    Quench Your Own Thirst

    by Jim Koch

    Founder of The Boston Beer Company, brewer of Samuel Adams Boston Lager, and a key catalyst of the American craft beer revolution, Jim Koch offers his unique perspective when it comes to business, beer, and turning your passion into a successful company or career. In 1984, it looked like an unwinnable David and Goliath struggle: one guy against the mammoth American beer industry. When others scoffed at Jim Koch’s plan to leave his consulting job and start a brewery that would challenge American palates, he chose a nineteenth-century family recipe and launched Samuel Adams. Now one of America’s leading craft breweries, Samuel Adams has redefined the way Americans think about beer and helped spur a craft beer revolution. In Quench Your Own Thirst, Koch offers unprecedented insights into the whirlwind ride from scrappy start-up to thriving public company. His innovative business model and refreshingly frank stories offer counterintuitive lessons that you can apply to business and to life. Koch covers everything from finding your own Yoda to his theory on how a piece of string can teach you the most important lesson you’ll ever learn about business. He also has surprising advice on sales, marketing, hiring, and company culture. Koch’s anecdotes, quirky musings, and bits of wisdom go far beyond brewing. A fun, engaging guide for building a career or launching a successful business based on your passions, Quench Your Own Thirst is the key to the ultimate dream: being successful while doing what you love.
  • Votes: 3

    The Grey Seas Under

    by Farley Mowat

    The author of Never Cry Wolf chronicles eighteen years in the life of Foundation Franklin, a sea-going tugboat involved in dozens of rescues at sea between 1930 and 1948. Reprint.
  • Votes: 3

    Losing My Virginity

    by Richard Branson

  • Votes: 3

    King of Capital

    by David Carey

    Strippers and Flippers . . . or a New Positive Force Helping to Drive the Economy . . . The untold story of Steve Schwarzman and Blackstone, the financier and his financial powerhouse that avoided the self-destructive tendencies of Wall Street. David Carey and John Morris show how Blackstone (and other private equity firms) transformed themselves from gamblers, hostile-takeover artists, and ‘barbarians at the gate’ into disciplined, risk-conscious investors. The financial establishment—banks and investment bankers such as Citigroup, Bear Stearns, Lehman, UBS, Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley—were the cowboys, recklessly assuming risks, leveraging up to astronomical levels and driving the economy to the brink of disaster. Blackstone is now ready to break out once again since it is sitting on billions of dollars that can be invested at a time when the market is starved for capital. The story of a financial revolution—the greatest untold success story on Wall Street:Not only have Blackstone and a small coterie of competitors wrested control of corporations around the globe, but they have emerged as a major force on Wall Street, challenging the likes of Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley for dominance. Great human interest story:How Blackstone went from two guys and a secretary to being one of Wall Street’s most powerful institutions, far outgrowing its much older rival KKR; and how Steve Schwarzman, with a pay packet one year of $398 million and $684 million from the Blackstone IPO, came to epitomize the spectacular new financial fortunes amassed in the 2000s. Controversial:Analyzes the controversies surrounding Blackstone and whether it and other private equity firms suck the lifeblood out of companies to enrich themselves—or whether they are a force that helps make the companies they own stronger and thereby better competitors. The story by two insiders with access:Insightful and hard-hitting, filled with never-before-revealed details about the workings of a heretofore secretive company that was the personal fiefdom of Schwarzman and Peter Peterson. Forward-looking:How Blackstone and private equity will drive the economy and provide a model for how financing will work. From the Hardcover edition.
  • Votes: 3

    Fooling Some of the People All of the Time

    by David Einhorn

    A revealing look at Wall Street, the financial media, and financial regulators by David Einhorn, the President of Greenlight Capital Could 2008's credit crisis have been minimized or even avoided? In 2002, David Einhorn-one of the country's top investors-was asked at a charity investment conference to share his best investment advice. Short sell Allied Capital. At the time, Allied was a leader in the private financing industry. Einhorn claimed Allied was using questionable accounting practices to prop itself up. Sound familiar? At the time of the original version of Fooling Some of the People All of the Time: A Long Short Story the outcome of his advice was unknown. Now, the story is complete and we know Einhorn was right. In 2008, Einhorn advised the same conference to short sell Lehman Brothers. And had the market been more open to his warnings, yes, the market meltdown might have been avoided, or at least minimized. Details the gripping battle between Allied Capital and Einhorn's Greenlight Capital Illuminates how questionable company practices are maintained and, at times, even protected by Wall Street Describes the failings of investment banks, analysts, journalists, and government regulators Describes how many parts of the Allied Capital story were replayed in the debate over Lehman Brothers Fooling Some of the People All of the Time is an important call for effective government regulation, free speech, and fair play.
  • Votes: 3

    CLIMATE WARMING, WATER RESOURCES AND GEOPOLITICAL CONFLICT

    by S. Lonergan

    This book takes a firm grip on the question of climate change, sets it in perspective and makes positive recommendations for the way ahead for the world community.
  • Votes: 3

    The Chocolate War

    by Robert Cormier

    A high-school freshman who refuses to participate in the annual fund-raising chocolate sale is forced to defend his convictions.
  • Votes: 3

    How the Internet Happened

    by Brian McCullough

    The internet was never intended for you, opines Brian McCullough in this lively narrative of an era that utterly transformed everything we thought we knew about technology. In How the Internet Happened, he chronicles the whole fascinating story for the first time, beginning in a dusty Illinois basement in 1993, when a group of college kids set off a once-in-an-epoch revolution with what would become the first "dotcom." Depicting the lives of now-famous innovators like Netscape's Marc Andreessen and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, McCullough also reveals surprising quirks and unknown tales as he tracks both the technology and the culture around the internet's rise. Cinematic in detail and unprecedented in scope, the result both enlightens and informs as it draws back the curtain on the new rhythm of disruption and innovation the internet fostered, and helps to redefine an era that changed every part of our lives.
  • Votes: 3

    Accidental Empires

    by Robert X. Cringely

    Computer manufacturing is--after cars, energy production and illegal drugs--the largest industry in the world, and it's one of the last great success stories in American business. Accidental Empires is the trenchant, vastly readable history of that industry, focusing as much on the astoundingly odd personalities at its core--Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mitch Kapor, etc. and the hacker culture they spawned as it does on the remarkable technology they created. Cringely reveals the manias and foibles of these men (they are always men) with deadpan hilarity and cogently demonstrates how their neuroses have shaped the computer business. But Cringely gives us much more than high-tech voyeurism and insider gossip. From the birth of the transistor to the mid-life crisis of the computer industry, he spins a sweeping, uniquely American saga of creativity and ego that is at once uproarious, shocking and inspiring.
  • Votes: 2

    Science Lessons

    by Gordon Binder

    Under Gordon Binder's leadership, Amgen became the world's largest and most successful biotech company in the world. This text describes what it really takes to manage risk, financing, creative employees, and intellectual property on the international stage.
  • Votes: 2

    This is the correct answer (Korean Edition)

    by The

  • Votes: 2

    Private Desires, Political Action

    by Michael Laver

    Private Desires, Political Action is an accessible overview of one of the most important approaches to the study of politics in the modern world - rational choice theory. Michael Laver does not set out to review this entire field, but rather to discuss how we might use rational choice theory to analyze the political competition that affects almost every aspect of our lives. The broad-ranging scope of the book introduces the theory at many levels of analysis, including: the private desires of individuals; the social context of how people fulfil their desires; and the problems of collective action. The discussion of these problems extends into the arena of politics, where the activities of `political entrepreneurs' or
  • Votes: 2

    Merchants of Debt

    by George Anders

  • Votes: 2

    The Magnolia Story

    by Chip Gaines

    This eBook includes the full text of the book plus an exclusive additional chapter from Chip and Joanna that is not found in the hardcover! National Bestseller--New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Publisher's Weekly Also, check out Capital Gaines and No Pain, No Gaines—two projects by Chip that share his unique perspective on life and work. Are you ready to see your fixer upper? These famous words are now synonymous with the dynamic husband-and-wife team Chip and Joanna Gaines, stars of HGTV’s Fixer Upper. As this question fills the airwaves with anticipation, their legions of fans continue to multiply and ask a different series of questions, like—Who are these people? What’s the secret to their success? And is Chip actually that funny in real life? By renovating homes in Waco, Texas, and changing lives in such a winsome and engaging way, Chip and Joanna have become more than just the stars of Fixer Upper, they have become America’s new best friends. The Magnolia Story is the first book from Chip and Joanna, offering their fans a detailed look at their life together. From the very first renovation project they ever tackled together, to the project that nearly cost them everything; from the childhood memories that shaped them, to the twists and turns that led them to the life they share on the farm today. They both attended Baylor University in Waco. However, their paths did not cross until Chip checked his car into the local Firestone tire shop where Joanna worked behind the counter. Even back then Chip was a serial entrepreneur who, among other things, ran a lawn care company, sold fireworks, and flipped houses. Soon they were married and living in their first fixer upper. Four children and countless renovations later, Joanna garners the attention of a television producer who notices her work on a blog one day. In The Magnolia Story fans will finally get to join the Gaines behind the scenes and discover: The time Chip ran to the grocery store and forgot to take their new, sleeping baby Joanna’s agonizing decision to close her dream business to focus on raising their children When Chip buys a houseboat, sight-unseen, and it turns out to be a leaky wreck Joanna’s breakthrough moment of discovering the secret to creating a beautiful home Harrowing stories of the financial ups and downs as an entrepreneurial couple Memories and photos from Chip and Jo’s wedding The significance of the word magnolia and why it permeates everything they do The way the couple pays the popularity of Fixer Upper forward, sharing the success with others, and bolstering the city of Waco along the way And yet there is still one lingering question for fans of the show: Is Chip really that funny? “Oh yeah,” says Joanna. “He was, and still is, my first fixer upper.”
  • Votes: 2

    The Match King

    by Frank Partnoy

    At the height of the roaring '20s, Swedish émigré Ivar Kreuger made a fortune raising money in America and loaning it to Europe in exchange for matchstick monopolies. His enterprise was a rare success story throughout the Great Depression. Yet after his suicide in 1932, it became clear that Kreuger was not all he seemed: evidence surfaced of fudged accounting figures, off-balance-sheet accounting, even forgery. He created a raft of innovative financial products— many of them precursors to instruments wreaking havoc in today's markets. In this gripping financial biography, Frank Partnoy recasts the life story of a remarkable yet forgotten genius in ways that force us to re-think our ideas about the wisdom of crowds, the invisible hand, and the free and unfettered market.
  • Votes: 2

    One Buck at a Time

    by Macon Brock

    For over thirty years, Dollar Tree has succeeded at something the retail industry thought impossible: selling goods of surprising quality for no more than a dollar apiece, and in the process earning profits that defy common sense.In One Buck at a Time, company cofounder Macon Brock leads readers through the twisty path that saw Dollar Tree mushroom from a humble five-and-dime in Norfolk, Virginia, into one of the fastest-growing businesses in America--one that today operates more than 14,000 stores, provides jobs for 165,000 people, and is climbing the Fortune 500.During every step of its growth, Dollar Tree has had to re-prove its concept to people who can't believe its success. Not long after entering the marketplace, the company faced a crisis of conscience. In view of inflation and pressure from suppliers, how long could it stick to its one-dollar price point? Would it have to abandon its founding principle and become just another Walmart competitor?Brock devised an experiment--he acquired a mixed bag of items Dollar Tree could sell for one dollar, for two dollars, for three and five, dumped them on a desk, and asked company officials to separate them into price piles.They couldn't do it. Even Brock was surprised.One Buck at a Time is an informal history of budget retail and a how-to on doing it right. Brock credits everyone from executives to store managers and associates for their devotion to a corporate culture of value and service. And yes, he paints an entertaining picture of how Dollar Tree fulfills its mission--how it scours the globe to maintain the all-important price point while fashioning a product mix that never fails to surprise and delight.
  • Votes: 2

    Distant Force

    by George A. Roberts

    [The] CD contains articles from the Teledyne quarterly and annual reports from 1969 through 1995. These articles were written by Robert J. McVicker, Teledyne's staff writer ... They reflect Teledyne's participation in various emerging ... technologies with new products and as a resource to many government research and development programs. The articles are in PDF formatted files. A directory of all reports, which have been indexed by date, title and Teledyne company featured, is in a PDF file on this disk and also included in the Appendix of the book [p.295-303] .... To find a specific issue ..., open the directory file and click on the issue or title or Teledyne company name. - Publisher.
  • Votes: 2

    Dream Big

    by Bob Goff

  • Votes: 2

    Four Seasons

    by Isadore Sharp

    Chinese edition of FOUR SEASONS: The Story of a Business Philosophy. A memoir of the founder of the hotel The Four Seasons Hotel and Resort. Isadore Sharp built the hotel chain bsed on four fundamental principles: quality, service, culture, and brand. In Traditional Chinese. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc.
  • Votes: 2

    Americanah

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

  • Votes: 1

    An Empire of Their Own

    by Neal Gabler

    The former "Sneak Previews" co-host profiles the early Hollywood studio moguls, examining how the movies of Fox, Mayer, and the Warners, among others, came to shape American values, myths, and traditions
  • Votes: 1

    The Cigarette Century

    by Allan M. Brandt

    The invention of mass marketing led to cigarettes being emblazoned in advertising and film, deeply tied to modern notions of glamour and sex appeal. It is hard to find a photo of Humphrey Bogart or Lauren Bacall without a cigarette. No product has been so heavily promoted or has become so deeply entrenched in American consciousness. And no product has received such sustained scientific scrutiny. The development of new medical knowledge demonstrating the dire harms of smoking ultimately shaped the evolution of evidence-based medicine. In response, the tobacco industry engineered a campaign of scientific disinformation seeking to delay, disrupt, and suppress these studies. Using a massive archive of previously secret documents, historian Allan Brandt shows how the industry pioneered these campaigns, particularly using special interest lobbying and largesse to elude regulation. But even as the cultural dominance of the cigarette has waned and consumption has fallen dramatically in the U.S., Big Tobacco remains securely positioned to expand into new global markets. The implications for the future are vast: 100 million people died of smoking-related diseases in the 20th century; in the next 100 years, we expect 1 billion deaths worldwide.
  • Votes: 1

    Losing The Signal

    by Jacquie Mcnish

    Winner of the Canadian National Business Book Award 2016 Shortlisted for the FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award 2015 In 2009, BlackBerry controlled half of the US smartphone market. Today that number is less than one per cent. What went so wrong? Losing the Signal is the riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before succumbing to the ruthlessly competitive forces of Silicon Valley. This is not a conventional tale of modern business failure by fraud and greed; instead, the rise and fall of BlackBerry reveals the dangerous speed at which innovators race along the information superhighway. With unprecedented access to key players, senior executives, directors, and competitors, Losing the Signal unveils the remarkable rise of a company that started above a bagel store in a small Canadian city and went on to control half of the US smartphone market. However, at the very moment BlackBerry was ranked the world’s fastest-growing company, internal feuds and chaotic growth crippled the company as it faced its gravest test: the entry of Apple and Google into the mobile phone market. Expertly told by acclaimed journalists Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, this is an entertaining, whirlwind narrative that goes behind the scenes to reveal one of the most compelling business stories of the new century.
  • Votes: 1

    Bitter Brew

    by William Knoedelseder

    “Bitter Brew deftly chronicles the contentious succession of kings in a uniquely American dynasty. You’ll never crack open a six again without thinking of this book.” —John Sayles, Director of Eight Men Out and author of A Moment in the Sun The creators of Budweiser and Michelob beers, the Anheuser-Busch company is one of the wealthiest, most colorful and enduring family dynasties in the history of American commerce. In Bitter Brew, critically acclaimed journalist William Knoedelseder tells the riveting, often scandalous saga of the rise and fall of the dysfunctional Busch family—an epic tale of prosperity, profligacy, hubris, and the dark consequences of success that spans three centuries, from the open salvos of the Civil War to the present day.
  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Profitability

    by Adrian J. Slywotzky

    Describes the various patterns of business operation that lead to profitability through a series of conversations in which an expert on profits teaches a student.
  • Votes: 1

    Hard Landing

    by Thomas Petzinger

  • Votes: 1

    Engineering the World

    by Caleb III Pirtle

    This volume celebrates the can-do, risk-taking, creative pioneers of Texas Instruments from its inception in the 1930s as a tiny geophysical exploration company working out of the back of a truck in the oilfields of the Southwest, to its status in the world today as one of the world's leading electronics companies. From the determination of its founders--Eugene McDermott, Erik Jonsson, Cecil Green, and Pat Haggerty--to the genius of its inventors such as Nobel prizewinner Jack Kilby, TI has transformed the world in seven and a half decades. In photographs and anecdotes, the book tells TI's history of innovation in products and technologies, including the development of the first commercial silicon transistors, the first integrated circuits, and the first electronic hand-held calculators. Today, this Fortune 500 company is at the forefront of digital signal processing and analog technologies--the semiconductor engines of the Internet age. TIers are currently working on solutions for large global markets such as wireless and broadband access, and for a variety of emerging markets such as digital projection systems and digital audio. The seventy-five vignettes making up this history paint a picture of TI and its people, providing a window into a corporate culture that fosters the creativity and mental toughness to compete in the world semiconductor market. The stories, in addition, show TI's staunch sense of fiscal responsibility, civic mindedness, and high ethical standards in its business practices.
  • Votes: 1

    Skunk Works

    by Ben R. Rich

    This classic history of America's high-stakes quest to dominate the skies is "a gripping technothriller in which the technology is real" (New York Times Book Review). From the development of the U-2 to the Stealth fighter, Skunk Works is the true story of America's most secret and successful aerospace operation. As recounted by Ben Rich, the operation's brilliant boss for nearly two decades, the chronicle of Lockheed's legendary Skunk Works is a drama of cold war confrontations and Gulf War air combat, of extraordinary feats of engineering and human achievement against fantastic odds. Here are up-close portraits of the maverick band of scientists and engineers who made the Skunk Works so renowned. Filled with telling personal anecdotes and high adventure, with narratives from the CIA and from Air Force pilots who flew the many classified, risky missions, this book is a riveting portrait of the most spectacular aviation triumphs of the twentieth century. "Thoroughly engrossing." --Los Angeles Times Book Review
  • Votes: 1

    How to Build a Business Warren Buffett Would Buy

    by Jeff Benedict

    Foreword by Warren Buffett Develop a Highly Successful Business How do you take a good company and transform it into one that even the billionaire Warren Buffett would buy? Any entrepreneur will appreciate – indeed, love! – this fascinating story sharing the life lessons that Bill Child learned as he built R. C. Willey, a highly successful furniture business eventually bought out by the legendary Warren Buffett. Lessons on leadership, frugality, honesty, integrity, innovation, and customer service will inspire and motivate readers. Bill’s philosophies speak about how: • Character and work ethic carry more weight than resumes • Change is an essential ingredient for success in the retail industry • Companies that don’t adapt don’t last • Delegation is vital to growing a small business Jeff Benedict is considered one of America’s top investigative journalists. He has published several critically acclaimed books, and his articles have been published in Sports Illustrated, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times. He has appeared on ESPN, NBC Nightly News, CBS’s 60 Minutes, and ABC News. Currently, Jeff teaches creative writing at Southern Virginia University. He lives in Virginia with his wife and their four children.
  • Votes: 1

    Sam Walton

    by Sam Walton

  • Votes: 1

    Big Brown

    by Greg Niemann

    Although its brown vans are on every block and its delivery service reaches more than 200 countries, UPS is among the world’s most underestimated and misunderstood companies. For the first time, a UPS “lifer” tells the behind-the-scenes story of how a small messenger service became a business giant. Big Brown reveals the remarkable 100-year history of UPS and the life of its founder Jim Casey—one of the greatest unknown capitalists of the twentieth century. Casey pursued a Spartan business philosophy that emphasized military discipline, drab uniforms, and reliability over flash—a model that is still reflected in UPS culture today. Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS: from its traditional management style and strict policies coupled with high employee loyalty and strong labor relations; from its historical “anti-marketing” bias (why brown?) to its sterling brand loyalty and reputation for quality.
  • Votes: 1

    Bad Blood

    by John Carreyrou

    The Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year A New York Times Notable Book A Washington Post Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, San Francisco Chronicle, Time, Esquire, Fortune, Marie Claire, GQ, Mental Floss, Science Friday, Bloomberg, Popular Mechanics, BookRiot, The Seattle Times, The Oregonian, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the next Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with its breakthrough device, which performed the whole range of laboratory tests from a single drop of blood. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.5 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. Erroneous results put patients in danger, leading to misdiagnoses and unnecessary treatments. All the while, Holmes and her partner, Sunny Balwani, worked to silence anyone who voiced misgivings--from journalists to their own employees. Rigorously reported and fearlessly written, Bad Blood is a gripping story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron--a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • Votes: 1

    My Years with General Motors

    by Alfred Pritchard Sloan

    'My years with General Motors' describes the early innovations and development of the company's basic management policies and strategic concepts in such areas as planning and strategy, stabilization, financial growth, and leadership.
  • Votes: 1

    Daring to Succeed

    by Guy Gendron

    The exceptional, winding path of a man who is inseparable from the empire he built. Combining a tobacconist, newstand, food mart, beer shop and general store, the convenience store has undergone many trans­formations over the last 35 years, ever since a man decided to turn it into his life's business. That man is Alain Bouchard. Strangely, few people know his name, even in Quebec, where he lives. He is, however, one of Canada's wealthiest entrepreneurs, as well as one of the most peer-honoured businessmen in the world. Starting as a volunteer clerk in his brother's business before doing all the tasks related to this often thankless work, Alain Bouchard is truly a self-made man who climbed through the professional ranks. Today, the multinational Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. empire that he founded encompasses Circle K, comprises 12,000 stores and over 100,000 employees. It posts revenues of almost US $35 billion. What is the recipe for this kind of success? What values drive this entrepreneur and his loyal collaborators? This book provides an unprecedented look into an extraordinary business and a man who put it all on the line to win.
  • Votes: 1

    Lights Out

    by Thomas Gryta

  • Votes: 1

    Fools Rush In

    Don't miss this deliciously romantic fan favorite from New York Times bestselling author Kristan Higgins! Millie Barnes is this close to finally achieving her perfect life: Rewarding job in Cape Cod? Check. Cute cottage of her very own? Check. Adorable dog suitable for walks past attractive locals? Check! But perfection isn't as easy as it looks—especially when Sam Nickerson, a local policeman, is so distracting. He is definitely not part of her master plan. But maybe it's time for Millie to make a new plan…. Previously published in 2006.
  • Votes: 1

    Les Schwab Pride in Performance

    by Les Schwab

  • Votes: 1

    One from Many

    by Dee Hock

  • Votes: 1

    How to Castrate a Bull

    by Dave Hitz

    Dave Hitz likes to solve fun problems. He didn’t set out to be a Silicon Valley icon, a business visionary, or even a billionaire. But he became all three. It turns out that business is a mosaic of interesting puzzles like managing risk, developing and reversing strategies, and looking into the future by deconstructing the past. As a founder of NetApp, a data storage firm that began as an idea scribbled on a placemat and now takes in $4 billion a year, Hitz has seen his company go through every major cycle in business—from the Jack-of-All-Trades mentality of a start-up, through the tumultuous period of the IPO and the dot-com bust, and finally to a mature enterprise company. NetApp is one of the fastest-growing computer companies ever, and for six years in a row it has been on Fortune magazine’s list of Best Companies to Work For. Not bad for a high school dropout who began his business career selling his blood for money and typing the names of diseases onto index cards. With colorful examples and anecdotes, How to Castrate a Bull is a story for everyone interested in understanding business, the reasons why companies succeed and fail, and how powerful lessons often come from strange and unexpected places. Dave Hitz co-founded NetApp in 1992 with James Lau and Michael Malcolm. He served as a programmer, marketing evangelist, technical architect, and vice president of engineering. Presently, he is responsible for future strategy and direction for the company. Before his career in Silicon Valley, Dave worked as a cowboy, where he got valuable management experience by herding, branding, and castrating cattle.
  • Votes: 1

    My Adventures with Your Money

    by T.D. Thornton

    Today, we talk about Bernard Madoff, but in the early 20th century, they talked about George Graham Rice. Born Jacob Simon Herzig in 1870, he later changed his name - just as he would frequently change his swindles to make himself into one of the most colorfully successful villains in American history. T.D. Thornton now tells the story of Rice's life as it unfolded against the dark rise of American greed in the early 20th century. In the early 1900s, Rice made market-manipulation killings valued at billions in today's dollars by inventing fictitious boom towns in Death Valley and flagrantly exaggerating worthless mining claims throughout the West. As a shameless racetrack tipster, Rice cultivated a national following of 100,000 daily subscribers who paid for the privilege of being tipped to bet on hopeless nags. Vilified by securities regulators as the "Jackal of Wall Street," Rice sparked riots in Manhattan's financial district by perfecting the art of "bucket shop" trading with the sole purpose of bilking the public blind. He was capable of pulling off everything from street corner rip-offs for pocket change to elaborately scripted gambling hoaxes, all while being vilified by old-guard profiteers like J.P. Morgan and befriended by gangsters like Arnold Rothstein. In My Adventures With Your Money, T.D. Thornton has given us a real-life version of The Sting with one of America's most colorful con men at it's center.
  • Votes: 1

    High Velocity Leadership

    by Brian K. Muirhead

    The project manager for NASA's Mars Pathfinder Mission explains how to accomplish a difficult mission on time, on budget, and under intense pressure and describes how his team used high-performance business tactics and techniques to complete a successful space mission. 35,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Bookmarked

    by Ann Camacho

  • Votes: 1

    American Kingpin

    by Nick Bilton

  • Votes: 1

    Unicorn in the Woods

    by Gordon Pitts

    As tech investors the world over search for elusive unicorns (start-ups valued at over $1 billion), acclaimed business journalist Gordon Pitts asks whether there can be a place for high-tech innovation and unicorn-like value creation outside of major urban centres, whether in Atlantic Canada, rust-belt New York, or Northern Ontario. Journeying back to the origins of Radian6 and Q1 Labs -- two New Brunswick companies that sold for a combined $1 billion -- in the basements and offices of a group of geeks and dreamers, Pitts tells a story of two remarkable companies and the legacies that continue to this day. But theirs was not a simple tale of overnight success; there were sellouts and firings, comebacks and vindication, and still unfulfilled promise. This is a story of high-tech value creation far from Silicon Valley, a story of the mythical unicorn in the woods. Are the stories of Radian6 and Q1 Labs outliers, rogue datapoints that should be discarded, or the foundation for a new knowledge economy outside of the mainstream?
  • Votes: 1

    Pizza Tiger

    by Thomas Monaghan

    The founder of Domino's Pizza explains how he expanded his business into the largest pizza delivery company in the world, discussing how ingenuity and strict personal ethics have made the American Dream come true
  • Votes: 1

    Be My Guest

    by Conrad N. Hilton

  • Votes: 1

    Shoe Dog

    by Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.
  • Votes: 1

    TAPE SUCKS

    by Frank Slootman

  • Votes: 1

    A Different Kind of Life

    by Virginia Williams

    In 1986, racing car constructor Frank Williams' life was turned upside down when a crash left him quadriplegic. For his wife, Ginny, the accident meant becoming head of the household while also struggling to overcome grief and anger. In this memoir, she tells her story with honesty and humor, set against the backdrop of Formula One racing.
  • Votes: 1

    Who Is Michael Ovitz?

    by Michael Ovitz

    If you're going to read one book about Hollywood, this is the one. As co-founder of Creative Artists Agency (CAA), Michael Ovitz earned a reputation for ruthless negotiation, brilliant strategy and fierce loyalty to his clients. He reinvented the role of the agent and helped shape the careers of hundreds of A-list stars and directors, including Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Meryl Streep, Sean Connery, Steven Seagal, Bill Murray, Robin Williams and David Letterman. But this personal history is much more than celebrity friendships and bare-knuckled deal-making. It's an underdog's story: How did a kid with no connections work his way into the William Morris mailroom, and become the most powerful person in Hollywood? How did a superagent also become a power in producing, advertising, mergers & acquisitions and modern art? And what were the personal consequences of all those deals? After decades of near-silence in the face of intense controversy, Michael Ovitz is finally telling his whole story in this blistering, unforgettable memoir.