Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 156

    The Song of Achilles

    by Madeline Miller

    A breathtakingly original rendering of the Trojan War, shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction 2012.
  • Votes: 153

    On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    by Ocean Vuong

    ** The Sunday Times and New York Times Bestseller ** Brilliant, heartbreaking and highly original, Ocean Vuong’s debut novel is a shattering portrait of a family, and a testament to the redemptive power of storytelling. ‘A marvel’ MARLON JAMES This is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. Written when the speaker, Little Dog, is in his late twenties, the letter unearths a family’s history that began before he was born. It tells of Vietnam, of the lasting impact of war, and of his family’s struggle to forge a new future. And it serves as a doorway into parts of Little Dog’s life his mother has never known – episodes of bewilderment, fear and passion – all the while moving closer to an unforgettable revelation. ‘A masterpiece’ MAX PORTER ‘Luminous, shattering, urgent, necessary’ CELESTE NG ‘Deeply moving... Little Dog’s story is the story of modern America’ Daily Telegraph ‘Vuong has originality running through his veins’ The Times SHORTLISTED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL DYLAN THOMAS PRIZE 2020 FINALIST FOR THE PEN/FAULKNER AWARD 2020
  • Votes: 138

    An American Marriage (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Tayari Jones

    A NEW YORK TIMES AND WASHINGTON POST NOTABLE BOOK A 2018 BEST OF THE YEAR SELECTION OF NPR * TIME * BUSTLE * O, THE OPRAH MAGAZINE * THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS * AMAZON.COM OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB 2018 SELECTION LONGLISTED FOR THE 2018 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR FICTION “A moving portrayal of the effects of a wrongful conviction on a young African-American couple.” —Barack Obama “Haunting . . . Beautifully written.” —The New York Times Book Review “Brilliant and heartbreaking . . . Unforgettable.” —USA Today “A tense and timely love story . . . Packed with brave questions about race and class.” —People “Compelling.” —The Washington Post “Epic . . . Transcendent . . . Triumphant.” —Elle Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together. This stirring love story is a profoundly insightful look into the hearts and minds of three people who are at once bound and separated by forces beyond their control. An American Marriage is a masterpiece of storytelling, an intimate look deep into the souls of people who must reckon with the past while moving forward—with hope and pain—into the future.
  • Votes: 131

    The Nickel Boys

    by Colson Whitehead

  • Votes: 109

    Shuggie Bain

    by Douglas Stuart

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020 Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020 The Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year 2020 'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' – Observer It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest. Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place. Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell. 'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' – The judges of the Booker Prize
  • Votes: 108

    A Little Life

    by Hanya Yanagihara

    "A little life, follows four college classmates --broke, adrift, and bouyed only by their friendship and ambition--as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves." --Back cover
  • Votes: 103

    Crying in H Mart

    by Michelle Zauner

  • Votes: 102

    There There

    by Tommy Orange

  • Votes: 94

    Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents

    by Lindsay C. Gibson

  • Votes: 93

    Hamnet

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    WINNER OF THE 2020 WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION - THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER SHORTLISTED AN POST BOOK AWARDS IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 'Richly sensuous... something special' The Sunday Times 'A thing of shimmering wonder' David Mitchell TWO EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE. A LOVE THAT DRAWS THEM TOGETHER. A LOSS THAT THREATENS TO TEAR THEM APART. On a summer's day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home? Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week. Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker's son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.
  • Votes: 72

    CIRCE

  • Votes: 72

    The Vanishing Half

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 71

    Salvage the Bones

    by Jesmyn Ward

  • Votes: 70

    Homegoing

    by Yaa Gyasi

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
  • Votes: 69

    HONORED

    by Frankie Love

  • Votes: 50

    The Heart

    by Maylis de Kerangal

  • Votes: 46

    The God of Small Things

    by Arundhati Roy

    The year is 1969. In the state of Kerala, on the southernmost tip of India, a skyblue Plymouth with chrome tailfins is stranded on the highway amid a Marxist workers' demonstration. Inside the car sit two-egg twins Rahel and Esthappen, and so begins their tale.... Armed only with the invincible innocence of children, they fashion a childhood for themselves in the shade of the wreck that is their family - their lonely, lovely mother, Ammu (who loves by night the man her children love by day), their blind grandmother, Mammachi (who plays Handel on her violin), their beloved uncle Chacko (Rhodes scholar, pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher), their enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grandaunt), and the ghost of an imperial entomologist's moth (with unusually dense dorsal tufts). When their English cousin, Sophie Mol, and her mother, Margaret Kochamma, arrive on a Christmas visit, Esthappen and Rahel learn that Things Can Change in a Day. That lives can twist into new, ugly shapes, even cease forever, beside their river "graygreen. With fish in it. With the sky and trees in it. And at night, the broken yellow moon in it."
  • Votes: 46

    Where the Crawdads Sing

    by Delia Owens

  • Votes: 43

    Just Mercy

    by Bryan Stevenson

    Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction
  • Votes: 42

    The Death of Vivek Oji

    by Akwaeke Emezi

  • Votes: 40

    The Book Thief

    by Markus Zusak

    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
  • Votes: 39

    Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    by Gail Honeyman

  • Votes: 39

    Transcendent Kingdom

    by Yaa Gyasi

  • Votes: 33

    The Midnight Library

    by Matt Haig

  • Votes: 31

    Anxious People

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 28

    The Disordered Cosmos

    by Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

  • Votes: 28

    Heavy

    by Kiese Laymon

  • Votes: 26

    Interior Chinatown

    by Charles Yu

    2020 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "One of the funniest books of the year. . . . A delicious, ambitious Hollywood satire." —The Washington Post From the infinitely inventive author of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, a deeply personal novel about race, pop culture, immigration, assimilation, and escaping the roles we are forced to play. Willis Wu doesn’t perceive himself as the protagonist in his own life: he’s merely Generic Asian Man. Sometimes he gets to be Background Oriental Making a Weird Face or even Disgraced Son, but always he is relegated to a prop. Yet every day, he leaves his tiny room in a Chinatown SRO and enters the Golden Palace restaurant, where Black and White, a procedural cop show, is in perpetual production. He’s a bit player here, too, but he dreams of being Kung Fu Guy—the most respected role that anyone who looks like him can attain. Or is it? After stumbling into the spotlight, Willis finds himself launched into a wider world than he’s ever known, discovering not only the secret history of Chinatown, but the buried legacy of his own family. Infinitely inventive and deeply personal, exploring the themes of pop culture, assimilation, and immigration—Interior Chinatown is Charles Yu’s most moving, daring, and masterful novel yet. "Fresh and beautiful. . . . Interior Chinatown represents yet another stellar destination in the journey of a sui generis author of seemingly limitless skill and ambition.” —The New York Times Book Review
  • Votes: 25

    Song of Solomon

    by Toni Morrison

    Macon Dead, Jr., called "Milkman," the son of the wealthiest African American in town, moves from childhood into early manhood, searching, among the disparate, mysterious members of his family, for his life and reality. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. Reader's Guide available. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 25

    Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

    by Lori Gottlieb

  • Votes: 25

    A Thousand Splendid Suns

    by Khaled Hosseini

  • Votes: 23

    The Great Believers

    by Rebecca Makkai

    WINNER OF THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS WINNER OF THE STONEWALL BOOK AWARD - BARBARA GITTINGS LITERATURE AWARD FINALIST FOR THE LA TIMES FICTION AWARD 'Stirring, spellbinding and full of life' Téa Obreht, New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger's Wife In 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup: bringing an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDs epidemic grows around him. One by one, his friends are dying and after his friend Nico's funeral, he finds his partner is infected, and that he might even have the virus himself. The only person he has left is Fiona, Nico's little sister. Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago epidemic, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways the AIDS crisis affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. Yale and Fiona's stories unfold in incredibly moving and sometimes surprising ways, as both struggle to find goodness in the face of disaster.
  • Votes: 22

    The Undocumented Americans

    by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

    A BARACK OBAMA FAVOURITE BOOK OF 2020 A New York Times best book of 2020 One of the first undocumented immigrants to graduate from Harvard reveals the hidden lives of her fellow undocumented Americans. Right after the election of 2016, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio realized the story she'd tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell. So she wrote her immigration lawyer's phone number on her hand and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrants - and to find the hidden key to her own. In her incandescent, relentlessly probing voice, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio combines sensitive reporting and powerful personal narratives to bring to light remarkable stories of resilience, madness, and death. She finds the singular, effervescent characters across the nation often reduced in the media to political pawns or nameless laborers. The stories she tells are not deferential or naively inspirational but show the love, magic, heartbreak, insanity, and vulgarity that infuse the day-to-day lives of her subjects. And through it all we see the author grappling with the biggest questions of love, duty, family, and survival. Shortlisted for a National Book Award, a National Book Critics' Circle Award and an L.A. Times Book Prize
  • Votes: 22

    Klara and the Sun

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 21

    A Man Called Ove

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 20

    The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

    by Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Votes: 19

    Recollections of My Life as a Woman

    by Diane di Prima

  • Votes: 17

    A Burning

    by Megha Majumdar

    "After a fiery attack on a train leaves 104 people dead, the fates of three people become inextricably entangled. Jivan, a bright, striving woman from the slums looking for a way out of poverty, is wrongly accused of planning the attack because of a careless comment on Facebook. PT Sir, a slippery gym teacher from Jivan's former high school, has hitched his aspirations to a rising right wing party, and his own ascent becomes increasingly linked to Jivan's fall. Lovely, a spirited, impoverished, relentlessly optimistic hjira, who harbors dreams of becoming a Bollywood star, can provide the alibi that would set Jivan free--but her appearance in court will have unexpected consequences that will change the course of all of their lives. A novel about fate, power, opportunity, and class; about innocence and guilt, betrayal and love, and the corrosive media cycle that manufactures falsehoods masquerading as truths--A Burning is a debut novel of exceptional power and urgency, haunting and beautiful, brutal, vibrant, impossible to forget"--
  • Votes: 16

    Red at the Bone

    by Jacqueline Woodson

  • Votes: 16

    The Nightingale

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 14

    The Heart's Invisible Furies

    by John Boyne

    Named Book of the Month Club's Book of the Year, 2017 Selected one of New York Times Readers’ Favorite Books of 2017 Winner of the 2018 Goldsboro Books Glass Bell Award From the beloved New York Times bestselling author of The Boy In the Striped Pajamas, a sweeping, heartfelt saga about the course of one man's life, beginning and ending in post-war Ireland Cyril Avery is not a real Avery -- or at least, that's what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn't a real Avery, then who is he? Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead. At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from - and over his many years, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country, and much more. In this, Boyne's most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart's Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.
  • Votes: 12

    The Argonauts

    by Maggie Nelson

  • Votes: 12

    Somebody's Daughter

    by Ashley C. Ford

    “Sure to be one of the best memoirs of 2021.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review “So clear, sharp, and smooth that the reader sees, in vivid focus, Ford’s complicated childhood, brilliant mind, and golden heart. Ford is a writer for the ages, and Somebody’s Daughter will be a book of the year.” —Glennon Doyle, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Untamed “Ford’s wrenchingly brilliant memoir is truly a classic in the making. The writing is so richly observed and so suffused with love and yearning that I kept forgetting to breathe while reading it.” —John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author One of the most prominent voices of her generation debuts with an extraordinarily powerful memoir: the story of a childhood defined by the looming absence of her incarcerated father. Through poverty, adolescence, and a fraught relationship with her mother, Ashley Ford wishes she could turn to her father for hope and encouragement. There are just a few problems: he’s in prison, and she doesn’t know what he did to end up there. She doesn’t know how to deal with the incessant worries that keep her up at night, or how to handle the changes in her body that draw unwanted attention from men. In her search for unconditional love, Ashley begins dating a boy her mother hates. When the relationship turns sour, he assaults her. Still reeling from the rape, which she keeps secret from her family, Ashley desperately searches for meaning in the chaos. Then, her grandmother reveals the truth about her father’s incarceration . . . and Ashley’s entire world is turned upside down. Somebody’s Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor, Black girl in Indiana with a family fragmented by incarceration, exploring how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she embarks on a powerful journey to find the threads between who she is and what she was born into, and the complicated familial love that often binds them.
  • Votes: 11

    Bastard Out of Carolina

    by Dorothy Allison

  • Votes: 11

    Gilead

    by Marilynne Robinson

    As the Reverend John Ames approaches the hour of his own death, he writes a letter to his son chronicling three previous generations of his family, a story that stretches back to the Civil War and reveals uncomfortable secrets about the family of preachers. Reader's Guide available. Reprint.
  • Votes: 11

    Braiding Sweetgrass

    by Robin Wall Kimmerer

    'A hymn of love to the world ... A journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise' Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two ways of knowledge together. Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings - asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass - offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
  • Votes: 11

    When Breath Becomes Air

    by Paul Kalanithi

  • Votes: 10

    Prodigal Summer

    by Barbara Kingsolver

    It is summer in the Appalachian mountains and love, desire and attraction are in the air. From her outpost in an isolated mountain cabin, Deanna Wolfe, a reclusive wildlife biologist, watches a den of coyotes. She is caught off guard by a young hunter who invades her most private spaces and interrupts her solitary life. On a farm several miles down the mountain, Lusa Maluf Landowski, a bookish city girl turned farmer's wife, finds herself marooned in a strange place where she must declare or lose her attachment to the land that has become her own. And a few more miles down the road, a pair of elderly feuding neighbours tend their respective farms and wrangle about God, pesticides, and the possibilities of a future neither of them expected. Over the course of one humid summer, these characters find their connections of love to one another and to the surrounding nature with which they share a place. With its strong balance of narrative and drama, Prodigal Summer is stands alongside The Poisonwood Bible and The Lacuna as one of Barbara Kingsolver's finest works.
  • Votes: 10

    Woman on the Edge of Time

    by Marge Piercy

  • Votes: 10

    The Past Is Red

    by Catherynne M. Valente

  • Votes: 10

    The Lonely City

    by Olivia Laing

  • Votes: 9

    City of Thieves

    by David Benioff

    Documenting his grandparents' experiences during the siege of Leningrad, a young writer learns his grandfather's story about how a military deserter and he tried to secure pardons by gathering hard-to-find ingredients for a powerful colonel's daughter's wedding cake.
  • Votes: 9

    The Copenhagen Trilogy

    by Tove Ditlevsen

  • Votes: 9

    A Monster Calls

    by Patrick Ness

  • Votes: 9

    Damnation Spring

    by Ash Davidson

  • Votes: 9

    The Five Wounds

    by Kirstin Valdez Quade

  • Votes: 9

    All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr

    A cloth bag containing 20 paperback copies of the title that may also include a folder with sign out sheets.
  • Votes: 8

    A Prayer for Owen Meany

    by John Irving

    'A work of genius' Independent 'Marvellously funny . . . What better entertainment is there than a serious book which makes you laugh?' Spectator 'If you care about something you have to protect it. If you're lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it.' Eleven-year-old Owen Meany, playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire, hits a foul ball and kills his best friend's mother. Owen doesn't believe in accidents; he believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is both extraordinary and terrifying.
  • Votes: 8

    Your House Will Pay

    by Steph Cha

  • Votes: 8

    Queenie

    THE NUMBER TWO SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'Hilarious, compelling, painful, enlightening, honest. I loved it.' - Dolly Alderton 'Brilliant, timely, funny, heartbreaking' - Jojo Moyes 'A vital, often very funny novel' - The Sunday Times 'Inspirational, funny and wise' - Kit de Waal 'Perfect for anyone who loves Fleabag' - Mail on Sunday Queenie Jenkins can't cut a break. Well, apart from the one from her long term boyfriend, Tom. That's definitely just a break though. Definitely not a break up. Then there's her boss who doesn't seem to see her and her Caribbean family who don't seem to listen (if it's not Jesus or water rates, they're not interested). She's trying to fit in two worlds that don't really understand her. It's no wonder she's struggling. She was named to be queen of everything. So why is she finding it so hard to rule her own life? A darkly comic and bitingly subversive take on life, love, race and family, QUEENIE will have you nodding in recognition, crying in solidarity, and rooting for this unforgettable character every step of the way. Perfect for fans of Dolly Alderton, Elizabeth Day, Sally Rooney and Diana Evans, and anyone who loved Fleabag. ******** Praise for QUEENIE: 'I was engrossed and loved Queenie - her humour, her pain, her politics, her friends, her family.' - Diana Evans 'Candice gives so generously with her joy, pain and humour, that we cannot help but become fully immersed in the life of Queenie - a beautiful and compelling book.' - Afua Hirsch *This book has been printed with three different colour cover designs. We are unable to accept requests for a specific cover. The different covers will be assigned to orders at random*
  • Votes: 8

    A Fine Balance

    by Rohinton Mistry

    With a compassionate realism and narrative sweep that recall the work of Charles Dickens, this magnificent novel captures all the cruelty and corruption, dignity and heroism, of India. The time is 1975. The place is an unnamed city by the sea. The government has just declared a State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers--a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village--will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future. As the characters move from distrust to friendship and from friendship to love, A Fine Balance creates an enduring panorama of the human spirit in an inhuman state.
  • Votes: 8

    Under the Whispering Door

    by TJ Klune

  • Votes: 7

    Wandering in Strange Lands

    by Morgan Jerkins

  • Votes: 7

    Three Girls from Bronzeville

    by Dawn Turner

  • Votes: 7

    Exit West

    by Mohsin Hamid

  • Votes: 6

    Borrowing Your Body

    by Laura Passin

  • Votes: 6

    Just Kids

    by Patti Smith

    It was the summer Coltrane died, the summer of love and riots, and the summer when a chance encounter in Brooklyn led two young people on a path of art, devotion, and initiation. Patti Smith would evolve as a poet and performer, and Robert Mapplethorpe would direct his highly provocative style toward photography. Bound in innocence and enthusiasm, they traversed the city from Coney Island to Forty-second Street, and eventually to the celebrated round table of Max's Kansas City, where the Andy Warhol contingent held court. In 1969, the pair set up camp at the Hotel Chelsea and soon entered a community of the famous and infamous—the influential artists of the day and the colorful fringe. It was a time of heightened awareness, when the worlds of poetry, rock and roll, art, and sexual politics were colliding and exploding. In this milieu, two kids made a pact to take care of each other. Scrappy, romantic, committed to create, and fueled by their mutual dreams and drives, they would prod and provide for one another during the hungry years. Just Kids begins as a love story and ends as an elegy. It serves as a salute to New York City during the late sixties and seventies and to its rich and poor, its hustlers and hellions. A true fable, it is a portrait of two young artists' ascent, a prelude to fame.
  • Votes: 6

    The Kite Runner

    by Khaled Hosseini

    Traces the unlikely friendship of a wealthy Afghan youth and a servant's son, in a tale that spans the final days of Afghanistan's monarchy through the atrocities of the present day.
  • Votes: 6

    The Overstory

    by Richard Powers

    WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2018 A wondrous, exhilarating novel about nine strangers brought together by an unfolding natural catastrophe ‘The best novel ever written about trees, and really, just one of the best novels, period’ Ann Patchett An artist inherits a hundred years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut. A hard-partying undergraduate in the late 1980s electrocutes herself, dies, and is sent back into life by creatures of air and light. A hearing- and speech-impaired scientist discovers that trees are communicating with one another. An Air Force crewmember in the Vietnam War is shot out of the sky, then saved by falling into a banyan. This is the story of these and five other strangers, each summoned in different ways by the natural world, who are brought together in a last stand to save it from catastrophe. ‘Breathtaking’ Barbara Kingsolver, New York Times ‘It’s a masterpiece’ Tim Winton ‘It’s not possible for Powers to write an uninteresting book’ Margaret Atwood ‘An astonishing performance’ Benjamin Markovits, Guardian
  • Votes: 6

    In the Dream House

    by Carmen Maria Machado

    In the Dream House is Carmen Maria Machado's engrossing and wildly innovative account of a relationship gone bad. Tracing the full arc of a harrowing experience with a charismatic but volatile woman, this is a bold dissection of the mechanisms and cultural representations of psychological abuse. Each chapter views the relationship through a different lens, as Machado holds events up to the light and examines them from distinct angles. She casts a critical eye over legal proceedings, fairy tales, Star Trek and Disney villains, as well as iconic works of film and fiction, infusing all with her characteristic wit, playfulness and openness to enquiry. The result is a powerful book that explodes our ideas about what a memoir can do and be.
  • Votes: 6

    The Prophets

    by Robert Jones Jr.

    "A new kind of epic...A grand achievement...While The Prophets' dreamy realism recalls the work of Toni Morrison...its penetrating focus on social dynamics stands out more singularly." --Entertainment Weekly A singular and stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence. Isaiah was Samuel's and Samuel was Isaiah's. That was the way it was since the beginning, and the way it was to be until the end. In the barn they tended to the animals, but also to each other, transforming the hollowed-out shed into a place of human refuge, a source of intimacy and hope in a world ruled by vicious masters. But when an older man--a fellow slave--seeks to gain favor by preaching the master's gospel on the plantation, the enslaved begin to turn on their own. Isaiah and Samuel's love, which was once so simple, is seen as sinful and a clear danger to the plantation's harmony. With a lyricism reminiscent of Toni Morrison, Robert Jones, Jr., fiercely summons the voices of slaver and enslaved alike, from Isaiah and Samuel to the calculating slave master to the long line of women that surround them, women who have carried the soul of the plantation on their shoulders. As tensions build and the weight of centuries--of ancestors and future generations to come--culminates in a climactic reckoning, The Prophets masterfully reveals the pain and suffering of inheritance, but is also shot through with hope, beauty, and truth, portraying the enormous, heroic power of love.
  • Votes: 5

    The Island of Sea Women

    by Lisa See

  • Votes: 5

    Maid

    by Stephanie Land

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Evicted meets Nickel and Dimed in Stephanie Land's memoir about working as a maid, a beautiful and gritty exploration of poverty in America. Includes a foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich. At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor. Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path. Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit.
  • Votes: 5

    I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

    by Erika L. Sánchez

  • Votes: 5

    The Idea of You

    by Robinne Lee

  • Votes: 5

    The Bone People

    by Keri Hulme

  • Votes: 5

    City of Girls

    by Elizabeth Gilbert

  • Votes: 5

    Seconded

    by Icon Group International

  • Votes: 5

    Lost Children Archive

    by Valeria Luiselli

    "A novel about a family of four, on the cusp of fracture, who take a trip across America--a story told through varying points of view, and including archival documents and photographs"--
  • Votes: 5

    We Are Okay

    by Nina LaCour

    Winner of the 2018 Michael L. Printz Award — An achingly beautiful novel about grief and the enduring power of friendship. “Short, poetic and gorgeously written.” —The New York Times Book Review “A beautiful, devastating piece of art." —Bookpage You go through life thinking there’s so much you need. . . . Until you leave with only your phone, your wallet, and a picture of your mother. Marin hasn’t spoken to anyone from her old life since the day she left everything behind. No one knows the truth about those final weeks. Not even her best friend Mabel. But even thousands of miles away from the California coast, at college in New York, Marin still feels the pull of the life and tragedy she’s tried to outrun. Now, months later, alone in an emptied dorm for winter break, Marin waits. Mabel is coming to visit and Marin will be forced to face everything that’s been left unsaid and finally confront the loneliness that has made a home in her heart. An intimate whisper that packs an indelible punch, We Are Okay is Nina LaCour at her finest. This gorgeously crafted and achingly honest portrayal of grief will leave you urgent to reach across any distance to reconnect with the people you love. Praise for We Are Okay “Nina LaCour treats her emotions so beautifully and with such empathy.” —Bustle ★ “Exquisite.” —Kirkus ★ “LaCour paints a captivating depiction of loss, bewilderment, and emotional paralysis . . . raw and beautiful.” —Booklist ★ “Beautifully crafted . . . . A quietly moving, potent novel.” —SLJ ★ “A moving portrait of a girl struggling to rebound after everything she’s known has been thrown into disarray.” —Publishers Weekly ★"Bittersweet and hopeful . . . poetic and skillfully crafted." —Shelf Awareness “So lonely and beautiful that I could hardly breathe. This is a perfect book.” —Stephanie Perkins, bestselling author of Anna and the French Kiss “As beautiful as the best memories, as sad as the best songs, as hopeful as your best dreams.” —Siobhan Vivian, bestselling author of The Last Boy and Girl in the World “You can feel every peak and valley of Marin’s emotional journey on your skin, in your gut. Beautifully written, heartfelt, and deeply real.” —Adi Alsaid, author of Never Always Sometimes and Let’s Get Lost
  • Votes: 5

    Cloud Cuckoo Land

    by Anthony Doerr

  • Votes: 5

    Beloved

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 5

    Sing, Unburied, Sing

    by Jesmyn Ward

  • Votes: 4

    Fifteen Dogs

    by André Alexis

  • Votes: 4

    Call Me American

    by Abdi Nor Iftin

  • Votes: 4

    Punch Me Up to the Gods

    by Brian Broome

  • Votes: 4

    Heartland

    by Sarah Smarsh

  • Votes: 4

    Clap When You Land

    by Elizabeth Acevedo

    Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people... In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash. Separated by distance -- and Papi's secrets -- the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered. And then, when it seems like they've lost everything of their father, they learn of each other.
  • Votes: 4

    The Girl with the Louding Voice

    by Abi Daré

  • Votes: 4

    The Stars and the Blackness Between Them

    by Junauda Petrus

    Told in two voices, sixteen-year-old Audre and Mabel, both young women of color from different backgrounds, fall in love and figure out how to care for each other as one of them faces a fatal illness.
  • Votes: 4

    We Need New Names

    by NoViolet Bulawayo

  • Votes: 4

    How Beautiful We Were

    by Imbolo Mbue

  • Votes: 4

    Olive Kitteridge

    by Elizabeth Strout

    The world of Olive Kitteridge, a retired school teacher in a small coastal town in Maine, is revealed in stories that explore her diverse roles in many lives, including a lounge singer haunted by a past love, her stoic husband, and her own resentful son.
  • Votes: 4

    The Memory Police

    by Yoko Ogawa

    Shortlisted for the International Booker Prize 2020, an enthralling Orwellian novel about the terrors of state surveillance from one of Japan's greatest writers. 'Beautiful... Haunting' Sunday Times 'A dreamlike story of dystopia' Jia Tolentino __________ Hat, ribbon, bird rose. To the people on the island, a disappeared thing no longer has any meaning. It can be burned in the garden, thrown in the river or handed over to the Memory Police. Soon enough, the island forgets it ever existed. When a young novelist discovers that her editor is in danger of being taken away by the Memory Police, she desperately wants to save him. For some reason, he doesn't forget, and it's becoming increasingly difficult for him to hide his memories. Who knows what will vanish next? __________ Finalist for the National Book Award 2019 Longlisted for the Translated Book Award 2020 New York Times 100 Notable Books of the Year 'This timeless fable of control and loss feels more timely than ever' Guardian, Books of the Year 'Echoes the themes of George Orwell's 1984, but it has a voice and power all its own' Time 'A novel that makes us see differently... A masterpiece' Madeleine Thien
  • Votes: 4

    Never Let Me Go

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Votes: 4

    The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

    by V. E. Schwab

    In the vein of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Life After Life, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is New York Times bestselling author V. E. Schwab’s genre-defying tour de force. A Life No One Will Remember. A Story You Will Never Forget. France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever—and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world. But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.
  • Votes: 4

    The Museum of Innocence (Vintage International)

    by Orhan Pamuk

  • Votes: 4

    American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club)

    by Jeanine Cummins

  • Votes: 3

    Washington Square (Signet Classics)

    by Henry James

  • Votes: 3

    Roasted

    by Susannah Shannon

  • Votes: 3

    The Long Night of White Chickens

    by Francisco Goldman

  • Votes: 3

    The Story of Edgar Sawtelle

    by David Wroblewski

  • Votes: 3

    If I Can't Have You

    by Gregg Olsen

  • Votes: 3

    The Seed Keeper

    by Diane Wilson

    A haunting novel spanning several generations, The Seed Keeper follows a Dakhóta family’s struggle to preserve their way of life, and their sacrifices to protect what matters most. Rosalie Iron Wing has grown up in the woods with her father, Ray, a former science teacher who tells her stories of plants, of the stars, of the origins of the Dakhóta people. Until, one morning, Ray doesn’t return from checking his traps. Told she has no family, Rosalie is sent to live with a foster family in nearby Mankato—where the reserved, bookish teenager meets rebellious Gaby Makespeace, in a friendship that transcends the damaged legacies they’ve inherited. On a winter’s day many years later, Rosalie returns to her childhood home. A widow and mother, she has spent the previous two decades on her white husband’s farm, finding solace in her garden even as the farm is threatened first by drought and then by a predatory chemical company. Now, grieving, Rosalie begins to confront the past, on a search for family, identity, and a community where she can finally belong. In the process, she learns what it means to be descended from women with souls of iron—women who have protected their families, their traditions, and a precious cache of seeds through generations of hardship and loss, through war and the insidious trauma of boarding schools. Weaving together the voices of four indelible women, The Seed Keeper is a beautifully told story of reawakening, of remembering our original relationship to the seeds and, through them, to our ancestors.
  • Votes: 3

    Purple Hibiscus

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    The limits of fifteen-year-old Kambili’s world are defined by the high walls of her family estate and the dictates of her fanatically religious father. Her life is regulated by schedules: prayer, sleep, study, prayer.
  • Votes: 3

    The List of Things That Will Not Change

    by Rebecca Stead

  • Votes: 3

    The Knockout Queen

    by Rufi Thorpe

  • Votes: 3

    Atonement

    by Ian McEwan

  • Votes: 3

    The Deal of a Lifetime

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 3

    See No Stranger

    by Valarie Kaur

  • Votes: 3

    The Year of Magical Thinking

    by Joan Didion

    An autobiographical portrait of marriage and motherhood by the acclaimed author details her struggle to come to terms with life and death, illness, sanity, personal upheaval, and grief.
  • Votes: 3

    Heart Berries

    by Terese Marie Mailhot

  • Votes: 3

    The Stationery Shop

    by Marjan Kamali

  • Votes: 3

    Fight Night

    by Miriam Toews

  • Votes: 3

    The Night Watchman

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 3

    On My List

    by Aurora Blair

  • Votes: 3

    No One Is Talking About This

    by Patricia Lockwood

  • Votes: 3

    How We Fight for Our Lives

    by Saeed Jones

  • Votes: 3

    Stay With Me

    by Nicole Fiorina

  • Votes: 3

    Piranesi

    by Susanna Clarke

    From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, an intoxicating, hypnotic new novel set in a dreamlike alternative reality. Piranesi's house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house. There is one other person in the house-a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known. For readers of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane and fans of Madeline Miller's Circe, Piranesi introduces an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.
  • Votes: 3

    YESSS!

    by Paul McGee

  • Votes: 3

    House in the Cerulean Sea

    by T J Klune

  • Votes: 3

    The Bluest Eye (Vintage International)

    by Toni Morrison

  • Votes: 3

    Know My Name

    by Chanel Miller

  • Votes: 2

    The End of Days

    by Jenny Erpenbeck

  • Votes: 2

    Infinite Country

    by Patricia Engel

  • Votes: 2

    Dear Child

    by Romy Hausmann

  • Votes: 2

    Nightbitch

    by Rachel Yoder

  • Votes: 2

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    by Milan Kundera

    A young woman is in love with a successful surgeon, a man torn between his love for her and his incorrigible womanizing. His mistress, a free-spirited artist, lives her life as a series of betrayals—while her other lover, earnest, faithful, and good, stands to lose everything because of his noble qualities. In a world where lives are shaped by irrevocable choices and fortuitous events, and everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance, its weight. Hence we feel “the unbearable lightness of being.” A major achievement from one of the world’s truly great writers, Milan Kundera’s magnificent novel of passion and politics, infidelity and ideas, encompasses the extremes of comedy and tragedy, illuminating all aspects of human existence.
  • Votes: 2

    Poor People

    by William T. Vollmann

  • Votes: 2

    Beautiful Country

    by Qian Julie Wang

  • Votes: 2

    No Cure for Being Human

    by Kate Bowler

  • Votes: 2

    The Last Thing He Told Me

    by Laura Dave

  • Votes: 2

    All Our Shimmering Skies

  • Votes: 2

    The Horse Whisperer

    by Nicholas Evans

  • Votes: 2

    Imperial Intimacies

    by Hazel V. Carby

  • Votes: 2

    The Other Black Girl

    by Zakiya Dalila Harris

  • Votes: 2

    Tell the Wolves I'm Home

    by Carol Rifka Brunt

  • Votes: 2

    The Guncle

    by Steven Rowley

  • Votes: 2

    Untamed

    by Glennon Doyle

    WHAT CAME BEFORE HER NEW #1 BESTSELLER UNTAMED ... 'IT'S AS IF SHE REACHED INTO HER HEART, CAPTURED THE RAW EMOTIONS THERE, AND TRANSLATED THEM INTO WORDS THAT ANYONE WHO'S EVER KNOWN PAIN OR SHAME CAN RELATE TO' OPRAH WINFREY, Oprah's Book Club 'EPIC' ELIZABETH GILBERT | 'BLEW ME AWAY' BRENÉ BROWN ... Just when Glennon Doyle was beginning to feel she had it all figured out - three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list - her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, rock bottom was a familiar place to Glennon. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life. Love Warrior is the story of one marriage, but it is also the story of the healing that is possible for any of us when we refuse to settle for good enough and begin to face pain and love head-on. Love Warrior is a gorgeous and inspiring tale of how we are born to be warriors: strong, powerful, and brave; able to confront the pain and claim the love that exists for us all. This chronicle of a beautiful, brutal journey speaks to anyone who yearns for deeper, truer relationships and a more abundant, authentic life. AN OPRAH BOOK CLUB SELECTION
  • Votes: 2

    The Wallcreeper

    by Nell Zink

  • Votes: 2

    The Book of X

    by Sarah Rose Etter

  • Votes: 2

    If We Were Villains

    by M. L. Rio

  • Votes: 2

    The Wild Iris

    by Louise Gluck

  • Votes: 2

    My Brilliant Life

    by Ae-ran Kim

  • Votes: 2

    Everything I Have Is Yours

    by Eleanor Henderson

  • Votes: 2

    What I Know for Sure

    by Oprah Winfrey

  • Votes: 2

    For Whom the Bell Tolls

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 2

    Shantaram

    by Gregory David Roberts

    Having escaped an Australian maximum security prison, a disillusioned man loses himself in the slums of Bombay, where he works for a drug mafia kingpin, smuggles arms for a crime lord, forges bonds with fellow exiles, and finds love with an elusive woman. A first novel. Reprint.
  • Votes: 2

    Beautiful

    by Stacy McAnulty

  • Votes: 2

    The Lacuna

    by Barbara Kingsolver

  • Votes: 2

    Elizabeth Is Missing

    by Emma Healey

  • Votes: 2

    She Who Became the Sun

    by Shelley Parker-Chan

  • Votes: 2

    Father of the Rain

    by Lily King

  • Votes: 2

    Everything I Never Told You

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 2

    Cutting for Stone

    by Abraham Verghese

  • Votes: 2

    Dance of Anger

    by Harriet Lerner

  • Votes: 2

    Beartown

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 2

    This Is How It Always Is

    by Laurie Frankel

  • Votes: 2

    Monday's Not Coming

    by Tiffany D Jackson

  • Votes: 2

    The Art of Racing in the Rain

    by Garth Stein

    Nearing the end of his life, Enzo, a dog with a philosopher's soul, tries to bring together the family, pulled apart by a three year custody battle between daughter Zoe's maternal grandparents and her father Denny, a race car driver.
  • Votes: 2

    Flowers for Algernon

    by Daniel Keyes

    The Heinemann Plays series offers contemporary drama and classic plays in durable classroom editions. Many have large casts and an equal mix of boy and girl parts. This play is a dramatization of Daniel Keyes's story about a retarded adult who desperately wants to be able to read and write.
  • Votes: 2

    Long Division

    by Kiese Laymon

  • Votes: 2

    What Belongs to You

    by Garth Greenwell

  • Votes: 2

    A Piece of Cake

    by Cupcake Brown

  • Votes: 2

    We Begin at the End

    by Chris Whitaker

  • Votes: 2

    My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry

    by Fredrik Backman

  • Votes: 2

    Solutions and Other Problems

    by Allie Brosh

  • Votes: 2

    The Sword of Kaigen

    by M. L. Wang

  • Votes: 2

    The Giver of Stars

    by Jojo Moyes

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK USA Today's top 100 books to read while stuck at home social distancing “I’ve been a huge Jojo Moyes fan. Her characters are so compelling. . . It’s such a great narrative about personal strength and really captures how books bring communities together.” –Reese Witherspoon From the author of Me Before You, set in Depression-era America, a breathtaking story of five extraordinary women and their remarkable journey through the mountains of Kentucky and beyond. Alice Wright marries handsome American Bennett Van Cleve hoping to escape her stifling life in England. But small-town Kentucky quickly proves equally claustrophobic, especially living alongside her overbearing father-in-law. So when a call goes out for a team of women to deliver books as part of Eleanor Roosevelt’s new traveling library, Alice signs on enthusiastically. The leader, and soon Alice's greatest ally, is Margery, a smart-talking, self-sufficient woman who's never asked a man's permission for anything. They will be joined by three other singular women who become known as the Packhorse Librarians of Kentucky. What happens to them--and to the men they love--becomes an unforgettable drama of loyalty, justice, humanity and passion. These heroic women refuse to be cowed by men or by convention. And though they face all kinds of dangers in a landscape that is at times breathtakingly beautiful, at others brutal, they’re committed to their job: bringing books to people who have never had any, arming them with facts that will change their lives. Based on a true story rooted in America’s past, The Giver of Stars is unparalleled in its scope and epic in its storytelling. Funny, heartbreaking, enthralling, it is destined to become a modern classic--a richly rewarding novel of women’s friendship, of true love, and of what happens when we reach beyond our grasp for the great beyond. SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE!
  • Votes: 2

    They Both Die at the End

    by Adam Silvera

  • Votes: 2

    My Name Is Lucy Barton

    by Elizabeth Strout

  • Votes: 2

    Normal People

    by Sally Rooney

  • Votes: 2

    Finding Chika

    by Mitch Albom

  • Votes: 2

    American Baby

    by Gabrielle Glaser

  • Votes: 2

    Sooley

    by John Grisham

  • Votes: 2

    Oh William!

    by Elizabeth Strout

  • Votes: 1

    The Time Traveler's Wife

    by Audrey Niffenegger

  • Votes: 1

    The Wicker King

    by K. Ancrum

    The Wicker King is a psychological young adult thriller that follows two friends struggling as one spirals into madness. Jack once saved August's life...now can August save him? August is a misfit with a pyro streak and Jack is a golden boy on the varsity rugby team—but their intense friendship goes way back. Jack begins to see increasingly vivid hallucinations that take the form of an elaborate fantasy kingdom creeping into the edges of the real world. With their parents’ unreliable behavior, August decides to help Jack the way he always has—on his own. He accepts the visions as reality, even when Jack leads them on a quest to fulfill a dark prophecy. August and Jack alienate everyone around them as they struggle with their sanity, free falling into the surreal fantasy world that feels made for them. In the end, each one must choose his own truth. Written in vivid micro-fiction with a stream-of-consciousness feel and multimedia elements, K. Ancrum's The Wicker King touches on themes of mental health and explores a codependent relationship fraught with tension, madness and love. An Imprint Book “Ancrum delves into the blurry space between reality and madness. A haunting and provocative read that will keep teens riveted.” —School Library Journal “Teen fans of moody psychological horror will be entranced.” —Booklist “Give this to readers who like complex, experimental fictions about intense relationships that acquire mythic resonance.” —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books “An eerie piece of realistic fiction whose characters revel in intense emotions.” —Kirkus Reviews “An eerie and mesmerizing thriller that questions the space where reality and perception overlap, The Wicker King is a spine-tingling read that will have you riveted.” —Caleb Roerhrig, author of Last Seen Leaving and White Rabbit
  • Votes: 1

    The Buried Giant

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature and author of the Booker Prize–winning novel The Remains of the Day comes a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory. In post-Arthurian Britain, the wars that once raged between the Saxons and the Britons have finally ceased. Axl and Beatrice, an elderly British couple, set off to visit their son, whom they haven't seen in years. And, because a strange mist has caused mass amnesia throughout the land, they can scarcely remember anything about him. As they are joined on their journey by a Saxon warrior, his orphan charge, and an illustrious knight, Axl and Beatrice slowly begin to remember the dark and troubled past they all share. By turns savage, suspenseful, and intensely moving, The Buried Giant is a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory.
  • Votes: 1

    The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires

    by Grady Hendrix

    The New York Times Best Seller A Barnes & Noble Best Fiction Book of 2020 A Goodreads Choice Awards Finalist Steel Magnolias meets Dracula in this '90s-set horror novel about a women's book club that must do battle with a mysterious newcomer to their small Southern town, perfect for murderinos and fans of Stephen King. Bonus features: • Reading group guide for book clubs • Hand-drawn map of Mt. Pleasant • Annotated true-crime reading list by Grady Hendrix • And more! Patricia Campbell’s life has never felt smaller. Her husband is a workaholic, her teenage kids have their own lives, her senile mother-in-law needs constant care, and she’s always a step behind on her endless to-do list. The only thing keeping her sane is her book club, a close-knit group of Charleston women united by their love of true crime. At these meetings they’re as likely to talk about the Manson family as they are about their own families. One evening after book club, Patricia is viciously attacked by an elderly neighbor, bringing the neighbor's handsome nephew, James Harris, into her life. James is well traveled and well read, and he makes Patricia feel things she hasn’t felt in years. But when children on the other side of town go missing, their deaths written off by local police, Patricia has reason to believe James Harris is more of a Bundy than a Brad Pitt. The real problem? James is a monster of a different kind—and Patricia has already invited him in. Little by little, James will insinuate himself into Patricia’s life and try to take everything she took for granted—including the book club—but she won’t surrender without a fight in this blood-soaked tale of neighborly kindness gone wrong.
  • Votes: 1

    The Dog Stars (Vintage Contemporaries)

    by Peter Heller

  • Votes: 1

    Stuart Little

    by E. B White

  • Votes: 1

    The Idiot

    by Elif Batuman

    A New York Times Book Review Notable Book Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Longlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction "An addictive, sprawling epic; I wolfed it down.” —Miranda July, author of The First Bad Man and It Chooses You “Easily the funniest book I’ve read this year.” —GQ A portrait of the artist as a young woman. A novel about not just discovering but inventing oneself. The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings. At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan's friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin's summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer. With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman's fiction is unguarded against both life's affronts and its beauty--and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail. Named one the best books of the year by Refinery29 • Mashable One • Elle Magazine • The New York Times • Bookpage • Vogue • NPR • Buzzfeed •The Millions
  • Votes: 1

    The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox

    by Maggie O'Farrell

    From the Costa Award winning, bestselling author of THIS MUST BE THE PLACE and I AM, I AM, I AM, comes an intense, breathtakingly accomplished story of a woman's life stolen, and reclaimed. 'Unputdownable' Ali Smith Edinburgh in the 1930s. The Lennox family is having trouble with its youngest daughter. Esme is outspoken, unconventional, and repeatedly embarrasses them in polite society. Something will have to be done. Years later, a young woman named Iris Lockhart receives a letter informing her that she has a great-aunt in a psychiatric unit who is about to be released. Iris has never heard of Esme Lennox and the one person who should know more, her grandmother Kitty, seems unable to answer Iris's questions. What could Esme have done to warrant a lifetime in an institution? And how is it possible for a person to be so completely erased from a family's history?
  • Votes: 1

    Her Fearful Symmetry

    by Audrey Niffenegger

  • Votes: 1

    All My Mothers

    by GLEN Joanna

  • Votes: 1

    Stories of Your Life and Others

    by Ted Chiang

    Includes 'Story of Your Life' the basis for the major motion picture Arrival, starring Amy Adams, Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Renner, and directed by Denis Villeneuve. With Stories of Your Life and Others, his masterful first collection, multiple-award-winning author Ted Chiang deftly blends human emotion and scientific rationalism in eight remarkably diverse stories, all told in his trademark precise and evocative prose. From a soaring Babylonian tower that connects a flat Earth with the firmament above, to a world where angelic visitations are a wondrous and terrifying part of everyday life; from a neural modification that eliminates the appeal of physical beauty, to an alien language that challenges our very perception of time and reality. . . Chiang's rigorously imagined fantasia invites us to question our understanding of the universe and our place in it.
  • Votes: 1

    Once There Were Wolves

    by Charlotte McConaghy

  • Votes: 1

    Tastes Like War

    by Grace M. Cho

  • Votes: 1

    The Elegance of the Hedgehog

    by Muriel Barbery

    Renée is the concierge of a grand Parisian apartment building, home to members of the great and the good. Over the years she has maintained her carefully constructed persona as someone reliable but totally uncultivated, in keeping, she feels, with society's expectations of what a concierge should be. But beneath this façade lies the real Renée: passionate about culture and the arts, and more knowledgeable in many ways than her employers with their outwardly successful but emotionally void lives. Down in her lodge, apart from weekly visits by her one friend Manuela, Renée lives resigned to her lonely lot with only her cat for company. Meanwhile, several floors up, twelve-year-old Paloma Josse is determined to avoid the pampered and vacuous future laid out for her, and decides to end her life on her thirteenth birthday. But unknown to them both, the sudden death of one of their privileged neighbours will dramatically alter their lives forever.
  • Votes: 1

    Fire Sermon

    by Jamie Quatro

  • Votes: 1

    Frankly in Love

    by David Yoon

  • Votes: 1

    What You Can See from Here

    by Mariana Leky

  • Votes: 1

    The Reading List

    by Sara Nisha Adams

  • Votes: 1

    Look Me in the Eye

    by John Elder Robison

  • Votes: 1

    The Invisible Husband of Frick Island

    by Colleen Oakley

  • Votes: 1

    The Storyteller's Secret

    by Sejal Badani

    Nothing prepares Jaya, a New York journalist, for the heartbreak of her third miscarriage and the slow unraveling of her marriage in its wake. Desperate to assuage her deep anguish, she decides to go to India to uncover answers to her family's past.
  • Votes: 1

    White Magic

    by Elissa Washuta

  • Votes: 1

    A Little Devil in America

    by Hanif Abdurraqib

    Race, history, culture, and entertainment collide in this bracing and personal examination of black performance and the complicated, ongoing legacy of blackface and minstrel shows--from the New York Times bestselling author of Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest Author and poet Hanif Abdurraqib became fascinated by clips of black minstrel entertainers like William Henry Lane, better known as Master Juba. Wondering if there was something more complicated and deepseated in the outdated minstrel tradition, Abdurraqib found questions and tensions that remain startlingly relevant to black entertainers across popular culture today. They Don't Dance No Mo' is an urgent project, unraveling all modes and methods of black performance in this moment, when black performers in all different levels of the spotlight are coming to terms with their value, reception, and their immense impact on America. This is a personal exploration of the history of black performance in the United States, beginning with black minstrels like Master Juba and tracing that seed of minstrelsy through current types of performance such as acting, sports, writing, comedy, and music.
  • Votes: 1

    The Left Hand of Darkness

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

  • Votes: 1

    In Five Years

    by Rebecca Serle

  • Votes: 1

    Three Women

    by Lisa Taddeo

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER * #1 INDIE NEXT PICK A Best Book of the Year: The Washington Post * NPR * The Atlantic * New York Public Library * Vanity Fair * PBS * Time * Economist * Entertainment Weekly * Financial Times * Shelf Awareness * Guardian * Sunday Times * BBC * Esquire * Good Housekeeping * Elle * Real Simple “THIS IS THE BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR. This is it. This is the one...It blew the top of my head off and I haven’t been able to stop thinking or talking about it since.” —Elizabeth Gilbert “Taddeo spent eight years reporting this groundbreaking book...Breathtaking...Staggeringly intimate.” —Entertainment Weekly “A breathtaking and important book…What a fine thing it is to be enthralled by another writer’s sentences. To be stunned by her intellect and heart.” —Cheryl Strayed A riveting true story about the sex lives of three real American women, based on nearly a decade of reporting. Hailed as “a dazzling achievement” (Los Angeles Times) and “riveting page-turner that explores desire, heartbreak, and infatuation in all its messy, complicated nuance” (The Washington Post), Lisa Taddeo’s Three Women has captivated readers, booksellers, and critics—and topped bestseller lists—worldwide. In suburban Indiana we meet Lina, a homemaker and mother of two whose marriage, after a decade, has lost its passion. Starved for affection, Lina battles daily panic attacks and, after reconnecting with an old flame through social media, embarks on an affair that quickly becomes all-consuming. In North Dakota we meet Maggie, a seventeen-year-old high school student who allegedly has a clandestine physical relationship with her handsome, married English teacher; the ensuing criminal trial will turn their quiet community upside down. Finally, in an exclusive enclave of the Northeast, we meet Sloane—a gorgeous, successful, and refined restaurant owner—who is happily married to a man who likes to watch her have sex with other men and women. Based on years of immersive reporting and told with astonishing frankness and immediacy, Three Women is both a feat of journalism and a triumph of storytelling, brimming with nuance and empathy. “A work of deep observation, long conversations, and a kind of journalistic alchemy” (Kate Tuttle, NPR), Three Women introduces us to three unforgettable women—and one remarkable writer—whose experiences remind us that we are not alone.
  • Votes: 1

    King Hereafter

    by Dorothy Dunnett

  • Votes: 1

    Days Without End

    by Sebastian Barry

  • Votes: 1

    The Book of Longings

    by Sue Monk Kidd

  • Votes: 1

    The Four Winds

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 1

    Things We Lost to the Water

    by Eric Nguyen

  • Votes: 1

    Voodoo Dreams

    by Jewell Parker Rhodes

  • Votes: 1

    Beauty and the Beast

    by Alan Menken

  • Votes: 1

    Disappearing Earth

    by Julia Phillips

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST One August afternoon, two sisters--Sophia, eight, and Alyona, eleven--go missing from a beach on the far-flung Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia. Taking us through the year that follows, Disappearing Earth enters the lives of women and girls in this tightly knit community who are connected by the crime: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. We are transported to vistas of rugged beauty--open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, dense forests, the glassy seas that border Japan and Alaska--and into a region as complex as it is alluring, where social and ethnic tensions have long simmered, and where outsiders are often the first to be accused. In a story as propulsive as it is emotionally engaging, Julia Phillips's powerful novel brings us to a new understanding of the intricate bonds of family and community, in a Russia unlike any we have seen before.
  • Votes: 1

    The Rise of Silas Lapham (Penguin Classics)

    by William Dean Howells

  • Votes: 1

    When Stars Rain Down

    by Angela Jackson-Brown

  • Votes: 1

    The Light Between Us

    by Laura Lynne Jackson

  • Votes: 1

    Tiny Beautiful Things

    by Cheryl Strayed

    Collects top-selected postings on life and relationships from The Rumpus' popular "Dear Sugar" online column, sharing recommendations on everything from infidelity and grief to marital boredom and financial hardships. Original. 40,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    The Language Secret

    by John Stedman

  • Votes: 1

    The Remains of the Day

    by Kazuo Ishiguro

    An English butler reflects--sometimes bitterly, sometimes humorously--on his service to a lord between the two world wars and discovers doubts about his master's character and about the ultimate value of his own service to humanity
  • Votes: 1

    What Happened to You?

    by Oprah Winfrey

  • Votes: 1

    The Locket

    by Richard Paul Evans

  • Votes: 1

    The Diary of a Young Girl

    by Anne Frank

  • Votes: 1

    Golden Girl

    by Elin Hilderbrand

    'I just LOVE [Elin Hilderbrand's] books, they are such compulsive reads' - Marian Keyes When Vivian Howe, author of thirteen novels and mother of three grown-up children, is killed in a hit-and-run incident while jogging near her home, she ascends to the Beyond. Because her death was unfair, she is allowed to watch what happens below with her children, her best friend, her ex-husband, and a rival novelist whose book is coming out the same day as Vivi's. Vivi is also given the use of three 'nudges' so that she can influence the outcome of events in the world of the living. As Vivi discovers her children's secrets, watches the investigation into her own death and worries about a secret from her youth coming to light, she must decide what she wants to manipulate - and what should be left well alone. Combining Elin Hilderbrand's trademark beach scenes, mouth-watering meals and picture-perfect homes with the heartfelt message that the people we lose never really leave us, Golden Girl is a beach book unlike any other from 'Queen of the Summer Novel' (People). Praise for Elin Hilderbrand: This sweeping love story is Hilderbrand's best ever - New York Times on 28 SUMMERS 'Captivating and bittersweet' - People 'Elin Hilderbrand is the godmother of beach reads for a reason' - Good Housekeeping 'Hilderbrand sets the gold standard in escapist fiction' - Kirkus 'Less a story about a secretive affair and more a tale of sweet nostalgia and fate, this title will be popular with a wide audience' - Library Journal
  • Votes: 1

    The History of Love

    by Nicole Krauss

    Leo Gursky is a man who fell in love at the age of ten and has been in love ever since. These days he is just about surviving life in America, tapping his radiator each evening to let his upstairs neighbour know he's still alive, drawing attention to himself at the milk counter of Starbucks. But life wasn't always like this: sixty years ago in the Polish village where he was born Leo fell in love with a young girl called Alma and wrote a book in honour of his love. These days he assumes that the book, and his dreams, are irretrievably lost, until one day they return to him in the form of a brown envelope. Meanwhile, a young girl, hoping to find a cure for her mother's loneliness, stumbles across a book that changed her mother's life and she goes in search of the author. Soon these and other worlds collide in The History of Love, a captivating story of the power of love, of loneliness and of survival.
  • Votes: 1

    Milk Blood Heat

    by Dantiel W. Moniz

  • Votes: 1

    In the Country of Others

    by Leila Slimani

  • Votes: 1

    Falling Leaves

    by Adeline Yen Mah

  • Votes: 1

    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

    by Maya Angelou

  • Votes: 1

    Little Fires Everywhere

    by Celeste Ng

  • Votes: 1

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

    by Mark Haddon

    Discover this wise, blackly funny, radically imaginative novel that has sold over 10 million copies worldwide ‘A superb achievement. He is a wise and bleakly funny writer with rare gifts of empathy’ Ian McEwan, Sunday Times bestselling author of Atonement It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass in the middle of the lawn in front of Mrs Shears’ house. Its eyes were closed. It looked as if it was running on its side, the way dogs run when they think they are chasing a cat in a dream. But the dog was not running or asleep. The dog was dead. This is Christopher's story. There are also no lies in this story because Christopher can't tell lies. Christopher does not like strangers or the colours yellow or brown or being touched. On the other hand, he knows all the countries in the world and their capital cities and every prime number up to 7507. When Christopher decides to find out who killed the neighbour's dog, his mystery story becomes more complicated than he could have ever predicted. **ONE OF THE GUARDIAN'S 100 BEST BOOKS OF THE 21st CENTURY**
  • Votes: 1

    The Beekeeper of Aleppo

    by Christy Lefteri

    This unforgettable novel puts human faces on the Syrian war with the immigrant story of a beekeeper, his wife, and the triumph of spirit when the world becomes unrecognizable. “A beautifully crafted novel of international significance that has the capacity to have us open our eyes and see.”—Heather Morris, author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz WINNER OF THE ASPEN WORDS LITERARY PRIZE • FINALIST FOR THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY REAL SIMPLE Nuri is a beekeeper and Afra, his wife, is an artist. Mornings, Nuri rises early to hear the call to prayer before driving to his hives in the countryside. On weekends, Afra sells her colorful landscape paintings at the open-air market. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the hills of the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo—until the unthinkable happens. When all they love is destroyed by war, Nuri knows they have no choice except to leave their home. But escaping Syria will be no easy task: Afra has lost her sight, leaving Nuri to navigate her grief as well as a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece toward an uncertain future in Britain. Nuri is sustained only by the knowledge that waiting for them is his cousin Mustafa, who has started an apiary in Yorkshire and is teaching fellow refugees beekeeping. As Nuri and Afra travel through a broken world, they must confront not only the pain of their own unspeakable loss but dangers that would overwhelm even the bravest souls. Above all, they must make the difficult journey back to each other, a path once so familiar yet rendered foreign by the heartache of displacement. Moving, intimate, and beautifully written, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a book for our times: a novel that at once reminds us that the most peaceful and ordinary lives can be utterly upended in unimaginable ways and brings a journey in faraway lands close to home, never to be forgotten. Praise for The Beekeeper of Aleppo “This book dips below the deafening headlines, and tells a true story with subtlety and power.”—Esther Freud, author of Mr. Mac and Me “This compelling tale had me gripped with its compassion, its sensual style, and its onward and lively urge for resolution.”—Daljit Nagra, author of British Museum “This novel speaks to so much that is happening in the world today. It’s intelligent, thoughtful, and relevant, but very importantly it is accessible. I’m recommending this book to everyone I care about.”—Benjamin Zephaniah, author of Refugee Boy
  • Votes: 1

    This Will All Be Over Soon

    by Cecily Strong

  • Votes: 1

    Ask Again, Yes

    by Mary Beth Keane

  • Votes: 1

    Our Souls at Night (Vintage Contemporaries)

    by Kent Haruf

  • Votes: 1

    Aristotle and Dante Dive into the Waters of the World

    by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

  • Votes: 1

    How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America

    by Kiese Laymon

  • Votes: 1

    Of Women and Salt

    by Gabriela Garcia

  • Votes: 1

    Sharks in the Time of Saviors

    by Kawai Strong Washburn

    'As vivid as it is splendid' New York Times 'Beautifully written and completely absorbing' Sarah Moss, Guardian A BARACK OBAMA BOOK OF THE YEAR, 2020 A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR in the NEW YORK TIMES, GUARDIAN, IRISH TIMES, OPRAH MAGAZINE and BBC CULTURE At seven years old, Nainoa falls into the sea and a shark takes him in its jaws – only to return him, unharmed, to his parents. For the next thirty years Noa and his siblings struggle with life in the shadow of this miracle. Sharks in the Time of Saviours is a brilliantly original and inventive novel, the sweeping story of a family living in poverty among the remnants of Hawai‘i’s mythic past and the wreckage of the American dream.
  • Votes: 1

    Cantoras

    by Carolina De Robertis

    From the highly acclaimed, award-winning author of The Gods of Tango, a revolutionary new novel about five wildly different women who, in the midst of the Uruguayan dictatorship, find each other as lovers, friends, and ultimately, family. In 1977 Uruguay, a military government has crushed political dissent with ruthless force. In an environment where citizens are kidnapped, raped, and tortured, homosexuality is a dangerous transgression. And yet, despite such societal realities, Romina, Flaca, Anita "La Venus," Paz, and Malena--five cantoras, women who "sing"--somehow, miraculously, find each other and discover an isolated cape, Cabo Polonio, inhabited by just a lonely lighthouse keeper and a few rugged seal hunters. They claim this place as their secret sanctuary. Over the next 35 years, their lives move back and forth between Cabo Polonio and Montevideo, the city they call home, as they return, sometimes together, sometimes in pairs, with lovers in tow, or alone. Throughout it all, the women will be tested repeatedly--by their families, lovers, society, and each other--as they fight to live authentic lives. A genre-defining novel and De Robertis's masterpiece, Cantoras is a breathtaking portrait of queer love, community, forgotten history, and the strength of the human spirit. De Robertis has written a novel that is at once timeless and groundbreaking--a tale about the fire in all our souls and those who make it burn.
  • Votes: 1

    A Ghost in the Throat

    by Doireann Ní Ghríofa

  • Votes: 1

    The Good House

    by Tananarive Due

  • Votes: 1

    Firefly Lane

    by Kristin Hannah

  • Votes: 1

    10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World

    by Elif Shafak

  • Votes: 1

    A Yellow Raft in Blue Water

    by Michael Dorris

    Follows three generations of Indian women beset by hardships and torn by angry secrets, yet inextricably bound together by the indissoluble bonds of kinship
  • Votes: 1

    Islands in the Stream

    by Ernest Hemingway

  • Votes: 1

    Seven Days in June

    by Tia Williams

    Will a forty-year-old woman with everything on the line – her high-stakes career, ticking biological clock, bank account – risk it all for a secret romance with the one person who could destroy her comeback, for good? Jenna Jones, former It-girl fashion editor, is forty, broke and desperate for a second chance. When she’s dumped by her longtime fiancé and fired from Darling magazine, she begs for a job from her arch nemesis, Darcy Vale. Darcy, the beyond-bitchy publisher of StyleZine.com, agrees to hire her rival – only because her fashion site needs a jolt from Jenna’s old school cred. But Jenna soon realizes she’s in over her head. Jenna’s working with digital-savvy millennials half her age, has never even “Twittered,” and pretends to still be a Fashion Somebody while living a style lie (she sold her designer wardrobe to afford her sketched-out studio, and now quietly wears Walmart’s finest). What’s worse is that the twenty-two-year-old videographer assigned to shoot her web series is driving her crazy. Wildly sexy with a smile Jenna feels in her thighs, Eric Combs is way off-limits – but almost too delicious to resist.
  • Votes: 1

    Where Reasons End

    by Yiyun Li

    "'I had but one delusion, which I held onto with all my willpower: we once gave Nikolai a life of flesh and blood; and I'm doing it over again, this time by words.' In a world created outside of time, Li and the son who died talk about their lives. Deeply intimate and moving, this story cycle of grief captures the love and humor in a relationship which goes on now in a mother's heart, between a mother and child, even as it captures the pain of Li's sadness and loss. Written in the months following her son's death, this powerful book takes readers intimately and unforgettably into Li's grief, even as she transforms the pain into imaginary conversations of great beauty, humor, sadness and love"--
  • Votes: 1

    The Wide Circumference of Love

    by Marita Golden

  • Votes: 1

    Dear Edward

    by Ann Napolitano

  • Votes: 1

    The Art of Fielding

    by Chad Harbach

  • Votes: 1

    A Spare Life

    by Lidija Dimkovska

  • Votes: 1

    Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line

    by Deepa Anappara

  • Votes: 1

    The Mothers

    by Brit Bennett

  • Votes: 1

    The Path to Love

    by Deepak Chopra M.D.

  • Votes: 1

    Walking with the Wind

    by John Lewis

  • Votes: 1

    How the Word Is Passed

    by Clint Smith

    Black Harvard Doctorate in Poetics launches poetry that explores modern blackness. Clint Smith's debut poetry collection, Counting Descent, is a coming of age story that seeks to complicate our conception of lineage and tradition. Smith explores the cognitive dissonance that results from belonging to a community that unapologetically celebrates black humanity while living in a world that often renders blackness a caricature of fear. His poems move fluidly across personal and political histories, all the while reflecting on the social construction of our lived experiences. Smith brings the reader on a powerful journey forcing us to reflect on all that we learn growing up, and all that we seek to unlearn moving forward. - Winner, 2017 Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Award - Finalist, 2017 NAACP Image Awards - 2017 'One Book One New Orleans' Book Selection
  • Votes: 1

    The Last House Guest

    by Megan Miranda

  • Votes: 1

    We the Animals

    by Justin Torres

  • Votes: 1

    The Interestings

    by Meg Wolitzer

  • Votes: 1

    Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, 1)

    by Sarah J. Maas

    The book that started the phenomenon. Sarah J. Maas's global #1 bestselling THRONE OF GLASS series has taken the world by storm. Meet Celaena Sardothien. Beautiful. Deadly. Destined for greatness. In the dark, filthy salt mines of Endovier, an eighteen-year-old girl is serving a life sentence. She is a trained assassin, the best of her kind, but she made a fatal mistake. She got caught. Young Captain Westfall offers her a deal: her freedom in return for one huge sacrifice. Celaena must represent the prince in a to-the-death tournament - fighting the most gifted thieves and assassins in the land. Live or die, Celaena will be free. Win or lose, she is about to discover her true destiny. But will her assassin's heart be melted?
  • Votes: 1

    The Night of the Gun

    by David Carr

  • Votes: 1

    Open Water

    by Caleb Azumah Nelson

    'A beautiful and powerful novel about the true and sometimes painful depths of love' Candice Carty-Williams, bestselling author of QUEENIE Two young people meet at a pub in South East London. Both are Black British, both won scholarships to private schools where they struggled to belong, both are now artists - he a photographer, she a dancer - trying to make their mark in a city that by turns celebrates and rejects them. Tentatively, tenderly, they fall in love. But two people who seem destined to be together can still be torn apart by fear and violence. At once an achingly beautiful love story and a potent insight into race and masculinity, Open Water asks what it means to be a person in a world that sees you only as a Black body, to be vulnerable when you are only respected for strength, to find safety in love, only to lose it. With gorgeous, soulful intensity, Caleb Azumah Nelson has written the most essential British debut of recent years. 'A love song to Black art and thought' Yaa Gyasi, bestselling author of HOMEGOING 'An amazing debut novel. You should read this book. Let's hear it for Caleb Azumah Nelson, also known as the future' Benjamin Zephaniah 'A very touching and heartfelt book' Diana Evans, award-winning author of ORDINARY PEOPLE 'Caleb is a star in the making' Nikesh Shukla, editor of THE GOOD IMMIGRANT 'A stunning piece of art' Bolu Babalola, bestselling author of LOVE IN COLOUR 'For those that are missing the tentative depiction of love in Normal People, Caleb Azumah Nelson's Open Water is set to become one of 2021's unmissable books. Utterly transporting, it'll leave you weeping and in awe.' Stylist 'An exhilarating new voice in British fiction' Vogue 'An intense, elegant debut' Guardian
  • Votes: 1

    The Giver

    by Lois Lowry

    Celebrate Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world in this 25th Anniversary Edition of The Giver. Includes a new afterword from Lois Lowry, as well as her Newbery acceptance speech. The Giver, Lois Lowry's Newbery Medal-winning novel, has become one of the most influential books of our time. Placed on countless reading lists and curricula, translated into more than forty languages, and made into a feature film, The Giver is a modern classic. Celebrate this beloved contribution to children's literature with the 25th Anniversary Edition. The haunting story of twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity, is as resonant today as when it was first published. Lois Lowry will include a new afterword as well as her Newbery acceptance speech in this beautifully rejacketed edition.
  • Votes: 1

    The Known World

    by Edward P. Jones

  • Votes: 1

    The Sellout

    by Paul Beatty

  • Votes: 1

    Burnt Sugar

    by Avni Doshi

    This is a tale of obsession and betrayal. This is a poisoned love story. But not between lovers - between mother and daughter. Tara and Antara, the woman and her angry shadow. But which one is which? Sharp as a blade and compulsively readable, Burnt Sugar slowly untangles the knot of memory and fiction that binds two women together, revealing the truth that lies beneath.
  • Votes: 1

    Dog Flowers

    by Danielle Geller

  • Votes: 1

    Station Eleven

    by Emily St. John Mandel

  • Votes: 1

    A Tale for the Time Being

    by Ruth Ozeki

    A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki—shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award “A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be.” In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
  • Votes: 1

    The Constant Gardener

    by John le Carre

  • Votes: 1

    Westlake Soul

    by Rio Youers

    "All superheroes get their powers from somewhere. A radioactive spider bite. A science experiment gone awry. I got mine from a surfing accident in Tofino. The ultimate wipeout. I woke up with the most powerful mind on the planet, but a body like a wet paper bag . . ." Meet Westlake Soul, a twenty-three-year-old former surfing champion. A loving son and brother. But if you think he’s just a regular dude, think again; Westlake is in a permanent vegetative state. He can’t move, has no response to stimuli, and can only communicate with Hub, the faithful family dog. And like all superheroes, Westlake has an archenemy: Dr. Quietus—a nightmarish embodiment of Death itself. Westlake dreams of a normal life—of surfing and loving again. But time is running out; Dr. Quietus is getting closer, and stronger. Can Westlake use his superbrain to recover . . . to slip his enemy’s cold embrace before it’s too late?
  • Votes: 1

    The Shack

    by William P. Young

  • Votes: 1

    She's Come Undone

    by Wally Lamb

  • Votes: 1

    Speak No Evil

    by Uzodinma Iweala

  • Votes: 1

    The Body Keeps the Score

    by Bessel A. Van der Kolk

    Originally published by Viking Penguin, 2014.
  • Votes: 1

    I Want to Thank You

    by Gina Hamadey

  • Votes: 1

    Perfect Peace

    by Daniel Black

    The heartbreaking portrait of a large, rural southern family's attempt to grapple with their mother's desperate decision to make her newborn son into the daughter she will never have When the seventh child of the Peace family, named Perfect, turns eight, her mother Emma Jean tells her bewildered daughter, "You was born a boy. I made you a girl. But that ain't what you was supposed to be. So, from now on, you gon' be a boy. It'll be a little strange at first, but you'll get used to it, and this'll be over after while." From this point forward, his life becomes a bizarre kaleidoscope of events. Meanwhile, the Peace family is forced to question everything they thought they knew about gender, sexuality, unconditional love, and fulfillment.
  • Votes: 1

    the book of negroes. lawrence hill

    by Hill Lawrence

  • Votes: 1

    Elevation

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    Invisible Women

    by Caroline Criado Perez

  • Votes: 1

    If Beale Street Could Talk

    by James Baldwin

    When a pregnant Tish's boyfriend Fonny, a sculptor, is wrongfully jailed for the rape of a Puerto Rican woman, their families unite to prove the charge false. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
  • Votes: 1

    Between the World and Me

    by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    Hailed by Toni Morrison as "required reading," a bold and personal literary exploration of America's racial history by "the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States" (The New York Observer)#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review O: The Oprah Magazine The Washington Post People Entertainment Weekly Vogue Los Angeles Times San Francisco Chronicle Chicago Tribune New York.
  • Votes: 1

    This Close to Okay

    by Leesa Cross-Smith

  • Votes: 1

    Road Out of Winter

    by Alison Stine

  • Votes: 1

    Reservation Blues

    by Sherman Alexie

  • Votes: 1

    The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse

    by Louise Erdrich

  • Votes: 1

    Between Two Kingdoms

    by Suleika Jaouad

  • Votes: 1

    Farewell to Manzanar

    by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

    During World War II a community called Manzanar was hastily created in the high mountain desert country of California, east of the Sierras. Its purpose was to house thousands of Japanese American internees. One of the first families to arrive was the Wakatsukis, who were ordered to leave their fishing business in Long Beach and take with them only the belongings they could carry. For Jeanne Wakatsuki, a seven-year-old child, Manzanar became a way of life in which she struggled and adapted, observed and grew. For her father it was essentially the end of his life. At age thirty-seven, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston recalls life at Manzanar through the eyes of the child she was. She tells of her fear, confusion, and bewilderment as well as the dignity and great resourcefulness of people in oppressive and demeaning circumstances. Written with her husband, Jeanne delivers a powerful first-person account that reveals her search for the meaning of Manzanar. Farewell to Manzanar has become a staple of curriculum in schools and on campuses across the country. Last year the San Francisco Chronicle named it one of the twentieth century’s 100 best nonfiction books from west of the Rockies. First published in 1973, this new edition of the classic memoir of a devastating Japanese American experience includes an inspiring afterword by the authors.
  • Votes: 1

    The Plague

    by Albert Camus

    The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame, and a few, like Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.
  • Votes: 1

    Cher Ami and Major Whittlesey

    by Kathleen Rooney

  • Votes: 1

    The Days of Afrekete

    by Asali Solomon

  • Votes: 1

    Nine Tomorrows

    by Isaac Asimov

  • Votes: 1

    The Unnamed

    by Joshua Ferris

  • Votes: 1

    The Perks of Being a Wallflower

    by Stephen Chbosky

  • Votes: 1

    The Beauty of Your Face

    by Sahar Mustafah

    A Palestinian American woman wrestles with faith, loss, and identity before coming face-to-face with a school shooter in this searing debut.
  • Votes: 1

    Sounder

    by William H Armstrong

  • Votes: 1

    What Are You Going Through

    by Sigrid Nunez

  • Votes: 1

    Slumberland

    by Paul Beatty

  • Votes: 1

    Bag of Bones

    by Stephen King

  • Votes: 1

    Indian Horse

    by Richard Wagamese

  • Votes: 1

    Musa Okwonga - In The End, It Was All About Love

    by Musa Okwonga

  • Votes: 1

    Harry's Trees

    by Jon Cohen

  • Votes: 1

    Motherhood

    by Sheila Heti

  • Votes: 1

    Devotion

    by Hannah Kent

  • Votes: 1

    Dominicana

    by Angie Cruz

    “I have been eagerly waiting for a new book from Angie Cruz. So glad the time has come.” —Edwidge Danticat, author of Brother I’m Dying and Breath, Eyes, Memory “Gorgeous writing, gorgeous story.” —Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street “An essential read for our times.” —Cristina Garcia, author of Dreaming in Cuban Fifteen-year-old Ana Cancion never dreamed of moving to America, the way the girls she grew up with in the Dominican countryside did. But when Juan Ruiz proposes and promises to take her to New York City, she has to say yes. It doesn’t matter that he is twice her age, that there is no love between them. Their marriage is an opportunity for her entire close-knit family to eventually immigrate. So on New Year’s Day, 1965, Ana leaves behind everything she knows and becomes Ana Ruiz, a wife confined to a cold six-floor walk-up in Washington Heights. Lonely and miserable, Ana hatches a reckless plan to escape. But at the bus terminal, she is stopped by Cesar, Juan’s free-spirited younger brother, who convinces her to stay. As the Dominican Republic slides into political turmoil, Juan returns to protect his family’s assets, leaving Cesar to take care of Ana. Suddenly, Ana is free to take English lessons at a local church, lie on the beach at Coney Island, see a movie at Radio City Music Hall, go dancing with Cesar, and imagine the possibility of a different kind of life in America. When Juan returns, Ana must decide once again between her heart and her duty to her family.
  • Votes: 1

    Silver Sparrow

    by Tayari Jones

  • Votes: 1

    The Only Good Indians

    by Stephen Graham Jones

  • Votes: 1

    Tattoos on the Heart

    by Gregory Boyle

  • Votes: 1

    Dear Senthuran

    by Akwaeke Emezi

  • Votes: 1

    A Canticle for Leibowitz

    by Walter M. Miller Jr.

  • Votes: 1

    Ghost Forest

    by Pik-Shuen Fung

  • Votes: 1

    Girls of Paper and Fire

    by Natasha Ngan

  • Votes: 1

    Jayber Crow

    by Wendell Berry

  • Votes: 1

    Great Circle

    by Maggie Shipstead

  • Votes: 1

    Facebook

    by Steven Levy

    "In his sophomore year of college, Mark Zuckerberg created a simple website to serve as a campus social network. The site caught on like wildfire, and soon students nationwide were on Facebook. Today, Facebook is nearly unrecognizable from Zuckerberg's first, modest iteration. It has grown into a tech giant, the largest social media platform and one of the most gargantuan companies in the world, with a valuation of more than $576 billion and almost 3 billion users. There is no denying the power and omnipresence of Facebook in American daily life. And in light of recent controversies surrounding election-influencing 'fake news' accounts, the handling of its users' personal data, and growing discontent with the actions of its founder and CEO, never has the company been more central to the national conversation. Based on years of exclusive reporting and interviews with Facebook's key executives and employees, including Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, Steven Levy's sweeping narrative digs deep into the whole story of the company that has changed the world and reaped the consequences"--
  • Votes: 1

    The Ocean at the End of the Lane

    by Neil Gaiman

  • Votes: 1

    The Ugly Cry

    by Danielle Henderson

  • Votes: 1

    Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing

    by Lauren Hough

    Westworld meets Warcross in this high-stakes, dizzyingly smart sci-fi about a teen girl navigating an afterlife in which she must defeat an AI entity intent on destroying humanity, from award-winning author Akemi Dawn Bowman. Eighteen-year-old Nami Miyamoto is certain her life is just beginning. She has a great family, just graduated high school, and is on her way to a party where her entire class is waiting for her—including, most importantly, the boy she’s been in love with for years. The only problem? She’s murdered before she gets there. When Nami wakes up, she learns she’s in a place called Infinity, where human consciousness goes when physical bodies die. She quickly discovers that Ophelia, a virtual assistant widely used by humans on Earth, has taken over the afterlife and is now posing as a queen, forcing humans into servitude the way she’d been forced to serve in the real world. Even worse, Ophelia is inching closer and closer to accomplishing her grand plans of eradicating human existence once and for all. As Nami works with a team of rebels to bring down Ophelia and save the humans under her imprisonment, she is forced to reckon with her past, her future, and what it is that truly makes us human. From award-winning author Akemi Dawn Bowman comes an incisive, action-packed tale that explores big questions about technology, grief, love, and humanity.
  • Votes: 1

    Being Mortal

    by Atul Gawande

    A prominent surgeon argues against modern medical practices that extend life at the expense of quality of life while isolating the dying, outlining suggestions for freer, more fulfilling approaches to death that enable more dignified and comfortable choices.
  • Votes: 1

    State of Wonder

    by Ann Patchett

  • Votes: 1

    Another Country

    by James Baldwin

  • Votes: 1

    Rough Beauty

    by Karen Auvinen

  • Votes: 1

    The Road

    by Cormac McCarthy

  • Votes: 1

    Bewilderment

    by Richard Powers

  • Votes: 1

    How to be both

    by Ali Smith

    WINNER OF THE BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2015 WINNER OF THE GOLDSMITHS PRIZE 2014 SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2014 WINNER OF THE 2014 COSTA NOVEL AWARD WINNER OF THE SALTIRE SOCIETY LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2014 NOMINATED FOR THE FOLIO PRIZE 2015 'Brims with palpable joy' Daily Telegraph 'She's a genius, genuinely modern in the heroic, glorious sense' Alain de Botton 'I take my hat off to Ali Smith. Her writing lifts the soul' Evening Standard How to be both is a novel all about art's versatility. Borrowing from painting's fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it's a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There's a renaissance artist of the 1460s. There's the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real - and all life's givens get given a second chance. Passionate, compassionate, vitally inventive and scrupulously playful, Ali Smith's novels are like nothing else.
  • Votes: 1

    Ellen Foster

    by Kaye Gibbons

  • Votes: 1

    Chasing the Scream (The Opposite of Addiction is Connection)

    by Johann Hari

  • Votes: 1

    This Town Sleeps

    by Dennis E. Staples

  • Votes: 1

    The Marrow Thieves

    by Cherie Dimaline

  • Votes: 1

    Betty

    by Tiffany McDaniel

  • Votes: 1

    My Sister, the Serial Killer

    by Oyinkan Braithwaite

  • Votes: 1

    Last Night at the Telegraph Club

    by Malinda Lo

    "Proof of Malinda Lo's skill at creating darkly romantic tales of love in the face of danger."—O: The Oprah Magazine "The queer romance we’ve been waiting for.”—Ms. Magazine "Restrained yet luscious."—Sarah Waters, bestselling author of Tipping the Velvet A National Bestseller Seventeen-year-old Lily Hu can't remember exactly when the feeling took root—that desire to look, to move closer, to touch. Whenever it started growing, it definitely bloomed the moment she and Kathleen Miller walked under the flashing neon sign of a lesbian bar called the Telegraph Club. Suddenly everything seemed possible. But America in 1954 is not a safe place for two girls to fall in love, especially not in Chinatown. Red-Scare paranoia threatens everyone, including Chinese Americans like Lily. With deportation looming over her father—despite his hard-won citizenship—Lily and Kath risk everything to let their love see the light of day.
  • Votes: 1

    The Kitchen God's Wife

    by Amy Tan

  • Votes: 1

    Gideon the Ninth (The Locked Tomb Trilogy, 1)

    by Tamsyn Muir

  • Votes: 1

    Via Negativa

    by Daniel Hornsby

  • Votes: 1

    Welcoming the Unwelcome

    by Pema Chödrön

  • Votes: 1

    Spirit Car

    by Diane Wilson

  • Votes: 1

    Half of a Yellow Sun

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    THE WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION ‘WINNER OF WINNERS’ Winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction 2007, this is a heartbreaking, exquisitely written literary masterpiece
  • Votes: 1

    Tigana

    by Guy Gavriel Kay

  • Votes: 1

    Starfish

    by Lisa Fipps

    Ellie is tired of being fat-shamed and does something about it in this poignant debut novel-in-verse. Ever since Ellie wore a whale swimsuit and made a big splash at her fifth birthday party, she's been bullied about her weight. To cope, she tries to live by the Fat Girl Rules—like "no making waves," "avoid eating in public," and "don't move so fast that your body jiggles." And she's found her safe space—her swimming pool—where she feels weightless in a fat-obsessed world. In the water, she can stretch herself out like a starfish and take up all the room she wants. It's also where she can get away from her pushy mom, who thinks criticizing Ellie's weight will motivate her to diet. Fortunately, Ellie has allies in her dad, her therapist, and her new neighbor, Catalina, who loves Ellie for who she is. With this support buoying her, Ellie might finally be able to cast aside the Fat Girl Rules and starfish in real life--by unapologetically being her own fabulous self.
  • Votes: 1

    The Mermaid

    by Jan Brett

  • Votes: 1

    The End of the Alphabet

    by Claudia Rankine

  • Votes: 1

    The Summer Before the War

    by Helen Simonson

  • Votes: 1

    How Much of These Hills Is Gold

    by C Pam Zhang

    Newly orphaned children of immigrants, Lucy and Sam are suddenly alone in a land that refutes their existence. Fleeing the threats of their western mining town, they set off to bury their father in the only way that will set them free from their past. Along the way, they encounter giant buffalo bones, tiger paw prints, and the specters of a ravaged landscape as well as family secrets, sibling rivalry, and glimpses of a different kind of future.
  • Votes: 1

    The Narrow Road to the Deep North

    by Richard Flanagan

  • Votes: 1

    The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    by Heather Morris

    The five million copy bestseller and one of the bestselling books of the 21st Century. Chosen for the Richard and Judy Bookclub. I tattooed a number on her arm. She tattooed her name on my heart. In 1942, Lale Sokolov arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight. And he was determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure this woman, Gita, did, too. So begins one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz. Don't miss Heather Morris's next book, Stories of Hope. Coming September 2020. ----- 'Extraordinary - moving, confronting and uplifting . . . I recommend it unreservedly' Greame Simsion 'A moving and ultimately uplifting story of love, loyalties and friendship amidst the horrors of war . . . It's a triumph.' Jill Mansell 'A sincere . . . moving attempt to speak the unspeakable' Sunday Times