Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 197

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

  • Votes: 194

    The Push

    by Ashley Audrain

  • Votes: 192

    The Devil and the Dark Water

    by Stuart Turton

    'If you read one book this year, make sure it's this one' Daily Mail SELECTED FOR THE BBC TWO BOOK CLUB BETWEEN THE COVERS AND THE RADIO 2 JO WHILEY BOOK CLUB SHORTLISTED FOR THE BOOKS ARE MY BAG FICTION AWARD An impossible murder A remarkable detective duo A demon who may or may not exist It's 1634 and Samuel Pipps, the world's greatest detective, is being transported from the Dutch East Indies to Amsterdam, where he is facing trial and execution for a crime he may, or may not, have committed. Travelling with him is his loyal bodyguard, Arent Hayes, who is determined to prove his friend innocent, while also on board are Sara Wessel, a noble woman with a secret, and her husband, the governor general of Batavia. But no sooner is their ship out to sea than devilry begins to blight the voyage. A strange symbol appears on the sail. A dead leper stalks the decks. Livestock are slaughtered in the night. And then the passengers hear a terrible voice whispering to them in the darkness, promising them three unholy miracles. First: an impossible pursuit. Second: an impossible theft. Third: an impossible murder. Could a demon be responsible for their misfortunes? With Pipps imprisoned, only Arent and Sara can solve a mystery that stretches back into their past and now threatens to sink the ship, killing everybody on board... 'A glorious mash-up of William Golding and Arthur Conan Doyle' Val McDermid 'A superb historical mystery: inventive, twisty, addictive and utterly beguiling ... A TRIUMPH' Will Dean From the author of the dazzling The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle, winner of the Costa Best First Novel Award, comes an audacious and original new high concept murder mystery.
  • Votes: 191

    In My Dreams I Hold a Knife

    by Ashley Winstead

  • Votes: 190

    Think Again

    by Adam Grant

  • Votes: 13

    The Danish Way of Parenting

    by Jessica Joelle Alexander

  • Votes: 6

    How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

    by Bill Gates

  • Votes: 6

    Project Hail Mary

    by Andy Weir

  • Votes: 4

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 4

    Ancillary Justice

    by Ann Leckie

    Winner of the Hugo, Nebula, British Science Fiction, Locus and Arthur C. Clarke Awards. On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest. Once, she was the Justice of Toren - a colossal starship with an artificial intelligence linking thousands of soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy. Now, an act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with one fragile human body, unanswered questions, and a burning desire for vengeance. In the Ancillary world: 1. Ancillary Justice2. Ancillary Sword3. Ancillary Mercy
  • Votes: 4

    Atomic Habits

    by James Clear

    James Clear presents strategies to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that help lead to an improved life.
  • Votes: 3

    Man's Search for Meaning

    by Viktor E. Frankl

  • Votes: 3

    The Murderbot Diaries

    by Martha Wells

  • Votes: 3

    The Peripheral (The Jackpot Trilogy)

    by William Gibson

  • Votes: 2

    A Court of Silver Flames (A Court of Thorns and Roses, 5)

    by Sarah J. Maas

  • Votes: 2

    Little Brother & Homeland

    by Cory Doctorow

  • Votes: 2

    Grant

    by Ron Chernow

  • Votes: 2

    Assassin's Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy, Book 1)

    by Robin Hobb

  • Votes: 2

    The Diary of a Young Girl

    by Anne Frank

  • Votes: 2

    Communion With God (Puritan Paperbacks

    by John Owen

  • Votes: 2

    Bottle Demon (Eric Carter)

    by Stephen Blackmoore

  • Votes: 2

    The Quantum Magician (1) (The Quantum Evolution)

    by Derek Künsken

  • Votes: 2

    Oathbringer

    by Brandon Sanderson

  • Votes: 2

    Fugitive Telemetry (The Murderbot Diaries, 6)

    by Martha Wells

    The New York Times bestselling security droid with a heart (though it wouldn't admit it!) is back! Having captured the hearts of readers across the globe (Annalee Newitz says it's "one of the most humane portraits of a nonhuman I've ever read") Murderbot has also established Martha Wells as one of the great SF writers of today. No, I didn't kill the dead human. If I had, I wouldn't dump the body in the station mall. When Murderbot discovers a dead body on Preservation Station, it knows it is going to have to assist station security to determine who the body is (was), how they were killed (that should be relatively straightforward, at least), and why (because apparently that matters to a lot of people—who knew?) Yes, the unthinkable is about to happen: Murderbot must voluntarily speak to humans! Again! A new standalone adventure in the New York Times-bestselling, Hugo and Nebula Award winning series!
  • Votes: 2

    The Silent Patient

    by Alex Michaelides

  • Votes: 2

    Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction
  • Votes: 2

    The Night We Burned

    by S. F. Kosa

  • Votes: 2

    Harrow the Ninth (The Locked Tomb Series, 2)

    by Tamsyn Muir

  • Votes: 2

    A Memory Called Empire (Teixcalaan, 1)

    by Arkady Martine

  • Votes: 2

    Invisible Women

    by Caroline Criado Perez

  • Votes: 1

    Piranesi

    by Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.
  • Votes: 1

    Homegoing

    by Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
  • Votes: 1

    The Last House Guest

    by Megan Miranda

  • Votes: 1

    The Rain Heron

    by Robbie Arnott

  • Votes: 1

    The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden

    by Peter L. Bergen

  • Votes: 1

    Leave Society (Vintage Contemporaries)

    by Tao Lin

  • Votes: 1

    Literate Programming (Lecture Notes)

    by Donald E. Knuth

  • Votes: 1

    The Night Circus

    by Erin Morgenstern

  • Votes: 1

    The Psychology of Money

    by Morgan Housel

    Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.
  • Votes: 1

    The Noise

    by James Patterson

  • Votes: 1

    Deep Work

    by Cal Newport

    One of the most valuable skills in our economy is becoming increasingly rare. If you master this skill, you'll achieve extraordinary results. Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep-spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there's a better way. In DEEP WORK, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four "rules," for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill. A mix of cultural criticism and actionable advice, DEEP WORK takes the reader on a journey through memorable stories-from Carl Jung building a stone tower in the woods to focus his mind, to a social media pioneer buying a round-trip business class ticket to Tokyo to write a book free from distraction in the air-and no-nonsense advice, such as the claim that most serious professionals should quit social media and that you should practice being bored. DEEP WORK is an indispensable guide to anyone seeking focused success in a distracted world.
  • Votes: 1

    How the Word Is Passed

    by Clint Smith

    Black Harvard Doctorate in Poetics launches poetry that explores modern blackness. Clint Smith's debut poetry collection, Counting Descent, is a coming of age story that seeks to complicate our conception of lineage and tradition. Smith explores the cognitive dissonance that results from belonging to a community that unapologetically celebrates black humanity while living in a world that often renders blackness a caricature of fear. His poems move fluidly across personal and political histories, all the while reflecting on the social construction of our lived experiences. Smith brings the reader on a powerful journey forcing us to reflect on all that we learn growing up, and all that we seek to unlearn moving forward. - Winner, 2017 Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Award - Finalist, 2017 NAACP Image Awards - 2017 'One Book One New Orleans' Book Selection
  • Votes: 1

    Life as a Unicorn

    by Amrou Al-Kadhi

  • Votes: 1

    Replay

    by Ken Grimwood

    Jeff Winston's life is not how he imagined it would be. An unhappy marriage and unrewarding job - and then he died. Aged forty-three. And woke up again, back in his college room, in 1963, aged eighteen. With all his memories intact. If he applies those memories, he can be rich - he can have anything he wants - in this new chance at life. Until he dies at forty-three and wakes up in his eighteen-year-old body again . . . and again in a continuous twenty-five year cycle each time starting from scratch at the age of eighteen to reclaim lost loves, make a fortune or remedy past mistakes. And then, in one replayed life, he meets a woman who knows all too well what he is experiencing. REPLAY is a novel of gripping adventure, romance, and fascinating speculation on the nature of time, Replay asks the question: 'What if you could live your life over again?'
  • Votes: 1

    Beautiful World, Where Are You

    by Sally Rooney

    Beautiful World, Where Are You is a new novel by Sally Rooney, the bestselling author of Normal People and Conversations with Friends. Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a warehouse, and asks him if he’d like to travel to Rome with her. In Dublin, her best friend, Eileen, is getting over a break-up, and slips back into flirting with Simon, a man she has known since childhood. Alice, Felix, Eileen, and Simon are still young—but life is catching up with them. They desire each other, they delude each other, they get together, they break apart. They have sex, they worry about sex, they worry about their friendships and the world they live in. Are they standing in the last lighted room before the darkness, bearing witness to something? Will they find a way to believe in a beautiful world?
  • Votes: 1

    Know My Name

    by Chanel Miller

    THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING MEMOIR 'Incredibly moving and haunting' Roxane Gay 'I read this book cover to cover and it stunned me' Jia Tolentino 'Powerful, honest and necessary' Marian Keyes 'To girls everywhere, I am with you. On nights when you feel alone, I am with you. When people doubt you or dismiss you, I am with you. I fought every day for you. So never stop fighting, I believe you.' Chanel Miller's story changed our world forever. In 2016 Brock Turner was sentenced to just six months in jail after he was caught sexually assaulting her on Stanford's campus. His light sentencing, and Chanel's victim impact statement, which was read by eleven million people in four days, sparked international outrage and action. Know My Name is an intimate, profoundly moving memoir that exposes a patriarchal culture biased to protect perpetrators, a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable, and ultimately shines with the courage required to move through suffering and live a full and beautiful life. Entwining pain, resilience, and humour, this breath-taking memoir will stand as a modern classic. 'I could not put this phenomenal book down' Glennon Doyle, bestselling author of UNTAMED 'To read Know My Name inspires hope' Guardian 'A searing, beautiful book' Sunday Times 'Know My Name marks the debut of a gifted young writer. Miller's words are purpose. They are maps. And she is a treasure who has prevailed' New York Times
  • Votes: 1

    IQ84

    by Mike Dickenson

  • Votes: 1

    The Biggest Bluff

    by Maria Konnikova

    How a New York Times bestselling author and New Yorker contributor parlayed a strong grasp of the science of human decision-making and a woeful ignorance of cards into a life-changing run as a professional poker player, under the wing of a legend of the game It's true that Maria Konnikova had never actually played poker before and didn't even know the rules when she approached Erik Seidel, Poker Hall of Fame inductee and winner of tens of millions of dollars in earnings, and convinced him to be her mentor. But she knew her man: a famously thoughtful and broad-minded player, he was intrigued by her pitch that she wasn't interested in making money so much as learning about life. She had faced a stretch of personal bad luck, and her reflections on the role of chance had led her to a giant of game theory, who pointed her to poker as the ultimate master class in learning to distinguish between what can be controlled and what can't. And she certainly brought something to the table, including a Ph.D. in psychology and an acclaimed and growing body of work on human behavior and how to hack it. So Seidel was in, and soon she was down the rabbit hole with him, into the wild, fiercely competitive, overwhelmingly masculine world of high-stakes Texas Hold'em, their initial end point the following year's World Series of Poker. But then something extraordinary happened. Under Seidel's guidance, Konnikova did have many epiphanies about life that derived from her new pursuit, including how to better read, not just her opponents but far more importantly herself; how to identify what tilted her into an emotional state that got in the way of good decisions; and how to get to a place where she could accept luck for what it was, and what it wasn't. But she also began to win. And win. In a little over a year, she began making earnest money from tournaments, ultimately totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars. She won a major title, got a sponsor, and got used to being on television, and to headlines like "How one writer's book deal turned her into a professional poker player." She even learned to like Las Vegas. But in the end, Maria Konnikova is a writer and student of human behavior, and ultimately the point was to render her incredible journey into a container for its invaluable lessons. The biggest bluff of all, she learned, is that skill is enough. Bad cards will come our way, but keeping our focus on how we play them and not on the outcome will keep us moving through many a dark patch, until the luck once again breaks our way.
  • Votes: 1

    Persepolis Rising (The Expanse, 7)

    by James S. A. Corey

  • Votes: 1

    Harzmagie

    by Jürgen H. Moch

  • Votes: 1

    Going Clear

    by Lawrence Wright

  • Votes: 1

    Finding the Mother Tree

    by Suzanne Simard

  • Votes: 1

    Crying in H Mart

    by Michelle Zauner

  • Votes: 1

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett