Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 245

    This One Summer

    by Mariko Tamaki

  • Votes: 221

    The Love Hypothesis

    by Ali Hazelwood

    'Contemporary romance's unicorn: the elusive marriage of deeply brainy and delightfully escapist.' Christina Lauren, New York Times bestselling author of The Unhoneymooners When a fake relationship between scientists meets the irresistible force of attraction, it throws one woman's carefully calculated theories on love into chaos. As a third-year Ph.D. candidate, Olive Smith doesn't believe in lasting romantic relationships but her best friend does, and that's what got her into this situation. Convincing Anh that Olive on her way to a happily ever after was always going to be tough, scientists require proof. So, like any self-respecting woman, Olive panics and kisses the first man she sees. That man is none other than Adam Carlsen, a young hotshot professor and well-known ass. Which is why Olive is positively floored when he agrees to keep her charade a secret and be her fake boyfriend. But when a big science conference goes haywire and Adam surprises her again with his unyielding support (and his unyielding abs), their little experiment feels dangerously close to combustion. Olive soon discovers that the only thing more complicated than a hypothesis on love is putting her own heart under the microscope.
  • Votes: 93

    The Inheritance Games

    by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

    Don't miss this New York Times bestselling "impossible to put down" (Buzzfeed) novel with deadly stakes, thrilling twists, and juicy secrets--perfect for fans of One of Us is Lying and Knives Out. Avery Grambs has a plan for a better future: survive high school, win a scholarship, and get out. But her fortunes change in an instant when billionaire Tobias Hawthorne dies and leaves Avery virtually his entire fortune. The catch? Avery has no idea why -- or even who Tobias Hawthorne is. To receive her inheritance, Avery must move into sprawling, secret passage-filled Hawthorne House, where every room bears the old man's touch -- and his love of puzzles, riddles, and codes. Unfortunately for Avery, Hawthorne House is also occupied by the family that Tobias Hawthorne just dispossessed. This includes the four Hawthorne grandsons: dangerous, magnetic, brilliant boys who grew up with every expectation that one day, they would inherit billions. Heir apparent Grayson Hawthorne is convinced that Avery must be a conwoman, and he's determined to take her down. His brother, Jameson, views her as their grandfather's last hurrah: a twisted riddle, a puzzle to be solved. Caught in a world of wealth and privilege, with danger around every turn, Avery will have to play the game herself just to survive.
  • Votes: 87

    Red Queen (Red Queen, 1)

    by Victoria Aveyard

  • Votes: 85

    The Young Elites

    by Marie Lu

    From the New York Times bestselling author of the Legend series I am tired of being used, hurt, and cast aside. Adelina Amouteru is a survivor of the blood fever. A decade ago, the deadly illness swept through her nation. Most of the infected perished, while many of the children who survived were left with strange markings. Adelina’s black hair turned silver, her lashes went pale, and now she has only a jagged scar where her left eye once was. Her cruel father believes she is a malfetto, an abomination, ruining their family’s good name and standing in the way of their fortune. But some of the fever’s survivors are rumored to possess more than just scars—they are believed to have mysterious and powerful gifts, and though their identities remain secret, they have come to be called the Young Elites. Teren Santoro works for the king. As Leader of the Inquisition Axis, it is his job to seek out the Young Elites, to destroy them before they destroy the nation. He believes the Young Elites to be dangerous and vengeful, but it’s Teren who may possess the darkest secret of all. Enzo Valenciano is a member of the Dagger Society. This secret sect of Young Elites seeks out others like them before the Inquisition Axis can. But when the Daggers find Adelina, they discover someone with powers like they’ve never seen. Adelina wants to believe Enzo is on her side, and that Teren is the true enemy. But the lives of these three will collide in unexpected ways, as each fights a very different and personal battle. But of one thing they are all certain: Adelina has abilities that shouldn’t belong in this world. A vengeful blackness in her heart. And a desire to destroy all who dare to cross her. It is my turn to use. My turn to hurt.
  • Votes: 83

    The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

    by V. E. Schwab

    In the vein of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Life After Life, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is New York Times bestselling author V. E. Schwab’s genre-defying tour de force. A Life No One Will Remember. A Story You Will Never Forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.
  • Votes: 82

    It Ends with Us

    by Colleen Hoover

  • Votes: 82

    November 9

    by Colleen Hoover

  • Votes: 82

    Ugly Love

    by Colleen Hoover

  • Votes: 80

    The Spanish Love Deception

    by Elena Armas

  • Votes: 75

    The Poppy War

    by R. F. Kuang

    A Library Journal Best Books of 2018 pick! Washington Post "5 Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Novel of 2018" pick! A Bustle "30 Best Fiction Books of 2018" pick! “I have no doubt this will end up being the best fantasy debut of the year [...] I have absolutely no doubt that [Kuang’s] name will be up there with the likes of Robin Hobb and N.K. Jemisin.” -- Booknest A brilliantly imaginative talent makes her exciting debut with this epic historical military fantasy, inspired by the bloody history of China’s twentieth century and filled with treachery and magic, in the tradition of Ken Liu’s Grace of Kings and N.K. Jemisin’s Inheritance Trilogy. When Rin aced the Keju—the Empire-wide test to find the most talented youth to learn at the Academies—it was a shock to everyone: to the test officials, who couldn’t believe a war orphan from Rooster Province could pass without cheating; to Rin’s guardians, who believed they’d finally be able to marry her off and further their criminal enterprise; and to Rin herself, who realized she was finally free of the servitude and despair that had made up her daily existence. That she got into Sinegard—the most elite military school in Nikan—was even more surprising. But surprises aren’t always good. Because being a dark-skinned peasant girl from the south is not an easy thing at Sinegard. Targeted from the outset by rival classmates for her color, poverty, and gender, Rin discovers she possesses a lethal, unearthly power—an aptitude for the nearly-mythical art of shamanism. Exploring the depths of her gift with the help of a seemingly insane teacher and psychoactive substances, Rin learns that gods long thought dead are very much alive—and that mastering control over those powers could mean more than just surviving school. For while the Nikara Empire is at peace, the Federation of Mugen still lurks across a narrow sea. The militarily advanced Federation occupied Nikan for decades after the First Poppy War, and only barely lost the continent in the Second. And while most of the people are complacent to go about their lives, a few are aware that a Third Poppy War is just a spark away . . . Rin’s shamanic powers may be the only way to save her people. But as she finds out more about the god that has chosen her, the vengeful Phoenix, she fears that winning the war may cost her humanity . . . and that it may already be too late.
  • Votes: 72

    Almond

    by Won-pyung Sohn

    This story is, in short, about a monster meeting another monster. One of the monsters is me. Yunjae was born with a brain condition called Alexithymia that makes it hard for him to feel emotions like fear or anger. He does not have friends—the two almond-shaped neurons located deep in his brain have seen to that—but his devoted mother and grandmother aren’t fazed by his condition. Their little home above his mother’s used bookstore is decorated with colorful post-it notes that remind him when to smile, when to say "thank you," and when to laugh. Yunjae grows up content, even happy, with his small family in this quiet, peaceful space. Then on Christmas Eve—Yunjae’s sixteenth birthday—everything changes. A shocking act of random violence shatters his world, leaving him alone and on his own. Struggling to cope with his loss, Yunjae retreats into silent isolation, until troubled teenager Gon arrives at his school and begins to bully Yunjae. Against all odds, tormentor and victim learn they have more in common than they realized. Gon is stumped by Yunjae’s impassive calm, while Yunjae thinks if he gets to know the hotheaded Gon, he might learn how to experience true feelings. Drawn by curiosity, the two strike up a surprising friendship. As Yunjae begins to open his life to new people—including a girl at school—something slowly changes inside him. And when Gon suddenly finds his life in danger, it is Yunjae who will step outside of every comfort zone he has created to perhaps become a most unlikely hero. The Emissary meets The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime in this poignant and triumphant story about how love, friendship, and persistence can change a life forever.
  • Votes: 71

    The Four Winds

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 70

    On the Come Up

    by Angie Thomas

    #1 New York Times bestseller · Seven starred reviews · Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book “For all the struggle in this book, Thomas rarely misses a step as a writer. Thomas continues to hold up that mirror with grace and confidence. We are lucky to have her, and lucky to know a girl like Bri.”—The New York Times Book Review This digital edition contains a letter from the author, deleted scenes, a picture of the author as a teen rapper, an annotated playlist, Angie’s top 5 MCs, an annotated rap, illustrated quotes from the book, and an excerpt from Angie’s next novel, Concrete Rose. Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral . . . for all the wrong reasons. Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn’t just want to make it—she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be. Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn’t always free.
  • Votes: 70

    The City of Brass

    by S. A Chakraborty

  • Votes: 70

    Lonely Castle in the Mirror

    by Mizuki Tsujimura

    For fans of BEFORE THE COFFEE GETS COLD, fairy tale and magic are weaved together in sparse language that belies a flooring emotional punch. 'Strange and beautiful. Imagine the offspring of The Wind-up Bird Chronicle with The Virgin Suicides' GUARDIAN Translated by Philip Gabriel, a translator of Murakami _______________________________ How can you save your friend's life if she doesn't want to be rescued? In a tranquil neighbourhood of Tokyo, seven teenagers wake to find their bedroom mirrors are shining. At a single touch, they are pulled from their lonely lives to a wondrous castle filled with winding stairways, watchful portraits and twinkling chandeliers. In this new sanctuary, they are confronted with a set of clues leading to a hidden room where one of them will be granted a wish. But there's a catch: if they don't leave the castle by five o'clock, they will be punished. As time passes, a devastating truth emerges: only those brave enough to share their stories will be saved. Tender, playful, gripping, LONELY CASTLE IN THE MIRROR is a mesmerizing tale about the importance of reaching out, confronting anxiety and embracing human connection. Readers love LONELY CASTLE IN THE MIRROR: ***** 'This book has become one of my favourite Japanese literature reads of all time . . . A magical heart felt read that will stay with you' ***** 'Unexpected, beautiful and heart-breaking . . . this is a work of fiction which reaches into the heart of a modern problem and has valuable insight' ***** 'Rich and vivid with lots of emotions . . . This book is a symbol of "hope is still there'
  • Votes: 61

    For One More Day

    by Mitch Albom

    A HEART-BREAKING, HOPEFUL NOVEL FROM THE MASTER STORYTELLER WHOSE BOOKS HAVE TOUCHED THE HEARTS OF OVER 40 MILLION READERS 'Mitch Albom sees the magical in the ordinary' Cecilia Ahern __________ As a child, Charley Benetto was told by his father, 'You can be a mama's boy or a daddy's boy, but you can't be both.' So he chooses his father, only to see him disappear when Charley is on the verge of adolescence. Decades later, Charley is a broken man. His life has been destroyed by alcohol and regret. He loses his job. He leaves his family. When he discovers that he won't be invited to his only daughter's wedding he realises he has hit rock bottom. Charley makes a midnight ride to his small hometown; his final journey before he ends his life. But as he staggers into his old house, he makes an astonishing discovery. His mother - who died eight years earlier - is there to welcome Charley home. What follows is the one seemingly ordinary day so many of us yearn for: a chance to reconcile with someone lost to us, to understand family secrets and to seek forgiveness from a person we love. __________ WHAT READERS SAY ABOUT FOR ONE MORE DAY 'Superb read, Mitch Albom has a way of writing to reach the soul of the reader' 'Ground-breaking . . . The amount of impact this book has had on my life is indescribable!' 'Mitch Albom makes you think about life . . . a book you can read again and again, and keep learning' 'Another awesome read by Albom. One of the most amazing writers of our generation' 'I absolutely love Mitch Albom. His stories always reduce me to real tears and laughter'
  • Votes: 23

    The Midnight Library

    by Matt Haig

    THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A BBC TWO BETWEEN THE COVERS BOOK CLUB PICK Between life and death there is a library. When Nora Seed finds herself in the Midnight Library, she has a chance to make things right. Up until now, her life has been full of misery and regret. She feels she has let everyone down, including herself. But things are about to change. The books in the Midnight Library enable Nora to live as if she had done things differently. With the help of an old friend, she can now undo every one of her regrets as she tries to work out her perfect life. But things aren’t always what she imagined they’d be, and soon her choices place the library and herself in extreme danger. Before time runs out, she must answer the ultimate question: what is the best way to live?
  • Votes: 15

    A Little Life

    by Hanya Yanagihara

    "A little life, follows four college classmates --broke, adrift, and bouyed only by their friendship and ambition--as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves." --Back cover
  • Votes: 13

    The Travelling Cat Chronicles

    by Hiro Arikawa

    THE PERFECT CURL-UP READ FOR CAT LOVERS 'Prepare to have your heartstrings tugged by this quirky tale' Sunday Mirror 'A book about kindness and love, and how the smallest things can provide happiness' Stylist ___ It's not the journey that counts, but who's at your side. Nana is on a road trip, but he is not sure where he is going. All that matters is that he can sit beside his beloved owner Satoru in the front seat of his silver van. Satoru is keen to visit three old friends from his youth, though Nana doesn't know why and Satoru won't say. Set against the backdrop of Japan's changing seasons and narrated with a rare gentleness and humour, Nana's story explores the wonder and thrill of life's unexpected detours. It is about the value of friendship and solitude, and knowing when to give and when to take. At the heart of this book is a powerful message about the importance of kindness. It shows, above all, how acts of love, both great and small, can transform our lives. ___ What readers are saying: 'Delightful, insightful, full of warmth with plenty of humour.' 'Uplifting and heart wrenching in equal measure.' 'It had me in floods of tears but filled me with hope too.'
  • Votes: 13

    Kafka on the Shore

    by Haruki Murakami

    Kafka Tamura runs away from home at fifteen, under the shadow of his father's dark prophesy. The aging Nakata, tracker of lost cats, who never recovered from a bizarre childhood affliction, finds his pleasantly simplified life suddenly turned upside down. As their parallel odysseys unravel, cats converse with people; fish tumble from the sky; a ghost-like pimp deploys a Hegel-spouting girl of the night; a forest harbours soldiers apparently un-aged since World War II. There is a savage killing, but the identity of both victim and killer is a riddle - one of many which combine to create an elegant and dreamlike masterpiece. 'Wonderful... Magical and outlandish' Daily Mail 'Hypnotic, spellbinding' The Times 'Cool, fluent and addictive' Daily Telegraph
  • Votes: 13

    Tuesdays with Morrie

    by Mitch Albom

    Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague? Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it? For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Mitch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final 'class': lessons in how to live. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world. Praise for Tuesdays with Morrie: 'This is a true story that shines and leaves you forever warmed by its afterglow' Amy Tan 'A moving tribute to embracing life' Glasgow Herald 'An extraordinary contribution to the literature of death' Boston Globe 'A beautifully written book of great clarity and wisdom that lovingly captures the simplicity beyond life's complexities' M Scott Peck
  • Votes: 12

    The Decagon House Murders (Pushkin Vertigo)

    by Yukito Ayatsuji

    A hugely enjoyable, page-turning murder mystery with one of the best and most-satisfying conclusions you'll ever read: clever enough that you're unlikely to guess it, but simple enough that you'll kick yourself when it's revealed. That's what has made it a classic in Japan, and what readers of this first ever English translation will love too. The members of a university mystery club decide to visit an island which was the site of a grisly, unsolved multiple murder the year before. They're looking forward to investigating the crime, putting their passion for solving mysteries to practical use, but before long there is a fresh murder, and soon the club-members realise they are being picked off one-by-one. The remaining amateur sleuths will have to use all of their murder-mystery expertise to find the killer before they end up dead too. This is a playful, loving and fiendishly plotted homage to the best of golden age crime. It will delight any mystery fan looking to put their little grey cells to use.
  • Votes: 12

    Soul Lanterns

    by Shaw Kuzki

    The haunting and poignant story of a how a young Japanese girl's understanding of the historic and tragic bombing of Hiroshima is transformed by a memorial lantern-floating ceremony. Twelve-year-old Nozomi lives in the Japanese city of Hiroshima. She wasn't even born when the bombing of Hiroshima took place. Every year Nozomi joins her family at the lantern-floating ceremony to honor those lost in the bombing. People write the names of their deceased loved ones along with messages of peace, on paper lanterns and set them afloat on the river. This year Nozomi realizes that her mother always releases one lantern with no name. She begins to ask questions, and when complicated stories of loss and loneliness unfold, Nozomi and her friends come up with a creative way to share their loved ones' experiences. By opening people's eyes to the struggles they all keep hidden, the project teaches the entire community new ways to show compassion. Soul Lanterns is an honest exploration of what happened on August 6, 1945, and offers readers a glimpse not only into the rich cultural history of Japan but also into the intimate lives of those who recognize--better than most--the urgent need for peace.
  • Votes: 12

    Punching the Air

    by Ibi Zoboi

    From award-winning, bestselling author Ibi Zoboi and prison reform activist Yusef Salaam of the Exonerated Five comes a powerful YA novel in verse about a boy who is wrongfully incarcerated. Perfect for fans of the Noughts & Crosses series and The Hate U Give.
  • Votes: 12

    Puppet Show

    by M. W. Craven

    *WINNER OF THE CWA GOLD DAGGER AWARD 2019 FOR BEST CRIME NOVEL OF THE YEAR* 'Fantastic' Martina Cole 'Dark, sharp and compelling' Peter James 'A thrilling curtain raiser for what looks set to be a great new series' Mick Herron A serial killer is burning people alive in the Lake District's prehistoric stone circles. He leaves no clues and the police are helpless. When his name is found carved into the charred remains of the third victim, disgraced detective Washington Poe is brought back from suspension and into an investigation he wants no part of . . . Reluctantly partnered with the brilliant, but socially awkward, civilian analyst, Tilly Bradshaw, the mismatched pair uncover a trail that only he is meant to see. The elusive killer has a plan and for some reason Poe is part of it. As the body count rises, Poe discovers he has far more invested in the case than he could have possibly imagined. And in a shocking finale that will shatter everything he's ever believed about himself, Poe will learn that there are things far worse than being burned alive ... Find out why everyone loves The Puppet Show 'A page turner' Sun 'So dark and twisty' Elly Griffiths 'A powerful thriller from an explosive new talent. Tightly plotted, and not for the faint hearted!' David Mark 'A gripping start to a much anticipated new series' Vaseem Khan 'Satisfyingly twisty and clever and the flashes of humour work well to offer the reader respite from the thrill of the read' Michael J. Malone 'Britain's answer to Harry Bosch' Matt Hilton 'Dark, disturbing and so very clever. Highly recommended' Anne Cater
  • Votes: 12

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick "I can't even express how much I love this book! I didn't want this story to end!"--Reese Witherspoon "Painfully beautiful."--The New York Times Book Review "Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver."--Bustle For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life--until the unthinkable happens. Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.
  • Votes: 10

    Klara and the Sun

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 9

    The Silent Patient

    by Alex Michaelides

  • Votes: 8

    Nightingale

    by KRISTIN HANNAH

  • Votes: 8

    Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    WINNER OF THE 2020 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION - THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED AN POST BOOK AWARDS IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 'Richly sensuous... something special' The Sunday Times 'A thing of shimmering wonder' David Mitchell TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART. On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home? Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week. Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.
  • Votes: 7

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 6

    My Dark Vanessa

    by Kate Elizabeth Russell

  • Votes: 6

    The Trial

    by Franz Kafka

    The story of The Trial's publication is almost as fascinating as the novel itself. Kafka intended his parable of alienation in a mysterious bureaucracy to be burned, along with the rest of his diaries and manuscripts, after his death in 1924. Yet his friend Max Brod pressed forward to prepare The Trial and the rest of his papers for publication.
  • Votes: 6

    Valentine

    by Elizabeth Wetmore

    With the haunting emotional power of Elizabeth Strout and Barbara Kingsolver, and the atmospheric suspense of The Girls: a compulsive debut novel about that explores the aftershock of a brutal crime on the women of a small Texas oil town.
  • Votes: 6

    Hour of the Witch

    by Chris Bohjalian

  • Votes: 6

    The Push

    by Ashley Audrain

  • Votes: 6

    All the Ugly and Wonderful Things

    by Bryn Greenwood

  • Votes: 6

    The Exiles

    by Christina Baker Kline

    'Christina's level of research into characters, place and time to tell a powerful story of suffering and survival in an historical fiction is masterful' Heather Morris, author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz 'Gorgeous' Kristin Hannah, author of The Nightingale London, 1840. Evangeline has languished in Newgate prison for months, falsely accused of stealing her master’s ring. Now beginning the long journey to Australia on a prison ship, she hopes for a new life for both her and her unborn child. On board she befriends Hazel, sentenced to seven years’ transport for theft, whose own path will cross with an orphaned indigenous girl. The governor of Tasmania has ‘adopted’ Mathinna, but the family treat her more as a curiosity than a child. Amid hardships and cruelties, new life will take root in stolen soil and friendships will define lives, but only some will find their place on the other side of the world. 'Master storyteller Christina Baker Kline is at her best in this epic tale of Australia’s complex history—a vivid and rewarding feat of both empathy and imagination. I loved this book' Paula McLain, bestselling author of The Paris Wife
  • Votes: 6

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    by Robert M Pirsig

    A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.
  • Votes: 6

    The Nickel Boys

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 6

    The Devotion of Suspect X

    by Keigo Higashino

    Yasuko Hanaoka thought she had escaped her abusive ex-husband Togashi. When he shows up one day, the situation quickly escalates, and Togashi ends up dead. Yasuko's next-door-neighbor Ishigami offers his help, not only disposing of the body, but plotting the cover-up as well.
  • Votes: 5

    Alice In Wonderland #1

    by Raven Gregory

    Alice can't believe her eyes when a white rabbit wearing a waistcoat and carrying a pocket watch dashes by her. She chases after him, down a rabbit hole to a strange land full of exotic creatures, like the Mad Hatter and March Hare, a smiling Cheshire cat, a philosophical caterpillar, and a temperamental croquet-playing queen. Alice can hardly keep track of all the curious characters, let alone herself! ALICE IN WONDERLAND is an incredible feast for your eyes, ears and heart that will captivate audiences of all sizes. Here you will find the 'Alice in Wonderland' complete collection: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Alice Through the Looking Glass The Hunting of the Snark Alice's Adventures Underground The Nursery 'Alice' Head down the rabbit hole with Alice for a fantastic adventure!
  • Votes: 5

    American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Jeanine Cummins

  • Votes: 4

    In The Time Of The Butterflies

    by Julia Alvarez

  • Votes: 4

    Mara and Dann

    by Doris Lessing

    In a distant future plagued by drought, a seven-year-old girl, accompanied by her brother, encounters a variety of strange peoples in her insatiable thirst for self-knowledge
  • Votes: 4

    The God of Small Things

    by Arundhati Roy

    The year is 1969. In the state of Kerala, on the southernmost tip of India, a skyblue Plymouth with chrome tailfins is stranded on the highway amid a Marxist workers' demonstration. Inside the car sit two-egg twins Rahel and Esthappen, and so begins their tale.... Armed only with the invincible innocence of children, they fashion a childhood for themselves in the shade of the wreck that is their family - their lonely, lovely mother, Ammu (who loves by night the man her children love by day), their blind grandmother, Mammachi (who plays Handel on her violin), their beloved uncle Chacko (Rhodes scholar, pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher), their enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grandaunt), and the ghost of an imperial entomologist's moth (with unusually dense dorsal tufts). When their English cousin, Sophie Mol, and her mother, Margaret Kochamma, arrive on a Christmas visit, Esthappen and Rahel learn that Things Can Change in a Day. That lives can twist into new, ugly shapes, even cease forever, beside their river "graygreen. With fish in it. With the sky and trees in it. And at night, the broken yellow moon in it."
  • Votes: 4

    The White Tiger

    by Aravind Adiga

  • Votes: 4

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 4

    A Man Called Ove

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 4

    Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982

    by Cho Nam-Joo

    The multi-million copy international bestseller Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 is the South Korean sensation that has got the whole world talking. The life story of one young woman born at the end of the twentieth century raises questions about endemic misogyny and institutional oppression that are relevant to us all. A GUARDIAN 'ONE TO LOOK OUT FOR 2020' A RED MAGAZINE 'CAN'T WAIT TO READ' BOOK OF 2020 Riveting, original and uncompromising, this is the most important book to have emerged from South Korea since Han Kang’s The Vegetarian. “This is a book about the life of a woman living in Korea; the despair of an ordinary woman which she takes for granted. The fact that it’s not about ‘someone special’ is extremely shocking, while also being incredibly relatable.” Sayaka Murata, author of Convenience Store Woman Kim Jiyoung is a girl born to a mother whose in-laws wanted a boy. Kim Jiyoung is a sister made to share a room while her brother gets one of his own. Kim Jiyoung is a female preyed upon by male teachers at school. Kim Jiyoung is a daughter whose father blames her when she is harassed late at night. Kim Jiyoung is a good student who doesn’t get put forward for internships. Kim Jiyoung is a model employee but gets overlooked for promotion. Kim Jiyoung is a wife who gives up her career and independence for a life of domesticity. Kim Jiyoung has started acting strangely. Kim Jiyoung is depressed. Kim Jiyoung is mad. Kim Jiyoung is her own woman. Kim Jiyoung is every woman. ‘A touchstone for a conversation around feminism and gender […] Kim Jiyoung can be seen as a sort of sacrifice: a protagonist who is broken in order to open up a channel for collective rage. Along with...Bong Joon-ho’s Oscar-winning film Parasite, her story could change the bigger one’ Guardian 'This witty, disturbing book deals with sexism, mental health issues and the hypocrisy of a country where young women are “popping caffeine pills and turning jaundiced” as they slave away in factories helping to fund higher education for male siblings.' The Independent 'A treatise and a howl of anger […] it describes experiences that will be recognisable everywhere. It’s slim, unadorned narrative distils a lifetime’s iniquities into a sharp punch. The books demonstrates the unfairness of the female experience and the sheer difficulty of improving it.’ The Sunday Times
  • Votes: 3

    Let's Pretend This Never Happened

    by Jenny Lawson

  • Votes: 3

    Night Film

    by Marisha Pessl

    Night Film is a breathtakingly suspenseful literary thriller that makes you question how you decide what is real and what isn't from the critically acclaimed author of Special Topics in Calamity Physics On a damp October night the body of beautiful Ashley Cordova is discovered in a Manhattan warehouse. Though her death is ruled a suicide, investigative journalist Scott McGrath suspects otherwise. The last time McGrath got too close to the Cordova dynasty, he lost his marriage and his career. This time he could lose his mind.
  • Votes: 3

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

    by Mark Haddon

    Discover this wise, blackly funny, radically imaginative novel that has sold over 10 million copies worldwide ‘A superb achievement. He is a wise and bleakly funny writer with rare gifts of empathy’ Ian McEwan, Sunday Times bestselling author of Atonement It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass in the middle of the lawn in front of Mrs Shears’ house. Its eyes were closed. It looked as if it was running on its side, the way dogs run when they think they are chasing a cat in a dream. But the dog was not running or asleep. The dog was dead. This is Christopher's story. There are also no lies in this story because Christopher can't tell lies. Christopher does not like strangers or the colours yellow or brown or being touched. On the other hand, he knows all the countries in the world and their capital cities and every prime number up to 7507. When Christopher decides to find out who killed the neighbour's dog, his mystery story becomes more complicated than he could have ever predicted. **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 3

    The Atlas Six

    by Olivie Blake

    The Alexandrian Society, caretakers of lost knowledge from the greatest civilizations of antiquity, are the foremost secret society of magical academicians in the world. Those who earn a place among the Alexandrians will secure a life of wealth, power, and prestige beyond their wildest dreams, and each decade, only the six most uniquely talented magicians are selected to be considered for initiation. Enter the latest round of six: Libby Rhodes and Nico de Varona, unwilling halves of an unfathomable whole, who exert uncanny control over every element of physicality. Reina Mori, a naturalist, who can intuit the language of life itself. Parisa Kamali, a telepath who can traverse the depths of the subconscious, navigating worlds inside the human mind. Callum Nova, an empath easily mistaken for a manipulative illusionist, who can influence the intimate workings of a person's inner self. Finally, there is Tristan Caine, who can see through illusions to a new structure of reality-an ability so rare that neither he nor his peers can fully grasp its implications. When the candidates are recruited by the mysterious Atlas Blakely, they are told they will have one year to qualify for initiation, during which time they will be permitted preliminary access to the Society's archives and judged based on their contributions to various subjects of impossibility: time and space, luck and thought, life and death. Five, they are told, will be initiated. One will be eliminated. The six potential initiates will fight to survive the next year of their lives, and if they can prove themselves to be the best among their rivals, most of them will.Most of them.
  • Votes: 3

    Hands Down

    by Mariana Zapata

  • Votes: 3

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 3

    Before the Coffee Gets Cold

    by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

    What would you change if you could travel back in time? Down a small alleyway in the heart of Tokyo, there’s an underground café that’s been serving carefully brewed coffee for over a hundred years. Local legend says that this shop offers its customers something else besides coffee—the chance to travel back in time. The rules, however, are far from simple: you must sit in one particular seat, and you can’t venture outside the café, nor can you change the present. And, most important, you only have the time it takes to drink a hot cup of coffee—or risk getting stuck forever. Over the course of one summer, four customers visit the café in the hopes of traveling to another time: a heartbroken lover looking for closure, a nurse with a mysterious letter from her husband, a waitress hoping to say one last goodbye and a mother whose child she may never get the chance to know. Heartwarming, wistful and delightfully quirky, Before the Coffee Gets Cold explores the intersecting lives of four women who come together in one extraordinary café, where the service may not be quick, but the opportunities are endless.
  • Votes: 3

    The Woman in the Window

    by A. J. Finn

    #1 New York Times Bestseller – Soon to be a Major Motion Picture starring Amy Adams, Julianne Moore, and Gary Oldman “Astounding. Thrilling. Amazing.” —Gillian Flynn “Unputdownable.” —Stephen King “A dark, twisty confection.” —Ruth Ware “Absolutely gripping.” —Louise Penny For readers of Gillian Flynn and Tana French comes one of the decade’s most anticipated debuts, to be published in thirty-six languages around the world and already in development as a major film from Fox: a twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house. It isn’t paranoia if it’s really happening . . . Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems. Twisty and powerful, ingenious and moving, The Woman in the Window is a smart, sophisticated novel of psychological suspense that recalls the best of Hitchcock.
  • Votes: 3

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 3

    The Five People You Meet in Heaven

    by Mitch Albom

  • Votes: 3

    House of Leaves

    by Mark Z. Danielewski

  • Votes: 2

    Life of Pi

    by Yann Martel

    MORE THAN SEVEN MILLION COPIES SOLD The beloved and bestselling novel and winner of the Booker Prize, Life of Pi. New York Times Bestseller * Los Angeles Times Bestseller * Washington Post Bestseller * San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller * Chicago Tribune Bestseller "A story to make you believe in the soul-sustaining power of fiction."—Los Angeles Times Book Review After the sinking of a cargo ship, a solitary lifeboat remains bobbing on the wild blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen-year-old boy named Pi, a hyena, a wounded zebra, an orangutan—and a 450-pound royal bengal tiger. The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary and beloved works of fiction in recent years. Universally acclaimed upon publication, Life of Pi is a modern classic.
  • Votes: 2

    The Night Circus

    by Erin Morgenstern

  • Votes: 2

    The Source

    by James A. Michener

  • Votes: 2

    The Blacktongue Thief (Blacktongue, 1)

    by Christopher Buehlman

  • Votes: 2

    Queenie

    THE NUMBER TWO SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'Hilarious, compelling, painful, enlightening, honest. I loved it.' - Dolly Alderton 'Brilliant, timely, funny, heartbreaking' - Jojo Moyes 'A vital, often very funny novel' - The Sunday Times 'Inspirational, funny and wise' - Kit de Waal 'Perfect for anyone who loves Fleabag' - Mail on Sunday Queenie Jenkins can't cut a break. Well, apart from the one from her long term boyfriend, Tom. That's definitely just a break though. Definitely not a break up. Then there's her boss who doesn't seem to see her and her Caribbean family who don't seem to listen (if it's not Jesus or water rates, they're not interested). She's trying to fit in two worlds that don't really understand her. It's no wonder she's struggling. She was named to be queen of everything. So why is she finding it so hard to rule her own life? A darkly comic and bitingly subversive take on life, love, race and family, QUEENIE will have you nodding in recognition, crying in solidarity, and rooting for this unforgettable character every step of the way. Perfect for fans of Dolly Alderton, Elizabeth Day, Sally Rooney and Diana Evans, and anyone who loved Fleabag. ******** Praise for QUEENIE: 'I was engrossed and loved Queenie - her humour, her pain, her politics, her friends, her family.' - Diana Evans 'Candice gives so generously with her joy, pain and humour, that we cannot help but become fully immersed in the life of Queenie - a beautiful and compelling book.' - Afua Hirsch *This book has been printed with three different colour cover designs. We are unable to accept requests for a specific cover. The different covers will be assigned to orders at random*
  • Votes: 2

    The Martian

    by Andy Weir

  • Votes: 2

    Oh Yes, Oh Yes

  • Votes: 2

    Monster Hunter Bloodlines

    by Larry Correia

  • Votes: 2

    Rohan Bullkin and the Shadows

    by Juleus Ghunta

    In this narrative of one boy's discovery of the healing power of books, Rohan Bullkin and the Shadows highlights connections between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), academic weaknesses and disruptive behaviours.
  • Votes: 2

    Fearless

    by Eric Blehm

    Chronicles the life of Navy SEAL Team Six operator Adam Brown, a man whose heroism and devotion still stand as a beacon to his friends and family, even after his death in the Afghan Hindu Kush mountains in 2010.
  • Votes: 2

    Gone Girl

    by Gillian Flynn

    For use in schools and libraries only. When a woman goes missing on her fifth wedding anniversary, her diary reveals hidden turmoil in her marriage, while her husband, desperate to clear himself of suspicion, realizes that something more disturbing than murder may have occurred.
  • Votes: 2

    A Gentleman in Moscow

    by Amor Towles

    The mega-bestseller with more than 1.5 million readers that is soon to be a major television series "The novel buzzes with the energy of numerous adventures, love affairs, [and] twists of fate." —The Wall Street Journal He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to. From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility—a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.
  • Votes: 2

    The Institute

    by Stephen King

    From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King whose “storytelling transcends genre” (Newsday) comes “another winner: creepy and touching and horrifyingly believable” (The Boston Globe) about a group of kids confronting evil. In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.” In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute. As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is “first-rate entertainment that has something important to say. We all need to listen” (The Washington Post).
  • Votes: 2

    The Lies of Locke Lamora (Gentleman Bastards)

    by Scott Lynch

  • Votes: 2

    The Thursday Murder Club

    by Richard Osman

  • Votes: 2

    Lonesome Dove

    by Larry McMurtry

  • Votes: 2

    Mexican Gothic

    by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

  • Votes: 2

    True Dead (Jane Yellowrock Book 14)

    by Faith Hunter

    Shapeshifting skinwalker Jane Yellowrock, used to work for vampires and hunt them down in the city of New Orleans. That was then. Now, Jane is the Dark Queen facing down the direst of all evils
  • Votes: 2

    The Martian Chronicles

    by Ray Bradbury

    The tranquility of Mars is disrupted by humans who want to conquer space, colonize the planet, and escape a doomed Earth.
  • Votes: 2

    At the End of the World (8) (Black Tide Rising)

    by Charles E. Gannon

  • Votes: 2

    Harlem Shuffle

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 2

    Dune

    by Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.
  • Votes: 2

    Archer's Voice

    by Mia Sheridan

  • Votes: 1

    The House on Mango Street

    by Sandra Cisneros

    The bestselling coming-of-age classic, acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught in schools and universities alike, and translated around the world from the winner of the 2019 PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Told in a series of vignettes-sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous-Sandra Cisneros' masterpiece is a classic story of childhood and self-discovery. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.
  • Votes: 1

    Golden Boy

    by Abigail Tarttelin

    Presenting themselves to the world as an effortlessly excellent family, successful criminal lawyer Karen, her Parliament candidate husband and her intelligent athlete son, Max, find their world crumbling in the wake of a friend's betrayal and the secret about Max's intersexual identity.
  • Votes: 1

    Small Gods

    by Terry Pratchett

  • Votes: 1

    Kane and Abel

    by Jeffrey Archer

  • Votes: 1

    And the Mountains Echoed

    by Khaled Hosseini

    From the no. 1 bestselling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, the book that readers everywhere have been waiting for: his first novel in six years.
  • Votes: 1

    The Shadow of the Wind

    by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    The international bestseller and modern classic - over 20 million copies sold worldwide 'Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots. One gorgeous read' STEPHEN KING 'An instant classic' DAILY TELEGRAPH The Shadow of the Wind is a stunning literary thriller in which the discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'Cemetery of Lost Books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'The Shadow of the Wind' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from the book, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind... A SUNDAY TIMES bestseller and Richard & Judy book club choice.
  • Votes: 1

    Diary of a Murderer

    by Young-ha Kim

    From "one of South Korea's best and most worldly writers" (NPR): An electric collection that captivates and provokes in equal measure, exploring what it means to be on the edge--between life and death, good and evil
  • Votes: 1

    All Systems Red

    by Martha Wells

    Now available in hardcover, All Systems Red is the first entry in Martha Wells' New York Times and USA Today bestselling, Alex and Nebula Award-winning science fiction series, The Murderbot Diaries. "As a heartless killing machine, I was a complete failure." In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company. Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety. But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn’t a primary concern. On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid—a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is. But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth. The Murderbot Diaries #1 All Systems Red #2 Artificial Condition #3 Rogue Protocol #4 Exit Strategy
  • Votes: 1

    The Hunter

    by Richard Stark

    You probably haven’t ever noticed them. But they’ve noticed you. They notice everything. That’s their job. Sitting quietly in a nondescript car outside a bank making note of the tellers’ work habits, the positions of the security guards. Lagging a few car lengths behind the Brinks truck on its daily rounds. Surreptitiously jiggling the handle of an unmarked service door at the racetrack. They’re thieves. Heisters, to be precise. They’re pros, and Parker is far and away the best of them. If you’re planning a job, you want him in. Tough, smart, hardworking, and relentlessly focused on his trade, he is the heister’s heister, the robber’s robber, the heavy’s heavy. You don’t want to cross him, and you don’t want to get in his way, because he’ll stop at nothing to get what he’s after. Parker, the ruthless antihero of Richard Stark’s eponymous mystery novels, is one of the most unforgettable characters in hardboiled noir. Lauded by critics for his taut realism, unapologetic amorality, and razor-sharp prose-style—and adored by fans who turn each intoxicating page with increasing urgency—Stark is a master of crime writing, his books as influential as any in the genre. The University of Chicago Press has embarked on a project to return the early volumes of this series to print for a new generation of readers to discover—and become addicted to. In The Hunter, the first volume in the series, Parker roars into New York City, seeking revenge on the woman who betrayed him and on the man who took his money, stealing and scamming his way to redemption. “Westlake knows precisely how to grab a reader, draw him or her into the story, and then slowly tighten his grip until escape is impossible.”—Washington Post Book World “Elmore Leonard wouldn’t write what he does if Stark hadn’t been there before. And Quentin Tarantino wouldn’t write what he does without Leonard. . . . Old master that he is, Stark does all of them one better.”—Los Angeles Times “Donald Westlake’s Parker novels are among the small number of books I read over and over. Forget all that crap you’ve been telling yourself about War and Peace and Proust—these are the books you’ll want on that desert island.”—Lawrence Block
  • Votes: 1

    Credence

    by Penelope Douglas

    Tiernan grew up with wealth and privilege, but not love or guidence. After her parents' deaths, she goes to live with her father's stepbrother and his two sons. As the three of them take her under their wing, teach her to work and survive in the remote woods, she slowly finds her place among them. And she realizes that lines blur and rules become easy to break when no one is watching.
  • Votes: 1

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 1

    You Too?

    by Janet Gurtler

  • Votes: 1

    Neverwhere

    by Neil Gaiman

  • Votes: 1

    The Financial Lives of the Poets

    by Jess Walter

    From the author of the bestselling Beautiful Ruins comes The Financial Lives of Poets - a brilliantly funny novel about a man who, in an attempt to save himself, may destroy everything he loves. Meet Matt Prior. He's about to lose his job, his house, his wife, and maybe his sanity too. Financial journalist Matt quit his job to set up a website which couldn't fail. Only now he's woken up to the biggest crisis since the Great Crash, and it has. He's got six days to save his house. It's hard to focus when your wife's having an online affair with her childhood sweetheart, but there are children to think about . . . So when he gets hold of some high-grade dope and finds he can sell a piece on at a profit, he begins to think this might be his salvation. A fabulously funny, heartfelt novel about how we can skate close to the edge of ruin - and pull back. 'A beautifully laid-back exultation of the human connections that make life worth living' Metro 'Ecstatically funny and unusually big-hearted' Financial Times 'It made me laugh more than any other book I've read this year' Nick Hornby
  • Votes: 1

    Lost Kingdom

    by Julia Flynn Siler

    The New York Times–bestselling author delivers “a riveting saga about Big Sugar flexing its imperialist muscle in Hawaii . . . A real gem of a book” (Douglas Brinkley, author of American Moonshot). Deftly weaving together a memorable cast of characters, Lost Kingdom brings to life the clash between a vulnerable Polynesian people and relentlessly expanding capitalist powers. Portraits of royalty and rogues, sugar barons, and missionaries combine into a sweeping tale of the Hawaiian Kingdom’s rise and fall. At the center of the story is Lili‘uokalani, the last queen of Hawai‘i. Born in 1838, she lived through the nearly complete economic transformation of the islands. Lucrative sugar plantations gradually subsumed the majority of the land, owned almost exclusively by white planters, dubbed the “Sugar Kings.” Hawai‘i became a prize in the contest between America, Britain, and France, each seeking to expand their military and commercial influence in the Pacific. The monarchy had become a figurehead, victim to manipulation from the wealthy sugar plantation owners. Lili‘u was determined to enact a constitution to reinstate the monarchy’s power but was outmaneuvered by the United States. The annexation of Hawai‘i had begun, ushering in a new century of American imperialism. “An important chapter in our national history, one that most Americans don’t know but should.” —The New York Times Book Review “Siler gives us a riveting and intimate look at the rise and tragic fall of Hawaii’s royal family . . . A reminder that Hawaii remains one of the most breathtaking places in the world. Even if the kingdom is lost.” —Fortune “[A] well-researched, nicely contextualized history . . . [Indeed] ‘one of the most audacious land grabs of the Gilded Age.’” —Los Angeles Times
  • Votes: 1

    Sharp Teeth

    by Toby Barlow

    An ancient race of lycanthropes survives in modern L.A. and its numbers are growing as packs convert the city's downtrodden into their fold. Stuck in the middle are a local dogcatcher and the woman he loves, whose secret past haunts her as she fights a bloody one-woman battle to save their relationship. Sharp Teeth is a novel-in-verse that blends epic themes with dark humour, dogs playing cards, crystal meth labs, and acts of heartache and betrayal in Southern California.
  • Votes: 1

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    by Harper Lee

    "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel—a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice—but the weight of history will only tolerate so much. One of the best-loved classics of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has earned many dis-tinctions since its original publication in 1960. It has won the Pulitzer Prize, been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and been made into an enormously popular movie. It was also named the best novel of the twentieth century by librarians across the country (Library Journal).
  • Votes: 1

    Still Life

    by Louise Penny

  • Votes: 1

    Before I Fall

    by Lauren Oliver

    After she dies in a car crash, teenaged Samantha relives the day of her death over and over again until, on the seventh day, she finally discovers a way to save herself.
  • Votes: 1

    Animal Farm

    by George Orwell

    Animal Farm is an allegorical novella reflecting events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism. In the book, Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England." When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt, driving the drunken, irresponsible farmer Mr Jones, as well as Mrs Jones and the other human caretakers and employees, off the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm." They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 - 21 January 1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.
  • Votes: 1

    Bewilderment

    by Richard Powers

  • Votes: 1

    The Language Secret

    by John Stedman

  • Votes: 1

    Mister Death's Blue-Eyed Girls

    by Mary Downing Hahn

    Narrated from several different perspectives, tells the story of the 1956 murder of two teenaged girls in suburban Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Votes: 1

    Brave New World

    by Aldous Huxley

    Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom.
  • Votes: 1

    Inkheart (Inkheart Trilogy)

    by Cornelia Funke

    Since Meggie's bookbinder father can "read" fictional characters to life one abducts them; Meggie "reads" herself into Inkworld as the original creator of the world tries to redirect the story; and the Book of Immortality starts to unravel.
  • Votes: 1

    Fault Lines

    by Raghuram G. Rajan

    From an economist who warned of the global financial crisis, a new warning about the continuing peril to the world economy Raghuram Rajan was one of the few economists who warned of the global financial crisis before it hit. Now, as the world struggles to recover, it's tempting to blame what happened on just a few greedy bankers who took irrational risks and left the rest of us to foot the bill. In Fault Lines, Rajan argues that serious flaws in the economy are also to blame, and warns that a potentially more devastating crisis awaits us if they aren't fixed. Rajan shows how the individual choices that collectively brought about the economic meltdown—made by bankers, government officials, and ordinary homeowners—were rational responses to a flawed global financial order in which the incentives to take on risk are incredibly out of step with the dangers those risks pose. He traces the deepening fault lines in a world overly dependent on the indebted American consumer to power global economic growth and stave off global downturns. He exposes a system where America's growing inequality and thin social safety net create tremendous political pressure to encourage easy credit and keep job creation robust, no matter what the consequences to the economy's long-term health; and where the U.S. financial sector, with its skewed incentives, is the critical but unstable link between an overstimulated America and an underconsuming world. In Fault Lines, Rajan demonstrates how unequal access to education and health care in the United States puts us all in deeper financial peril, even as the economic choices of countries like Germany, Japan, and China place an undue burden on America to get its policies right. He outlines the hard choices we need to make to ensure a more stable world economy and restore lasting prosperity.
  • Votes: 1

    The Fisherman King

    by Kathrina Mohd Daud

    [Finalist for the 2020 Epigram Books Fiction Prize] Eight years ago, Lisan the fisherman, who has always believed he was descended from royalty, left his wife and the Water Village. Now he’s back, and he says he can prove it. Six hundred years ago, a forbidden relationship between the royal children of Brunei set into motion a chain of events that will end with the death of a king...or the death of a god. As the story of Lisan’s true intentions – and what he was really doing in those years away – unravels, the story of those doomed royal children also spins to its inevitable conclusion.
  • Votes: 1

    The Goldfinch

    by Donna Tartt

  • Votes: 1

    We Were Liars

    by E. Lockhart

    A Zoella Bookclub title 2016 1. Read this book. 2. On reaching the final page, you may experience an urgent need to read it all over again. 3. Check your friends have read it. 4. NOW YOU ARE FREE TO TALK TO THEM ABOUT IT ENDLESSLY Winner of Goodreads Best Young Adult Fiction Book 2014 'E. Lockhart is one of our most important novelists, and she has given us her best book yet. Thrilling, beautiful, and blisteringly smart, We Were Liars is utterly unforgettable.' - John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars 'Irresistible' - New York Times Book Review 'Haunting, sophisticated' - Wall Street Journal 'Bowl-you-over' - Cosmopolitan 'So freaking good' - Sarah Dessen 'Such beautiful writing' - Libba Bray 'Beautiful and disturbing' - Justine Larbalestier 'Better than the hype' - Lauren Oliver We are the Liars. We are beautiful, privileged and live a life of carefree luxury. We are cracked and broken. A story of love and romance. A tale of tragedy. Which are lies? Which is truth?
  • Votes: 1

    Leaving Poppy by Kate Cann (2006-05-03)

    This attractively presented edited collection is a welcome analysis of issues facing universities. It consists of 14 chapters by experts who work in university management and economics departments. . . this is an excellent collection. Its value stems from the fact that it enables comparisons to be made and to see that globally the traditional university system is being seriously challenged. The authors in this collection provide a range of perspectives on how the universities in their various locations can begin to respond to these challenges. Anthony Potts, Journal of Educational Administration and History The future of the university, this old European institution, is of utmost interest not only to university students and teachers, but to whole societies; not only in Europe, but in the whole world, as the institution has become global. Nobody can predict it, but the editors of this volume were able to ask incisive questions and collected thoughtful and provocative answers, which can contribute to the debate on the fate of universities in a significant way. Barbara Czarniawska, University of Gothenburg, Sweden While acknowledging the value of better university management, this book resists the idea that an externally imposed standardization and a more homogenous European system of higher education adds up to a desiderata. On the contrary the book editors argue that the persistence of the university and its survival in the future is aided by differences between universities. European Universities in Transition is must reading for students of higher education reform. Francisco O. Ramirez, Stanford University, US This timely and important book provides a critical analysis of the changes and challenges that currently affect European universities. Using both theoretical contributions and applied case studies, leading experts argue that universities as institutions are in need of change although the routes that the process may take are heterogeneous. The authors debate whether the reform of universities suffers from the undue influence of generalisations that do not stand up to scrutiny. It is simply too narrow to focus on strategies such as imitating a university model , hoping that best practices will solve the inefficiencies of the organisation as a whole, or relying on the presence of few external individuals on the universities board to save the difficult relationships between the university and the surrounding economy and society. These ideas ignore the diversity of universities geographically and historically. Above all, they underestimate the power that such diversity holds in making universities survive across centuries. Researchers with an interest in university reform will appreciate this important contribution to the debate, whilst policymakers and university administrators will find this book invaluable in understanding the changes and problems facing European universities and gaining insights on possible solutions.
  • Votes: 1

    Goodbye Heiko, Goodbye Berlin (Leb Wohl Heiko, Leb Wohl Berlin)

    by Owen Levy

    A bittersweet gay romance narrated by an African-American expatriate landing in West Berlin as Cold War tensions ease and the infamous Berlin Wall soon to fall. His infatuation with East Berlin wunderkind Heiko Heinz precipitates an emotional journey of self-discovery. Heiko's own self-reinvention parallels the dramatic changes Germany undergoes in the swiftest political and socioeconomic transition recorded in modern times. The first original English-language novel depicting the East Berlin cultural underground and the thriving gay scenes on both sides of The Wall.
  • Votes: 1

    Daisy Jones & The Six

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 1

    My Wattpad Love

    by Ariana Godoy

    Julie has always been the shy type. Her world changes when she finds Wattpad, a very popular ebook community. She becomes addicted to it and even starts posting her own stories. But are friends, fans and votes all she will get from this site? Or is it possible to find love as well?
  • Votes: 1

    Nobody Does it Better

    by Samantha Chase

    A billionaire hell bent on transforming a sleepy coastal town. The hometown girl determined to do whatever it takes to stop him. Peyton Bishop has big plans and big dreams when it comes to leaving her mark on Magnolia Sound. Her great-grandfather founded the coastal town and every generation before her has left their stamp. Now it’s her turn. But just as she takes the leap and makes plans to build her own restaurant, a sexy business mogul buys her dream property right from under her. Ryder Ashford knows a good thing when he sees it, and he knows he’s found a gem with Magnolia Sound. He just needs to get the small town up to his standards first. He’s received nothing but praise from the locals so far, but that’s about to change because the bratty and beautiful café owner whose property he just snatched isn’t shy about calling him out on his plans. He should be annoyed she’s getting in his way, but he enjoys their verbal sparring too much. Ryder’s a man who goes after what he wants, and what he wants is the best. He never thought that would turn out to be the one woman standing between him and his dreams.
  • Votes: 1

    The Best of Me

    by Nicholas Sparks

    The bestselling love story behind the massive Hollywood film starring James Marsden and Michelle Monaghan. They were teenage sweethearts from opposite sides of the tracks - with a passion that would change their lives for ever. But life would force them apart. Years later, the lines they had drawn between past and present are about to slip . . . Called back to their hometown for the funeral of the mentor who once gave them shelter when they needed it most, they are faced with each other once again, and forced to confront the paths they chose. Can true love ever rewrite the past? This is the new epic love story from the multi-million-copy bestselling author of The Notebook, The Lucky One and The Last Song. Nicholas Sparks is one of the world's most beloved authors.
  • Votes: 1

    The Queen of the Tearling

    by Erika Johansen

    'Like Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games meets Pulp Fiction' Daily Mail Her throne awaits . . . if she can live long enough to take it. Kelsea Glynn is the sole heir to the throne of Tearling but has been raised in secret after her mother – a monarch as vain as she was foolish – was murdered for ruining her kingdom. For eighteen years, the Tearling has been ruled by Kelsea’s uncle - Regent in name, but in truth the debauched puppet of the Red Queen, the sorceress-tyrant of neighbouring realm of Mortmesme. On Kelsea’s nineteenth birthday, the tattered remnants of her mother’s guard - each pledged to defend the queen to the death - arrive to bring this most un-regal young woman out of hiding... And so begins her journey back to her kingdom’s heart, to claim the throne, win the loyalty of her people, overturn her mother’s legacy and redeem the Tearling from the forces of corruption and dark magic that are threatening to destroy it. But Kelsea's story is not just about her learning the true nature of her inheritance - it's about a heroine who must learn to acknowledge and live with the realities of coming of age in all its insecurities and attractions, alongside the ethical dilemmas of ruling justly and fairly while simply trying to stay alive...
  • Votes: 1

    A Darker Shade of Magic

    by V. E. Schwab

  • Votes: 1

    A Certain Hunger

    by Chelsea G. Summers

  • Votes: 1

    The Way of the Lion

    by Olumide Holloway

  • Votes: 1

    Brimstone Angels

    by Erin M. Evans

    “Well, I'm now behind on my own writing, because I couldn't tear myself away from Lesser Evils. Then again, I'm only behind by a single day--because I really couldn't tear myself away from Lesser Evils. If the next one's not out until tomorrow, it's still too far off. And if Evans is not already a name spoken of as part of the true Forgotten Realms pantheon, along with Kemp, Cunningham, and Salvatore, it can only be because she has fewer books out, and thus hasn't reached everyone yet.”— Ari Marmell, author of Agents of Artifice, The Conqueror's Shadow, and the Widdershins Adventure series “Lesser Evils is incredibly immersive and technically brilliant. I love the complex characters and layered plot, and the dialogue is sharp, natural, and brimming with personality. It’s one of those books where you forget about the fact that you're reading a book, and just experience the story as though you were there. Erin M. Evans has a rare talent. She's one to follow for sure.”—Susan J. Morris, author of “Writers Don’t Cry” column on Omnivoracious, an Amazon.com books blog “Lesser Evils will leave you begging for more from Erin M. Evans. Intrigue upon intrigue and a host of unforgettable characters interwoven into a plot that is riddled with heart-stopping action.Who could ask for more!” —Chris A. Jackson, award-winning author of Scimitar Moon Overview: Mere weeks after escaping Neverwinter, Farideh’s dreams are still haunted by Lorcan, the cambion devil whose power fuels her own. One of only four known descendents of the original Brimstone Angel, Farideh has no regrets about the pact she made with the devil. But no one in the Hells knows that she has a twin—an impulsive eager sister, just waiting to be corrupted. At least as long as Lorcan can keep her secret. Determined to protect her sister, Farideh searches for a ritual that could call Lorcan out of the Hells. But in the midst of her hunt, she’s drawn into an assignment for the secret society the Harpers, an assignment which leads her and a ragtag group of allies to an ancient Netherese library deep underground. While the group combs the site, dodging ghosts and magical traps, Farideh discovers a magical book whose pronouncements throw into question everything she thought she knew about herself and her sister. The more the Book gives up its macabre secrets, the more one thing becomes clear—a traitor lurks among them. Read More: If you are looking for more from Erin M. Evans, search for “The God Catcher” her debut novel about a woman who may be a dragon—or who may just be criminally insane. If you are looking for more in this series, search for “Brimstone Angels” by Erin M. Evans about Farideh, a kickass heroine sets out to unravel the schemes of an evil succubus in the ruined city. If you are looking for more kickass heroines, search for “Gauntlgrym” by R.A. Salvatore, featuring the alluring and powerful Dahlia Sin’Felle who squares off against the legendary Drizzt Do’Urden. If you are looking for more epic fantasy series, search for “Homeland” by R.A. Salvatore, the first book in the epic Legend of Drizzt. If you are looking for more sword and sorcery, search for “Sword of the Gods” by Bruce R. Cordell, the story of an angel given mortal flesh to act as an assassin for gods who no longer exist. If you are looking for more stories set in the Forgotten Realms, search for “Twilight Falling” by Paul Kemp, about Erevis Cale, an assassin with a conscience.
  • Votes: 1

    Islands in the Stream

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 1

    The Richest Man in Babylon

    by George S. Clason

  • Votes: 1

    Apples Never Fall

    by Liane Moriarty

    The Sunday Times bestseller from the worldwide bestselling author of Amazon Prime's NINE PERFECT STRANGERS and the Emmy and Golden Globe-winning HBO series BIG LITTLE LIES 'A tour-de-force of a novel; brilliantly plotted and superbly written . . . The tension builds to a conclusion alive with ingenious twists. Smart, sharp and utterly riveting' DAILY MAIL 'Utterly and completely wonderful. I've loved all of Liane's books but Apples Never Fall is next-level writing: an intelligent, forensic portrait of a family' MARIAN KEYES 'A fantastic storyteller. Apples Never Fall is gripping, getting to the dark underbelly of a seemingly perfect family. A cracking read' ITV's LORRAINE KELLY 'HER BEST YET' MAIL ON SUNDAY _______ The Delaney family love one another dearly - it's just that sometimes they want to murder each other . . . Joy Delaney and husband Stan have done well. Four wonderful grown-up children. A family business to envy. The golden years of retirement ahead of them. So when Joy Delaney vanishes - no note, no calls, her bike missing - it's natural that tongues will wag. How did Stan scratch his face? And who was the stranger who entered and suddenly left their lives? What are they all hiding? But for the Delaney children there is a much more terrifying question: did they ever know their parents at all? _______ 'Magnificent, pyrotechnic, deliciously theatrical' GUARDIAN 'The perfect mix of edge-of-your-seat plotting, well-crafted characters and a satisfying ending' GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Praise for Liane Moriarty: 'One of the few writers I'll drop anything for' JOJO MOYES 'Staggeringly brilliant' SOPHIE HANNAH 'Keeps you guessing until the very end' REESE WITHERSPOON **Apples Never Fall has been optioned for TV by Heyday Television**
  • Votes: 1

    Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

    by Haruki Murakami

    A mesmerising mystery story about friendship from the internationally bestselling author of Norwegian Wood and 1Q84 Tsukuru Tazaki had four best friends at school. By chance all of their names contained a colour. The two boys were called Akamatsu, meaning ‘red pine’, and Oumi, ‘blue sea’, while the girls’ names were Shirane, ‘white root’, and Kurono, ‘black field’. Tazaki was the only last name with no colour in it. One day Tsukuru Tazaki’s friends announced that they didn't want to see him, or talk to him, ever again. Since that day Tsukuru has been floating through life, unable to form intimate connections with anyone. But then he meets Sara, who tells him that the time has come to find out what happened all those years ago.
  • Votes: 1

    Breath

    by James Nestor

  • Votes: 1

    Love, Triangle

    by Marcie Colleen

    A hilariously clever geometry-inspired picture book from acclaimed author Marcie Colleen and popular illustrator Bob Shea. Perfect for fans of Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Ever since they were a dot and a speck, Circle and Square have been best friends.... Then someone new comes along: a cool, exciting Triangle. And three starts to feel like a crowd. . . . With their friendship bent out of shape, can they put it back together again?
  • Votes: 1

    It Will Just Be Us

    by Jo Kaplan

  • Votes: 1

    Where the Forest Meets the Stars

    by Glendy Vanderah

    In this gorgeously stunning debut, a mysterious child teaches two strangers how to love and trust again. After the loss of her mother and her own battle with breast cancer, Joanna Teale returns to her graduate research on nesting birds in rural Illinois, determined to prove that her recent hardships have not broken her. She throws herself into her work from dusk to dawn, until her solitary routine is disrupted by the appearance of a mysterious child who shows up at her cabin barefoot and covered in bruises. The girl calls herself Ursa, and she claims to have been sent from the stars to witness five miracles. With concerns about the child's home situation, Jo reluctantly agrees to let her stay--just until she learns more about Ursa's past. Jo enlists the help of her reclusive neighbor, Gabriel Nash, to solve the mystery of the charming child. But the more time they spend together, the more questions they have. How does a young girl not only read but understand Shakespeare? Why do good things keep happening in her presence? And why aren't Jo and Gabe checking the missing children's website anymore? Though the three have formed an incredible bond, they know difficult choices must be made. As the summer nears an end and Ursa gets closer to her fifth miracle, her dangerous past closes in. When it finally catches up to them, all of their painful secrets will be forced into the open, and their fates will be left to the stars.
  • Votes: 1

    Lovely War

    by Julie Berry

  • Votes: 1

    The Wrath & the Dawn (The Wrath and the Dawn)

    by Renée Ahdieh

    #1 New York Times Bestseller A sumptuous and epically told love story inspired by A Thousand and One Nights Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when sixteen-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the Caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi’s wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch . . . she’s falling in love with the very boy who killed her dearest friend. She discovers that the murderous boy-king is not all that he seems and neither are the deaths of so many girls. Shazi is determined to uncover the reason for the murders and to break the cycle once and for all. *The book is a Rough Cut Edition (pages are deliberately not the same length).*
  • Votes: 1

    The Girl and the Ghost

    by Hanna Alkaf

    A Malaysian folk tale comes to life in this emotionally layered, chilling middle grade debut, perfect for fans of The Book of Boy and The Jumbies. I am a dark spirit, the ghost announced grandly. I am your inheritance, your grandmother’s legacy. I am yours to command. Suraya is delighted when her witch grandmother gifts her a pelesit. She names her ghostly companion Pink, and the two quickly become inseparable. But Suraya doesn’t know that pelesits have a dark side—and when Pink’s shadows threaten to consume them both, they must find enough light to survive . . . before they are both lost to the darkness. Fans of Holly Black’s Doll Bones and Tahereh Mafi’s Furthermore series will love this ghostly middle grade debut that explores jealousy, love, and the extraordinary power of friendship.
  • Votes: 1

    Sing Me Forgotten

    by Jessica S. Olson

    Isda should have died. Cast into a well for being one of the magical few who can manipulate memories when people sing, she was rescued by the local opera house's owner. All he asks in exchange for keeping her safe is that she use her power to keep his customers happy...and that she stay out of sight. Then Isda meets Emeric Rodin, and she finds in his memories hints of a way to break free of her gilded prison. Haunted by this possibility, she searches his mind for the answers she's craved her whole life. But even as she struggles with growing feelings for Emeric, she learns that in order to take charge of her own destiny, she must become what the world always feared she would be--a monster. "Lush and lavish, Sing Me Forgotten hit all the right notes." --Erin A. Craig, New York Times bestselling author of House of Salt and Sorrows "A deliciously magical feminist twist on the beloved classic The Phantom of the Opera." --Kester Grant, Sunday Times bestselling author of The Court of Miracles
  • Votes: 1

    The Seed Keeper

    by Diane Wilson

    A haunting novel spanning several generations, The Seed Keeper follows a Dakhóta family’s struggle to preserve their way of life, and their sacrifices to protect what matters most. Rosalie Iron Wing has grown up in the woods with her father, Ray, a former science teacher who tells her stories of plants, of the stars, of the origins of the Dakhóta people. Until, one morning, Ray doesn’t return from checking his traps. Told she has no family, Rosalie is sent to live with a foster family in nearby Mankato—where the reserved, bookish teenager meets rebellious Gaby Makespeace, in a friendship that transcends the damaged legacies they’ve inherited. On a winter’s day many years later, Rosalie returns to her childhood home. A widow and mother, she has spent the previous two decades on her white husband’s farm, finding solace in her garden even as the farm is threatened first by drought and then by a predatory chemical company. Now, grieving, Rosalie begins to confront the past, on a search for family, identity, and a community where she can finally belong. In the process, she learns what it means to be descended from women with souls of iron—women who have protected their families, their traditions, and a precious cache of seeds through generations of hardship and loss, through war and the insidious trauma of boarding schools. Weaving together the voices of four indelible women, The Seed Keeper is a beautifully told story of reawakening, of remembering our original relationship to the seeds and, through them, to our ancestors.
  • Votes: 1

    The Elites

    by Natasha Ngan

    Uncover a riveting story of palace intrigue set in a sumptuous Asian-inspired fantasy world in the breakout YA novel that Publisher's Weekly calls "elegant and adrenaline-soaked." In this richly developed fantasy, Lei is a member of the Paper caste, the lowest and most persecuted class of people in Ikhara. She lives in a remote village with her father, where the decade-old trauma of watching her mother snatched by royal guards for an unknown fate still haunts her. Now, the guards are back and this time it's Lei they're after -- the girl with the golden eyes whose rumored beauty has piqued the king's interest. Over weeks of training in the opulent but oppressive palace, Lei and eight other girls learns the skills and charm that befit a king's consort. There, she does the unthinkable: she falls in love. Her forbidden romance becomes enmeshed with an explosive plot that threatens her world's entire way of life. Lei, still the wide-eyed country girl at heart, must decide how far she's willing to go for justice and revenge.
  • Votes: 1

    Smoking Guns and Bleeding Streets

    by Olumide Holloway

    This story takes place in Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa. It brings together an investigative journalist, an assassin, law enforcement officers and some shady individuals. The characters are all in a race to obtain an incriminating piece of evidence.
  • Votes: 1

    Improbable

    by Adam Fawer

    From a brilliant new talent comes a riveting novel of chance, fate, and numbers, and one man's strange journey past the boundaries of the possible. David Caine inhabits a world of obsession, rich rewards, and rapid, destructive downfalls. A compulsive gambler and brilliant mathematician prone to crippling epileptic seizures, he possesses the uncanny ability to calculate odds of any hand in the blink of an eye. But one night at an underground poker club, Caine makes a costly mi scalculation, sending his life spinning out of control. Desperate, he agrees to test an experimental drug with unnerving side effects: inexplicable visions of the past, present, and future. Unsure whether he's perceiving an alternate reality or suffering a psychotic breakdown, Caine embarks on a journey that stretches beyond the possible into the world of the improbable. Gradually, he discovers the extent of his astonishing new ability -- but powerful, shadowy forces know Caine's secret. Now Caine must fight for his survival -- and his sanity . . .
  • Votes: 1

    The Cat in the Hat

    by Dr. Seuss

  • Votes: 1

    The Great Divorce

    by C. S. Lewis

  • Votes: 1

    The Riddles of Epsilon

    by Christine Morton-Shaw

    Something dark has awoken on the remote island of Lume Jess is not pleased when her parents drag her off to live on the weird little island of Lume. But then she encounters an eerie presence in an abandoned cottage, and her anger turns to fear when it begins to lead her through a series of creepy riddles. As she slowly unravels the mysteries of Lume, she finds the writings of Sebastian, a boy who lived one hundred years ago and whose life contains unsettling reflections of her own. To her horror, the dangers he unearthed in 1894 now begin to threaten Jess and her family . . . and if Jess does not unlock the riddles in time, she may lose her mother forever.
  • Votes: 1

    The Pillars of the Earth

    by Ken Follett

  • Votes: 1

    [The Golem and the Djinni] [By

    by Helene Wecker

    In The Golem and the Jinni, a chance meeting between mythical beings takes readers on a dazzling journey through cultures in turn-of-the-century New York. Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life to by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic and dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899. Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.
  • Votes: 1

    The Bancroft Strategy

    by Robert Ludlum

  • Votes: 1

    Kokoro

    by Natsume Soseki

  • Votes: 1

    I Am Pilgrim

    by Terry Hayes

    Pilgrim is the code name for a world class and legendary secret agent. His adversary is known only as the Saracen. As a young boy, the Saracen saw his dissident father beheaded in a Saudi Arabian public square, creating a burning desire to destroy the special relationship between the US and the Kingdom. When a woman's body is found in a seedy hotel near Ground Zero, the techniques are pulled from a cult classic of forensic science that Pilgrim wrote under a pen name. In offering the NYPD assistance with the case, Pilgrim gets pulled back into the intelligence underground.
  • Votes: 1

    The Chalk Man

    by C. J. Tudor

    "Want to read something good?. . . If you like my stuff, you'll like this."--Stephen King * WINNER OF THE ITW THRILLER AWARD * WINNER OF THE STRAND MAGAZINE AWARD FOR BEST DEBUT NOVEL A riveting psychological suspense debut that weaves a mystery about a childhood game gone dangerously awry, and will keep readers guessing right up to the shocking ending In 1986, Eddie and his friends are on the verge of adolescence, spending their days biking in search of adventure. The chalk men are their secret code, stick figures they draw for one another as hidden messages. But one morning the friends find a chalk man leading them to the woods. They follow the message, only to find the dead body of a teenage girl. In 2016, Eddie is nursing a drinking problem and trying to forget his past, until one day he gets a letter containing a chalk man--the same one he and his friends saw when they found the body. Soon he learns that all his old friends received the same note. When one of them is killed, Eddie realizes that saving himself means figuring out what happened all those years ago. But digging into the past proves more dangerous than he could have known. Because in this town, everyone has secrets, no one is innocent, and some will do anything to bury the truth. Praise for The Chalk Man "Wonderfully creepy--like a cold blade on the back of your neck."--Lee Child "An assured debut that alternates between 1986 and 2016 with unpredictable twists. The Chalk Man fits well with other stories about troubled childhoods such as Stephen King's novella Stand by Me. . . . Tudor never misses a beat in showing each character as both a child and an adult while also exploring the foreboding environs of a small town."--Associated Press "Utterly hypnotic. The Chalk Man is a dream novel, a book of nightmares: haunted and haunting, shot through with shadow and light--a story to quicken the pulse and freeze the blood. A dark star is born."--A.J. Finn, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Woman in the Window "If you can't get enough of psychological thrillers with sharp twists and turns, you need to read The Chalk Man"--Hello Giggles "I haven't had a sleepless night due to a book for a long time. The Chalk Man changed that."--Fiona Barton, New York Times bestselling author of The Widow
  • Votes: 1

    Kill All Your Darlings

    by David Bell

    A Most Anticipated Summer Read by SheReads * Frolic * and more! "Grabs you by the throat and never lets go...with a twist you’ll never see coming.” --Liv Constantine, bestselling author of The Last Mrs. Parrish "Sounds like Wonder Boys times Patricia Highsmith. Yes please!"--Crime Reads When a student disappears and is presumed dead, her professor passes off her manuscript as his own—only to find out it implicates him in an unsolved murder in this new thriller from the USA Today bestselling author of The Request. After years of struggling to write following the deaths of his wife and son, English professor Connor Nye publishes his first novel, a thriller about the murder of a young woman. There’s just one problem: Connor didn’t write the book. His missing student did. And then she appears on his doorstep, alive and well, threatening to expose him. Connor’s problems escalate when the police insist details in the novel implicate him in an unsolved murder from two years ago. Soon Connor discovers the crime is part of a disturbing scandal on campus and faces an impossible dilemma—admit he didn’t write the book and lose his job or keep up the lie and risk everything. When another murder occurs, Connor must clear his name by unraveling the horrifying secrets buried in his student’s manuscript. This is a suspenseful, provocative novel about the sexual harassment that still runs rampant in academia—and the lengths those in power will go to cover it up.
  • Votes: 1

    Foucault's Pendulum

    by Umberto Eco

  • Votes: 1

    The Overstory

    by Richard Powers

    The Overstory, winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, is a sweeping, impassioned work of activism and resistance that is also a stunning evocation of--and paean to--the natural world. From the roots to the crown and back to the seeds, Richard Powers's twelfth novel unfolds in concentric rings of interlocking fables that range from antebellum New York to the late twentieth-century Timber Wars of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. There is a world alongside ours--vast, slow, interconnected, resourceful, magnificently inventive, and almost invisible to us. This is the story of a handful of people who learn how to see that world and who are drawn up into its unfolding catastrophe.
  • Votes: 1

    The Nightingale

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 1

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar

    by Eric Carle

  • Votes: 1

    The Broken Earth Trilogy

    by N. K. Jemisin

    This special boxed set includes the New York Times bestselling author N. K. Jemisin's complete, two-time Hugo award-winning Broken Earth Trilogy. This is the way the world ends. For the last time. A season of endings has begun. It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world's sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun. It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter. It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester. This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy. The Broken Earth trilogyThe Fifth SeasonThe Obelisk GateThe Stone Sky
  • Votes: 1

    And Then There Were None

    by Agatha Christie

  • Votes: 1

    The City We Became

    by N. K. Jemisin

    'A glorious fantasy, set in that most imaginary of cities, New York' Neil Gaiman on THE CITY WE BECAME 'The most celebrated science fiction and fantasy writer of her generation... Jemisin seems able to do just about everything' NEW YORK TIMES 'Jemisin is now a pillar of speculative fiction, breathtakingly imaginative and narratively bold' ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY Five New Yorkers must band together to defend their city in the first book of a stunning new series by Hugo award-winning and New York Times bestselling author N. K. Jemisin. Every city has a soul. Some are as ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York City? She's got five. But every city also has a dark side. A roiling, ancient evil stirs beneath the earth, threatening to destroy the city and her five protectors unless they can come together and stop it once and for all. 'The most critically acclaimed author in contemporary science fiction and fantasy' GQ 'N. K. Jemisin is a powerhouse of speculative fiction' BUSTLE
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    My Name Is Red

    by Orhan Pamuk

    The Sultan secretly commissions a great book: a celebration of his life and the Ottoman Empire, to be illuminated by the best artists of the day - in the European manner. In Istanbul at a time of violent fundamentalism, however, this is a dangerous proposition. Even the illustrious circle of artists are not allowed to know for whom they are working. But when one of the miniaturists is murdered, their Master has to seek outside help. Did the dead painter fall victim to professional rivalry, romantic jealousy or religious terror? With the Sultan demanding an answer within three days, perhaps the clue lies somewhere in the half-finished pictures . . . From Turkey's winner of the Nobel Prize and author of Istanbul and The Museum of Innocence, this novel is a thrilling murder mystery set amid the splendour of Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire. Part fantasy and part philosophical puzzle, My Name is Red is also a stunning meditation on love, artistic devotion and the tensions between East and West.
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    Meh

    by Deborah Malcolm

    Meh is a story of one boy's journey through sadness.
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    Rebellious Desire

    by Julie Garwood

    Before there was Downton Abbey, there was Rebellious Desire...in this classic Regency romance from bestselling author Julie Garwood, an American heiress must land a titled lord. Of all the dukes in England, Jered Marcus Benton, the Duke of Bradford, was the wealthiest, most handsome—and most arrogant. And of all London’s ladies, he wanted the tender obedience of only one—Caroline Richmond. She was a ravishing beauty from Boston, with a mysterious past and a fiery spirit. Drawn to the powerful duke, undeterred by his presumptuous airs, Caroline was determined to win his lasting love. But Bradford would bend to no woman—until a deadly intrigue drew them enticingly close. Now, united against a common enemy, they would discover the power of the magnificent attraction that brought them together...a desire born in danger, but destined to flame into love!
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    Keeper of the Lost Cities Collection Books 1-5

    by Shannon Messenger

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    Daughters of the Dragon

    by William Andrews

    When twenty-year-old Anna Carlson travels from America to a Korean orphanage to locate her birth mother, she's devastated to learn the woman is already dead. But just when it seems her search is over, a stranger hands her a parcel containing an antique comb--and an address. That scrap of paper leads Anna to the Seoul apartment of the poor yet elegant Hong Jae-hee. Jae-hee recounts an epic tale that begins with the Japanese occupation of Korea and China during World War II, when more than two hundred thousand Korean women were forced to serve the soldiers as "comfort women." Jae-hee knows the story well--she was one of them. As Jae-hee's narrative unfolds, Anna discovers that the precious tortoiseshell comb, with its two-headed ivory dragon, has survived against all odds through generations of her family's women. And as its origins become clearer, Anna realizes that along with the comb, she inherits a legacy--of resilience and courage, love and redemption--beyond her wildest imagination.
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    Run Away

    by Nicole Neo

    Samantha and Sophie are forced to run away from home when their step mother, Elise Lau, threatens their sistership. They flee to Perth, Autralia, but their stay is threatened when Elise hires a private investigator and he comes to Perth to search for them. Samantha, Sophie and their guardian Scott escape, but would they be able to be free for long? Read the book to find out!
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    The Sound and the Fury

    by William Faulkner

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    The Alchemist

    by Paulo Coelho

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    Schindler's List

    by Thomas Keneally

    In remembrance of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and the Nazi concentration camps, this award-winning, bestselling work of Holocaust fiction, inspiration for the classic film and “masterful account of the growth of the human soul” (Los Angeles Times Book Review), returns with an all-new introduction and beautifully redesigned cover. An “extraordinary” (New York Review of Books) novel based on the true story of how German war profiteer and factory director Oskar Schindler came to save more Jews from the gas chambers than any other single person during World War II. In this milestone of Holocaust literature, Thomas Keneally, author of The Book of Science and Antiquities and The Daughter of Mars, uses the actual testimony of the Schindlerjuden—Schindler’s Jews—to brilliantly portray the courage and cunning of a good man in the midst of unspeakable evil. “Astounding…in this case the truth is far more powerful than anything the imagination could invent” (Newsweek).
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    The Great Believers

    by Rebecca Makkai

    WINNER OF THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS WINNER OF THE STONEWALL BOOK AWARD - BARBARA GITTINGS LITERATURE AWARD FINALIST FOR THE LA TIMES FICTION AWARD 'Stirring, spellbinding and full of life' Téa Obreht, New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger's Wife In 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup: bringing an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDs epidemic grows around him. One by one, his friends are dying and after his friend Nico's funeral, he finds his partner is infected, and that he might even have the virus himself. The only person he has left is Fiona, Nico's little sister. Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago epidemic, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways the AIDS crisis affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. Yale and Fiona's stories unfold in incredibly moving and sometimes surprising ways, as both struggle to find goodness in the face of disaster.
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    The Glass Hotel

    by Emily St. John Mandel

    From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts, and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it. Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass and cedar palace on an island in British Columbia. Jonathan Alkaitis works in finance and owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it's the beginning of their life together. That same day, Vincent's half-brother, Paul, scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: "Why don't you swallow broken glass." Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship. Weaving together the lives of these characters, The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan, and the wilderness of northern Vancouver Island, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.
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    A Nearly Normal Family

    by M.T. Edvardsson

    'A deceptive and riveting novel' - Karin Slaughter Chosen as one of the best seven thrillers of the summer by the New York Times A Nearly Normal Family is the stunning psychological thriller from M. T. Edvardsson and asks what would you do if your child was suspected of murder, how far would you go to protect them? Do you want to know the truth? If you loved A. J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window or J. P. Delaney’s The Girl Before, you will love this. Every murder case starts with a suspect. What if the suspect is your daughter? Would you believe her, or the evidence against her? The Father Believes his daughter has been framed. The Mother Believes she is hiding something. The Daughter Believes they have no idea what she’s truly capable of . . . There are three sides to the story. And the truth will shatter this family to pieces. Praise for A Nearly Normal Family 'Tore through this in a matter of days . . . A cracking read!' - T M Logan 'An absolutely fantastic read . . . I can see why it's being pitched as the big one for 2019' - Jo Spain 'An utterly compelling premise . . . a layered, intelligent novel' - Fiona Cummins 'A canny, intensely suspenseful legal thriller' - Scott Turow 'I couldn't go to bed until I finished it. Effortlessly brilliant' - Sandie Jones 'Any parent will be gripped by this book . . . I couldn't put it down' - Michelle Frances 'An unsettling page turner. Highly Recommended' Adam Hamdy
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    Equipoise

    by Makena Onjerika

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    Master of the Game

    by Sidney Sheldon

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    The Sun Also Rises

    by Ernest Hemingway

    Ernest Hemingway was one of the most famous American authors of the 20th century. In The Sun Also Rises, a group of American and British expatriates travel to Pamplona, Spain for the running of the bulls
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    Three Daughters of Eve

    by Elif Shafak

    *As mentioned on BBC's Desert Island Discs* 'A fascinating exploration of faith and friendship, rich and poor, and the devastating clash of tradition and modernity' Independent Set across Istanbul and Oxford, from the 1980s to the present day, Three Daughters of Eve is a sweeping tale of faith and friendship, tradition and modernity, love and an unexpected betrayal. Peri, a wealthy Turkish housewife, is on her way to a dinner party at a seaside mansion in Istanbul when a beggar snatches her handbag. As she wrestles to get it back, a photograph falls to the ground - an old polaroid of three young women and their university professor. A relic from a past - and a love - Peri had tried desperately to forget. The photograph takes Peri back to Oxford University, as an eighteen year old sent abroad for the first time. To her dazzling, rebellious Professor and his life-changing course on God. To her home with her two best friends, Shirin and Mona, and their arguments about Islam and femininity. And finally, to the scandal that tore them all apart.
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    Turing's Nightmares

    by Dr. John Charles Thomas Ph.D.

    Turing's Nightmares is a series of scenarios that explore possible implications of artificial intelligence technologies. It is a work of speculative fiction meant to encourage individuals and communities to consider the many social, political, economic and ethical issues possible from the widespread deployment of artificial intelligence. Many of these scenarios revolve around the idea called "The Singularity." The Singularity refers to a hypothetical time in the not so distant future when an AI system is created which is both much smarter than people and able to build a still more intelligent system. By considering possible scenarios, we can examine how we feel about the potential relationships among people and between people and their technology in time to prepare, prevent or utilize the impacts.
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    The Darkest Hour

    by Erin Hunter

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    The Ghost Bride

    by Yangsze Choo

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    Bury Elminster Deep

    by Ed Greenwood

    Elminster's archenemy, the vampiric Lord Manshoon, thinks he has destroyed Elminster at last. But Elminster survives in the form of magical ash, and with the help of his scion, a fop who is growing into a true nobleman, and his longtime companion Storm, he still has a chance to counter Manshoon's insidious plots. From the Hardcover edition.
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    They Both Die at the End

    by Adam Silvera

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    Life Expectancy

    by Dean Koontz

    A dying man's clairvoyant prophesies about his grandson, Jimmy Tock, reveal five terrifying and horrific events, occuring on five different days at different periods in his life, that will turn the young man's world upside down. 600,000 first printing.
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    Crazy Rich Asians

    by Kevin Kwan

    A hilarious and heartwarming New York Times bestselling novel—now a major motion picture! “This 48-karat beach read is crazy fun.” —Entertainment Weekly When New Yorker Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home and quality time with the man she hopes to marry. But Nick has failed to give his girlfriend a few key details. One, that his childhood home looks like a palace; two, that he grew up riding in more private planes than cars; and three, that he just happens to be the country’s most eligible bachelor. On Nick’s arm, Rachel may as well have a target on her back the second she steps off the plane, and soon, her relaxed vacation turns into an obstacle course of old money, new money, nosy relatives, and scheming social climbers.