Michael Nielsen

Michael Nielsen

A cunning arrangement of 10^29 protons, neutrons, & electrons 🇦🇺 🇨🇦, now home in 🇺🇸 Researcher @AsteraInstitute Thinking out loud at https://t.co/maezekQUWb

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140+ Book Recommendations by Michael Nielsen

  • Into Thin Air

    Jon Krakauer

    The author describes his spring 1996 trek to Mt. Everest, a disastrous expedition that claimed the lives of eight climbers, and explains why he survived

    @dommydoteth Just so you're not disappointed: Kropp is a side story. But the book is amazing.

  • Oh, the book is already out: https://t.co/dslIXBG1XW The title is interesting. Reminded of Richard Brautigan's astonishing title, "All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace"

  • A Pattern Language

    Christopher Alexander

    Two hundred and fifty-three archetypal patterns consisting of problem statements, discussions, illustrations, and solutions provide lay persons with a framework for engaging in architectural design

    Rest in peace, Christopher Alexander. Incredibly imaginative and original and thoughtful. Loved his "A Pattern Language": https://t.co/qxODrBX0xN https://t.co/clmlN7YCq3

  • The Genetic Lottery

    Kathryn Paige Harden

    A provocative and timely case for how the science of genetics can help create a more just and equal society In recent years, scientists like Kathryn Paige Harden have shown that DNA makes us different, in our personalities and in our health—and in ways that matter for educational and economic success in our current society. In The Genetic Lottery, Harden introduces readers to the latest genetic science, dismantling dangerous ideas about racial superiority and challenging us to grapple with what equality really means in a world where people are born different. Weaving together personal stories with scientific evidence, Harden shows why our refusal to recognize the power of DNA perpetuates the myth of meritocracy, and argues that we must acknowledge the role of genetic luck if we are ever to create a fair society. Reclaiming genetic science from the legacy of eugenics, this groundbreaking book offers a bold new vision of society where everyone thrives, regardless of how one fares in the genetic lottery.

    My quick review of @kph3k's lay intro to behavioural genetics, "The Genetic Lottery" (ht @albrgr) Behavioural genetics will be a crucial issue of the 21st century - I found this book a helpful stimulus to my thinking! https://t.co/WM6ExOvQfl

  • Whole Earth

    John Markoff

    Out March 22, I'm very much looking forward to this: https://t.co/n3tkt0YtDJ https://t.co/QzVAkHMWkg

  • A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life. This new edition contains an interview with Pirsig and letters and documents detailing how this extraordinary book came to be. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

    @noahlt Instinct, a sense that the book had some strength I'd missed the first time. Some of my favourite books I very nearly missed: I was bored by them, but sensed some strength I wasn't quite grasping. True of "Zen and the Art", for instance, or "Cyteen". And many others.

  • Cyteen

    C.J. Cherryh

    The Hugo Award-winning SF saga is now available in one complete trade paperback edition, containing Cyteen: The Betrayal, The Rebirth and The Vindication. "A psychological novel, a murder mystery and an examination of power on a grand scale, encompassing light years and outsize lifetimes".--Locus.

    @noahlt Instinct, a sense that the book had some strength I'd missed the first time. Some of my favourite books I very nearly missed: I was bored by them, but sensed some strength I wasn't quite grasping. True of "Zen and the Art", for instance, or "Cyteen". And many others.

  • Chaos

    Tom O'Neill

    A journalist's twenty-year fascination with the Manson murders leads to shocking new revelations about the FBI's involvement in this riveting reassessment of an infamous case in American history. Over two grim nights in Los Angeles, the young followers of Charles Manson murdered seven people, including the actress Sharon Tate, then eight months pregnant. With no mercy and seemingly no motive, the Manson Family followed their leader's every order-their crimes lit a flame of paranoia across the nation, spelling the end of the sixties. Manson became one of history's most infamous criminals, his name forever attached to an era when charlatans mixed with prodigies, free love was as possible as brainwashing, and utopia-or dystopia-was just an acid trip away. Twenty years ago, when journalist Tom O'Neill was reporting a magazine piece about the murders, he worried there was nothing new to say. Then he unearthed shocking evidence of a cover-up behind the "official" story, including police carelessness, legal misconduct, and potential surveillance by intelligence agents. When a tense interview with Vincent Bugliosi-prosecutor of the Manson Family, and author of Helter Skelter-turned a friendly source into a nemesis, O'Neill knew he was onto something. But every discovery brought more questions: Who were Manson's real friends in Hollywood, and how far would they go to hide their ties? Why didn't law enforcement, including Manson's own parole officer, act on their many chances to stop him? And how did Manson-an illiterate ex-con-turn a group of peaceful hippies into remorseless killers? O'Neill's quest for the truth led him from reclusive celebrities to seasoned spies, from San Francisco's summer of love to the shadowy sites of the CIA's mind-control experiments, on a trail rife with shady cover-ups and suspicious coincidences. The product of two decades of reporting, hundreds of new interviews, and dozens of never-before-seen documents from the LAPD, the FBI, and the CIA, CHAOS mounts an argument that could be, according to Los Angeles Deputy District Attorney Steven Kay, strong enough to overturn the verdicts on the Manson murders. This is a book that overturns our understanding of a pivotal time in American history.

    @dalalzebat @NGKabra "Chaos" is a wonderful book. I like Gleick's "Genius" even better (a bio of Richard Feynman), one of my two favourite bios.

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    @mindspillage @nayafia Many of these are, of course, more law-adjacent than law, per se. Ostrom really changed how I think about law in general, however, despite not exactly being about the law. Also, one of my favourite books ever :-)

  • Origin

    Dan Brown

    Another juxtaposition: Wootton on artists' gaining the ability to depict the previously unimaginable, and a passage I love from Mascelli's book on cinematography https://t.co/B4aJiyZZbc

  • The purity of the sand found in northern Berkshire County provided resources for over fifty years of glassmaking for regular windows and stained-glass windows in the rural landscape of western Massachusetts. From the first cylinders blown in November 1853, demand for the Berkshire Glass Company's work grew exponentially until it was producing three thousand feet of glass by 1855. As the Civil War raged, the company suffered along with the country but came out of the strife stronger than ever. Join authors William J. Patriquin and Julie L. Sloan as they reveal the inner workings of the Berkshire Glass Company and the intricate stained glass born of Berkshire glass.

    Another juxtaposition: Wootton on artists' gaining the ability to depict the previously unimaginable, and a passage I love from Mascelli's book on cinematography https://t.co/B4aJiyZZbc

  • Another juxtaposition: Wootton on artists' gaining the ability to depict the previously unimaginable, and a passage I love from Mascelli's book on cinematography https://t.co/B4aJiyZZbc

  • Evergreen

    Susan Fawcett

    With carefully crafted instruction, engaging student models, and plentiful practice exercises, this best-selling text continues to provide the most effective paragraph-essay level writing instruction available. EVERGREEN is structured around Susan Fawcett's proven MAP (model-analysis-practice) format -- a guiding pedagogy featuring minimal inductive instruction followed by varied practice designed to improve students' confidence and learning outcomes. Known for its superior essay coverage, EVERGREEN demonstrates each of the nine rhetorical patterns with two student sample essays (one in the third person, and one in the first person), and a graphic organizer. The Eleventh Edition includes a new chapter focused on active reading strategies; more explanation of and practice for writing effective thesis statements; updated information about research and citing sources; and nine new high-interest readings in a variety of modes, with new post-reading questions and assignments. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

    Another juxtaposition: Wootton on artists' gaining the ability to depict the previously unimaginable, and a passage I love from Mascelli's book on cinematography https://t.co/B4aJiyZZbc

  • A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder, A Clockwork Universe, and Darwin’s Ghosts—a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history, the Scientific Revolution, and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our world. We live in a world transformed by scientific discovery. Yet today, science and its practitioners have come under political attack. In this fascinating history spanning continents and centuries, historian David Wootton offers a lively defense of science, revealing why the Scientific Revolution was truly the greatest event in our history. The Invention of Science goes back five hundred years in time to chronicle this crucial transformation, exploring the factors that led to its birth and the people who made it happen. Wootton argues that the Scientific Revolution was actually five separate yet concurrent events that developed independently, but came to intersect and create a new worldview. Here are the brilliant iconoclasts—Galileo, Copernicus, Brahe, Newton, and many more curious minds from across Europe—whose studies of the natural world challenged centuries of religious orthodoxy and ingrained superstition. From gunpowder technology, the discovery of the new world, movable type printing, perspective painting, and the telescope to the practice of conducting experiments, the laws of nature, and the concept of the fact, Wotton shows how these discoveries codified into a social construct and a system of knowledge. Ultimately, he makes clear the link between scientific discovery and the rise of industrialization—and the birth of the modern world we know.

    Another juxtaposition: Wootton on artists' gaining the ability to depict the previously unimaginable, and a passage I love from Mascelli's book on cinematography https://t.co/B4aJiyZZbc

  • "People sometimes ask me what they should read to find out about artificial intelligence. Herbert Simon's book The Sciences of the Artificial is always on the list I give them. Every page issues a challenge to conventional thinking, and the layman who digests it well will certainly understand what the field of artificial intelligence hopes to accomplish. I recommend it in the same spirit that I recommend Freud to people who ask about psychoanalysis, or Piaget to those who ask about child psychology: If you want to learn about a subject, start by reading its founding fathers." -- George A. Miller, "Complex Information Processing" Continuing his exploration of the organization of complexity and the science of design, this new edition of Herbert Simon's classic work on artificial intelligence adds a chapter that sorts out the current themes and tools -- chaos, adaptive systems, genetic algorithms -- for analyzing complexity and complex systems.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Paradigms of AI Programming is the first text to teach advanced Common Lisp techniques in the context of building major AI systems. By reconstructing authentic, complex AI programs using state-of-the-art Common Lisp, the book teaches students and professionals how to build and debug robust practical programs, while demonstrating superior programming style and important AI concepts. The author strongly emphasizes the practical performance issues involved in writing real working programs of significant size. Chapters on troubleshooting and efficiency are included, along with a discussion of the fundamentals of object-oriented programming and a description of the main CLOS functions. This volume is an excellent text for a course on AI programming, a useful supplement for general AI courses and an indispensable reference for the professional programmer.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • What did Jesus teach? Distilled from years of study and lecture, affirmed by nearly a million readers over the last fifty years, Emmet Fox's answer in The Sermon on the Mount is simple. The Bible is a "textbook of metaphysics" and the teachings of Jesus express--without dogma--a practical approach for the development of the soul and for the shaping of our lives into what we really wish them to be. For Fox, Jesus was "no sentimental dreamer, no mere dealer in empty platitudes, but the unflinching realist that only a great mystic can be." In his most popular work, Emmet Fox shows how to: Understand the true nature of divine wisdom. Tap into the power of prayer. Develop a completely integrated and fully expressed personality. Transform negative attitudes into life-affirming beliefs. Claim our divine right to the full abundance of life.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • "The Starship and the Canoe is neither a wilderness survival manual nor a book of blueprints. It is another of those rare books impossible to define: the kind that seeks you in time. And you will know it, live it, and consult it thereafter simply by name." --Chicago Sun-Times "Brower's superbly written book clutches at one's imagination." --Publishers Weekly "In the tradition of Carl Sagan and John McPhee, a bracing cerebral voyage past intergalactic hoopla and backwoods retreats." --Kirkus Reviews Originally published in 1978,The Starship and the Canoe is the remarkable story of a father and son: Freeman Dyson is a world-renowned astrophysicist who dreams of exploring the heavens and has designed a spaceship to take him there. His son George, a brilliant high school dropout, lives in a treehouse and is designing a giant kayak to explore the icy coastal wilderness of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Author Kenneth Brower describes with stunning impact their lives and their visions of the world. It is a timeless tale framed by modern science, adventure, family, and the natural world.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Ted Chiang's first published story, "Tower of Babylon," won the Nebula Award for 1990. Now, collected for the first time, are all seven of this extraordinary writer's extraordinary stories--plus a new story written especially for this volume.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • A definitive compilation of short fiction by the two time Hugo Award winner ranges from his earliest works to his longer takes from the 1970s and 1980s and includes such classics as "The Ungoverned" and "THe Blabber." Reprint. 30,000 first printing.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Stand on Zanzibar

    John Brunner

    Norman Niblock House is a rising executive at General Technics, one of a few all-powerful corporations. His work is leading General Technics to the forefront of global domination, both in the marketplace and politically---it's about to take over a country in Africa. Donald Hogan is his roommate, a seemingly sheepish bookworm. But Hogan is a spy, and he's about to discover a breakthrough in genetic engineering that will change the world...and kill him. These two men's lives weave through one of science fiction's most praised novels. Written in a way that echoes John Dos Passos' U.S.A. Trilogy, Stand on Zanzibar is a cross-section of a world overpopulated by the billions. Where society is squeezed into hive-living madness by god-like mega computers, mass-marketed psychedelic drugs, and mundane uses of genetic engineering. Though written in 1968, it speaks of 2010, and is frighteningly prescient and intensely powerful.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Barbarian Days

    William Finnegan

    Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Penetrating analysis of the functions and organization of city neighborhoods, the forces of deterioration and regeneration, and the necessary planning innovations

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • How Buildings Learn

    Stewart Brand

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Watership Down

    Richard Adams

    An allegorical tale of survival about a band of wild rabbits who leave their ancestral home to build a more humane society chronicles their adventures as they search for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Illich suggests radical reforms for the education system to stop its headlong rush towards frustrated expectations and inequalities.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • A Civil Campaign

    Lois McMaster Bujold

    Spring in Vorbarr Sultana sends its inhabitants looking for love, which too often proves to be unrequited.

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • Rainbows End

    Vernor Vinge

    La Californie, au milieu du XXIe siècle. Dans un monde où dominent l'informatique et le cyberespace, un dangereux procédé de contrôle des esprits est élaboré. Le chef des services secrets européens est derrière ce procédé appelé V-D-M-C (Vous-Devez-Me-Croire). Robert Gu, le plus grand poète américain, se trouve mèlé à l'affaire...

    More: + The Sciences of the Artificial + Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming (the first Norvig book, not the second) + Edward Abbey + The Sermon on the Mount + "The Starship and the Canoe" + Freeman Dyson

  • @sennoma Canticle would have to go on my list, too. Amazing book! Thanks for the list, wonderful!

  • Ted Chiang's first published story, "Tower of Babylon," won the Nebula Award for 1990. Now, collected for the first time, are all seven of this extraordinary writer's extraordinary stories--plus a new story written especially for this volume.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • A definitive compilation of short fiction by the two time Hugo Award winner ranges from his earliest works to his longer takes from the 1970s and 1980s and includes such classics as "The Ungoverned" and "THe Blabber." Reprint. 30,000 first printing.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Stand on Zanzibar

    John Brunner

    Norman Niblock House is a rising executive at General Technics, one of a few all-powerful corporations. His work is leading General Technics to the forefront of global domination, both in the marketplace and politically---it's about to take over a country in Africa. Donald Hogan is his roommate, a seemingly sheepish bookworm. But Hogan is a spy, and he's about to discover a breakthrough in genetic engineering that will change the world...and kill him. These two men's lives weave through one of science fiction's most praised novels. Written in a way that echoes John Dos Passos' U.S.A. Trilogy, Stand on Zanzibar is a cross-section of a world overpopulated by the billions. Where society is squeezed into hive-living madness by god-like mega computers, mass-marketed psychedelic drugs, and mundane uses of genetic engineering. Though written in 1968, it speaks of 2010, and is frighteningly prescient and intensely powerful.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Barbarian Days

    William Finnegan

    Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Penetrating analysis of the functions and organization of city neighborhoods, the forces of deterioration and regeneration, and the necessary planning innovations

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • How Buildings Learn

    Stewart Brand

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Watership Down

    Richard Adams

    An allegorical tale of survival about a band of wild rabbits who leave their ancestral home to build a more humane society chronicles their adventures as they search for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Illich suggests radical reforms for the education system to stop its headlong rush towards frustrated expectations and inequalities.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • A Civil Campaign

    Lois McMaster Bujold

    Spring in Vorbarr Sultana sends its inhabitants looking for love, which too often proves to be unrequited.

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Rainbows End

    Vernor Vinge

    La Californie, au milieu du XXIe siècle. Dans un monde où dominent l'informatique et le cyberespace, un dangereux procédé de contrôle des esprits est élaboré. Le chef des services secrets européens est derrière ce procédé appelé V-D-M-C (Vous-Devez-Me-Croire). Robert Gu, le plus grand poète américain, se trouve mèlé à l'affaire...

    Many of these books had a transformative effect on me. I'll read something like Deschooling Society, be transformed; and then I meet someone else decades later who loved it, and we're both instantly in a club!

  • Watership Down

    Richard Adams

    An allegorical tale of survival about a band of wild rabbits who leave their ancestral home to build a more humane society chronicles their adventures as they search for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

    What are some books where you it makes you happy & excited when you learn they're a favourite of someone else? A few for me, no particular order + Watership Down + Governing the Commons + Deschooling Society + A Civil Campaign + Last and First Men, or Starmaker + Rainbows End

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    What are some books where you it makes you happy & excited when you learn they're a favourite of someone else? A few for me, no particular order + Watership Down + Governing the Commons + Deschooling Society + A Civil Campaign + Last and First Men, or Starmaker + Rainbows End

  • Illich suggests radical reforms for the education system to stop its headlong rush towards frustrated expectations and inequalities.

    What are some books where you it makes you happy & excited when you learn they're a favourite of someone else? A few for me, no particular order + Watership Down + Governing the Commons + Deschooling Society + A Civil Campaign + Last and First Men, or Starmaker + Rainbows End

  • A Civil Campaign

    Lois McMaster Bujold

    Spring in Vorbarr Sultana sends its inhabitants looking for love, which too often proves to be unrequited.

    What are some books where you it makes you happy & excited when you learn they're a favourite of someone else? A few for me, no particular order + Watership Down + Governing the Commons + Deschooling Society + A Civil Campaign + Last and First Men, or Starmaker + Rainbows End

  • Rainbows End

    Vernor Vinge

    La Californie, au milieu du XXIe siècle. Dans un monde où dominent l'informatique et le cyberespace, un dangereux procédé de contrôle des esprits est élaboré. Le chef des services secrets européens est derrière ce procédé appelé V-D-M-C (Vous-Devez-Me-Croire). Robert Gu, le plus grand poète américain, se trouve mèlé à l'affaire...

    What are some books where you it makes you happy & excited when you learn they're a favourite of someone else? A few for me, no particular order + Watership Down + Governing the Commons + Deschooling Society + A Civil Campaign + Last and First Men, or Starmaker + Rainbows End

  • In this definitive third and final edition (1950) of his masterwork, Joseph A. Schumpeter introduced the world to the concept of “creative destruction,” which forever altered how global economics is approached and perceived. Now featuring a new introduction by Schumpeter biographer Thomas K. McCraw, Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy is essential read­ing for anyone who seeks to understand where the world economy is headed.

    Reading Schumpeter's famous book about "Creative Destruction". It's an enjoyable read, and I'm learning a lot! One unexpected & enjoyable thing about the book is how loudly he praises Marx, & builds upon him (while ultimately taking a v different path) https://t.co/xFdvfsDRuM https://t.co/00uK33AnRx

  • Culture

    A. L. Kroeber

    Alfred Louis Kroeber offers an all-embracing account of human culture, looking at its historical definitions, many definitions, and its role as a foundation for all of the social sciences. A work striking for its thoroughness, Culture: A Critical Review begins by examining the origins of the term Culture, and how it came to be associated with civilization and social change. The appearance of the word in intellectual writings, such as those of Kant and Hegel, increased through the 19th century. Interpretations of the word - as the later section on definitions shows - persisted in varying widely, with scholars differing in what they consider part of a given country's culture. Some constructed strict definitions involving things like a country's symbols, morality, festivals, and heritage while others opted to apply the term more generally or loosely. This conceptual problem serves as an overarching theme, its difficulty apparent in the many contrasting views the author quotes. Nevertheless by listing and commenting on these numerous ideas, Kroeber demonstrates the broadness of culture; its influence ranging into disciplines such as psychology, history, linguistics, medicine and sociology. The author himself considers this study as anthropology; a tracing of how culture emerged from occasional academic mentions and allusions into a dominant cluster of ideas, transcending many disciplines and assuming place in popular consciousness.

    Link: https://t.co/rASAytFOCX

  • From the reviews: "The work is one of the real classics of this century; it has had much influence on teaching, on research in several branches of hard analysis, particularly complex function theory, and it has been an essential indispensable source book for those seriously interested in mathematical problems." Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society

    @DRMacIver Polya and Szego (volume 1 of 3, IIRC): https://t.co/aESbC4H740

  • A self-help approach to treating back and neck pain, comprising stretching, strengthening, re-patterning, and relaxation techiques.

    FWIW I found Kit Laughlin's book unusually well written in these ways: https://t.co/xqDVQysqHi Pretty good on explaining diagnosis, and mechanism of action, less good on the other two (though significantly better than most resources). Also just generally very thoughtful.

  • Reinventing Discovery

    Michael Nielsen

    "Reinventing Discovery argues that we are in the early days of the most dramatic change in how science is done in more than 300 years. This change is being driven by new online tools, which are transforming and radically accelerating scientific discovery"--Provided by publisher.

    Late addition, from someone without a Twitter account: https://t.co/nJ6FpYTCvs https://t.co/Jx47Fsz9gW

  • @gadgetmad Amazing book. Famous decades ago, but it seems to have gradually become obscure. I wonder how much of modern tech culture has its origins in this book?

  • The new edition of a classic text that concentrates on developing general methods for studying the behavior of classical systems, with extensive use of computation.

    @memosisland Loved it! https://t.co/KGUko6n4f8 Abelson's "Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics" is also very interesting as an experimental medium (it's fine as a book on mechanics, though not the best book written).

  • Star Maker

    Olaf Stapledon

    This 1937 successor to Last and First Men offers another entrancing speculative history of the future. Cited as a key influence by science-fiction masters such as Doris Lessing, its bold exploration of the cosmos ventures into intelligent star clusters and mingles among alien races for a memorable vision of infinity.

    @tdfirth Two of my favorite books - just astounding! What a wonderful things Stapledon did!

  • @Jon58632955 I'd never heard of Viz - thank you! MA is very interesting. I have an abridged version by Mark Forstater that I find intriguing - not so much the text, as the action of doing that abridgement. I suspect it's a good way to engage seriously with a text: https://t.co/jvIzJTZtLq

  • Impro

    Keith Johnstone

    First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

    @coen_armstrong Oh, I've meant to read Rapoport forever, thank you for the suggestion! "Impro" was a surprise hit for me. I question the, er, status he gives to status. But that's a quibble: it's a great book!

  • An analytical framework for explaining the ways in which institutions and institutional change affect the performance of economies is developed in this analysis of economic structures.

    @crabl Great book, and deeply influential on my current work! Your mini-review "might actually have enjoyed [...]" is wonderful :-)

  • Takes students and researchers on a tour through some of the deepest ideas of maths, computer science and physics.

    @AlexLavin_C137 Lovely book! I wrote one of the endorsements. IIRC I suggested to one of my publishers to publish Scott's notes that the book is based on, but it turned out he already had a deal.

  • @perceptophore One of my favorite books ever. I can't shut up about it, actually: https://t.co/XhZI15659h

  • Skunk Works

    Ben R. Rich

    This classic history of America's high-stakes quest to dominate the skies is "a gripping technothriller in which the technology is real" (New York Times Book Review). From the development of the U-2 to the Stealth fighter, Skunk Works is the true story of America's most secret and successful aerospace operation. As recounted by Ben Rich, the operation's brilliant boss for nearly two decades, the chronicle of Lockheed's legendary Skunk Works is a drama of cold war confrontations and Gulf War air combat, of extraordinary feats of engineering and human achievement against fantastic odds. Here are up-close portraits of the maverick band of scientists and engineers who made the Skunk Works so renowned. Filled with telling personal anecdotes and high adventure, with narratives from the CIA and from Air Force pilots who flew the many classified, risky missions, this book is a riveting portrait of the most spectacular aviation triumphs of the twentieth century. "Thoroughly engrossing." --Los Angeles Times Book Review

    @dassicity Absolutely loved it. Read it more than 20 years ago, at the very strong recommendation of an ex-girlfriend who worked for Lockheed-Martin. There's rarely a week I don't think of it.

  • Olson develops a theory of group and organizational behavior that cuts across disciplinary lines and illustrates the theory with empirical and historical studies of particular organizations, examining the extent to which individuals who share a common interest find it in their individual interest to bear the costs of the organizational effort.

    @johncarlosbaez One of my favorite books is Mancur Olson's "The Logic of Collective Action", which among other things discusses how trade unions grow. Kinda similar :-)

  • The Inner Game of Work

    W. Timothy Gallwey

    Explains how to overcome the inner obstacles that prevent readers from accomplishing excellence, success, and fulfillment in the workplace and describes how such tools as focus, awareness, mobility, and coaching can offer a radical new approach to business performance.

    @jordanschnyc @ArtirKel Not the kind of focus I'm talking about, though a lovely book. (BTW, I recommend "The Inner Game of Work" over "... Tennis", though both are excellent.)

  • Also reflecting on Freeman Dyson's beautiful title, "The Scientist as Rebel": https://t.co/T99tGh00SX

  • Provides an overview of the sustainable energy crisis that is threatening the world's natural resources, explaining how energy consumption is estimated and how those numbers have been skewed by various factors and discussing alternate forms of energy that can and should be used.

    @dmthomann It's a lovely book (though dated), and I recommend it often. But it doesn't address the issues I described at all.

  • The Ear of the Heart

    Mother Dolores Hart OSB

    I should have checked: she has an autobiography: https://t.co/eloRGmu4HE

  • Science, Money, and Politics

    Daniel S. Greenberg

    Greenberg explores how scientific research is funded in the United States, including why the political process distributes the funds the way it does and how it can be corrupted by special interests in academia, business, and political machines.

    I've particularly enjoyed (and learned from) Daniel Greenberg, eg: https://t.co/pI2Wifr7qO (I disagree with much in that, but it was a very interesting read, as is much of his writing).

  • *Kazuo Ishiguro's new novel Klara and the Sun is now available to preorder* From the Nobel Prize-winning author of Never Let Me Go Winner of the Booker Prize ONE OF THE BBC'S '100 NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD' A contemporary classic, The Remains of the Day is Kazuo Ishiguro's beautiful and haunting evocation of life between the wars in a Great English House. In the summer of 1956, Stevens, the ageing butler of Darlington Hall, embarks on a leisurely holiday that will take him deep into the English countryside and into his past.

    @tommycollison Ishiguro's "Remains of the Day" is a book & movie I absolutely love. I've seen the movie of NLYG, but haven't read it.

  • The Dirac book, BTW: https://t.co/wbwujq4JaM Great book! I learned a lot about GR from it (particularly in concert with Isham's book on differential geometry, & @seanmcarroll's wonderful short notes, which I carried around with me for months: https://t.co/agSq4gKA1c ).

  • The Inner Game of Tennis

    W. Timothy Gallwey

    Concentrates upon overcoming mental attitudes that adversely affect tennis performance, including learning to relax, effectively concentrating, and discarding bad habits

    @christinacaci @brettberson Oh, so fun to see this here! One of my favourite books. Love this clip of Alan Kay showing Tim Gallwey teaching tennis: https://t.co/meeuDdXjNF

  • The Righteous Mind

    Jonathan Haidt

    Presents a groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality at the core of religion and politics, offering scholarly insight into the motivations behind cultural clashes that are polarizing America.

    When reading popular books in a field I'm often uncertain how to treat the evidence. I'm reading Haidt's "The Righteous Mind". Fascinating, and much agrees with my prejudices. But I worry about caveats & counter-evidence that may not have made it into the book

  • Highly regarded here and abroad for some thirty works of cultural history and criticism, master historian Jacques Barzun has now set down in one continuous narrative the sum of his discoveries and conclusions about the whole of Western culture since 1500. In this account, Barzun describes what Western Man wrought from the Renaisance and Reformation down to the present in the double light of its own time and our pressing concerns. He introduces characters and incidents with his unusual literary style and grace, bringing to the fore those that have "Puritans as Democrats," "The Monarch's Revolution," "The Artist Prophet and Jester" -- show the recurrent role of great themes throughout the eras. The triumphs and defeats of five hundred years form an inspiring saga that modifies the current impression of one long tale of oppression by white European males. Women and their deeds are prominent, and freedom (even in sexual matters) is not an invention of the last decades. And when Barzun rates the present not as a culmination but a decline, he is in no way a prophet of doom. Instead, he shows decadence as the creative novelty that will burst forth -- tomorrow or the next day. Only after a lifetime of separate studies covering a broad territory could a writer create with such ease the synthesis displayed in this magnificent volume.

    The book is, by the way, tremendous fun to read. I didn't read it all the way through - rather, for some months I would just pick it up, open to a random page, and read. And it was nearly always interesting.

  • Watership Down

    Richard Adams

    An allegorical tale of survival about a band of wild rabbits who leave their ancestral home to build a more humane society chronicles their adventures as they search for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

    Many fascinating recommendations in this thread. Tangential: A book that deeply affected me is "Watership Down". It's a book about power and survival and war and mateship, with quite a bit about leadership thrown in. I read it at age 7, & it's still in me, decades later. https://t.co/QIYvvLlqgv

  • First Principles

    Howard Burton

    Oops, that link should be to the in-print edition of the book: https://t.co/ptxQe4cAMf Recommended, if you have any interest at all in this kind of thing - how science works as a social enterprise.

  • First Principles

    Howard Burton

    Howard Burton was a freshly-minted physics PhD from the University of Waterloo when a random job query resulted in a strange-albeit fateful-meeting with Research-in-Motion founder and co-CEO Mike Lazaridis. Mike had a crazy idea: he wanted to fund a state-of-the-art science research facility and bring in the most innovative scientists from around the world. Its mission? To study and probe the most complex, intriguing and fundamental problems of science. Mike was ready to commit $100 million of his own money to get it started. But that wasn't his only crazy idea. He wanted Howard to run it. First Principles is part-biography and part lively rumination on the world-and the world of science in particular-by the engaging physicist and former director of the prestigious Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario. Since its founding in 1999, the Institute has received more than $125 million in government grants, not including the eye-popping sum of $150 million that Mike Lazaridis has donated from his own personal fortune.

    How theoretical physicists approach practical problems. I find this terribly endearing, and certainly recognize it in myself. From @IdeasRoadshow's fascinating book about founding Perimeter Institute: https://t.co/EiWshLXf2Q https://t.co/ogqe9GEbLm

  • Wonderful to see @juliagalef's book coming out! I just pre-ordered it: https://t.co/36MAZNTAAa Julia's good-faith and open-minded-but-rigorous approach to conversation is an ongoing inspiration to me. I'm excited to see this out! https://t.co/qF3zijNZc7

  • Accelerando

    Charles Stross

    Trying to cope with the unchecked technological innovations that have rendered humankind nearly obsolete, the members of the Macx family are confronted by an unknown enemy that is systematically attempting to annihilate all biological lifeforms.

    @minney_cat Charles Stress’s book Accelerando explored some ideas in this vein. So did Cory Doctorow’s Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. Both are pretty good, if you haven’t read them, and like that kind of thing

  • @minney_cat Charles Stress’s book Accelerando explored some ideas in this vein. So did Cory Doctorow’s Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. Both are pretty good, if you haven’t read them, and like that kind of thing

  • Cyteen

    C.J. Cherryh

    The Hugo Award-winning SF saga is now available in one complete trade paperback edition, containing Cyteen: The Betrayal, The Rebirth and The Vindication. "A psychological novel, a murder mystery and an examination of power on a grand scale, encompassing light years and outsize lifetimes".--Locus.

    @uncatherio Great books, both unlike anything else!

  • FIRST BOOK FEATURING CORDELIA NAISMITH. Journey back to where it all started, from multiple New York Times best selling author, Hugo Award winner, Lois McMaster Bujold. When Cordelia Naismith and her survey crew are attacked by a renegade group from Barrayar, she is taken prisoner by Aral Vorkosigan, commander of the Barrayan ship that has been taken over by an ambitious and ruthless crew member. Aral and Cordelia survive countless mishaps while their mutual admiration and even stronger feelings emerge. About Shards of Honor: “All in all, Shards is a worthy effort, and worth reading for any fan of SF romance.”—Analog About Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga: “Bujold mixes quirky humor with action [and] superb character development…[E]normously satisfying.”—Publishers Weekly. “One of sf’s outstanding talents . . . an outstanding series.”—Booklist “. . . an intelligent, well-crafted and thoroughly satisfying blend of adventure, sociopolitical commentary, scientific experiments, and occasional perils . . . with that extra spicing of romance. . . .”—Locus The Vorkosigan Series in Story-based Chronological Order Falling Free Shards of Honor Barrayar The Warrior's Apprentice The Vor Game Cetaganda Ethan of Athos Borders of Infinity Brothers in Arms Mirror Dance Memory Komarr A Civil Campaign Diplomatic Immunity Captain Vorpatril's Alliance CryoBurn Omnibus Editions MILES, MYSTERY & MAYHEM contains Cetaganda, Ethan of Athos YOUNG MILES contains The Warrior's Apprentice + stories CORDELIA’S HONOR contains Shards of Honor, Barayarr MILES, MUTANTS & MICROBES contains Falling Free, Diplomatic Immunity MILES IN LOVE contains Komarr, A Civil Campaign MILES ERRANT contains Brothers in Arms, Mirror Dance

    One of my favorite passages in all literature. It's in Lois Bujold's sci-fi book "Shards of Honor". The heroine, Cordelia Naismith, has just married Count Aral Vorkosigan. She's being question by his Emperor about why they married. https://t.co/FUt2TbmL6M

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    It's not strictly about science, but I must also point to Elinor Ostrom's work, especially her wonderful "Governing the Commons" (https://t.co/GhKZoFVAna). It's not quite about managing a knowledge commons, like science, but is deep & wise & sufficiently close to be worth reading

  • Professor Price has enlarged his widely known and influential study of science and the humanities to include much new material, extraordinarily broad in its range: from ancient automata, talismans and symbols, to the differences of modern science and technology. Science since Babylon is now more fascinating and useful than ever to anyone concerned with the humanistic understanding of science. Originating in a series of five public lectures delivered under the auspices of the history department at Yale University in 1959, this book is an investigation of the circumstances and consequences of certain vital decisions relating to scientific crises which have the world to its present state of scientific and technological development. Not just another book on "History of Science," it is a plea, an exemplification for a whole new range of studies to take its place in the territory between the humanities and the sciences. The chapter on "Diseases of Science" has received much public attention as an analysis of the present structure and probable future of the organization of science. The author documents his study with accounts of his own researches in his specific fields of interest, relating them to the "crises" which he believes to be of paramount importance.

    15. Derek de Solla Price is often recognized (along with Eugene Garfield) as cofounder of scientometrics. He wrote many thoughtful pieces (https://t.co/JfFBLdr5uL ), including "Science Since Babylon": https://t.co/9IJP8xpJi7 https://t.co/U6exMPo6Um

  • Herbert Simon's classic work on artificial intelligence in the expanded and updated third edition from 1996, with a new introduction by John E. Laird. Herbert Simon's classic and influential The Sciences of the Artificial declares definitively that there can be a science not only of natural phenomena but also of what is artificial. Exploring the commonalities of artificial systems, including economic systems, the business firm, artificial intelligence, complex engineering projects, and social plans, Simon argues that designed systems are a valid field of study, and he proposes a science of design. For this third edition, originally published in 1996, Simon added new material that takes into account advances in cognitive psychology and the science of design while confirming and extending the book's basic thesis: that a physical symbol system has the necessary and sufficient means for intelligent action. Simon won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1978 for his research into the decision-making process within economic organizations and the Turing Award (considered by some the computer science equivalent to the Nobel) with Allen Newell in 1975 for contributions to artificial intelligence, the psychology of human cognition, and list processing. The Sciences of the Artificial distills the essence of Simon's thought accessibly and coherently. This reissue of the third edition makes a pioneering work available to a new audience.

    13. More: Herb Simon on "The Sciences of the Artificial", https://t.co/E2NcrgblwB, and @DavidDeutschOxf's "Beginning of Infinity", both of which consider the ultimate scope of human understanding and creativity: https://t.co/cTfJW8vJoL

  • A pioneer in the field of quantum computation explores the nature and progress of knowledge in the universe, arguing that humans are subject to the laws of physics but unlimited by what can be understood, controlled, and achieved.

    13. More: Herb Simon on "The Sciences of the Artificial", https://t.co/E2NcrgblwB, and @DavidDeutschOxf's "Beginning of Infinity", both of which consider the ultimate scope of human understanding and creativity: https://t.co/cTfJW8vJoL

  • "People sometimes ask me what they should read to find out about artificial intelligence. Herbert Simon's book The Sciences of the Artificial is always on the list I give them. Every page issues a challenge to conventional thinking, and the layman who digests it well will certainly understand what the field of artificial intelligence hopes to accomplish. I recommend it in the same spirit that I recommend Freud to people who ask about psychoanalysis, or Piaget to those who ask about child psychology: If you want to learn about a subject, start by reading its founding fathers." -- George A. Miller, "Complex Information Processing" Continuing his exploration of the organization of complexity and the science of design, this new edition of Herbert Simon's classic work on artificial intelligence adds a chapter that sorts out the current themes and tools -- chaos, adaptive systems, genetic algorithms -- for analyzing complexity and complex systems.

    @RhysLindmark Yes, David's book (indeed, both) are just wonderful. Reminds me of Herb Simon's "Sciences of the Artificial", another of my favorite books. I should really read Merchants of Doubt!

  • Science, Money, and Politics

    Daniel S. Greenberg

    Greenberg explores how scientific research is funded in the United States, including why the political process distributes the funds the way it does and how it can be corrupted by special interests in academia, business, and political machines.

    7. One of our best long-term observers of science and science policy was Daniel Greenberg (who passed away last year). Many possibilities to choose from, but here's one I got a lot out of: "Science, Money, and Politics": https://t.co/8QANkuL6ZA

  • Creativity in Science

    Dean Keith Simonton

    Sample Text

    2. Dean Keith Simonton's book "Creativity in Science: Chance, Logic, Genius, and Zeitgeist". If an essentially scientometric book could be described as a fun romp through science & creativity, this would be it https://t.co/RQ935H1fKs

  • Very little in our human experience is truly comparable to the immensely crowded and bustling interior of a cell. Biological numeracy provides a new kind of understanding of the cellular world. This book brings together up-to-date quantitative data from the vast biological literature and uses the powerful tool of "back of the envelope" estimates to reveal fresh perspectives and insights from numbers commonly encountered in cell biology. Readers gain a feeling for the sizes, concentrations, energies, and rates that characterize the lives of cells-- thereby shedding new light on the microscopic realm.

    Thread inspired by the (terrific) book "Cell Biology by the Numbers": https://t.co/vH5Jo7f1fp

  • Biology Is Technology

    Robert H. Carlson

    17. @rob_carlson's excellent book "Biology is Technology" has a great discussion of the necessity of predictive quantitative models for design and engineering. Here's an excerpt, which repays thought IMO: https://t.co/9Ta64fFzG0

  • Dune

    Frank Herbert

    Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.

    @NatureInTheory @curiouswavefn Enjoy Stephenson - the best bits, in particular, are amazing! I enjoyed "Dune", though not the later books; I also found "Dune" quite difficult to get into, but once I did it was great! Also loved Carolyn Cherryh's "Cyteen" https://t.co/HgYHkSFFw5

  • @NatureInTheory @curiouswavefn Enjoy Stephenson - the best bits, in particular, are amazing! I enjoyed "Dune", though not the later books; I also found "Dune" quite difficult to get into, but once I did it was great! Also loved Carolyn Cherryh's "Cyteen" https://t.co/HgYHkSFFw5

  • Lyra Belacqua tries to prevent kidnapped children from becoming the subject of gruesome experiments, helps Will Parry search for his father, and finds that she and Will are caught in a battle between the forces of the Authority and those gathered by her uncle, Lord Asriel.

    @andy_matuschak I'm not sure the audio books "substantially upgraded" the experience, but I did very much enjoy the "His Dark Materials" audio books. Certainly, they gave a different quality to it - I can still remember many of the voices.

  • What does a chess master think when he prepares his next move? How are his thoughts organized? Which methods and strategies does he use by solving his problem of choice? To answer these questions, the author did an experimental study in 1938, to which famous chessmasters participated (Alekhine, Max Euwe and Flohr). This book is still useful for everybody who studies cognition and artificial intelligence. The studies involve participants of all chess backgrounds, from amateurs to masters. They investigate the cognitive requirements and the thought processes involved in moving a chess piece. The participants were usually required to solve a given chess problem correctly under the supervision of an experimenter and represent their thought-processes vocally so that they could be recorded. De Groot found that much of what is important in choosing a move occurs during the first few seconds of exposure to a new position. Four stages in the task of choosing the next move were noted. The first stage was the 'orientation phase', in which the subject assessed the situation and determined a general idea of what to do next. The second stage, the 'exploration phase' was manifested by looking at some branches of the game tree. The third stage, or 'investigation phase' resulted in the subject choosing a probable best move. Finally, in the fourth stage, the 'proof phase', saw the subject confirming with him/herself that the results of the investigation were valid. De Groot concurred with Alfred Binet that visual memory and visual perception are important and that problem-solving ability is of paramount importance. Memory is particularly important, according to de Groot (1965), in that there are no 'new' moves in chess and so those from personal experience or from the experience of others can be committed to memory.

    Fun early papers on this were written about chess by the great Herb Simon (eg https://t.co/x6tgiHyBm6 ) and by Adriaan de Groot (eg https://t.co/UlAMezxOTO ).

  • Lyra Belacqua tries to prevent kidnapped children from becoming the subject of gruesome experiments, helps Will Parry search for his father, and finds that she and Will are caught in a battle between the forces of the Authority and those gathered by her uncle, Lord Asriel.

    @robot__dreams @kanjun @InquilineKea Nice list! I liked the "His Dark Materials" books, too. Lyra's pluck is pretty amazing.

  • Technopoly

    Neil Postman

    A social critic argues that the United States has become a "technopoly"--a system that sacrifices social institutions for self-perpetuating technological advancement--and suggests ways to use technical skills to enhance our democracy

    @joaoeira @Noahpinion @bhorowitz The first few chapters of Technopoly remain a favourite. I do not get much out of Morozov, unfortunately.

  • Working in Public

    Nadia Eghbal

    Whoo! Excited to see @nayafia's book "Working in Public: The Making & Maintenance of Open Source Software" now for pre-order https://t.co/5mgd87Idp0 If you haven't seen her "Roads&Bridges: The Unseen Labor Behind Our Digital Infrastructure" it's a classic https://t.co/r42tnQMUDp

  • Congratulations to Elinor Ostrom, Co-Winner of The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2009! The governance of natural resources used by many individuals in common is an issue of increasing concern to policy analysts. Both state control and privatization of resources have been advocated, but neither the state nor the market have been uniformly successful in solving common pool resource problems. After critiquing the foundations of policy analysis as applied to natural resources, Elinor Ostrom here provides a unique body of empirical data to explore conditions under which common pool resource problems have been satisfactorily or unsatisfactorily solved. Dr. Ostrom first describes three models most frequently used as the foundation for recommending state or market solutions. She then outlines theoretical and empirical alternatives to these models in order to illustrate the diversity of possible solutions. In the following chapters she uses institutional analysis to examine different ways--both successful and unsuccessful--of governing the commons. In contrast to the proposition of the tragedy of the commons argument, common pool problems sometimes are solved by voluntary organizations rather than by a coercive state. Among the cases considered are communal tenure in meadows and forests, irrigation communities and other water rights, and fisheries.

    Lovely - Vienna is building a new park, filled with public goods, to be named after Elinor Ostrom. One of my most recommended books is Ostrom's remarkable "Governing the Commons": https://t.co/547TURB57b https://t.co/2Z5I90XEOC https://t.co/7pZ8we27sl

  • The Logic Of Failure

    Dietrich Dorner

    @zooko @bfeld @IanHathaway This is great. Reminds me of: https://t.co/wB7W3J9lZl (Which is a very good book, in addition to having a magnificent cover.)

  • @Altimor Similarly, the excellent "Logic of Failure": https://t.co/u6bOVu2eBE

  • The bestselling author of "Bombardiers" and "The First $20 Million Is Always the Hardest" traveled the world in search of people who had found meaningful answers to one of life's greatest questions: What should I do with my life?"

    @sriramk @paulg Another good book with a related premise is Po Bronson's "What Should I Do With My Life?" Upon reflection, I suspect if I reread Terkel today I'd get far more out of it. At the time, I don't think I knew how to read that book well.

  • Technopoly

    Neil Postman

    A social critic argues that the United States has become a "technopoly"--a system that sacrifices social institutions for self-perpetuating technological advancement--and suggests ways to use technical skills to enhance our democracy

    @Clever_MetaName @literalbanana Neil Postman's book "Technopoly" ties together religion, technocracy, and bureaucratic control in a related way. He discusses many "transcendent narratives", from the Talmud to Marx to the belief in efficiency (narrowly defined) espoused by many bureaucracies.

  • Better

    Atul Gawande

    Explores the efforts of physicians to close the gap between best intentions and best performance in the face of insurmountable obstacles, discussing such topics as the ethical considerations of lethal injections, malpractice, and surgical errors.

    The WHO campaign to eradicate polio: a single new case comes in, & 5 days later 37,000 vaccinators have vaccinated 4.2 million children in 50,000 square miles around the initial case Done on a shoestring, & with very limited authority From Atul Gawande's excellent book "Better" https://t.co/zatOaAxaZB

  • @rememberlenny @paulg Very good choices. If you want just a taste, try "The John McPhee reader", which is a sample of some shorter essays. They ranged from extremely good to extraordinary, IMO.

  • I want to try and understand why so many people commit crimes in the name of identity,” writes Amin Maalouf. Identity is the crucible out of which we come: our background, our race, our gender, our tribal affiliations, our religion (or lack thereof), all go into making up who we are. All too often, however, the notion of identity—personal, religious, ethnic, or national—has given rise to heated passions and even massive crimes. Moving across the world’s history, faiths, and politics, he argues against an oversimplified and hostile interpretation of the concept. He cogently and persuasively examines identity in the context of the modern world, where it can be viewed as both glory and poison. Evident here are the dangers of using identity as a protective—and therefore aggressive—mechanism, the root of racial, geographical, and colonialist subjugation throughout history. Maalouf contends that many of us would reject our inherited conceptions of identity, to which we cling through habit, if only we examined them more closely. The future of society depends on accepting all identities, while recognizing our individualism.

    @eriktorenberg @glenweyl (Tangential, but Amin Maalouf's book "In the Name of Identity" has an interesting discussion of how we construct unique identities as the intersection of the communities to which we belong.)

  • Ted Chiang's first published story, "Tower of Babylon," won the Nebula Award for 1990. Now, collected for the first time, are all seven of this extraordinary writer's extraordinary stories--plus a new story written especially for this volume.

    Recently reread Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life" (for the fourth time, I think), and "Exhalation". It's such a joy to read him in real time. I suspect he's one of the great writers Apologies for the hyping, which I know can create unmet expectations. Still, I'm just blown away

  • Exhalation

    Ted Chiang

    ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR A NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Exhalation by Ted Chiang is a collection of short stories that will make you think, grapple with big questions, and feel more human. The best kind of science fiction." --Barack Obama From the acclaimed author of Stories of Your Life and Others--the basis for the Academy Award -nominated film Arrival: a groundbreaking new collection of short fiction. "THE UNIVERSE BEGAN AS AN ENORMOUS BREATH BEING HELD." In these nine stunningly original, provocative, and poignant stories, Ted Chiang tackles some of humanity's oldest questions along with new quandaries only he could imagine. In "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate," a portal through time forces a fabric seller in ancient Baghdad to grapple with past mistakes and second chances. In "Exhalation," an alien scientist makes a shocking discovery with ramifications that are literally universal. In "Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom," the ability to glimpse into alternate universes necessitates a radically new examination of the concepts of choice and free will. Including stories being published for the first time as well as some of his rare and classic uncollected work, Exhalation is Ted Chiang at his best: profound, sympathetic--revelatory.

    Recently reread Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life" (for the fourth time, I think), and "Exhalation". It's such a joy to read him in real time. I suspect he's one of the great writers Apologies for the hyping, which I know can create unmet expectations. Still, I'm just blown away

  • The Silmarillion

    J.R.R. Tolkien

    RIP Christopher Tolkien. "The Silmarillion" and "Unfinished Tales", two books he edited, were two of my favourite books growing up. https://t.co/0l7DJfIztq

  • RIP Christopher Tolkien. "The Silmarillion" and "Unfinished Tales", two books he edited, were two of my favourite books growing up. https://t.co/0l7DJfIztq

  • Cyteen

    C.J. Cherryh

    The Hugo Award-winning SF saga is now available in one complete trade paperback edition, containing Cyteen: The Betrayal, The Rebirth and The Vindication. "A psychological novel, a murder mystery and an examination of power on a grand scale, encompassing light years and outsize lifetimes".--Locus.

    Short reviews of books & authors is, itself, a wonderful genre. Here's a classic, Cosma Shalizi on the marvellous Carolyn Cherryh. Cherryh's "Cyteen" is one of my favourite books. https://t.co/Wj6UkDKLqB

  • Thoughtful and articulate study of the origin of ideas. Role of the unconscious in invention; the medium of ideas — do they come to mind in words? in pictures? in mathematical terms? Much more. "It is essential for the mathematician, and the layman will find it good reading." — Library Journal.

    @F_Vaggi @paulg Do you mean Hadamard's book? "The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field"?

  • @DavidDeutschOxf One of the leads on ScopeX wrote this little book about geoengineering: https://t.co/ajG4FVoIuc

  • In Drawdown, renowned environmentalist Paul Hawken has assembled a team of over 200 scholars, scientists, policymakers, business leaders and activists to illustrate the hundred most substantive solutions to combat climate change that together will not only slow down the growth of carbon emissions, but reverse them altogether. Put into action together, these solutions will mobilise society into taking the climate change conversation from problem definition to problem solving, from fear and apathy to collaboration and regeneration.

    A few resources, which I don't necessarily have strong opinions on: Drawdown: from Paul Hawken and a large team of researchers. https://t.co/QJtGWhjW4i

  • In this classic, the world's expert on language and mind lucidly explains everything you always wanted to know about language: how it works, how children learn it, how it changes, how the brain computes it, and how it evolved. With deft use of examples of humor and wordplay, Steven Pinker weaves our vast knowledge of language into a compelling story: language is a human instinct, wired into our brains by evolution. The Language Instinct received the William James Book Prize from the American Psychological Association and the Public Interest Award from the Linguistics Society of America. This edition includes an update on advances in the science of language since The Language Instinct was first published.

    One of my favourite opening lines in literature is Steven Pinker's opening to "The Language Instinct": "As you are reading these words, you are taking part in one of the wonders of the natural world."

  • The New Atlantis

    Sir Francis Bacon

    What it wasn't: Bacon's "New Atlantis". There's certainly antecedents for open science in Bacon's vision. But I don't believe he uses the term.

  • Reinventing Discovery

    Michael Nielsen

    @buirachel Now I'm shilling for my own book, "Reinventing Discovery"! https://t.co/j5mFDSrcos

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    And Elinor Ostrom's "Governing the Commons" - my most-frequently bought book, I believe - is a wonderful book about setting up functioning commons. Not directly open science, but very relevant: https://t.co/Iivzlivrbi

  • Henry Oldenburg

    Marie Boas Hall

    May as well add: Mary Boas Hall's biography of Henry Oldenburg is a wonderful, more personal account that is wrapped up with the origins of open science. https://t.co/NvR5Rpww0m (Yeah, that price. I read a library version - then shelled out for my own copy.)

  • One of the most cited books in physics of all time, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information remains the best textbook in this exciting field of science. This 10th anniversary edition includes an introduction from the authors setting the work in context. This comprehensive textbook describes such remarkable effects as fast quantum algorithms, quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography and quantum error-correction. Quantum mechanics and computer science are introduced before moving on to describe what a quantum computer is, how it can be used to solve problems faster than 'classical' computers and its real-world implementation. It concludes with an in-depth treatment of quantum information. Containing a wealth of figures and exercises, this well-known textbook is ideal for courses on the subject, and will interest beginning graduate students and researchers in physics, computer science, mathematics, and electrical engineering.

    @_NicT_ @andy_matuschak It's explained on page 108 of my book with Ike Chuang, "Quantum Computation and Quantum Information". Depending on your background, you may need to read back in the book (it uses things like the reduced density operator and other things).

  • Against Method

    Paul Feyerabend

    Beyond Popper and Kuhn to an anarchist philosophy of science.

    @The_Lagrangian @Meaningness I read "Against Method" when I was 17, and it really got into the core of how I think about science. "Epistemological anarchist" sounds about right.

  • The macroscope

    Joël de Rosnay

    @eriktorenberg Related: I recommend Joel de Rosnay's book "The Macroscope". Not about the noosphere, but definitely related. The author has an English translation online somewhere, Google will know where.

  • Visionary theologian and evolutionary theorist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin applied his whole life, his tremendous intellect, and his great spiritual faith to building a philosophy that would reconcile religion with the scientific theory of evolution. In this timeless book, which contains the quintessence of his thought, Teilhard argues that just as living organisms sprung from inorganic matter and evolved into ever more complex thinking beings, humans are evolving toward an "omega point"—defined by Teilhard as a convergence with the Divine.

    @eriktorenberg I read part of Teilhard de Chardin's book on it, crouching in the library stacks, as a teenager. I remember the book as pretty weird and wild and interesting. IIRC it was "The Phenomenon of Man", though Wikipedia suggests "Cosmogenesis".

  • This is a practical anthology of some of the best elementary problems in different branches of mathematics. Arranged by subject, the problems highlight the most common problem-solving techniques encountered in undergraduate mathematics. This book teaches the important principles and broad strategies for coping with the experience of solving problems. It has been found very helpful for students preparing for the Putnam exam.

    @johncarlosbaez Huh. I'd forgotten that. Another book which I loved, and spent hundreds of hours with, is Larson's "Problem Solving Through Problems". More than anything I learnt the basics of discrete math from that book.

  • Concrete Mathematics

    Ronald L. Graham

    This book, updated and improved, introduces the mathematics that supports advanced computer programming and the analysis of algorithms. The primary aim of its well-known authors is to provide a solid and relevant base of mathematical skills--the skills needed to solve complex problems, to evaluate horrendous-looking sums, to solve complex recurrence relations, and to discover subtle patterns in data. It is an indispensable text and reference, not only for computer scientists but for all technical professionals in virtually every discipline.

    @johncarlosbaez I thought Graham, Knuth, and Patashnik's "Concrete Mathematics" was very good when I read (part of) it, and wished I'd come to it right when I'd started mathematics. Haven't looked at it in years.

  • The Logic Of Failure

    Dietrich Dorner

    An incisive analysis of real-life situations that helps all those involved in any kind of strategic planning recognize and avoid logical yet devastating errors.

    @DRMacIver Much less horrifying, but I quite enjoyed "The Logic of Failure". Has one of the best covers ever: https://t.co/PR8dAhB6Wa

  • Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • Illich suggests radical reforms for the education system to stop its headlong rush towards frustrated expectations and inequalities.

    Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • How Buildings Learn

    Stewart Brand

    Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • Watership Down

    Richard Adams

    WINNER of the Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Class Animated Program Now a Netflix animated miniseries starring James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, and Oscar and Grammy award-winner Sir Ben Kingsley. A worldwide bestseller for more than forty years, Watership Down is the compelling tale of a band of wild rabbits struggling to hold onto their place in the world—“a classic yarn of discovery and struggle” (The New York Times). Richard Adams’s Watership Down is a timeless classic and one of the most beloved novels of all time. Set in the Hampshire Downs in Southern England, an idyllic rural landscape, this stirring tale of “suspense, hot pursuit, and derring-do” (Chicago Tribune) follows a band of rabbits in flight from the incursion of man and the destruction of their home. Led by a stouthearted pair of brothers, they travel forth from their native Sandleford warren through harrowing trials to a mysterious promised land and a more perfect society. “A marvelous story of rebellion, exile, and survival” (Sunday Telegraph) this is an unforgettable literary classic for all ages.

    Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • Genius

    James Gleick

    A biography of the flamboyant Nobel Prize-winning scientist describes how Feynman cracked safes, played the bongos, studied the behavior of Jell-O, and conducted experiments in seduction, all in the name of science. Reprint. 125,000 first printing. $50,000 ad/promo. Tour.

    Just ordered Brand's "How Buildings Learn", Illich's "Deschooling Society", Ostrom's "Governing the Commons", Adams's "Watership Down", Lakatos's "Proofs and Refutations", Gleick's "Genius". Six books I love, and hope someone else will enjoy too.

  • This elegant book by distinguished mathematician John Milnor, provides a clear and succinct introduction to one of the most important subjects in modern mathematics. Beginning with basic concepts such as diffeomorphisms and smooth manifolds, he goes on to examine tangent spaces, oriented manifolds, and vector fields. Key concepts such as homotopy, the index number of a map, and the Pontryagin construction are discussed. The author presents proofs of Sard's theorem and the Hopf theorem.

    @braised_babbage @JaminSpeer Fun suggestion. I tried to read "Topology from the Differentiable Viewpoint" years ago, and must admit I didn't connect. I wonder how I'd enjoy it now.

  • Provides an overview of the sustainable energy crisis that is threatening the world's natural resources, explaining how energy consumption is estimated and how those numbers have been skewed by various factors and discussing alternate forms of energy that can and should be used.

    @richardtomsett @JaminSpeer Really enjoying the frequency with which McKay's name comes up; I feel there's a message here. I loved his "Sustainable Energy [etc]". I should read more.

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    @Conaw Let me plug Ostrom's "Governing the Commons" (again) as a great book on open source, despite being written ~1990. And Schelling's book on Micromotives and Macrobehaviour is pretty great too. I read it before finishing RD, but didn't appreciate it as much as I have since come to

  • Barbarian Days

    William Finnegan

    Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves.

    Mavericks just before 2pm today. Good spot to finish reading William Finnegan's superb "Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life". https://t.co/rSHvxV3rrE

  • Reading Disentangled

    Favell Lee Mortimer

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

    @gwern @calebmontiveros @Altimor Fun fact: I believe there are premade cards in this too, from the 19th century: https://t.co/1IHwNNApgt (My copy is still on its way, so I'm not yet sure.)

  • A study of the creator of the Dune saga, a landmark of modern science fiction.

    @simonw @timoreilly In a lovely piece of symmetry, both books are now available from Amazon: https://t.co/E62Jqn9Fwj and https://t.co/gnxJb4AAhc Just ordered the second.

  • The Maker of Dune

    Frank Herbert

    A compendium of Herbert's essays, articles, observations, reminiscences and meditations, as well as a never-before-published interview with the late writer

    @simonw @timoreilly In a lovely piece of symmetry, both books are now available from Amazon: https://t.co/E62Jqn9Fwj and https://t.co/gnxJb4AAhc Just ordered the second.

  • Ducks

    William Cook

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

    @flantz It's this one: https://t.co/ET5JoU2PZe

  • Technopoly

    Neil Postman

    A social critic argues that the United States has become a "technopoly"--a system that sacrifices social institutions for self-perpetuating technological advancement--and suggests ways to use technical skills to enhance our democracy

    @glenweyl @ESYudkowsky Have you read Neil Postman's "Technopoly"? It's perhaps the most striking argument against technocracy I've seen. https://t.co/DsGQXDQ50V

  • First Man

    James R. Hansen

    Soon to be a major motion picture, this is the first—and only—definitive authorized account of Neil Armstrong, the man whose “one small step” changed history. When Apollo 11 touched down on the Moon’s surface in 1969, the first man on the Moon became a legend. In First Man, author James R. Hansen explores the life of Neil Armstrong. Based on over fifty hours of interviews with the intensely private Armstrong, who also gave Hansen exclusive access to private documents and family sources, this “magnificent panorama of the second half of the American twentieth century” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) is an unparalleled biography of an American icon. In this “compelling and nuanced portrait” (Chicago Tribune) filled with revelations, Hansen vividly recreates Armstrong’s career in flying, from his seventy-eight combat missions as a naval aviator flying over North Korea to his formative trans-atmospheric flights in the rocket-powered X-15 to his piloting Gemini VIII to the first-ever docking in space. For a pilot who cared more about flying to the Moon than he did about walking on it, Hansen asserts, Armstrong’s storied vocation exacted a dear personal toll, paid in kind by his wife and children. For the near-fifty years since the Moon landing, rumors have swirled around Armstrong concerning his dreams of space travel, his religious beliefs, and his private life. A penetrating exploration of American hero worship, Hansen addresses the complex legacy of the First Man, as an astronaut and as an individual. “First Man burrows deep into Armstrong’s past and present…What emerges is an earnest and brave man” (Houston Chronicle) who will forever be known as history’s most famous space traveler.

    @suzatweet @AlSalehSarahs I should reread both these. I enjoyed both circa age 20, but suspect I'd read them very differently now. Camus' autobiographical "The First Man" has had a lasting impact on my life.

  • This book presents a substantial part of matrix analysis that is functional analytic in spirit. Topics covered include the theory of majorization, variational principles for eigenvalues, operator monotone and convex functions, and perturbation of matrix functions and matrix inequalities. The book offers several powerful methods and techniques of wide applicability, and it discusses connections with other areas of mathematics.

    @DRMacIver Bhatia's "Matrix Analysis" and Cooks' "Ducks: And How to Make Them Pay" seem like a promising combo.

  • Ducks

    William Cook

    This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.

    @DRMacIver Bhatia's "Matrix Analysis" and Cooks' "Ducks: And How to Make Them Pay" seem like a promising combo.

  • Tackles one of the most enduring and contentious issues of positive political economy: common pool resource management.

    @webdevMason SICP. Watership Down. Governing the Commons. How Buildings learn. Death and Life of Great American Cities. Cosmos.

  • How Buildings Learn

    Stewart Brand

    @webdevMason SICP. Watership Down. Governing the Commons. How Buildings learn. Death and Life of Great American Cities. Cosmos.

  • Penetrating analysis of the functions and organization of city neighborhoods, the forces of deterioration and regeneration, and the necessary planning innovations

    @webdevMason SICP. Watership Down. Governing the Commons. How Buildings learn. Death and Life of Great American Cities. Cosmos.

  • @devonzuegel One of my favourite things learned this year: baboons have been known to sit down, put their arms around one another, and watch the sunset together. Source: https://t.co/TMocKCIRv4

  • A Pattern Language

    Christopher Alexander

    Two hundred and fifty-three archetypal patterns consisting of problem statements, discussions, illustrations, and solutions provide lay persons with a framework for engaging in architectural design

    @melsreallife @stewartbrand @kevin2kelly I love "A Pattern Language"! Also, this note from CA is a favourite mini-essay: https://t.co/poUmHWm8uI

  • Argues that the privacy of individuals actually hampers accountability, which is the foundation of any civilized society and that openness is far more liberating than secrecy

    @juliagalef @dgkimpton David Brin's book "The Transparent Society" accepts that logic and explores the consequences of a society without privacy. It's old - mid-90s - but I enjoyed the exploration.