Book mentions in this thread

  • Votes: 80

    One Up On Wall Street

    by Peter Lynch

    The manager of a top investment fund discusses how individuals can make a killing in the market through research and investment techniques that confound conventional market wisdom.
  • Votes: 80

    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    by Robert T. Kiyosaki

    In Rich Dad Poor Dad, the #1 Personal Finance book of all time, Robert Kiyosaki shares the story of his two dad: his real father, whom he calls his poor dad,’ and the father of his best friend, the man who became his mentor and his rich dad.’ One man was well educated and an employee all his life, the other’s education was street smarts” over traditional classroom education and he took the path of entrepreneurship a road that led him to become one of the wealthiest men in Hawaii. Robert’s poor dad struggled financially all his life, and these two dads these very different points of view of money, investing, and employment shaped Robert’s thinking about money.Robert has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people, around the world, think about money and investing and he has become a global advocate for financial education and the path to financial freedom. Rich Dad Poor Dad (and the Rich Dad series it spawned) has sold over 36 million copies in English and translated editions around the world.Rich Dad Poor Dad will explode the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich challenge the belief that your house is an asset show parents why they can’t rely on the school system to teach their kidsabout money define, once and for all, an asset and a liability explain the difference between good debt and bad debt teach you to see the world of money from different perspectives discuss the shift in mindset that can put you on the road to financial freedom
  • Votes: 80

    You Can Be a Stock Market Genius

    by Joel Greenblatt

    A comprehensive and practical guide to the stock market from a successful fund manager—filled with case studies, important background information, and all the tools you’ll need to become a stock market genius. Fund manager Joel Greenblatt has been beating the Dow (with returns of 50 percent a year) for more than a decade. And now, in this highly accessible guide, he’s going to show you how to do it, too. You’re about to discover investment opportunities that portfolio managers, business-school professors, and top investment experts regularly miss—uncharted areas where the individual investor has a huge advantage over the Wall Street wizards. Here is your personal treasure map to special situations in which big profits are possible, including: · Spin-offs · Restructurings · Merger Securities · Rights Offerings · Recapitalizations · Bankruptcies · Risk Arbitrage
  • Votes: 80

    Margin of Safety

    by Seth A. Klarman

  • Votes: 80

    Quality of Earnings

    by Thornton L. O'glove

  • Votes: 80

    The Warren Buffett Way

    by Robert G. Hagstrom

  • Votes: 80

    Beating the Street

    by Peter Lynch

  • Votes: 80

    Security Analysis

    by Benjamin Graham

    Buying a dollar's worth of assets for 50 cents isn't the only way to succeed on Wall Street. But it is how Warren Buffett got rich. Just as value investing never goes out of style, neither does the value investor's bible, Security Analysis, by Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd, which has withstood the test of time as well or better than any investment book ever published. Now the Sixth Edition updates the masters' ideas and adapts them for the 21st century's markets.
  • Votes: 80

    The Confidence Game

    by Maria Konnikova

    A compelling investigation into the minds, motives, and methods of con artistsand the people who fall for their cons over and over again.
  • Votes: 80

    The Intelligent Investor

    by Benjamin Graham